19:25
EG 2007

Liz Diller: The Blur Building and other tech-empowered architecture

リズ・ディラー: 建築と遊ぶ

Filmed:

この心を奪われそうなEGトークで、リズ・ディラーが彼女の事務所DS+Rの並外れた作品について話します。それらの中には霧で出来たBlurビルディングや、光る木の壁で包まれた改修中のアリス・タリー・ホールが含まれています。

- Designer
Liz Diller and her maverick firm DS+R bring a groundbreaking approach to big and small projects in architecture, urban design and art -- playing with new materials, tampering with space and spectacle in ways that make you look twice. Full bio

雨を避けて 何か使える空間を生み出す以外に
00:16
Aside from keeping the rain out and producing some usable space,
建築は 感覚を楽しませるか もしくはかき乱す
00:23
architecture is nothing but a special-effects machine
特殊効果みたいなものです
00:27
that delights and disturbs the senses.
私たちの作品はあらゆるメディアに行き渡って
いろいろな形と大きさがあります
00:30
Our work is across media. The work comes in all shapes and sizes.
小さいものも大きいものも これは灰皿で コップです
00:35
It's small and large. This is an ashtray, a water glass.
都市計画 総合設計から
00:39
From urban planning and master planning
劇場などのようなものまで
00:42
to theater and all sorts of stuff.
これら全てに共通しているのは
00:46
The thing that all the work has in common
空間についての先入観や慣習に
挑戦していることです
00:48
is that it challenges the assumptions about conventions of space.
それらは日々見慣れたもので
00:53
And these are everyday conventions,
あまりに明白なので そのこと自体に
気づかなくなっています
00:55
conventions that are so obvious that we are blinded by their familiarity.
私は ある種の特殊効果を作り出すのに
01:00
And I've assembled a sampling of work
役立つ「生産的虚無主義」の見本のようなものを
01:04
that all share a kind of productive nihilism
まとめましたので それを皆さんと
共有したいと思います
01:08
that's used in the service of creating a particular special effect.
つまり「無」あるいは「ほとんど無」のようなもので
01:12
And that is something like nothing, or something next to nothing.
私たちが普段意識しなくなっている
世界から差し引くか
01:18
It's done through a form of subtraction or obstruction or interference
もしくは障害か妨害することで出来上がりました
01:23
in a world that we naturally sleepwalk through.
スイスのジュネーブ近郊 ニューカテル湖畔での
01:27
This is an image that won us a competition
スイスエキスポ2002のための
展示パビリオンとして
01:30
for an exhibition pavilion for the Swiss Expo 2002
コンペで優勝したものです
01:34
on Lake Neuchatel, near Geneva.
ここでは 水を単なる環境としてではなく
01:36
And we wanted to use the water not only as a context,
建築の構造材として使用しました
01:39
but as a primary building material.
大気でできた建築を作りたかったのです
01:41
We wanted to make an architecture of atmosphere.
壁も 屋根も 目的もなく
01:44
So, no walls, no roof, no purpose --
霧と化した水 大きな雲です
01:47
just a mass of atomized water, a big cloud.
この提案は 最近の国内外での展示会での
01:50
And this proposal was a reaction to the over-saturation
過剰な新興技術に対向するものです
01:53
of emergent technologies in recent national and world expositions,
近年ますます過大になるデジタル技巧が
01:58
which feeds, or has been feeding, our insatiable appetite
視覚的な刺激の飽くなき欲求を
満たそうとしています
02:03
for visual stimulation with an ever greater digital virtuosity.
「高精細化」は 私たちの意見では
今や正統となりました
02:09
High definition, in our opinion, has become the new orthodoxy.
私は問うたのです:私たちは高度な技術を使って
02:14
And we ask the question, can we use technology, high technology,
展示パビリオンを決定的に低解像度で
あいまいなものにして
02:18
to make an expo pavilion that's decidedly low definition,
空間や表面についての因習に挑戦し
02:24
that also challenges the conventions of space and skin,
視覚への依存そのものを再考できるか?と
02:27
and rethinks our dependence on vision?
それで次のようなことをやってみました
02:29
So this is how we sought to do it.
湖の水を汲み上げ ろ過してから
02:32
Water's pumped from the lake and is filtered
3万5千個の高圧ノズルから
霧にして吹き出すのです
02:34
and shot as a fine mist through an array of high-pressure fog nozzles,
建物の中には天候観測装置が仕組まれていて
02:39
35,000 of them. And a weather station is on the structure.
変化していく気温 湿度
02:43
It reads the shifting conditions of temperature, humidity,
風向 風速 結露温度を読み取り
02:46
wind direction, wind speed, dew point,
中央コンピュータで計算し
02:49
and it processes this data in a central computer
吹き出す水圧と分布を
02:52
that calibrates the degree of water pressure
調節するのです
02:55
and distribution of water throughout.
実際の天候で調整された反応型システムです
02:57
And it's a responsive system that's trained on actual weather.
建設中の写真で
テンセグリティ構造になっています
03:02
So, this is just in construction, and there's a tensegrity structure.
幅が約100メートルで
フットボール競技場くらいあります
03:06
It's about 300 feet wide, the size of a football field,
非常に華奢な4本の柱に乗っています
03:09
and it sits on just four very delicate columns.
これが霧ノズルで インターフェースになり
03:13
These are the fog nozzles, the interface,
システムは大気の状態を読み取り
03:16
and basically the system is kind of reading the real weather,
半人工 半自然な天候を作り出すのです
03:20
and producing kind of semi-artificial and real weather.
つまり天気を作るのに興味があったんです 
なぜかわからないけど
03:24
So, we're very interested in creating weather. I don't know why.
それでこれが一方は外で
03:28
Now, here we go, one side, the outside
もう一方は内部の映像で
03:31
and then from the inside of the space
どういう場所なのかお分かりになると思います
03:33
you can see what the quality of the space was.
普通の空間ででなく
03:35
Unlike entering any normal space,
「Blur」の中に入るのは「居住可能な媒体」に
入っていくようなものです
03:38
entering Blur is like stepping into a habitable medium.
形がなく 特徴もなく 深さも スケール感も 規模も
03:42
It's formless, featureless, depthless, scaleless, massless,
目的も 決まった大きさもありません
03:47
purposeless and dimensionless.
基準がなにもなく
03:49
All references are erased,
視覚的なホワイトアウト状態で
ノズルの脈動音だけが聞こえます
03:52
leaving only an optical whiteout and white noise of the pulsing nozzles.
つまりこれは まったく何一つ
03:58
So, this is an exhibition pavilion
見るものもすることもない展覧会場なのです
04:01
where there is absolutely nothing to see and nothing to do.
自慢したいのですが
—「壮大な凡景」を作ったわけで
04:05
And we pride ourselves -- it's a spectacular anti-spectacle
壮観を作り上げるための常套手段を
すべて逆転させたのです
04:11
in which all the conventions of spectacle are turned on their head.
来館者の クライマックスへと
04:15
So, the audience is dispersed,
盛り上がって行く演出への期待は
霧が発し続ける
04:17
focused attention and dramatic build-up and climax
不安感と注意力の減衰に取って代わられ
04:20
are all replaced by a kind of attenuated attention
散り散りになってしまうのです
04:23
that's sustained by a sense of apprehension caused by the fog.
ビクトリア時代の小説が霧を使った手法と
よく似ています
04:27
And this is very much like how the Victorian novel used fog in this way.
よく似ています
世界への焦点をぼかされることにより
04:33
So here the world is put out of focus,
視覚への依存に焦点が当てられるのです
04:36
while our visual dependence is put into focus.
いったん方向感覚をなくした観客たちは
04:40
The public, you know, once disoriented
「天使のデッキ」に昇ることになり
04:43
can actually ascend to the angel deck above
それからこの縁の下の水のバーに降りてきます
04:47
and then just come down under those lips into the water bar.
この世界では水はあらゆることに使われ
04:50
So, all the waters of the world are served there,
水のところにたどり着いて
04:52
so we thought that, you know, after being at the water
水の中を動き回り 水を呼吸し
04:56
and moving through the water and breathing the water,
パビリオンを飲むことができるのです
04:59
you could also drink this building.
これはある種の主題なわけですが
05:02
And so it is sort of a theme,
もう少し深いところまで行っていると思います
05:06
but it goes a little bit, you know, deeper than that.
私たちは この(視覚という)
05:09
We really wanted to bring out
主感覚に絶対的に依存していることを強調し
05:11
our absolute dependence on this master sense,
この感覚を私たちの他の感覚にも
共有したいのです
05:15
and maybe share our kind of sensibility with our other senses.
この計画を行った時
それはなかなか理解を得られませんでした
05:19
You know, when we did this project it was a kind of tough sell,
スイス政府はこう言いました「なぜあなたがたは
05:23
because the Swiss said, "Well, why are we going to spend, you know,
一千万ドルも使って どこにでもあるあの
05:25
10 million dollars producing an effect
憎たらしい霧を再現するつもりなのか?」と
05:29
that we already have in natural abundance that we hate?"
我々は彼らを説得しようとしました
05:31
And, you know, we thought -- well, we tried to convince them.
最後にはスイスの国民的アイコンにしました 
つまり—
05:36
And in the end, you know, they adapted this as a national icon
05:42
that came to represent Swiss doubt, which we -- you know,
「スイス人的猜疑心」を形にしたというか
それに何か意味を持たせた機械というか
05:47
it was kind of a meaning machine
各々自分の感じた意味を持たせたというか
05:49
that everybody kind of laid on their own meanings off of.
いずれにせよこれは一時的な建造物で
最後には取り壊され
05:51
Anyway, it's a temporary structure that was ultimately destroyed,
今では幻影の記憶になっていますが
05:54
and so it's now a memory of an apparition, actually,
食べられる形でなら生き残っています
05:58
but it continues to live in edible form.
そしてこれは スイスで
06:01
And this is the highest honor
建築家に与えられる最高の賞なのです
―板チョコになるのはね
06:03
to be bestowed upon an architect in Switzerland -- to have a chocolate bar.
次に行きましょう
06:08
Anyway, moving along.
私たちは80年代から90年代に
美術館や非営利団体から委託された
06:10
So in the '80s and '90s, we were mostly known for independent work,
個別の作品を作る インストレーションアーティスト
06:15
such as installation artist, architect,
あるいは
06:19
commissioned projects by museums and non-for-profit organizations.
建築家として知られていました
数多くのメディア作品を作り
06:24
And we did a lot of media work,
実験的な演劇プロジェクトも多数行いました
06:27
also a lot of experimental theater projects.
2003年にホイットニー美術館が
私たちの作品の回顧展を企画し
06:29
In 2003, the Whitney mounted a retrospective of our work
それにはこの80~90年代の作品が
多数含まれていました
06:34
that featured a lot of this work from the '80s and '90s.
しかし 作品そのものが
まさに「回顧展」の性格に反するもので
06:38
However, the work itself resisted the very nature of a retrospective,
展示品はこういったものだったのですが:
06:44
and this is just some of the stuff that was in the show.
これは米国のツーリズムに関する作品です
06:47
This was a piece on tourism in the United States.
これは「ソフトセル」という42番街のもので
06:50
This is "Soft Sell" for 42nd Street.
カルティエ財団で行われたものです
06:53
This was something done at the Cartier Foundation.
MOMAでの「マスター/スレーブ」
「パラサイト」というプロジェクトの一部です
06:56
"Master/Slave" at the MOMA, the project series, a piece called "Parasite."
つまりそういうものがいろいろとあったのです
07:01
And so there were many, many of these kinds of projects.
美術館は4階フロアを
すべて使わせてくれてましたが
07:04
Anyway, they gave us the whole fourth floor, and, you know,
その回顧展の問題は 私たちが
07:10
the problem of the retrospective
あまりいい感じがしていなかった ということです
07:12
was something we were very uncomfortable with.
それは美術館が計画したもので
07:14
It's a kind of invention of the museum
ひとまとめの作品について 包括的な理解を
07:16
that's supposed to bring a kind of cohesive understanding
大衆に伝えるといったものでした
07:20
to the public of a body of work.
しかし私たちの作品は
ひとまとめの作品という形にならなかったのです
07:22
And our work doesn't really resolve itself into a body in any way at all.
それらの作品に繰り返し現れていたテーマは
07:27
And one of the recurring themes, by the way, that in the work
美術館自体に対する敵意 といったものでした
07:32
was a kind of hostility toward the museum itself,
たとえば白い壁のような 美術館の慣習に
疑問を投げかけていました
07:35
and asking about the conventions of the museum, like the wall, the white wall.
これは さまざまな
07:40
So, what you see here
インストレーションを配置する図面です
07:42
is basically a plan of many installations that were put there.
まとめられない作品を分けて配置するのに
07:45
And we actually had to install white walls
白い壁を置くことになったのです
07:48
to separate these pieces, which didn't belong together.
その白い壁自体が 攻撃の的と同時に
07:50
But these white walls became a kind of target and weapon at the same time.
武器になりました
07:55
We used the wall to partition the 13 installations of the project
私たちはその壁を使って
13個のインストレーションを分けて配置し
音響および空間を分離しました
07:58
and produce a kind of acoustic and visual separation.
そしてここに見える
08:03
And what you see is -- actually,
赤い点線は ここでパフォーマンスをするモノの
08:05
the red dotted line shows the track of this performing element,
通過経路で
08:10
which was a new piece that created -- that we created for the --
それは私たちが新しく作ったモノで
―このために作ったんですが―
要するにロボット式のドリルで 美術館の壁を
08:13
which was a robotic drill, basically, that went all the way around,
あちこち動き回り どんどん壁を壊して行きます
08:17
cruised the museum, went all around the walls and did a lot of damage.
ドリルはロボットアームに取り付けられています
08:23
So, the drill was mounted on this robotic arm.
ハニービー・ロボティクスとの恊働作業でした
08:26
We worked with, by the way, Honeybee Robotics. This is the brain.
これが制御装置です
08:30
Honeybee Robotics designed the Mars Driller,
ハニービー・ロボティクスは
火星探査用のドリルを制作した会社で
非常に楽しい協同作業でした
08:33
and it was really very much fun to work with them.
彼らは 私たちと仕事をしている間は
08:35
They weren't doing their primary work, which was for the government,
本業である政府との仕事を
08:39
while they were helping us with this.
ほっぽらかしにしていました
この仕組みは
08:42
In any case, the way it works is that
コンピュータ式の制御装置が
08:44
an intelligent navigator basically maps the entire surface of these walls.
壁全体の地図を作っているんです
拡げると全長100メートルほどになります
08:50
So, unfolded it's about 300 linear feet.
その三次元の格子上に ランダムに点を発生させ
08:53
And it randomly generates points within a three-dimensional matrix.
その中の点を選び ドリルをそこへ持っていって
08:57
It selects a point, it guides the drill to that point, it pierces the dry wall,
そこのドライウォールに穴をあけ
09:02
leaving a half-inch hole before traveling to the next location.
1 cmちょっとの穴をあけると
また別の場所へと移動していきます
最初はこの穴はバラバラの傷なんですが
09:07
Initially these holes were lone blemishes,
展覧会の日が過ぎるにつれて
09:11
and as the exhibition continued
どんどん穴が増えていきます
09:13
the walls became increasingly perforated.
最後には壁の両側の穴の位置がつながり
09:16
So eventually holes on both sides of the wall aligned,
一方のギャラリーから
別のギャラリーが見えるようになるのです
09:19
opening views from gallery to gallery.
穴がひとかたまりになって
壁のあちこちに穴をあけます
09:21
Clusters of holes randomly opened up sections of wall.
壁自体が
三ヶ月間のパフォーマンスアートになっていて
09:25
And so this was a three-month performance piece
壁がだんだん不安定な要素になっていくのです
09:28
in which the wall was made into kind of an increasingly unstable element.
音の遮断もできなくなっていきます
09:35
And also the acoustic separation was destroyed.
視覚的にもそうです
09:39
Also the visual separation.
しかも展示の背景でいつもうめいていて
09:41
And there was also this constant background groan, which was very annoying.
非常に気に障るのです
ここは真っ暗な空間ですが
09:47
And this is one of the blackout spaces
ビデオ映像がまったく無用の長物になっています
09:49
where there's a video piece that became totally not useful.
つまり
09:52
So rather than securing a neutral background for the artworks on display,
安定した作品展示の背景を提供していた
壁というものが
09:56
the wall now actively competed for attention.
作品と同様に積極的に注意を惹いているのです
この音響および視覚的な迷惑そのものが
10:00
And this acoustical nuisance and visual nuisance
このような回顧展の包囲性に対する
10:04
basically exposed the discomfort of the work
作品の側の不快感をあらわにしているのです
10:07
to this encompassing nature of the retrospective.
この装置が
あちこちの壁の説明文を壊し始めた時は
10:13
It was really great when it started to break up all of the curatorial text.
実にいい感じでした
10:17
Moving along to a project that we finished about a year ago.
次に一年ほど前に終了したプロジェクトについて
お話しします
10:21
It's the ICA -- the Institute of Contemporary Art -- in Boston,
これはボストンのウォーターフロントにある「ICA」
「現代美術協会」です
10:26
which is on the waterfront.
紹介する時間があまりないのですが
10:28
And there's not enough time to really introduce the building,
この建物は その場所の
10:31
but I'll simply say that the building negotiates
外へ向かう注意力と―
10:33
between this outwardly focused nature of the site --
ボストンのこのウォーターフロントは
10:39
you know, it's a really great waterfront site in Boston --
本当にいい眺めなんです―
10:42
and this contradictory other desire to have an inwardly focused museum.
美術館の 内側に集中してほしいという欲求に
うまく折り合いを付けたものです
つまりこの建物の性格は 「見ることを見る」こと-
10:47
So, the nature of the building is that it looks at looking --
それを第一の目的にしています
10:51
I mean that's its primary objective,
展示プログラムと建物の着想の両方をです
10:54
both its program and its architectural conceit.
建物は―風景を取り入れていますが
11:00
The building incorporates the site,
11:04
but it dispenses it in very small doses
その風景は非常にわずかづつ消費されるように
美術館の演出がなされています
11:08
in the way that the museum is choreographed.
建物に入ると劇場の―
11:11
So, you come in and you're basically squeezed by the theater,
劇場の腹部で
非常に狭い場所にに詰め込まれます
11:15
by the belly of the theater, into this very compressed space
そこからは景色が見えません
11:17
where the view is turned off.
そこからカーテンウォールの近くの
11:19
Then you come up in this glass elevator right near the curtain wall.
ガラスのエレベーターで上に昇ります
11:24
This elevator's about the size of a New York City studio apartment.
このエレベーターは
NYのロフトくらいのサイズがあります
昇るとこんな感じの風景で
11:28
And then, this is a view going up,
そして劇場に着くと
11:30
and then you could come into the theater,
そこは風景を遮断することも
11:32
which can actually deny the view or open it up and become a backdrop.
開放して
ステージの背景にすることもできます
11:37
And many musicians choose to use the theater glass walls totally open.
多くの音楽家はガラスの壁を
全部明けることを選ぶようです
11:43
The view is denied in the galleries
ギャラリーでは風景は遮断され
自然光だけが入り込むようになっていて
11:45
where we receive just natural light,
そして北側のギャラリーでは
11:48
and then exposed again in the north gallery with a panoramic view.
再び大パノラマ風景が見えます
この場所の元々の意図は
11:53
The original intention of this space,
不幸なことに実現されなかったんですが
11:55
which was unfortunately never realized,
レンズガラスを使って
11:58
was to use lenticular glass
垂直方向の風景だけを見せたものでした
12:00
which allowed only a kind of perpendicular view out.
東と西のギャラリーをつなぐこの狭いスペースは
12:03
In this very narrow space that connects east and west galleries
クライマックスに到達するためのものではなく
12:06
the intention was really to not get a climax,
風景をあなたに忍び寄らせて
12:10
but to have the view stalk you,
端から端に歩いている間だけ
12:12
so the view would open up as you walked from one end to the other.
風景が見えるようにしました
12:16
This was eliminated because the view was too good,
この計画は
風景があまりに美しいために
取り止めになりました
12:19
and the mayor said, "No, we just want this open."
市長が
「いやここは景色を見えるようにしてくれ」
と言ったのです
ここでは建築家は負け…
12:22
The architect lost here.
しかし 最高なのは
―ここが私の話のテーマにも繋がるのですが―
12:24
But culminating -- and that's where this hooks into the theme of my little talk --
この「メディアティーク」です
12:27
is this Mediatheque,
これは片持ちの部分からぶら下がっています
12:29
which is suspended from the cantilevered portion of the building.
25メートルの片持ち構造―かなりすごいです
12:33
So this is an 80-foot cantilever -- it's quite substantial.
それだけですでに空間に飛び出しており
12:36
So, it's already sticking out into space enough,
そこからさらにこの小さな部分に
メディアティークがあるのです
12:40
and then from that is this, is this small area called the Mediatheque.
メディアティークには16のステーションがあって
12:45
The Mediatheque has something like 16 stations
観客はサーバーにアクセスして
12:49
where the public can get onto the server
デジタルアートや
ネットから選ばれた芸術作品を見ることができます
12:51
and look at digital artworks or also curated artworks off the web.
ここがこの建物の中で非常に重要な部分で
12:55
And this was really a kind of very important part of this building,
そのポイントは ここでは―
13:02
and here is a point where architecture --
建築はまったく技術と無縁で
単に「額縁」を作っているだけで
13:04
this is like technology-free -- architecture is only a framing device,
産業港湾の風景を切り取って
13:08
it only edits the harbor view, the industrial harbor
その壁を通して 床や天上を通じて
13:12
just through its walls, its floors and its ceiling,
単に水だけを 水面の表情だけを見せて
13:16
to only expose the water itself, the texture of water,
ちょうど電気式の雪とか ラバランプのような
13:22
much like a hypnotic effect created by electronic snow
催眠的効果を演出しています
13:26
or a lava lamp or something like that.
プロジェクトの中のこの部分で
テクノロジーと自然が
13:29
And here is where we really felt that there was a great convergence
最高の融合をもたらしていると思うのです
13:33
of the technological and the natural in the project.
しかもそこには情報はなく
―ただ単に催眠効果だけがあります
13:38
But there is just no information, it's just -- it's just hypnosis.
リンカーンセンターの話をします
13:45
Moving along to Lincoln Center.
これが最初のプロジェクトに携わった男達で
50年前のことです
13:48
These are the guys that did the project in the first place, 50 years ago.
私たちはそれを引き継ぎ 様々なスケールで
13:52
We're taking over now, doing work that ranges in scale
小さな補修から
大掛かりな改修や拡張までを行います
13:55
from small-scale repairs to major renovations and major facility expansions.
男性ホルモン無しでやるのです
14:01
But we're doing it with a lot less testosterone.
これが2010年までの作業範囲ですが
14:04
This is the extent of the work that's to be completed by 2010.
このスピーチのために
14:09
And for the purposes of this talk,
建築の特殊効果というテーマに関連した
プロジェクトの一部の
14:11
I wanted to isolate just a part of a project that's even a part of a project
そのまたごく一部についてだけお話しします
14:15
that touches a little bit on this theme of architectural special effects,
それが私たちが現在取り憑かれていることで
14:19
and it happens to be our current obsession,
それは余計なものを取り払い
14:23
and it plays a little bit with the purging and adding of distraction.
また追加することなのです
14:29
It's Alice Tully Hall, and it's tucked under the Juilliard Building
これはアリス・タリー・ホールで
ジュリアードビルの下に隠れていますが
ジュリアードビルの下に隠れていますが
14:33
and descends several levels under the street.
通りの地下何階かまであります
ここがタリーホールのかつての入口で
14:37
So, this is the entrance to Tully Hall as it used to be,
ちょうど改修が始まったところです
14:41
before the renovation, which we just started.
私たちは自問しました:
14:43
And we asked ourselves, why couldn't it be exhibitionistic,
なぜこの建物は メトロポリタン歌劇場や
14:46
like the Met, or like some of the other buildings at Lincoln Center?
リンカーンセンターの他の建物のように
露出狂的であってはいけないのか?
私たちが要求されたのは
14:49
And one of the things that we were asked to do
そこに通りとしての個性を与え
14:52
was give it a street identity, expand the lobbies and make it visually accessible.
ロビーを拡張し 見えるようにすることでした
14:57
And this building, which is just naturally hermetic, we stripped.
そこで この本来密閉的な建物を 裸にしました
要するに
15:01
We basically did a striptease, architectural striptease,
建築的なストリップショーをやったんです
このような天蓋を組み立て
15:04
where we're framing with this kind of canopy --
ジュリアードの三階分の拡張部分の下側ですが
15:09
the underside of three levels of expansion of Juilliard,
4000平方メートルで ブロードウェイ通り
の角度で切り取り
15:12
about 45,000 square feet -- cutting it to the angle of Broadway,
タリーホールを額に入れるように拡張しました
15:17
and then exposing, using that canopy to frame Tully Hall.
前と後の図です
15:22
Before and after shot. (Applause)
待って まだ途中です まだずっと先です
15:26
Wait a minute, it's just in that state, we have a long way to go.
残り時間を使って
15:30
But what I wanted to do was take a couple of seconds that I have left
ホールそのものについてお話しします
15:33
to just talk about the hall itself,
そこで非常に大掛かりな仕事をしています
15:35
which is kind of where we're really doing a massive amount of work.
このホールは多目的型で
15:39
So, the hall is a multi-purpose hall.
依頼人は
15:42
The clients have asked us to produce a great chamber music hall.
ここを素晴らしい室内楽ホールにしてほしい
というのです
1100席もある室内楽向けホールを作るのは
ものすごく大変です
15:47
Now, that's really tough to do with a hall that has 1,100 seats.
「室内楽」や「室内」という言葉は 「サロン」や
15:51
Chamber and the notion of chamber has to do with salons
小規模の演奏と関連しています
15:54
and small-scale performances. They asked us to bring an intimacy.
「親近感」を持ち込むことが必要です
15:57
How do you bring an intimacy into a hall?
大ホールでどうやって「親近感」を?
私たちにとって「親近感」は
いろいろな意味を持ちます
16:00
Intimacy for us means a lot of different things.
音響的 また視覚的な親近感
16:02
It means acoustic intimacy and it means visual intimacy.
問題の一つはホールの真下を
16:06
One thing is that the subway is running and rumbling right under the hall.
地下鉄がごうごうと走っていることでした
もう一つの問題はホールの形でした
16:10
Another thing that could be fixed is the shape of the hall.
それは棺桶形で 全ての音は
16:12
It's like a coffin, it basically sends all the sound,
まるでガターボールのように通路を伝わります
16:15
like a gutter-ball effect, down the aisles.
壁は吸音素材で出来ていて
16:17
The walls are made of absorptive surface,
半吸音 半反射音で
16:20
half absorptive, half reflective,
管弦楽系の音にはあまり向いていません
16:22
which is not very good for concert sound.
これはエイヴリーフィシャーホールで
「視覚的ジャンク」は
16:25
This is Avery Fisher Hall, but the notion of junk -- visual junk --
視覚ノイズを取り除くために非常に重要です
16:29
was very, very important to us, to get rid of visual noise.
椅子は一つも取り外せなかったので
16:33
Because we can't eliminate a single seat,
45センチの幅に建築が制限されました
16:35
the architecture is restricted to 18 inches.
ものすごく薄い建築物です
16:38
So it's a very, very thin architecture.
まず最初に空間同士の分離を行いました
16:41
First we do a kind of partial box and box separation,
地下鉄のノイズを遮断するためです
16:45
to take away the distraction of the subway noise.
それからホール全体をラップしました
―オリベッティのキーボードみたいに―
16:47
Next we wrap the entire hall -- almost like this Olivetti keyboard --
木の素材で
16:52
with a material, with a wood material
それで表面が全部覆われました:
16:55
that basically covers all the surfaces:
壁 天井 床 ステージ 階段 何もかも ボックス席も
16:57
wall, ceiling, floor, stage, steps, everything, boxes.
音響的には音を室内に閉じ込め
17:01
But it's acoustically engineered to focus the sound into the house
ステージに戻るようにしました これが音響棚で
17:05
and back to the stage. And here's an acoustic shelf.
ホールを見上げています ステージの一部
17:08
Looking up the hall. Just a section of the stage.
とにかく全てを覆い
17:11
Just everything is lined, it incorporates --
思いつくどんなものもすべて
17:14
every single thing that you could possibly imagine
高性能な表面で覆いました
17:16
is tucked into this high-performance skin.
そしてさらにもう一つ
17:18
But one more added feature.
ホールの 「親近感」を阻害する
17:20
So now that we've stripped the hall of all visual distraction,
あらゆる視覚的な邪魔ものを剥ぎ取り
17:23
everything that prevents this intimacy
建物と聴衆とを
17:26
which is supposed to connect the house, the audience,
演奏家と結びつけました
17:29
with the performers, we add one little detail,
そしてちょっと細部を追加しました
そしてちょっと細部を追加しました
17:33
one piece of architectural excess, a special effect: lighting.
建築上の過剰を一つ 特殊効果:ライティングです
私たちは コンサートホールの演劇性というものは
17:37
We very strongly believe that the theatrics of a concert hall
休憩時間の間や 到着後の間などでも
コンサートの開始後と
17:41
is as much in the space of intermission and the space of arrival
同じくらいあると確信しています
17:45
as it is when the concert starts.
そこで私たちはこういう効果をーこういう
17:47
So what we wanted to do was produce this effect,
光の効果を求めました
17:51
this lighting effect,
それで木の壁を生体工学的に作りました
17:53
which made us have to bioengineer the wood walls.
非常に厚いレジンと
17:57
And what it entails is the use of resin, of this very thick resin
ホール全体の壁と同じ材質の化粧材を使い
18:03
with a veneer of the same kind of wood that's used throughout the hall,
継ぎ目のない連続性で
18:07
in a kind of seamless continuity
ホールを光のベルトで包み
聴衆と演奏家を分離する
18:11
that wraps the hall in light, like a belt of light: rather than separating,
プロセニアムのようなものを作らないで
18:16
like a proscenium would separate the audience from performers,
聴衆と演奏家を結びつけました
18:20
it connects audience with players.
これがソルトレークシティにある模型で
18:22
And this is a mockup that is in Salt Lake City
実物大ではどうなるか
18:28
that gives you a sense of what this is going to look like in full-scale.
感覚的につかむことができるでしょう
ソルトレークシティで人に座ってもらって
18:33
And this is a guy from Salt Lake City,
どんな感じか示しています
18:36
this is what they look like out there.
(笑)
18:38
(Laughter)
とても奇妙な感じがすると思うんです つまり
18:41
And for us, I mean it's really kind of a very strange thing,
ホールのざわめきが消えた瞬間
18:44
but the moments in the hall that the buzz kind of dies down
聴衆は演奏が始まるのを待ち
18:50
when the audience is waiting for the performance to begin,
ちょうどカーテンが開かれ
シャンデリアが上がるようなタイミングで
18:53
very similar to the parting of curtains or the raising of a chandelier,
壁が光をにじみ出して その瞬間
18:57
the walls will just exude this glow, temporarily stealing attention from the stage.
聴衆の注意をステージから引き離すのは
19:03
And this is Tully in construction now.
これが建築中のタリーホールです
終わりの言葉はありません
19:07
I have no ending to say, except that I'm a couple of minutes over.
ちょっと時間オーバーしてるわね
どうもありがとう
19:11
Thank you very much.
(拍手)
19:13
(Applause)
Translated by Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Liz Diller - Designer
Liz Diller and her maverick firm DS+R bring a groundbreaking approach to big and small projects in architecture, urban design and art -- playing with new materials, tampering with space and spectacle in ways that make you look twice.

Why you should listen

Liz Diller's firm, Diller Scofidio & Renfro, might just be the first post-wall architects. From a mid-lake rotunda made of fog to a gallery that destroys itself with a robotic drill, her brainy takes on the essence of buildings are mind-bending and rebellious. DS+R partakes of criticism that goes past academic papers and into real structures -- buildings and art installations that seem to tease the squareness of their neighbors.

DS+R was the first architecture firm to receive a MacArthur "genius" grant -- and it also won an Obie for Jet Lag, a wildly creative piece of multimedia off-Broadway theater. A reputation for rampant repurposing of materials and tricksy tinkering with space -- on stage, on paper, on the waterfront -- have made DS+R a sought-after firm, winning accounts from the Juilliard School, Alice Tully Hall and the School of American Ballet, as part of the Lincoln Center overhaul; at Brown University; and on New York's revamp of Governer's Island. Their Institute for Comtemporary Art has opened up a new piece of Boston's waterfront, creating an elegant space that embraces the water.

Learn more about the Hirshhorn Museum >>

 

More profile about the speaker
Liz Diller | Speaker | TED.com