sponsored links
Serious Play 2008

Stuart Brown: Play is more than just fun

スチュアート・ブラウン:遊びは楽しむ以上に不可欠なもの

May 8, 2008

遊びについての研究のパイオニア、スチュアート・ブラウン博士は、ユーモア、ゲーム、取っ組み合い、戯れ、ファンタジー等は、ただ楽しむだけのものではないと言っています。子供時代のたくさんの遊びは人間を幸せで賢い大人にし、遊びを続けることで、何歳になっても私たちはより賢くなることができます。

Stuart Brown - Play researcher, psychiatrist
Stuart Brown's research shows play is not just joyful and energizing -- it's deeply involved with human development and intelligence. Through the National Institute for Play, he's working to better understand its significance. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, here we go: a flyby of play.
では 始めましょう 遊びについて話します
00:15
It's got to be serious if the New York Times
2月17日 ニューヨーク・タイムズが 日曜版のトップに
00:19
puts a cover story of their February 17th Sunday magazine about play.
遊びに関する記事を載せたのは重大なことです
00:23
At the bottom of this, it says, "It's deeper than gender.
このページの下には
“ 男女を問わず
00:29
Seriously, but dangerously fun.
真面目で 危ういほど楽しい
00:34
And a sandbox for new ideas about evolution."
そして進化の新説を生み出すもの”
とあります
00:38
Not bad, except if you look at that cover, what's missing?
悪くありませんが 表紙を見ると 何かが欠けています
00:43
You see any adults?
大人はどこですか?
00:47
Well, lets go back to the 15th century.
15世紀にさかのぼってみましょう
00:50
This is a courtyard in Europe,
これはヨーロッパの中庭の絵で
00:54
and a mixture of 124 different kinds of play.
124種類の遊び方が描かれています
00:57
All ages, solo play, body play, games, taunting.
若者も 年寄りも 一人遊びや
身体を使った遊び ゲーム からかい
01:01
And there it is. And I think this is a typical picture
全てがここに描かれています これはその時代の
01:07
of what it was like in a courtyard then.
中庭の典型的な様子だったと思います
01:12
I think we may have lost something in our culture.
我々の文化は何か大切なものを失ってしまったようです
01:16
So I'm gonna take you through
ではここで 驚くべき出来事を
01:20
what I think is a remarkable sequence.
お話ししようと思います
01:23
North of Churchill, Manitoba, in October and November,
カナダのマニトバ県チャーチル市の北のハドソン湾地域は
01:27
there's no ice on Hudson Bay.
10~11月はまだ氷が張りません
01:30
And this polar bear that you see, this 1200-pound male,
この 550キロある雄の白クマは
01:32
he's wild and fairly hungry.
野生で大変お腹が空いています
01:35
And Norbert Rosing, a German photographer,
ドイツ人写真家のノーバート・ローシングは
01:39
is there on scene, making a series of photos of these huskies, who are tethered.
リードにつながれたエスキモー犬を撮影していました
01:42
And from out of stage left comes this wild, male polar bear,
突然 左側から野生の雄の白クマが現れます
01:49
with a predatory gaze.
獲物を狙う目つきです
01:53
Any of you who've been to Africa or had a junkyard dog come after you,
アフリカに行ったり 野犬に追われたりした人は
01:56
there is a fixed kind of predatory gaze
この目つきを見たら
02:01
that you know you're in trouble.
危ないことが分かるでしょう
02:04
But on the other side of that predatory gaze
でも その獲物を狙う目つきの先にいる
02:06
is a female husky in a play bow, wagging her tail.
雌のエスキモー犬は 尻尾を振って 遊びのお辞儀をします
02:08
And something very unusual happens.
すると 予期せぬことが起こります
02:13
That fixed behavior -- which is rigid and stereotyped
決まりきった行動― 白クマの食事で
02:17
and ends up with a meal -- changes.
終わってしまうはず― が変わるのです
02:20
And this polar bear
この白クマは
02:24
stands over the husky,
立ち上がります
02:26
no claws extended, no fangs taking a look.
ツメは立てず キバも剥き出していません
02:29
And they begin an incredible ballet.
二頭は素晴らしいバレエを始めます
02:33
A play ballet.
遊びのバレエ
02:40
This is in nature: it overrides a carnivorous nature
大自然の世界です 肉食の本能を覆して
02:41
and what otherwise would have been a short fight to the death.
普通なら死に至る戦いを避けたのです
02:45
And if you'll begin to look closely at the husky that's bearing her throat to the polar bear,
注意深く見ると エスキモー犬は
白クマにノドを出しています
02:49
and look a little more closely, they're in an altered state.
その二頭はいつもと違う状態にあります
02:55
They're in a state of play.
遊びの状態です
02:59
And it's that state
この状態で
03:02
that allows these two creatures to explore the possible.
この二頭は可能性を探りあっています
03:05
They are beginning to do something that neither would have done
彼らは遊びのシグナルがなかった場合には
03:09
without the play signals.
できなかったことを し始めます
03:12
And it is a marvelous example
この素晴らしい事例が示すのは
03:16
of how a differential in power
私たちが共有している自然の掟には
03:19
can be overridden by a process of nature that's within all of us.
弱肉強食の壁を乗り越える力があるということです
03:22
Now how did I get involved in this?
私がこの仕事を始めた経緯をお話しましょう
03:26
John mentioned that I've done some work with murderers, and I have.
ジョンは私が以前 殺人犯を研究していたと言いました
そのとおりです
03:29
The Texas Tower murderer opened my eyes,
テキサス大学で起きた銃撃殺人事件に大変驚きました
03:32
in retrospect, when we studied his tragic mass murder,
この悲惨な無差別殺人の犯人を詳しく見てみたら
03:35
to the importance of play,
遊びとの関係から言うと
03:40
in that that individual, by deep study,
この犯人には著しく
03:42
was found to have severe play deprivation.
遊び感覚が欠乏していました
03:45
Charles Whitman was his name.
犯人はチャールズ・ホウィットマンという名前でした
03:47
And our committee, which consisted of a lot of hard scientists,
多くの権威ある科学者から構成された委員会は
03:49
did feel at the end of that study
調査の結果 遊び心が欠けていたこと
03:52
that the absence of play and a progressive suppression of developmentally normal play
成長期に不可欠な遊ぶ気持ちを抑圧したことが
03:54
led him to be more vulnerable to the tragedy that he perpetrated.
悲劇を引き起した遠因だと結論づけました
04:00
And that finding has stood the test of time --
その調査結果は今も説得力があります
04:05
unfortunately even into more recent times, at Virginia Tech.
残念ながら バージニア工科大学の悲劇が物語っています
04:09
And other studies of populations at risk
私は犯罪を犯す傾向がある人々の別の研究でも
04:13
sensitized me to the importance of play,
遊びの重要さを実感しましたが
04:16
but I didn't really understand what it was.
まだ 遊びの本質は理解していませんでした
04:20
And it was many years in taking play histories of individuals
人々の遊び方の歴史を長期間研究して
04:22
before I really began to recognize that I didn't really have a full understanding of it.
ようやく理解していなかった
遊びの本質がわかってきたように思います
04:27
And I don't think any of us has a full understanding of it, by any means.
誰もまだ遊びを完全に理解していないと思いますが
04:33
But there are ways of looking at it
でも これから説明する見方によって
04:37
that I think can give you -- give us all a taxonomy, a way of thinking about it.
遊びを分類することができ
考え方がしっかりすると思います
04:39
And this image is, for humans, the beginning point of play.
この写真は 人間としての遊びの出発点です
04:44
When that mother and infant lock eyes,
お母さんと赤ちゃんの目が合う時
04:49
and the infant's old enough to have a social smile,
赤ちゃんが人懐っこい微笑みを作れるようになると
04:52
what happens -- spontaneously -- is the eruption of joy on the part of the mother.
自然にお母さんは喜びでいっぱいになります
04:55
And she begins to babble and coo and smile, and so does the baby.
彼女は赤ちゃん語で優しくささやき 微笑み
そして赤ちゃんも真似します
04:59
If we've got them wired up with an electroencephalogram,
もし二人を脳波測定器につないでいたら
05:03
the right brain of each of them becomes attuned,
右脳の波長が調和しているのが見えるでしょう
05:07
so that the joyful emergence of this earliest of play scenes
このように私たちは最初の遊びの喜ばしい状態における
05:12
and the physiology of that is something we're beginning to get a handle on.
生理状態を徐々に理解できるようになってきました
05:17
And I'd like you to think that every bit of more complex play
あらゆる複雑な遊びは この赤ちゃんの遊び方を
05:22
builds on this base for us humans.
基礎に発展したと考えられます
05:26
And so now I'm going to take you through sort of a way of looking at play,
今から遊びの見方を ひとつ話そうと思いますが
05:30
but it's never just singularly one thing.
遊びは一種類だけではありません
05:34
We're going to look at body play,
身体を使った遊び
05:38
which is a spontaneous desire to get ourselves out of gravity.
引力に逆らおうという自然な欲求を見てみましょう
05:41
This is a mountain goat.
これは山羊です
05:47
If you're having a bad day, try this:
アンラッキーな日には これを試して下さい
05:49
jump up and down, wiggle around -- you're going to feel better.
上下にジャンプして 身体をクネクネして
きっと元気が出るでしょう
05:51
And you may feel like this character,
この子と同じように感じるでしょう
05:54
who is also just doing it for its own sake.
彼は単純に遊んでいます
05:56
It doesn't have a particular purpose, and that's what's great about play.
目的がないのが遊びの素晴らしいところです
05:59
If its purpose is more important
もし目的が より大事なら
06:02
than the act of doing it, it's probably not play.
たぶん遊び ではないのです
06:05
And there's a whole other type of play, which is object play.
遊びにはもうひとつの種類があります
物を使って遊ぶことです
06:08
And this Japanese macaque has made a snowball,
この日本猿は雪玉を作りました
06:12
and he or she's going to roll down a hill.
坂を転がすつもりです
06:15
And -- they don't throw it at each other, but this is a fundamental part of being playful.
他の猿に向かって投げるつもりはありません
これは戯れることの基本動作です
06:18
The human hand, in manipulation of objects,
人間の手は物体を操りながら
06:22
is the hand in search of a brain;
手は脳と連動しようとしています
06:26
the brain is in search of a hand;
脳は手と連動しようとしています
06:29
and play is the medium by which those two are linked in the best way.
遊びが手と脳を結びつける役割を担っているのです
06:31
JPL we heard this morning -- JPL is an incredible place.
今朝 ジェット推進研究所(JPL)について講演がありました
JPLは素晴らしい施設です
06:36
They have located two consultants,
JPLは二人のコンサルタント
06:42
Frank Wilson and Nate Johnson,
フランク・ウィルソンとネート・ジョンソン
に仕事を依頼しました
06:45
who are -- Frank Wilson is a neurologist, Nate Johnson is a mechanic.
フランク・ウィルソンは神経科医で
ネート・ジョンソンは機械技師です
06:48
He taught mechanics in a high school in Long Beach,
ジョンソンはロングビーチの高校で
機械工学を教えていましたが
06:52
and found that his students were no longer able to solve problems.
生徒たちの問題解決能力が低下している事に気づき
06:55
And he tried to figure out why. And he came to the conclusion, quite on his own,
その原因を調査しました 彼の結論によると
07:01
that the students who could no longer solve problems, such as fixing cars,
車修理のような課題をクリアできない生徒たちは
07:04
hadn't worked with their hands.
手を使って物を作る経験に乏しかったのです
07:08
Frank Wilson had written a book called "The Hand."
フランク・ウィルソンは「手」という本を書きました
07:10
They got together -- JPL hired them.
二人は共に JPL に雇用されました
07:13
Now JPL, NASA and Boeing,
JPL NASA そしてボーイングは
07:16
before they will hire a research and development problem solver --
研究者や技術者を採用する際
07:19
even if they're summa cum laude from Harvard or Cal Tech --
ハーバード大学やカリフォニア工科大学の
最優秀な学生であろうとも
07:22
if they haven't fixed cars, haven't done stuff with their hands early in life,
車修理をしたり 幼少時に手を使って物を作ったり
07:26
played with their hands, they can't problem-solve as well.
手の遊びをしていなければ
問題解決能力がないと見なします
07:29
So play is practical, and it's very important.
つまり 遊びは実用的だし とても重要なのです
07:32
Now one of the things about play is that it is born by curiosity and exploration. (Laughter)
遊びが生まれる元は好奇心や探究心です (笑)
07:36
But it has to be safe exploration.
でも安全な探究でなければなりません
07:42
This happens to be OK -- he's an anatomically interested little boy
これは大丈夫でしょう
この男の子は人体に興味があります
07:45
and that's his mom. Other situations wouldn't be quite so good.
お母さんです あまりよろしくない状況ですが
07:48
But curiosity, exploration, are part of the play scene.
好奇心 探究心は遊びの一部です
07:52
If you want to belong, you need social play.
仲間が欲しい場合には 社交的な遊びが必要です
07:55
And social play is part of what we're about here today,
社交的な遊びは今日の話のポイントのひとつで
07:58
and is a byproduct of the play scene.
遊びの副産物です
08:01
Rough and tumble play.
取っ組み合いの遊び
08:05
These lionesses, seen from a distance, looked like they were fighting.
これらの雌ライオンは遠目では 争っているように見えます
08:07
But if you look closely, they're kind of like the polar bear and husky:
近寄って見ると 白クマとエスキモー犬と同じです
08:10
no claws, flat fur, soft eyes,
ツメは立てず 毛も逆立っていません 優しい目をして
08:13
open mouth with no fangs, balletic movements,
キバも剥き出しておらず バレエを踊っているかの如くです
08:17
curvilinear movements -- all specific to play.
みんな遊んでいる時の特徴です
08:20
And rough-and-tumble play is a great learning medium for all of us.
取っ組み合いの遊びは私達にとっていい研究材料です
08:23
Preschool kids, for example, should be allowed to dive, hit, whistle,
例えば幼稚園児は 跳んだり 殴ったり 口笛を吹いたり
08:27
scream, be chaotic, and develop through that a lot of emotional regulation
叫んだり 取り乱したり
それらを通して学んだ感情の調節や
08:31
and a lot of the other social byproducts -- cognitive, emotional and physical --
社会的な副産物― 認識 情緒 身体的― を
08:38
that come as a part of rough and tumble play.
自由に発達させるべきです
08:43
Spectator play, ritual play -- we're involved in some of that.
観る遊び 儀式的な遊びも 私たちの遊びのひとつです
08:46
Those of you who are from Boston know that this was the moment -- rare --
ボストン出身の方は お分かりでしょう
まさに貴重な
08:50
where the Red Sox won the World Series.
レッドソックス ワールド・シリーズ優勝の瞬間
08:54
But take a look at the face and the body language of everybody
写っている人々の顔と身体の表現を見て下さい
08:58
in this fuzzy picture, and you can get a sense that they're all at play.
ぼやけていますが 全員喜んでいるが良く分かるでしょう
09:01
Imaginative play.
想像に富んだ遊び
09:05
I love this picture because my daughter, who's now almost 40, is in this picture,
この写真が大好きです 私の娘です もうすぐ40歳になります
09:06
but it reminds me of her storytelling and her imagination,
これを見ると 幼稚園の頃の 彼女のお話や想像する力
09:11
her ability to spin yarns at this age -- preschool.
糸をつむぐ能力等を思い出します
09:15
A really important part of being a player
遊びの中でとても重要な要素は
09:20
is imaginative solo play.
創造的な一人遊びです
09:23
And I love this one, because it's also what we're about.
この写真も大好きです 人間の本当の姿が見られますから
09:26
We all have an internal narrative that's our own inner story.
私たち人間は心の中に 自分だけの物語を持っています
09:30
The unit of intelligibility of most of our brains is the story.
私たちの脳の理解力の単位は物語です
09:34
I'm telling you a story today about play.
今日私は遊びについて話をしています
09:39
Well, this bushman, I think, is talking about the fish that got away that was that long,
このブッシュマンは 逃した魚はこ~んなに大きかったと
言っていると思います
09:42
but it's a fundamental part of the play scene.
誇張は遊びの基本要素のひとつです
09:47
So what does play do for the brain?
では 遊びは脳にどういう影響を及ぼすのでしょうか
09:51
Well, a lot.
実はすごく影響します
09:54
We don't know a whole lot about what it does for the human brain,
遊びが人間の脳に及ぼす影響は充分に解明されていません
09:57
because funding has not been exactly heavy for research on play.
研究のために必要な予算が充分にないのが一因です
10:01
I walked into the Carnegie asking for a grant.
私はカーネギー科学財団に助成金申請に行きました
10:08
They'd given me a large grant when I was an academician
飲酒運転犯罪の研究をした時は
多額の助成金をもらえました
10:10
for the study of felony drunken drivers, and I thought I had a pretty good track record,
研究成果も挙がったので関係は良かったのです
10:13
and by the time I had spent half an hour talking about play,
しかし 遊びについて30分も話をすると
10:18
it was obvious that they were not -- did not feel that play was serious.
遊びを真面目なテーマと思わないのは明らかでした
10:23
I think that -- that's a few years back -- I think that wave is past,
それは数年前のことで 古い考え方だったと思います
10:27
and the play wave is cresting,
今は 遊びが大事だという風潮になってきました
10:31
because there is some good science.
科学が進んだおかげです
10:33
Nothing lights up the brain like play.
脳を活性化には遊びが一番です
10:35
Three-dimensional play fires up the cerebellum,
三次元の遊びは小脳を活性化させて
10:38
puts a lot of impulses into the frontal lobe --
決定権を司る前頭葉にたくさん刺激を与え
10:41
the executive portion -- helps contextual memory be developed,
連想記憶を発達させる
10:44
and -- and, and, and.
等々
10:48
So it's -- for me, its been an extremely nourishing scholarly adventure
ですから 私にとっては 遊びの研究に縁がなかった
10:50
to look at the neuroscience that's associated with play, and to bring together people
他の分野の人々に参画してもらいながら
遊びの神経科学を一緒に研究することは
10:56
who in their individual disciplines hadn't really thought of it that way.
科学者として とてもやりがいがあります
11:01
And that's part of what the National Institute for Play is all about.
設立された非営利団体 全国遊び機構 の目標でもあります
11:06
And this is one of the ways you can study play --
これは遊びの研究の方法のひとつで
11:09
is to get a 256-lead electroencephalogram.
256個の電極の脳電図測定器です
11:11
I'm sorry I don't have a playful-looking subject, but it allows mobility,
被試験者の表情が暗いのが残念ですが
11:15
which has limited the actual study of play.
この器具は研究に不可欠な可動性を発揮します
11:20
And we've got a mother-infant play scenario
そして今お母さんと赤ちゃんの遊びについて
11:22
that we're hoping to complete underway at the moment.
別の研究も進行中です
11:26
The reason I put this here is also to queue up
この写真をお見せする もうひとつの理由は
11:29
my thoughts about objectifying what play does.
遊びについて私の考えを整理するためです
11:32
The animal world has objectified it.
動物の世界には お決まりの遊びがあります
11:36
In the animal world, if you take rats,
動物の世界でネズミを例にとると
11:40
who are hardwired to play at a certain period of their juvenile years
若いネズミは チューチュー鳴いたり
レスリングしたり 寝技をかけたり
11:43
and you suppress play -- they squeak, they wrestle,
本能的に決まった遊び方をします
11:49
they pin each other, that's part of their play.
その遊びを抑圧したらどうなるでしょう
11:52
If you stop that behavior on one group that you're experimenting with,
ネズミの被験グループのひとつに遊ぶ行動を止めさせ
11:55
and you allow it in another group that you're experimenting with,
もうひとつのグループは自由にしておきます
12:00
and then you present those rats
そして彼らに
12:03
with a cat odor-saturated collar,
猫の匂いがする首輪を与えると
12:05
they're hardwired to flee and hide.
両方とも本能的に逃げて隠れます
12:08
Pretty smart -- they don't want to get killed by a cat.
賢いでしょう 猫に殺されたくないですよね
12:11
So what happens?
次はどうなるでしょう?
12:14
They both hide out.
両方とも隠れました
12:16
The non-players never come out --
でも遊べなかったグループは 隠れ場所から出られず
12:19
they die.
死んでしまいます
12:22
The players slowly explore the environment,
遊んだグループは 徐々に周囲を探検し
12:23
and begin again to test things out.
周りの物をもう一度試しだします
12:27
That says to me, at least in rats --
これから分かる事は 少なくともネズミにとっては
12:30
and I think they have the same neurotransmitters that we do
ちなみに ネズミは人間と同じ神経伝達物質を持ち
12:33
and a similar cortical architecture --
脳皮質の構造も似ています―
12:36
that play may be pretty important for our survival.
遊びは生死に関わる重要な問題なのです
12:38
And, and, and -- there are a lot more animal studies that I could talk about.
他にもお話できる動物の研究がたくさんあります
12:41
Now, this is a consequence of play deprivation. (Laughter)
さて これは遊び欠乏の結果です
(笑)
12:46
This took a long time --
けっこう時間がかかりました
12:50
I had to get Homer down and put him through the fMRI and the SPECT
ホーマーを座らせて fMRI SPECT さらにEEGを撮りました
12:52
and multiple EEGs, but as a couch potato, his brain has shrunk.
彼はカウチポテトなので 脳みそが縮小してしまいました
12:57
And we do know that in domestic animals
ペット 家畜 さらにネズミも
13:01
and others, when they're play deprived,
遊びが欠乏すると
13:04
they don't -- and rats also -- they don't develop a brain that is normal.
正常に脳が発達しないことが分かっています
13:06
Now, the program says that the opposite of play is not work,
我々の結論は「遊び」の逆は「仕事」ではなくて
13:11
it's depression.
「鬱病」だということです
13:16
And I think if you think about life without play --
遊びのない人生を考えてみましょう
13:18
no humor, no flirtation, no movies,
ユーモアも 戯れも 映画も
13:22
no games, no fantasy and, and, and.
ゲームも ファンタジーも 何もない人生を
13:25
Try and imagine a culture or a life, adult or otherwise
大人であれ 子どもであれ 遊びのない文化や人生を
13:30
without play.
想像して下さい
13:35
And the thing that's so unique about our species
私たちの種の特徴は
13:37
is that we're really designed to play through our whole lifetime.
一生通じて遊ぶように出来ていることです
13:40
And we all have capacity to play signal.
私達はみんな「遊ぼう」と信号を送れます
13:45
Nobody misses that dog I took a picture of on a Carmel beach a couple of weeks ago.
数週間前にカーメルビーチで撮影した
この犬の意図はみなさん分かりますよね
13:48
What's going to follow from that behavior
この動作の次に必ず来るのが
13:53
is play.
遊びです
13:56
And you can trust it.
間違いありません
13:57
The basis of human trust is established through play signals.
人間の信頼は遊びの信号を通して作られます
13:58
And we begin to lose those signals, culturally and otherwise, as adults.
でも大人になると 遊びの信号を忘れてしまいます
14:02
That's a shame.
残念なことです
14:07
I think we've got a lot of learning to do.
まだ学ぶべき事はたくさんあります
14:09
Now, Jane Goodall has here a play face along with one of her favorite chimps.
この写真でジェーン・グドールはチンパンジーと一緒に
「遊びの顔」をしています
14:12
So part of the signaling system of play
遊びの信号は
14:16
has to do with vocal, facial, body, gestural.
声 顔 身体 ジェスチャー等です
14:19
You know, you can tell -- and I think when we're getting into collective play,
分かるでしょう 集団の遊びが始まると
14:23
its really important for groups to gain a sense of safety
グループのメンバーが遊びの信号を交わしながら
14:28
through their own sharing of play signals.
安心感を得ることはとても大事です
14:32
You may not know this word,
皆さんは この単語を知らないでしょう
14:36
but it should be your biological first name and last name.
でも私達の生物学的な名前と同じくらい重要な単語です
14:38
Because neoteny means the retention of immature qualities into adulthood.
幼生生殖とは未熟な性質を大人でも保つという意味です
14:43
And we are, by physical anthropologists,
人類学者や数多くの研究によると 私たち人間は
14:47
by many, many studies, the most neotenous,
全ての生物の中で幼生生殖性が一番強くて
14:50
the most youthful, the most flexible, the most plastic of all creatures.
一番若々しくて 一番適応性を持っていて 一番柔軟です
14:53
And therefore, the most playful.
故に 私たちは一番の遊び屋さんなのです
14:58
And this gives us a leg up on adaptability.
他の生物より順応性が優れているのです
15:01
Now, there is a way of looking at play
これから遊びについて もうひとつの考え方
15:05
that I also want to emphasize here,
すなわち 遊びの経歴を
15:08
which is the play history.
説明します
15:11
Your own personal play history is unique,
みなさんの個人的な遊びの経歴は独特で
15:14
and often is not something we think about particularly.
たぶん深く考えたことはないでしょう
15:17
This is a book written by a consummate player
これはケビン・カロルという
15:21
by the name of Kevin Carroll.
究極の遊び人が書いた本です
15:24
Kevin Carroll came from extremely deprived circumstances:
ケビン・カロルは非常に不遇な境遇で育ちました
15:26
alcoholic mother, absent father, inner-city Philadelphia,
母はアルコール依存症 父は不在
フィラデルフィアのスラムに住み
15:31
black, had to take care of a younger brother.
黒人で 弟の面倒をみました
15:35
Found that when he looked at a playground
ある日 閉じこめられた部屋の窓から
15:38
out of a window into which he had been confined,
遊び場を見た時 心の中に
15:41
he felt something different.
不思議な気持ちが沸きあがりました
15:44
And so he followed up on it.
その気持ちを彼は追いかけました
15:46
And his life -- the transformation of his life
そして人生が変わりました
15:49
from deprivation and what one would expect -- potentially prison or death --
貧困な境遇から 行く末は刑務所か死と思われましたが
15:52
he become a linguist, a trainer for the 76ers and now is a motivational speaker.
彼は言語学者になり (プロ・バスケットボール)
76ersのトレーナーになり 啓発活動家にもなりました
15:57
And he gives play as a transformative force
彼は 自分の人生を変えたのは
16:03
over his entire life.
遊び と述べています
16:08
Now there's another play history that I think is a work in progress.
さて もうひとつ進行中の遊びの経歴を見てみましょう
16:11
Those of you who remember Al Gore,
アル・ゴアが副大統領だった時
16:18
during the first term and then during his successful
それから落選しましたが印象的だった
16:21
but unelected run for the presidency,
大統領選挙戦を振り返ると
16:26
may remember him as being kind of wooden and not entirely his own person,
少なくとも人前では
彼は冷たい人で個性を発揮していなかったと
16:29
at least in public.
多くの人は思い出すかもしれません
16:34
And looking at his history, which is common in the press,
公表されている彼の経歴を調べれば
16:36
it seems to me, at least -- looking at it from a shrink's point of view --
精神科医の私から見たら
16:40
that a lot of his life was programmed.
彼の人生は運命づけられていたように思えます
16:46
Summers were hard, hard work, in the heat of Tennessee summers.
テネシー州の暑い夏には重労働をして過ごし
16:51
He had the expectations of his senatorial father and Washington, D.C.
上院議員の父とワシントンの期待を一身に背負いました
16:57
And although I think he certainly had the capacity for play --
彼は間違いなく遊ぶ能力を持っていると 私は思います
17:03
because I do know something about that --
それは確かですが
17:06
he wasn't as empowered, I think, as he now is
現在の彼と比べると当時は
17:08
by paying attention to what is his own passion
自分の情熱と 内に潜められた力に
耳を貸さなかったために
17:12
and his own inner drive,
彼の個性はまだ十分に
17:16
which I think has its basis in all of us in our play history.
開花していなかったのだと思います
17:19
So what I would encourage on an individual level to do,
そこで みなさんにお薦めしたいことは
17:24
is to explore backwards as far as you can go
自分の人生を振返って 幼い頃を思い出して
17:27
to the most clear, joyful, playful image that you have,
一番鮮明な 楽しくて 遊んでいる時の
イメージを思い浮かべて欲しいのです
17:31
whether it's with a toy, on a birthday or on a vacation.
おもちゃ 誕生日 旅行 何でもいいです
17:36
And begin to build to build from the emotion of that
その日の気持ちを思い出して
17:39
into how that connects with your life now.
今の生活にどう影響しているか考えて下さい
17:42
And you'll find, you may change jobs --
もしかしたら転職するかもしれません
17:45
which has happened to a number people when I've had them do this --
実際にカウンセリングした多くの人は
17:48
in order to be more empowered through their play.
自分の遊び方を通して個性を開花した結果
転職しました
17:51
Or you'll be able to enrich your life by prioritizing it
あるいは自分の個性を見直し優先づけすることで
17:54
and paying attention to it.
人生をより豊かにできるかもしれません
17:58
Most of us work with groups, and I put this up because
私たちはグループで活動します この写真は
18:00
the d.school, the design school at Stanford,
スタンフォード大学のデザイン学部で
18:03
thanks to David Kelley and a lot of others
デイビッド・ケリーや多く人々のおかげで開講した
18:06
who have been visionary about its establishment,
デイビッド・ケリーや多く人々のおかげで開講した
18:09
has allowed a group of us to get together
「遊びから革新まで」という講座の様子です
18:12
and create a course called "From Play to Innovation."
「遊びから革新まで」という講座の様子です
18:14
And you'll see this course is to investigate
この講座の目標は
18:18
the human state of play, which is kind of like the polar bear-husky state
白クマとエスキモー犬と同じ状態を作ることにより
人間の遊びの状態と想像力の重要性さを調べることです
18:21
and its importance to creative thinking:
白クマとエスキモー犬と同じ状態を作ることにより
人間の遊びの状態と想像力の重要性さを調べることです
18:25
"to explore play behavior, its development and its biological basis;
「遊びの行動 発達 生物学的な根本を探索し
18:27
to apply those principles, through design thinking,
デザインの観点から理論を適用して
18:30
to promote innovation in the corporate world;
ビジネス上の革新を促進すること
18:33
and the students will work with real-world partners
学生は幅広いデザインの仕事に関与する
18:35
on design projects with widespread application."
社会人と協業して研究をする」
18:38
This is our maiden voyage in this.
いわば私達の処女航海です
18:41
We're about two and a half, three months into it, and it's really been fun.
約3ヵ月経過したところで とても楽しいです
18:43
There is our star pupil, this labrador,
クラスの優等生です
18:47
who taught a lot of us what a state of play is,
このラブラドールは遊びについて
たくさん教えてくれました
18:50
and an extremely aged and decrepit professor in charge there.
そしてとても年輩でボロボロな教授です (自分)
18:54
And Brendan Boyle, Rich Crandall -- and on the far right is, I think, a person who
ブレンダン・ボイルとリッチ・クランダールです
右脇にいる人は
18:58
will be in cahoots with George Smoot for a Nobel Prize -- Stuart Thompson,
ジョージ・スムートと共に
ノーベル賞受賞が有望視される
19:03
in neuroscience.
神経学者スチュアート・トムソンです
19:08
So we've had Brendan, who's from IDEO,
IDEOのブレンダンと一緒に
19:09
and the rest of us sitting aside and watching these students
私達は教室の端から
19:11
as they put play principles into practice in the classroom.
学生達が遊びの原則を実行するのを見学しています
19:15
And one of their projects was to
学生達のプロジェクトのひとつは
19:21
see what makes meetings boring,
会議をつまらなくしている原因を見つけ
19:25
and to try and do something about it.
対策を立てるというものです
19:28
So what will follow is a student-made film
これからお見せするのは
19:31
about just that.
学生自作の映画です
19:35
Narrator: Flow is the mental state of apparition
「フロー」というのは やっていることに熱中すると
19:38
in which the person is fully immersed in what he or she is doing.
出現する心理的状態のことです
19:42
Characterized by a feeling of energized focus,
特徴は 精力的に集中すること
19:45
full involvement and success in the process of the activity.
全面的な関与 そして活動プロセスの成功です
19:48
An important key insight that we learned about meetings
私達が実感した会議の問題は
19:55
is that people pack them in one after another,
次々に会議の予定があって そのたびに
19:58
disruptive to the day.
仕事が中断することです
20:01
Attendees at meetings don't know when they'll get back to the task
会議出席者は何時になったら残してきた
20:03
that they left at their desk.
仕事に戻れるか知りません
20:06
But it doesn't have to be that way.
それは良くないですよね
20:08
(Music)
(音楽)
20:11
Some sage and repeatedly furry monks
デザイン学部では賢明な学生
21:04
at this place called the d.school
時には毛皮で覆われた犬が
21:07
designed a meeting that you can literally step out of when it's over.
終わったらすぐ脱げる会議をデザインしました
21:09
Take the meeting off, and have peace of mind that you can come back to me.
この会議は脱いだら直ぐに安心感を取り戻せます
21:14
Because when you need it again,
なぜなら また必要な時のために
21:19
the meeting is literally hanging in your closet.
会議を文字通りクローゼットに掛けられるからです
21:21
The Wearable Meeting.
着脱可能な会議
21:27
Because when you put it on, you immediately get everything you need
着た途端 楽しくて 豊かで
21:29
to have a fun and productive and useful meeting.
役に立つ会議ができるのです
21:33
But when you take it off --
でも脱いだ瞬間に
21:36
that's when the real action happens.
本当の行動が起こります
21:39
(Music)
(音楽)
21:41
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)
(拍手)
21:47
Stuart Brown: So I would encourage you all
皆さんにお勧めしたいのは
21:50
to engage
違う生き方―
21:56
not in the work-play differential --
仕事と遊びを わざわざ分離して
21:58
where you set aside time to play --
遊ぶ時間を別にとるのではなく
22:01
but where your life becomes infused
普段の生活を
22:04
minute by minute, hour by hour,
分刻みで いつでも
22:07
with body,
身体
22:11
object,
22:13
social, fantasy, transformational kinds of play.
社交 空想 変身等の遊びと融合する生活をしよう
ということです
22:15
And I think you'll have a better and more empowered life.
そうすれば より豊かな生活が手に入ると思います
22:20
Thank You.
ありがとうございます
22:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:26
John Hockenberry: So it sounds to me like what you're saying is that
博士がおっしゃったことを聞いた人の中には
22:33
there may be some temptation on the part of people to look at your work
誤解する人がいるような気がします
22:36
and go --
すなわち
22:40
I think I've heard this, in my kind of pop psychological understanding of play,
この研究についての素人的な心理学の解釈によれば
22:42
that somehow,
もしかしたら
22:47
the way animals and humans deal with play,
動物と人間にとって遊びとは
22:49
is that it's some sort of rehearsal for adult activity.
大人になるためのリハーサルだと
22:52
Your work seems to suggest that that is powerfully wrong.
この解釈は大変間違っているのですね
22:55
SB: Yeah, I don't think that's accurate,
ええ それは正しくないと思います
22:58
and I think probably because animals have taught us that.
動物がそのことを私達に教えてくれたと思います
23:01
If you stop a cat from playing --
もし 猫に遊ばせるのを止めても―
23:04
which you can do, and we've all seen how cats bat around stuff --
猫は小物とじゃれるのが好きなことは
誰でも知っていますが それを止めるのです
23:08
they're just as good predators as they would be if they hadn't played.
遊ばない猫も 遊ぶ猫と同じ位
上手に狩りができました
23:12
And if you imagine a kid
一方 子供の場合は
23:17
pretending to be King Kong,
キングコングの真似や
23:19
or a race car driver, or a fireman,
カーレース・ドライバーや 消防士のふりをしても
23:22
they don't all become race car drivers or firemen, you know.
全員がカーレース・ドライバーや消防士消防士に
なるわけではありません
23:25
So there's a disconnect between preparation for the future --
つまり みんなが信じ込んでいる
遊びは将来のための予行という解釈と
23:29
which is what most people are comfortable in thinking about play as --
遊びは特別な生物学的現象という解釈には
23:34
and thinking of it as a separate biological entity.
大きな違いがあります
23:37
And this is where my chasing animals for four, five years
4, 5年に渡って動物を追いかけた経験のおかげで
23:41
really changed my perspective from a clinician to what I am now,
私の見方は 普通の開業医から
現在へと変わりました
23:46
which is that play has a biological place,
生物学的には眠りや夢と同じ位
23:51
just like sleep and dreams do.
遊びも重要だという考えです
23:55
And if you look at sleep and dreams biologically,
生物学的に眠りと夢を研究して分かったのは
23:58
animals sleep and dream,
動物は寝て 夢を見ながら
24:03
and they rehearse and they do some other things that help memory
復習等の活動をして記憶力を高めるのです
24:05
and that are a very important part of sleep and dreams.
ですから眠りと夢はとても重要なのです
24:08
The next step of evolution in mammals and
哺乳動物や
神経が十分に発達している動物にとっては
24:11
creatures with divinely superfluous neurons
眠りと夢の次の進化の過程は
24:14
will be to play.
遊びです
24:18
And the fact that the polar bear and husky or magpie and a bear
白クマもエスキモー犬も カササギも熊も
24:21
or you and I and our dogs can crossover and have that experience
あなたも 私も 愛犬も
種を超えて一緒に遊べる事実は
24:24
sets play aside as something separate.
遊びは特別な現象であることを示しています
24:30
And its hugely important in learning and crafting the brain.
学習や脳の発達にとっては
とても大切なことです
24:33
So it's not just something you do in your spare time.
ですから暇な時だけ
遊べばいい訳ではありません
24:37
JH: How do you keep -- and I know you're part of the scientific research community,
教授は科学者の一人として他の研究者と同じく
24:40
and you have to justify your existence with grants and proposals like everyone else --
助成金を確保するために 提言等して
ご自分を正当化しなければなりません
24:43
how do you prevent --
でも博士が発表したデータの中には
24:48
and some of the data that you've produced, the good science that you're talking about you've produced, is hot to handle.
けっこう刺激的なことが入っています
24:50
How do you prevent either the media's interpretation of your work
他の科学者やメディアが間違った解釈をして
24:56
or the scientific community's interpretation of the implications of your work,
次のような状況を引き起すのを
どうやって防ぎますか
25:00
kind of like the Mozart metaphor,
例えばモーツァルトのたとえのように
25:06
where, "Oh, MRIs show
MRI結果は
25:09
that play enhances your intelligence.
遊びは知力を高めることを証明した
25:12
Well, let's round these kids up, put them in pens
では子供たちを集めて囲いに入れて
25:15
and make them play for months at a time; they'll all be geniuses and go to Harvard."
数ヵ月遊ばせれば 全員が天才になって
ハーバ-ドへ行けるだろう
25:17
How do you prevent people from taking that sort of action
人々が教授の研究を誤解して
25:21
on the data that you're developing?
こんな行動をとる心配はありませんか
25:24
SB: Well, I think the only way I know to do it
私が知っている唯一の方法は
25:26
is to have accumulated the advisers that I have
さらに研究を重ねて正しい知識を蓄積し
25:29
who go from practitioners --
広げることです
25:32
who can establish through improvisational play or clowning or whatever --
即行の遊びでもピエロでも何でもいいのですが
25:34
a state of play.
遊びを見せることです
25:38
So people know that it's there.
そうすれば人々が遊びを理解するでしょう
25:40
And then you get an fMRI specialist, and you get Frank Wilson,
一方ではfMRIの専門家 フランク・ウィルソンや
25:42
and you get other kinds of hard scientists, including neuroendocrinologists.
神経内分泌学者と共に
他分野の一流科学者を集めます
25:46
And you get them into a group together focused on play,
そして全員が一致団結して
遊びの研究をするのです
25:51
and it's pretty hard not to take it seriously.
そしたら みんな結果を
まじめに取るでしょう
25:57
Unfortunately, that hasn't been done sufficiently
残念ながら研究は不十分で
26:01
for the National Science Foundation, National Institute of Mental Health
国立科学財団
国立精神健康研究所
26:04
or anybody else to really look at it in this way seriously.
含めて 誰も真剣に取り組もうとはしません
26:07
I mean you don't hear about anything that's like cancer or heart disease
がんや心臓病の研究で聞くような取組みは
26:10
associated with play.
遊びについては皆無です
26:16
And yet I see it as something that's just as basic for survival -- long term --
でも私が思うに 遊びは生存のために
26:18
as learning some of the basic things about public health.
公衆の健康の基礎を学ぶことと同じぐらい
基本的で長期的に大切なものです
26:23
JH: Stuart Brown, thank you very much.
スチュアート・ブラウン博士
どうもありがとうございました
26:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
26:29
Translator:Masami Mutsukado and Kacie Landrum
Reviewer:Akira Kan

sponsored links

Stuart Brown - Play researcher, psychiatrist
Stuart Brown's research shows play is not just joyful and energizing -- it's deeply involved with human development and intelligence. Through the National Institute for Play, he's working to better understand its significance.

Why you should listen

Dr. Stuart Brown came to research play through research on murderers -- unlikely as that seems -- after he found a stunning common thread in killers' stories: lack of play in childhood. Since then, he's interviewed thousands of people to catalog their relationships with play, noting a strong correlation between success and playful activity. His book Play describes the impact play can have on one's life. 

With the support of the National Geographic Society and Jane Goodall, he has observed animal play in the wild, where he first concieved of play as an evolved behavior important for the well being -- and survival -- of animals, especially those of higher intelligence. Now, through his organization, the National Institute for Play, he hopes to expand the study of human play into a vital science -- and help people everywhere enjoy and participate in play throughout life.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.