18:55
TED2010

Philip K. Howard: Four ways to fix a broken legal system

フィリップ ハワード: 壊れた法制度を直す4つの方法

Filmed:

自由の国は法律の地雷原になってしまったと フィリップ・ハワードは言います。特に医師と教師の仕事は訴訟の恐怖に麻痺してしまいました。どうすれば良いのでしょう。自身も法律家であるハワードが、米国の法律を簡単にするための 4 項目を提案します。

- Legal activist
Philip K. Howard is the founder of Common Good, a drive to overhaul the US legal system. His new book is 'The Rule of Nobody.' Full bio

I've always been interested in
私はずっと社会の制度や仕組みと
00:15
the relationship of formal structures and human behavior.
人々の行動との関係に関心をもってきました
00:18
If you build a wide road out to the outskirts of town, people will move there.
郊外まで広い道路を作れば 皆がそこに引っ越します
00:22
Well, law is also a powerful driver
さて 法律も人の行動を左右する
00:26
of human behavior.
強力な影響をもっています
00:30
And what I'd like to discuss today
今日 お話したいことは
00:32
is the need to overhaul and simplify the law
法制度を総点検して簡単にすることで
00:34
to release the energy and passion
アメリカ国民のエネルギーと情熱を解き放ち
00:37
of Americans, so that we can begin
現代社会の課題に立ち向かえるように
00:40
to address the challenges of our society.
できるということです
00:42
You might have noticed that law has grown
お気づきのことでしょう 法律は次第に緻密になり
00:45
progressively denser in your lives over the last decade or two.
ここ20年ほどの間に生活の隅々まで入り込んで来ました
00:48
If you run a business, it's hard to do much of anything
今や ビジネスをしていたら 顧問弁護士に相談せずに
00:51
without calling your general counsel.
何かをする事は困難です
00:55
Indeed, there is this phenomenon now
実際こんな現象もあります
00:57
where the general counsels are becoming the CEOs.
顧問弁護士が CEO になりつつあるのです
00:59
It's a little bit like the Invasion Of The Body Snatchers.
寄生生物が宿主を乗っ取るようなものです
01:02
You need a lawyer to run the company,
会社を運営するのに法律家が必要なのは
01:05
because there's so much law.
法律が非常に多いからです
01:07
But it's not just business that's affected by this,
このことで影響されているのはビジネスだけではありません
01:09
it's actually pressed down into the daily activities
日常の市民生活にもまた
01:12
of ordinary people.
影を落としています
01:14
A couple of years ago I was hiking near Cody, Wyoming.
数年前 私がワイオミングのコディで ハイキングをしたときのことです
01:16
It was in a grizzly bear preserve,
行って始めて気がついたのですが
01:20
although no one told me that before we went.
そこは野生のグリズリーの保護区でした
01:22
And our guide was a local science teacher.
我々のガイドは地元の理科の先生で
01:24
She was wholly unconcerned about the bears,
熊についてはまったく心配していませんでしたが
01:28
but she was terrified of lawyers.
彼女は法律家のことを恐れていて
01:30
The stories started pouring out.
法律の話が次々と続きました
01:33
She'd just been involved in an episode where a parent
ちょうどこんな出来事があったと言うのです
01:35
had threatened to sue the school
レポートの提出が遅れた生徒の成績を1割下げたところ
01:37
because she lowered the grade of the student by 10 percent
学校を訴えると
01:40
when he turned the paper in late.
保護者が脅したのです
01:42
The principal didn't want to stand up to the parent
校長がその保護者と対決しようとしなかったのは
01:44
because he didn't want to get dragged into some legal proceedings.
法的な争いに引き込まれたくなかったからでした
01:46
So, she had to go to meeting after meeting, same arguments made
彼女は幾つもの会合に呼び出され
01:49
over and over again.
いつも同じ議論の繰り返しでした
01:51
After 30 days of sleepless nights, she finally capitulated
30日も眠れない夜を過ごすうちに
01:53
and raised the grade.
彼女は降参して成績を戻しました
01:56
She said, "Life's too short, I just can't keep going with this."
「人生は短いから こんなことに関わり合っていられない」
01:58
About the same time, she was going to take two students to a leadership conference
またその頃 彼女は二人の生徒をリーダーシップの研究会に引率しようとしました
02:01
in Laramie, which is a couple of hours away,
研究会は数時間離れたララミーで行われるので
02:04
and she was going to drive them in her car,
自分の車で生徒達を連れて行こうとしましたが
02:07
but the school said, "No, you can't drive them in the car
学校に指示されました 「法的責任の問題となるから
02:09
for liability reasons.
生徒を同乗させて行かないで
02:11
You have to go in a school bus."
スクールバスで行って下さい」
02:13
So, they provided a bus that held 60 people
その結果 60人乗りのバスが登場して
02:15
and drove the three of them back and forth
3人を載せてララミーまで数時間の道のりを
02:18
several hours to Laramie.
行き来したのでした
02:20
Her husband is also a science teacher,
彼女の夫もまた科学の先生で
02:22
and he takes his biology class on a hike
生物の授業では近くの国立公園まで
02:25
in the nearby national park.
ハイキングに出かけていました
02:28
But he was told he couldn't go on the hike this year
しかし今年は屋外実習はやめてくれと言われたのです
02:31
because one of the students in the class was disabled,
なぜかというとクラスに障害者が一人いたからです
02:33
so the other 25 students didn't get to go on the hike either.
そこで 他の25人も屋外実習に行けなくなりました
02:36
At the end of this day I could have filled a book
その日のうちに この先生から聞いた 法律にまつわる話だけで
02:40
just with stories about law
本が一冊書けるほど
02:43
from this one teacher.
たっぷりありました
02:45
Now, we've been taught to believe that law
私たちは 法律は自由の基盤と
02:47
is the foundation of freedom.
教えられて来ましたが
02:49
But somehow or another, in the last couple of decades,
どうしたわけか ここ20年間に この自由の国は
02:52
the land of the free has become a legal minefield.
法律の地雷原のようになってしまいました
02:54
It's really changed our lives in ways
知らず知らずのうちに 我々の生活は
02:58
that are sort of imperceptible;
すっかり変わってしまっているのです
03:01
and yet, when you pull back, you see it all the time.
立ち止まって考えれば 至る所で見られる話です
03:03
It's changed the way we talk. I was talking to a
我々の話し方も変わりました
03:05
pediatrician friend
ノースカロライナの小児科の友人が言うには
03:07
in North Carolina. He said,
「昔と同じような接し方で
03:09
"Well you know, I don't deal with patients the same way anymore.
患者に接することはなくなった
03:11
You wouldn't want to say something off-the-cuff
思いつきでなにかうっかり口にしようものなら
03:14
that might be used against you."
あとで自分に不利なように使われるかもしれないからね」
03:17
This is a doctor, whose life is caring for people.
人のために働く医者がこう言うのです
03:20
My own law firm has a list of questions
私の法律事務所には
03:23
that I'm not allowed to ask
採用面接のときに
03:26
when interviewing candidates,
聞いてはいけない質問のリストがあります
03:28
such as the sinister question,
例えば底意地悪いあてつけをしのばせた
03:30
bulging with hidden motives and innuendo,
悪名高い例の質問です
03:32
"Where are you from?"
「どちらからお越しですか?」
03:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:38
Now for 20 years, tort reformers have been sounding the alarm
この20年間 不法行為法改革を進める人たちは
03:40
that lawsuits are out of control.
訴訟は制御不能になっていると 警鐘を鳴らしてきました
03:44
And we read every once in while
みなさんも ときおり 馬鹿げた訴訟を
03:46
about these crazy lawsuits, like the guy
耳にするでしょう コロンビア特別区で
03:48
in the District of Columbia who sued his dry cleaners for 54 million dollars
あるクリーニング店は ズボンを1本紛失したために
03:50
because they lost his pair of pants.
5千4百万ドルの訴えを起こされました
03:54
The case went on for two years; I think he's still appealing the case.
この訴訟は2年は続き 今も上訴審で争っていると思います
03:56
But the reality is, these crazy cases
しかし実際はこれらの馬鹿げた例は
03:59
are relatively rare. They don't usually win.
かなりまれです 普通は勝つことなどありません
04:02
And the total of direct tort cost
不法行為の訴訟費用の総額は
04:05
in this country is about two percent,
アメリカではおよそ 2% で
04:07
which is twice as much as in other countries
これは他国の倍になります
04:09
but, as taxes go, hardly crippling.
税金のようなものなので 問題にもされません
04:12
But the direct costs are really only the tip of the iceberg.
しかし直接的な費用は実は氷山の一角にすぎません
04:16
What's happened here, again,
気づかれることも無いままに
04:20
almost without our knowing,
我々の文化の変化が
04:22
is our culture has changed.
起きています
04:24
People no longer feel free
もはや 自らの最良の判断に基づいて
04:27
to act on their best judgment.
自由に行動できなくなりました
04:29
So, what do we do about it?
この状況はどうしたものでしょうか
04:31
We certainly don't want to give up the rights,
だれかが間違った何かをしたときに
04:33
when people do something wrong, to seek redress in the courts.
法廷でそれを是正する権利を放棄したくはありません
04:35
We need regulation to make sure
公害を防止するような規制など
04:38
people don't pollute and such.
必要なものもあります
04:40
We lack even a vocabulary to deal with
この問題を語るためのボキャブラリーすら
04:42
this problem,
不足しているのです
04:44
and that's because we have the wrong frame of reference.
我々の議論の枠組みが間違っているからなのです
04:46
We've been trained to think that the way to look at every dispute,
我々は すべての論争や争点は 個人の権利に関わる問題として
04:49
every issue, is a matter of kind of individual rights.
考えるように訓練されて来ました
04:52
And so we peer through a legal microscope, and look at everything.
そこで すべてのことを法律という顕微鏡をのぞきこんで
04:55
Is it possible that there are extenuating circumstances
見ようとします ワイオミング州コディで
04:58
that explain why Johnny
ジョニーのレポートが遅れたのに
05:02
turned his paper in late in Cody, Wyoming?
酌量の余地があるか
05:04
Is it possible that the doctor
病人の体調が悪化したときに
05:08
might have done something differently when the sick person gets sicker?
医者は何か別のことをできたのではないか
05:10
And of course the hindsight bias is perfect.
後講釈が 完璧なのは言うまでもありません
05:13
There's always a different scenario that you can sketch out
いつだって別のシナリオに従って
05:16
where it's possible that something could have been done differently.
違うやり方があったと指摘できるのです
05:19
And yet, we've been trained to squint into this legal microscope,
私たちは 完全な社会という基準に照らしてどんな論争も判断できるという
05:21
hoping that we can judge any dispute
考えのもとで 法律という顕微鏡を覗き込むよう訓練されました
05:26
against the standard of a perfect society,
完全な社会では 何が公平であるかについて
05:29
where everyone will agree what's fair,
皆が同意し
05:32
and where accidents will be extinct,
事故はなくなり
05:34
risk will be no more.
リスクは繰り返さないのです
05:37
Of course, this is Utopia;
もちろん これはユートピアですが
05:40
it's a formula for paralysis, not freedom.
社会が機能停止し そこに自由はありません
05:42
It's not the basis of the rule of law,
完全な社会というのは 法律のルールの基礎ではありません
05:45
it's not the basis of a free society.
自由な社会の基礎ではありません
05:47
So, now I have the first of four propositions
これが 4つのうちで最初の論点です
05:50
I'm going to leave with you about how you simplify the law:
法律をどうやって単純化するかということは皆さんへの宿題にします
05:53
You've got to judge law mainly
社会への影響を広く捉えて
05:56
by its effect on the broader society,
法律を評価しなければならず
05:58
not individual disputes.
個別の論争で捉えてはいけません
06:01
Absolutely vital.
このことは絶対に重要です
06:03
So, let's pull back from the anecdotes for a second
では 具体的な話から離れて
06:05
and look at our society from high above.
我々の社会を高所から眺めましょう
06:07
Is it working?
うまく機能していますか?
06:09
What does the macro-data show us?
マクロのデータは何を示しているでしょう
06:11
Well, the healthcare system has been transformed:
健康保険のシステムは改革されました
06:13
a culture pervaded with defensiveness,
社会は防御策であふれ返っています
06:16
universal distrust of the system of justice,
法制度に対して至るところで信頼が損なわれています
06:19
universal practice of defensive medicine.
防御的な医療の実践が至るところで見られます
06:22
It's very hard to measure
それを評価するのが難しいのは
06:25
because there are mixed motives.
いくつかの意図が入り交じっているからです
06:27
Doctors can make more on ordering tests sometimes,
医師は時には検査をすることで よりよい医療を提供できることもありますが
06:29
and also they no longer even know what's right or wrong.
もはや何が正しくて何が間違いか分からないこともあります
06:32
But reliable estimates
信頼できる推測値によれば
06:35
range between 60 billion and
年間 600億から
06:37
200 billion dollars per year.
2000億ドルが検査に投じられています
06:39
That's enough to provide care to all the people
これだけのお金があれば
06:43
in America who don't have it.
無保険のアメリカ全国民に医療を提供出来ます
06:46
The trial lawyers say, "Well, this legal fear
弁護士は 訴訟のおそれがあるから
06:48
makes doctors practice better medicine."
医者がよりよい医療を提供するのだと言いますが
06:50
Well that's been studied too, by the Institute of Medicine
米国医学研究所などの研究を通して
06:52
and others. Turns out that's not the case.
そうではないことが明らかになりました
06:54
The fear has chilled professional interaction
恐れはプロとしての働きかけを委縮させ
06:57
so thousands of tragic errors occur
何千もの悲劇的な失敗が生じます
07:00
because doctors are afraid
医師たちが「その投与量で間違いないか?」
07:03
to speak up: "Are you sure that's the right dosage?"
と口にすることをためらうからです
07:06
Because they're not sure,
確信がないからです
07:09
and they don't want to take legal responsibility.
法的な責任を負いたくないのです
07:11
Let's go to schools.
学校の話に移りましょう
07:14
As we saw with the teacher in Cody, Wyoming,
先ほど ワイオミング州コーディの先生が
07:16
she seems to be affected by the law.
法律によって影響されている様子を紹介しました
07:19
Well it turns out the schools are literally drowning in law.
学校は法律の海で文字通り溺れそうになっています
07:21
You could have a separate section of a law library
以下に述べる法的概念のそれぞれに対して
07:25
around each of the following legal concepts:
独立した章をあてて説明できるほどです
07:28
due process, special education,
適正な手続きや配慮を必要とする児童
07:31
no child left behind,
おちこぼれ対策
07:33
zero tolerance, work rules ...
厳罰主義や労務管理
07:36
it goes on. We did a study
まだまだ続きます
07:38
of all the rules that affect one school
ニューヨークのある学校で規制の調査を行ったところ
07:40
in New York. The Board of Ed. had no idea.
学校の理事会をお手上げにするような
07:43
Tens of thousands of discreet rules,
用心深い規制が何千,何万もあって
07:46
60 steps to suspend a student from school:
生徒を停学させるためには 60 ものステップが必要です
07:48
It's a formula for paralysis.
機能停止に陥ってしまいます
07:52
What's the effect of that? One is a decline in order.
その影響は何か?規律が緩みます
07:54
Again, studies have shown
別の研究によれば
07:57
it's directly attributable
規律の低下は
07:59
to the rise of due process.
適正手続の普及が原因とされます
08:01
Public agenda did a survey for us a couple of years ago
「パブリックアジェンダ」が全米で数年前に行った調査では
08:03
where they found that 43 percent of the high school teachers in America
アメリカの高校教師の43パーセントは
08:06
say that they spend at least half of their time
「授業時間の少なくとも半分を 静かにさせるために使っている」
08:09
maintaining order in the classroom.
と答えています
08:12
That means those students are getting half the learning
つまり本来の半分しか学んでいないということです
08:15
they're supposed to, because if one child is disrupting the class
クラスでひとりが邪魔をすれば
08:18
no one can learn.
誰ひとりとして勉強できないのですから
08:21
And what happens when the teacher tries to assert order?
そして先生が静かにと命じようとすると どうなるか?
08:23
They're threatened with a legal claim.
法律に訴えると脅されるのです
08:27
We also surveyed that. Seventy-eight percent of the middle and high school teachers
調査によればアメリカの中学高校の教師の78パーセントは
08:29
in America have been threatened by their students
生徒たちの権利を侵害したとして
08:32
with violating their rights, with lawsuits
裁判にすると脅されたことがあるのです
08:35
by their students. They are threatening, their students.
生徒を脅したと訴えられるのです
08:37
It's not that they usually sue,
普通は訴訟には至りません
08:40
it's not that they would win, but it's an
訴えが通ることなどありませんが
08:42
indication of the corrosion of authority.
権力が劣化していることも明らかです
08:45
And how has this system of law worked for government?
では法律の制度は政府にはどう働くのでしょうか
08:48
It doesn't seem to be working very well does it?
サクラメントでもワシントンでも
08:52
Neither in Sacramento nor in Washington.
うまく働いていないように思いませんか?
08:54
The other day at the State of the Union speech,
先日の一般教書演説では
08:57
President Obama said,
オバマ大統領が述べたことの
08:59
and I think we could all agree with this goal,
目指すゴールには誰もが同意します
09:01
"From the first railroads to the interstate highway system,
「最初の鉄道や最初の高速道路
09:03
our nation has always been the first to compete.
アメリカは常に先端を競ってきた
09:06
There is no reason Europe or China should have the fastest trains."
ヨーロッパや中国に最速の鉄道を譲る理由はない」
09:09
Well, actually there is a reason:
実は理由があるのです
09:14
Environmental review has evolved into a process
大規模な建設計画は何であれ
09:16
of no pebble left unturned
重箱のすみをつつくようになってしまった環境基準評価に
09:19
for any major project taking the better part of a decade,
期間の大半を割き
09:21
then followed by years of litigation
その後も建設に反対する者との
09:25
by anybody who doesn't like the project.
訴訟が何年も続くからです
09:27
Then, just staying above the Earth for one more second,
地球上に少し長く生き残るだけのために
09:30
people are acting like idiots,
ばかみたいなことをやっているのです
09:33
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:36
all across the country.
全国どこでも
09:37
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:39
Idiots. A couple of years ago,
数年前
09:41
Broward County, Florida, banned running at recess.
フロリダのブロワード郡では放課に走ることを禁じました
09:43
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:47
That means all the boys are going to be ADD.
つまり男の子はみんな 多動性障害 になります
09:48
I mean it's just absolutely
絶対に上手くいかない
09:51
a formula for failure.
やり方です
09:53
My favorite, though, are all the warning labels.
こんな警告ラベルも傑作です
09:55
"Caution: Contents are hot,"
あらゆるコーヒーカップに
09:57
on billions of coffee cups.
「注意 熱くなっています」と書いてあります
09:59
Archeologists will dig us up in a thousand years
千年後の考古学者がこれを掘り出すと
10:01
and they won't know about defensive medicine and stuff,
それを訴訟対策とは気づかないで
10:04
but they'll see all these labels, "Contents are extremely hot."
警告ラベルだけを目にします 「ホットなものが入っています」
10:07
They'll think it was some kind of aphrodisiac.
媚薬か何かと思うでしょうね
10:10
That's the only explanation. Because why
それ以外に説明できないでしょう
10:12
would you have to tell people that something was actually hot?
何で熱いものを熱いとわざわざ説明するのでしょう
10:15
My favorite warning was one on a five-inch fishing lure.
5インチのルアーのこんな警告も傑作です
10:18
I grew up in the South and whiled away the summers fishing.
南部育ちの私は のんびり魚釣りを楽しんだものですが
10:21
Five-inch fishing lure, it's a big fishing lure,
5インチのルアーと言えば 大きなルアーです
10:24
with a three pronged hook in the back,
先には三つ又のかぎ針もつながっています
10:26
and outside it said, "Harmful if swallowed."
「飲み込むと危険です」
10:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:31
So, none of these people
こんなことがまともだと思いながら
10:38
are doing what they think is right.
行っている人はいません
10:40
And why not? They don't trust the law. Why don't they trust the law?
なのになぜでしょう 法律が信頼されていないからです
10:42
Because it gives us the worst of both worlds:
法律は二つの世界の最悪の面を合わせ持つからです
10:44
It's random -- anybody can sue for almost anything
手当たり次第に 誰もがほぼあらゆることを訴えて
10:46
and take it to a jury, not even an effort at consistency --
法廷に持ち込むことができます
10:49
and it's also too detailed.
そしてまた全てが細かすぎるのです
10:52
In the areas that are regulated, there are so many rules
規制された領域では実に多くの規則があり
10:54
no human could possibly know it.
その全部を分かる人がいるとは思えません
10:57
Well how do you fix it? We could spend 10,000 lifetimes
さてどうしましょうか 法律のジャングルを
10:59
trying to prune this legal jungle.
刈りこむ作業にはきりがなく
11:01
But the challenge here is not one of just
しかもここでの本当の課題は法律の
11:03
amending the law,
こまごました修正などではありません
11:06
because the hurdle for success is trust.
成功するためには 信頼が必要です
11:08
People -- for law to be the platform for freedom,
法律が自由のためのプラットフォームとなるためには
11:12
people have to trust it.
人々の信頼を得なければなりません
11:16
So, that's my second proposition:
これが私からの第2の提案です
11:19
Trust is an essential condition
信頼は自由な社会において
11:21
to a free society.
必要とされる条件です
11:24
Life is complicated enough without legal fear.
法律に関しての心配などなくても すでに人生は十分に複雑です
11:26
But law is different than other kinds of uncertainties,
しかし法律はそれ以外の不確定要因とは異なり
11:29
because it carries with it the power of state.
国家権力を背景にしています
11:31
And so the state can come in.
そこに政府が介入します
11:34
It actually changes the way people think.
すると人々の考え方が変わります
11:36
It's like having a little lawyer on your shoulders
小さな法律家が肩に乗っていて
11:39
all day long, whispering in your ear,
一日中のべつまくなしに耳元で
11:42
"Could that go wrong? Might that go wrong?"
失敗したらどうする まずいんじゃないかと囁き続けるのです
11:44
It drives people from the smart part of the brain --
そうなると頭の賢い働きが失われ
11:46
that dark, deep well of the subconscious,
直感や経験やその他の
11:50
where instincts and experience,
創造性につながる諸々の働きや
11:53
and all the other factors of creativity
きちんとした判断力のありかである
11:55
and good judgment are --
無意識という井戸から距離を置いて
11:58
it drives us to the thin veneer of conscious logic.
薄っぺらなベニヤ張りの意識と理屈の世界に追いやられます
12:00
Pretty soon the doctor's saying, "Well, I doubt
そのうち 医師たちはこう言うでしょう
12:03
if that headache could be a tumor, but who would protect me
頭痛は腫瘍の疑いはないと思いますが 万一の場合に私を守るために
12:05
if it were? So maybe I'll just order the MRI."
まず MRI を受けてきて下さい
12:07
Then you've wasted 200 billion dollars in unnecessary tests.
こうして 2千億ドルが不要な検査に費やされます
12:10
If you make people self-conscious
ある研究によれば
12:14
about their judgments, studies show
決断について意識させることで
12:17
you will make them make worse judgments.
人は劣った判断をするようになります
12:19
If you tell the pianist to think about how she's hitting the notes
ピアニストが音楽を演奏している時に
12:22
when she's playing the piece, she can't play the piece.
どう音符を奏でているかを考えさせたら演奏できません
12:26
Self-consciousness is the enemy of accomplishment.
自意識は達成への障害となります
12:30
Edison stated it best. He said,
エジソンがこのことを述べています
12:33
"Hell, we ain't got no rules around here,
「私の研究室にはルールはありません
12:35
we're trying to accomplish something."
新しいものを創ろうとしているのですから」
12:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:39
So, how do you restore trust?
では どうやって信頼をとり戻しましょうか
12:41
Tweaking the law's clearly not good enough,
法律を修正しても不十分なことは明らかです
12:42
and tort reform, which is a great idea,
不法行為改革は重要なアイデアです
12:44
lowers your cost if you're a businessperson,
事業をしているならコストの低下につながります
12:47
but it's like a Band-Aid on this gaping wound of distrust.
しかし信頼欠如という傷口につけるバンドエイドにすぎません
12:49
States with extensive tort reform
不法行為改革を徹底的におこなった州においても
12:52
still suffer all these pathologies.
いまだにこれらの病理に苦しんでいます
12:54
So, what's needed is not just to limit claims,
そこで 訴訟を制限するだけではなく
12:56
but actually create a dry ground of freedom.
自由のための新しい領土を作る必要があります
12:59
It turns out that freedom actually has a formal structure.
自由にはちゃんとした構造があります
13:02
And it is this:
こういうものです
13:06
Law sets boundaries,
法は外縁を規定します
13:08
and on one side of those boundaries are all the things
してはいけないこと としなければならないことの
13:10
you can't do or must do --
境界を示します
13:12
you can't steal, you've got to pay your taxes --
盗みはいけないこと
13:14
but those same boundaries are supposed to define
税金は払うこと この同じ境界によって
13:15
and protect a dry ground of freedom.
自由のための領域を描こうというのです
13:18
Isaiah Berlin put it this way:
アイザィア バーリンは次のように述べています
13:22
"Law sets frontiers, not artificially drawn,
「法律はフロンティアを定めるが 人工的な線引きではなく
13:24
within which men shall be inviolable."
内側にいる人は侵害されることがないという境界です」
13:27
We've forgotten that second part.
後半の部分を我々は失念していました
13:31
Those dikes have burst. People wade through law
境界の堤防は決壊してしまい
13:33
all day long.
人々は法律の海で溺れそうです
13:36
So, what's needed now
今必要なのは これらの境界を
13:38
is to rebuild these boundaries.
再建することです
13:40
And it's especially important to rebuild them
特に訴訟に備えて再建することが
13:43
for lawsuits.
とりわけ重要です
13:45
Because what people can sue for establishes the boundaries
だれかが訴えることの可能な事柄が
13:47
for everybody else's freedom.
他の人の自由に対する境界となるのです
13:50
If someone brings a lawsuit over, "A kid fell off the seesaw,"
子どもがシーソーから落ちたという裁判を 誰かが始めた途端に
13:52
it doesn't matter what happens in the lawsuit,
裁判の中で何が起ころうとも関係なく
13:55
all the seesaws will disappear.
すべてのシーソーは撤去されます
13:57
Because no one will want to take the risk of a lawsuit.
訴訟のリスクを負いたい人はいないからです
13:59
And that's what's happened. There are no seesaws, jungle gyms,
そういうわけで シーソーも ジャングルジムも
14:01
merry-go-rounds, climbing ropes,
メリーゴーランドも登り綱も
14:03
nothing that would interest a kid over the age of four,
4歳以上の子どもが興味をひくものは全て撤去されました
14:05
because there's no risk associated with it.
こうしてリスクを全てなくせるからです
14:08
So, how do we rebuild it?
さてどのように再建しましょうか
14:10
Life is too complex for...
人生は複雑で
14:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:14
Life is too complex for a software program.
複雑でソフトウェアでは扱えません
14:19
All these choices involve value judgments
全ての選択は社会的な基準による --
14:21
and social norms, not objective facts.
価値判断を伴い 客観的な事実などではありません
14:23
And so here is the fourth proposition.
そこで 第4の提言です
14:26
This is what we have, the philosophy we have to change to.
考え方を 変えなければいけません
14:29
And there are two essential elements of it:
そこには本質的な要素が二つあります
14:31
We have to simplify the law.
法律を簡単にしなければなりません
14:34
We have to migrate from all this complexity
現在の複雑な状況から
14:37
towards general principles and goals.
一般原則とゴールに移行しなければなりません
14:40
The constitution is only 16 pages long.
合衆国憲法は16ページと短いですが
14:42
Worked pretty well for 200 years.
200年ほど実にうまく機能してきました
14:45
Law has to be simple enough
法律は十分に単純で
14:47
so that people can internalize it
日々の選択において
14:49
in their daily choices.
腑に落ちて使えるものでなければなりません
14:52
If they can't internalize it, they won't trust it.
腑に落ちない法律を だれも信頼しないでしょう
14:54
And how do you make it simple?
どうすれば単純にできるか
14:58
Because life is complex,
しかも人の暮らしは複雑です
15:00
and here is the hardest and biggest change:
これが難しく最大の課題です
15:02
We have to restore the authority
権威を復権させなければなりません
15:05
to judges and officials
法廷や法務省の権威です
15:07
to interpret and apply the law.
解釈や運用の権威です
15:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:11
We have to rehumanize the law.
法律は人間的なものに戻さなければなりません
15:14
To make law simple so that you feel free,
シンプルで人が自由を感じる法律を作り
15:17
the people in charge have to be free
合理的な社会規範と釣り合うように
15:20
to use their judgment to interpret and apply the law
自身の判断で法の解釈や運用を行うためには
15:22
in accord with reasonable social norms.
責任者は自由でなければなりません
15:25
As you're going down, and walking down the sidewalk during the day,
外に出て 日中に歩道を歩きながら
15:27
you have to think that if there is a dispute,
考えなければなりません
15:31
there's somebody in society who sees it as their job
何か論争があっても 合理的に行動しているなら
15:34
to affirmatively protect you
世の中にはあなたを守ることが自分の仕事だと
15:38
if you're acting reasonably.
思う人がいるはずです
15:40
That person doesn't exist today.
でも今日そんな人がいなくなりました
15:42
This is the hardest hurdle.
それが一番の障害です
15:45
It's actually not very hard. Ninety-eight percent of cases, this is a piece of cake.
実のところ大変な障害ではなく その 98% は実に簡単なことです
15:48
Maybe you've got a claim in small claims court
紛失してしまった100ドルのズボンのことで
15:51
for your lost pair of pants for $100,
少額訴訟で訴えられるかもしれません
15:53
but not in a court of general jurisdiction for millions of dollars.
しかし100万ドルを求める正式裁判ではありません
15:55
Case dismissed without prejudice or refiling in small claims court.
「本件申立てを却下する」 もしくは 「少額訴訟で争いなさい」
15:58
Takes five minutes. That's it,
5 分でかたがつきます それだけ
16:01
it's not that hard.
それほど大変なことでもありません
16:03
But it's a hard hurdle because we got into this legal quicksand
しかし大変な障壁となってしまうのは法が泥沼になっているからです
16:05
because we woke up in the 1960s
私たちは60年代に
16:09
to all these really bad values: racism,
人種差別や男女差別や公害などの
16:11
gender discrimination, pollution --
ひどい価値基準に立ち向かいました
16:13
they were bad values. And we wanted to create a legal system
こんな社会悪があったので 我々はそれ以上の害悪が生まれないような
16:15
where no one could have bad values anymore.
法体系を創ろうとしました
16:18
The problem is, we created a system
困ったことに できあがった制度は
16:22
where we eliminated the right to have good values.
優れた価値基準を持つことも許さないものでした
16:24
It doesn't mean that people in authority
私が言いたいのは 権力者が思うがままに振舞えるようにしようという
16:26
can do whatever they want.
意味ではありません
16:30
They're still bounded by legal goals and principles:
権力を持っている人達もまた一般原則と目標とに縛られています
16:32
The teacher is accountable to the principal,
先生たちは校長に説明責任を負います
16:35
the judge is accountable to an appellate court,
裁判官も上級審に説明責任を負います
16:38
the president is accountable to voters.
大統領は有権者に説明責任を負います
16:40
But the accountability's up the line
説明責任の元をたどれば
16:43
judging the decision against the effect on everybody,
全員に対する影響を判断するべきであり
16:45
not just on the disgruntled person.
単に不満を抱く人への説明ではありません
16:48
You can't run a society by the lowest common denominator.
共通項だけでは 社会は回りません
16:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:55
So, what's needed is a basic shift in philosophy.
そう 考え方の変化が必要とされています
17:02
We can pull the plug on a lot of this stuff if we shift our philosophy.
考え方を変えれば 多くの束縛から解放されます
17:04
We've been taught that authority is the enemy of freedom.
権限は自由の敵だと教えられてきましたが
17:07
It's not true. Authority, in fact,
それは正しくありません
17:10
is essential to freedom.
実際 権限は自由に欠かせないものです
17:12
Law is a human institution;
法は人が作った制度です
17:14
responsibility is a human institution.
責任も人が作った仕組みです
17:16
If teachers don't have authority to run the classroom,
先生がクラス運営の権限を持って
17:18
to maintain order, everybody's learning suffers.
秩序を維持しなければ皆の勉強が妨げられます
17:20
If the judge doesn't have the authority to toss out unreasonable claims,
不合理な訴えを排除しなければ
17:23
then all of us go through the day looking over our shoulders.
誰もがお互いを監視することになります
17:26
If the environmental agency can't decide
環境庁が送電線は環境にとって
17:28
that the power lines are good for the environment,
有益だと判断出来なければ
17:30
then there's no way to bring the power from the wind farms
風力発電所から都市まで
17:33
to the city.
電気を送電できません
17:35
A free society requires red lights and green lights,
自由な社会には赤信号と青信号とが必要です
17:37
otherwise it soon descends into gridlock.
さもなければ交通渋滞に陥ります
17:40
That's what's happened to America. Look around.
それがあなたの周りのアメリカに起きていることです
17:43
What the world needs now
今世界に求められていることは
17:46
is to restore the authority to make common choices.
普通の選択ができる権力の復活です
17:48
It's the only way to get our freedom back,
それこそ 自由を取り戻すための唯一の方法です
17:51
and it's the only way to release the energy and passion
現代の諸課題に取り組むために
17:55
needed so that we can meet the challenges
エネルギーと情熱を解き放つための
17:58
of our time. Thank you.
唯一の方法です
18:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:02
Translated by Natsuhiko Mizutani
Reviewed by Satoshi Tatsuhara

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Philip K. Howard - Legal activist
Philip K. Howard is the founder of Common Good, a drive to overhaul the US legal system. His new book is 'The Rule of Nobody.'

Why you should listen

We love to laugh at America’s warning-label culture (the bag of airline peanuts that says Caution: Contains Nuts). But more troubling are the everyday acts of silence and loss promoted by the fear of being sued. Your doctor might not speak to you frankly; your kids’ principal might not feel he has the right to remove bad teachers.

Attorney Philip K. Howard founded the nonpartisan group Common Good to combat this culture and reform several key areas of our legal system. Among Common Good’s suggestions: specialized health care courts, which would give lower but smarter awards, and a project with the NYC Board of Ed and the Teachers Union to overhaul the disciplinary system in New York public schools. His new book is The Rule of Nobody: Saving America from Dead Laws and Broken Government.

More profile about the speaker
Philip K. Howard | Speaker | TED.com