English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDMED 2009

David Agus: A new strategy in the war on cancer

デイビット・アガス: がんとの戦いへの新しい戦略

Filmed
Views 703,755

デイビット・アガスは従来のがん治療は個々の細胞を攻撃することに焦点をあてた視野の狭いアプローチだったと説明する。そして、今までになかった薬やコンピューター・モデリング、タンパク質の解析などを活用し分野を超えて体全体を分析し治療する新しいアプローチを提案する。

- Cancer Doctor
Although a highly-accomplished conventional doctor, David Agus has embraced the future of medicine and is constantly exploring ways that new technologies can help in the fight against cancer. Full bio

I'm a cancer doctor, and I walked out of my office
私はがんの専門医です オフィスを出て
00:15
and walked by the pharmacy in the hospital three or four years ago,
病院の中の薬局の横を抜けた時—3〜4年ほど前のことでした
00:18
and this was the cover of Fortune magazine
目に止まったフォーチュン誌のカバーです
[何故私たちはがんとの戦いに勝てないのか]
00:22
sitting in the window of the pharmacy.
薬局の窓からこれが見えたのです
[何故私たちはがんとの戦いに勝てないのか]
00:25
And so, as a cancer doctor, you look at this,
そして がんの専門医としてこれを見ると
[何故私たちはがんとの戦いに勝てないのか]
00:27
and you get a little bit downhearted.
少々落胆します
[何故私たちはがんとの戦いに勝てないのか]
00:29
But when you start to read the article by Cliff,
ですが自身もがんのサバイバーである
00:31
who himself is a cancer survivor,
クリフの記事を読むと
00:34
who was saved by a clinical trial
—彼も臨床試験により救われました
00:36
where his parents drove him from New York City to upstate New York
実験的治療のため彼の両親はニューヨーク市街から
00:38
to get an experimental therapy for --
近郊の街まで運転し
00:42
at the time -- Hodgkin's disease, which saved his life,
ホジキン病(悪性リンパ腫)の治療を受けさせたのです—
00:44
he makes remarkable points here.
その記事の中で優れた論点を示しています
00:47
And the point of the article was that we have gotten
それは「私たちは
00:50
reductionist in our view of biology,
生物学の見解やがんに関して
00:53
in our view of cancer.
還元主義に囚われてしまった」というものです
00:56
For the last 50 years, we have focused on treating
過去50年間 個々の遺伝子を取り扱うことで
00:58
the individual gene
がんを理解しようとして来ましたが
01:01
in understanding cancer, not in controlling cancer.
がんのコントロールには至りませんでした
01:03
So, this is an astounding table.
びっくり仰天するようなグラフです
[アメリカにおける死亡率推移、死因別]
01:06
And this is something that sobers us in our field everyday
これは医療の現場にいる私たちを毎日でも暗い気持ちにできます
01:09
in that, obviously, we've made remarkable impacts
明らかに私たちは
01:12
on cardiovascular disease,
心血管疾患治療において目覚ましい進歩を遂げました
01:14
but look at cancer. The death rate in cancer
しかし がんの死亡率は
01:16
in over 50 years hasn't changed.
50年前と変わっていません
01:19
We've made small wins in diseases like chronic myelogenous leukemia,
わずかに慢性骨髄白血病に関して
01:22
where we have a pill that can put 100 percent of people in remission,
100%の患者を寛解させる薬の開発により小さな勝利を得ました
01:26
but in general, we haven't made an impact at all in the war on cancer.
しかし 総合的に見てがんとの戦いには大した力を発揮できていないのです
01:29
So, what I'm going to tell you today,
そこで今日は皆さんに
01:35
is a little bit of why I think that's the case,
なぜ がんとの闘いに対してはこういう状態なのか、そして
01:38
and then go out of my comfort zone
自分のコンフォートゾーンから脱して
01:41
and tell you where I think it's going,
研究者達とがんとの闘いがどこへ向かっているのか
01:43
where a new approach -- that we hope to push forward
私たちが推し進めて行こうとしている
01:46
in terms of treating cancer.
新しいがん治療のアプローチについてお話したいと思います
01:49
Because this is wrong.
この状況は間違っているからです
01:53
So, what is cancer, first of all?
まず始めにがんとは何でしょうか?
01:56
Well, if one has a mass or an abnormal blood value, you go to a doctor,
しこりを見つけたり異常な血液検査結果のために医師を訪ねたとします
01:58
they stick a needle in.
医師はそこに針を差し込みます
02:03
They way we make the diagnosis today is by pattern recognition:
今日の診断方法はパターン認識で行われているのです
02:05
Does it look normal? Does it look abnormal?
これは正常に見えるかそれとも異常に見えるか?
02:09
So, that pathologist is just like looking at this plastic bottle.
病理学医はこのペットボトルを見ているようなものです
02:13
This is a normal cell. This is a cancer cell.
これは正常な細胞でこちらががん細胞です
02:16
That is the state-of-the-art today in diagnosing cancer.
これが今日のがん診断の最先端です
02:19
There's no molecular test,
分子テストも行わず
02:24
there's no sequencing of genes that was referred to yesterday,
遺伝子配列解析も行われず
02:27
there's no fancy looking at the chromosomes.
染色体の難しい分析も行われません
02:30
This is the state-of-the-art and how we do it.
これが今日最先端とされて用いられているやり方なのです
02:33
You know, I know very well, as a cancer doctor, I can't treat advanced cancer.
がん専門医としてよくわかっていることは進行したがんは治療できないということです
02:36
So, as an aside, I firmly believe in the field of trying to identify cancer early.
余談ですが 私は早期発見に関する分野には大きな期待を寄せています
02:42
It is the only way you can start to fight cancer, is by catching it early.
早期発見が勝算を得る唯一の方法です
02:49
We can prevent most cancers.
ほとんどのがんは予防することができます
02:54
You know, the previous talk alluded to preventing heart disease.
私の前の講演者は心臓病の予防についてお話しされましたが
02:57
We could do the same in cancer.
がんに対しても同じようなことができます
03:00
I co-founded a company called Navigenics,
私は「ナビジェニックス」という会社の共同創立者です
03:02
where, if you spit into a tube --
試験管にツバを吐き出し
03:04
and we can look look at 35 or 40 genetic markers for disease,
35から40の病気の遺伝子マーカーを調べ
03:06
all of which are delayable in many of the cancers --
それらのすべては多くのがんにおいて進行を遅らせることができるので
03:12
you start to identify what you could get,
どんな病気にかかる可能性があるのか確認した上で
03:14
and then we can start to work to prevent them.
それらの病気の予防を行うことができるのです
03:18
Because the problem is, when you have advanced cancer,
進行がんになってしまうと 統計の示すように
03:21
we can't do that much today about it, as the statistics allude to.
今日私達に出来る事が限られていることが問題なのです
03:24
So, the thing about cancer is that it's a disease of the aged.
がんは年配者がかかる病気です
03:28
Why is it a disease of the aged?
なぜ年配者がかかる病気なのでしょうか?
03:32
Because evolution doesn't care about us after we've had our children.
子孫を残した後は進化の仕組みが関係しないからです
03:34
See, evolution protected us during our childbearing years
子育ての年齢までは進化に守られてきました
03:39
and then, after age 35 or 40 or 45,
しかし 35歳から40歳そして45歳になると
03:42
it said "It doesn't matter anymore, because they've had their progeny."
もう関係ないということになります なぜならもう子孫を残しているからです
03:46
So if you look at cancers, it is very rare -- extremely rare --
と言うわけで 子供のがんの症例は極めて
03:50
to have cancer in a child, on the order of thousands of cases a year.
少ないのです それも一年に数千という数に留まるのです
03:55
As one gets older? Very, very common.
しかし 年を取るにつれて がんはとてもよくある症例となります
04:00
Why is it hard to treat?
なぜそんなに治療が難しいのでしょうか?
04:04
Because it's heterogeneous,
がんは異種遺伝子性で
04:06
and that's the perfect substrate for evolution within the cancer.
そのことはがんの中での進化を支持します
04:08
It starts to select out for those bad, aggressive cells,
悪性で侵攻性の細胞が選ばれて行きます
04:13
what we call clonal selection.
これはクローン選択と呼ばれます
04:17
But, if we start to understand
しかし 私たちががんは単なる分子の不具合から起こるのではなく
04:21
that cancer isn't just a molecular defect, it's something more,
それ以上の何かが原因となって起こると気づいた時
04:24
then we'll get to new ways of treating it, as I'll show you.
新しい治療法を発見することができるのです
04:29
So, one of the fundamental problems we have in cancer
がんに関する根本的な問題は
04:33
is that, right now, we describe it by a number of adjectives, symptoms:
私たちががんを形容詞 つまり症状のみの説明で片付けてしまっているということです
04:35
"I'm tired, I'm bloated, I have pain, etc."
『私は疲れた、むくんでいる、そして痛みに苦しんでいる』などです
04:39
You then have some anatomic descriptions,
そして 体の構造に関する説明を受けます
04:42
you get that CT scan: "There's a three centimeter mass in the liver."
CTスキャンを受けます 『肝臓に3センチの腫瘤がありますね』
04:44
You then have some body part descriptions:
それから身体の各部分の状況説明があるでしょう
04:48
"It's in the liver, in the breast, in the prostate."
『(腫瘍は)肝臓 乳房 そして 前立腺にあります』
04:51
And that's about it.
それだけです
04:53
So, our dictionary for describing cancer is very, very poor.
私たちががんを説明する辞書はとても とても貧弱です
04:56
It's basically symptoms.
がんは症状によって表現されます
05:00
It's manifestations of a disease.
ということは症状の発現によって表現されるのです
05:02
What's exciting is that over the last two or three years,
過去2〜3年の間に
05:05
the government has spent 400 million dollars,
米国政府は4億ドルを投じています
05:08
and they've allocated another billion dollars,
それ以外にも10億ドルの追加資金も
05:10
to what we call the Cancer Genome Atlas Project.
癌ゲノム・アトラス・プロジェクトに投じられました
05:13
So, it is the idea of sequencing all of the genes in the cancer,
がんの遺伝子をすべて読み取ろうという発想から起こった事業で
05:15
and giving us a new lexicon, a new dictionary to describe it.
がんを説明する上での新しい語彙、辞書を生み出そうというわけです
05:19
You know, in the mid-1850's in France,
1850年代の半ばフランスで
05:24
they started to describe cancer by body part.
がんを体の部位ごとに説明する習慣が始まりました
05:27
That hasn't changed in over 150 years.
それは150年たった今も何ら変わっていません
05:30
It is absolutely archaic that we call cancer
がんを体の部位ごとに説明するのは絶対的に「古い」のです
05:34
by prostate, by breast, by muscle.
前立腺 乳房 筋肉というように
05:38
It makes no sense, if you think about it.
考えてみれば これは無意味なことです
05:42
So, obviously, the technology is here today,
今日では 明らかにテクノロジーがあります
05:45
and, over the next several years, that will change.
そしてここ5〜6年すればそれも変わって来るでしょう
05:48
You will no longer go to a breast cancer clinic.
皆さんはもはや乳がんクリニックには行く必要がなくなります
05:51
You will go to a HER2 amplified clinic, or an EGFR activated clinic,
HER2 を増幅したり EGFR を活性化するために
クリニックに通うことでしょう
05:53
and they will go to some of the pathogenic lesions
そして個々のがんを引き起こした
05:58
that were involved in causing this individual cancer.
病原障害のいくつかに焦点をあてるようになります
06:00
So, hopefully, we will go from being the art of medicine
願わくば 私たちが技術の医療から
06:04
more to the science of medicine,
科学の医療へ変貌を遂げ
06:07
and be able to do what they do in infectious disease,
感染症の治療で行うように
06:09
which is look at that organism, that bacteria,
生体や細菌を見て
06:12
and then say, "This antibiotic makes sense,
抗生物質がその患者に
06:15
because you have a particular bacteria that will respond to it."
効くかどうかを判断できるように
科学的根拠から治療をできるようになることです
06:18
When one is exposed to H1N1, you take Tamiflu,
私たちはH1N1にさらされている時は
タミフル(抗インフルエンザ薬)を飲み
06:22
and you can remarkably decrease the severity of symptoms
症状を著しく緩和して
06:26
and prevent many of the manifestations of the disease.
色々な病気の発現を予防することができます
06:29
Why? Because we know what you have, and we know how to treat it --
なぜか?患者が何を患い どういう治療が効果的かを知っているからです
06:32
although we can't make vaccine in this country, but that's a different story.
この国ではワクチンを
開発することまではできませんが それはまた別の話です
06:37
The Cancer Genome Atlas is coming out now.
癌ゲノム・アトラス・プロジェクトは成果を挙げ始めています
06:41
The first cancer was done, which was brain cancer.
最初の症例は脳がんで
06:44
In the next month, the end of December, you'll see ovarian cancer,
来月の12月の終わりには卵巣がん
06:48
and then lung cancer will come several months after.
数月後には肺がんの解析が完了します
06:52
There's also a field of proteomics that I'll talk about in a few minutes,
プロテオミクスの分野もあります
06:56
which I think is going to be the next level
プロテオミクスがこれから病気を分類し理解していく上で
06:59
in terms of understanding and classifying disease.
私達を次の段階へリードしてくれる分野だと思います
07:02
But remember, I'm not pushing genomics,
しかし ゲノム学やプロテオミクスを追及して
07:06
proteomics, to be a reductionist.
要素だけを突き詰めるつもりはありません
07:08
I'm doing it so we can identify what we're up against.
これらの追求から何と闘えば良いかを明らかにしようとしているのです
07:11
And there's a very important distinction there that we'll get to.
その重要な違いに関しては後ほどお話しします
07:14
In health care today, we spend most of the dollars --
今日の医療で私たちは
07:18
in terms of treating disease --
患者の最後の2年間に
07:21
most of the dollars in the last two years of a person's life.
最も多くの資金を投じています
07:24
We spend very little, if any, dollars in terms of identifying what we're up against.
私たちがどのような病と
闘っているのかという事の解析には
07:28
If you could start to move that, to identify what you're up against,
ほとんど資金が投じられていません
07:33
you're going to do things a hell of a lot better.
もっと私たちがこの点に
07:37
If we could even take it one step further and prevent disease,
力を注ぐことが出来れば数段状況は改善されるはずです
07:40
we can take it enormously the other direction,
更に予防まで出来れば 状況を
劇的に変えることが出来るでしょう
07:44
and obviously, that's where we need to go, going forward.
私たちはがんとの戦いにおいて
前進して行かなければならないのですから
07:47
So, this is the website of the National Cancer Institute.
これは全米癌研究所(NCI)のサイトです
07:51
And I'm here to tell you, it's wrong.
ここで申し上げたいのはこれが間違っているということです
07:54
So, the website of the National Cancer Institute
癌研究所のサイトにがんは
07:57
says that cancer is a genetic disease.
遺伝性疾患であると書かれています
07:59
The website says, "If you look, there's an individual mutation,
ウェブサイトは最初の個別の変異から
08:03
and maybe a second, and maybe a third,
2度 3度と変異が重なり
08:07
and that is cancer."
がんが発現するとしています
08:09
But, as a cancer doc, this is what I see.
しかし がん専門医としての私の見解は
08:11
This isn't a genetic disease.
これは遺伝性疾患ではない
08:15
So, there you see, it's a liver with colon cancer in it,
結腸がんのある肝臓です
08:17
and you see into the microscope a lymph node
そして顕微鏡を覗くと
08:20
where cancer has invaded.
がんが侵したリンパ節が見える
08:22
You see a CT scan where cancer is in the liver.
CTスキャンでがんが肝臓にあることが確認できます
08:24
Cancer is an interaction of a cell
がんは増殖制御ができなくなった細胞と
08:28
that no longer is under growth control with the environment.
環境との相互作用により起こるのです
08:31
It's not in the abstract; it's the interaction with the environment.
抽象的な意味でなく 環境との相互作用によって起こる
08:36
It's what we call a system.
これが私たちがシステムと呼ぶ現象なのです
08:40
The goal of me as a cancer doctor is not to understand cancer.
私のがん専門医としての目標は
がんを理解することではありません
08:43
And I think that's been the fundamental problem over the last five decades,
私たちはがんを理解しようと努力して来ました
08:47
is that we have strived to understand cancer.
それがここ5年間の根本的な間違いなのです
08:50
The goal is to control cancer.
実は目標とすべきはコントロールすることなのです
08:53
And that is a very different optimization scheme,
それにより全く違う最適化戦略を
08:56
a very different strategy for all of us.
私たちそれぞれの為に立てられるのです
08:58
I got up at the American Association of Cancer Research,
2万人もが集まる大きながん研究の集会
09:01
one of the big cancer research meetings, with 20,000 people there,
米国癌研究学会(AACR)の会議で私は
09:03
and I said, "We've made a mistake.
「私たちは間違いを犯しました」と言いました
09:07
We've all made a mistake, myself included,
「要素だけを還元主義的に考え 視野を狭く持ったあまり
09:10
by focusing down, by being a reductionist.
私も含め皆 間違いを犯しました
09:13
We need to take a step back."
私たちは一歩 後ろに下がって考え直さなければならない」
09:15
And, believe it or not, there were hisses in the audience.
信じがたいですが ブーイングをする人もいました
09:17
People got upset, but this is the only way we're going to go forward.
皆 うろたえました でもこれは前進のため 避けられないのです
09:19
You know, I was very fortunate to meet Danny Hillis a few years ago.
数年ほど前 ダニー・ヒリスに会う機会に恵まれました
09:23
We were pushed together, and neither one of us really wanted to meet the other.
お互いせき立てられて引き合わされたので私は
09:27
I said, "Do I really want to meet a guy from Disney, who designed computers?"
「コンピューターをデザインしたディズニーの社員に
会ってどうするのだろうか?」
09:31
And he was saying: Does he really want to meet another doctor?
そして ダニーは「また別の医者に会ってどうするんだろう?」と思っていました
09:35
But people prevailed on us, and we got together,
私たちは周りの押しに負けて会うこととなりましたが
09:38
and it's been transformative in what I do, absolutely transformative.
それが全く仕事人生を変えるような出来事となりました
09:40
We have designed, and we have worked on the modeling --
私たちは複雑な仕組みとしての 体内のがんのモデルを
09:46
and much of these ideas came from Danny and from his team --
多くはダニーとそのチームの仲間の発想のお陰で
09:49
the modeling of cancer in the body as complex system.
デザインしました。
09:53
And I'll show you some data there
これからあるデータをお見せします
09:56
where I really think it can make a difference and a new way to approach it.
今までと違う結果の出せる新しいがんへのアプローチとは
09:58
The key is, when you look at these variables and you look at this data,
要するにこれらのデータを見る時に
10:02
you have to understand the data inputs.
その入力されたデータの詳細について理解することが必要だという事です
10:06
You know, if I measured your temperature over 30 days,
皆さんの体温を30日間測ったとします
10:10
and I asked, "What was the average temperature?"
体温の平均値はと問いかけ
10:14
and it came back at 98.7, I would say, "Great."
答えは約36.7度であれば素晴らしいと言います
10:16
But if during one of those days
しかし もし皆さんの体温がその内6時間の間
10:20
your temperature spiked to 102 for six hours,
約38.8度まで上がっていて
10:22
and you took Tylenol and got better, etc.,
解熱剤のおかげで熱が下がっていたとしたら
10:25
I would totally miss it.
私はその情報を全く見逃しているのです
10:27
So, one of the problems, the fundamental problems in medicine
ですから医療の根本的な問題は
10:29
is that you and I, and all of us,
私たちが主治医に診てもらうのは
10:32
we go to our doctor once a year.
1年に1度だけだということです
10:34
We have discrete data elements; we don't have a time function on them.
これで診る事ができるのは一時点でのデータのみで 時間による変化はわかりません
10:36
Earlier it was referred to this direct life device.
この装置を
10:40
You know, I've been using it for two and a half months.
2ヶ月半使っています
10:43
It's a staggering device, not because it tells me
これは驚異的な装置です
10:46
how many kilocalories I do every day,
毎日私が何キロカロリー消費したかがわかるからではなく
10:48
but because it looks, over 24 hours, what I've done in a day.
この装置は24時間私が何をしたかを把握できるからです
10:51
And I didn't realize that for three hours I'm sitting at my desk,
3時間私が机に座っている間中
10:55
and I'm not moving at all.
自分が全く動いていないことに気づきませんでした
10:58
And a lot of the functions in the data that we have as input systems here
入力されたインプットのデータだけでは
11:00
are really different than we understand them,
表層的な事だけしか読みとれず
11:05
because we're not measuring them dynamically.
その裏に隠された真相を理解するのは難しいのです
11:08
And so, if you think of cancer as a system,
がんをひとつのシステムとして考えた場合
11:10
there's an input and an output and a state in the middle.
インプットとアウトプットの間にある状態が存在します
11:15
So, the states, are equivalent classes of history,
この状態は病歴や患者自身であり
11:19
and the cancer patient, the input, is the environment,
環境や食生活 治療や遺伝的突然変異が
11:22
the diet, the treatment, the genetic mutations.
インプットとなり
11:25
The output are our symptoms:
症状がアウトプットとなります
11:29
Do we have pain? Is the cancer growing? Do we feel bloated, etc.?
痛みはあるか?がんは成長したか?膨張感はあるか?等
11:32
Most of that state is hidden.
状態のほとんどは明らかではありません
11:36
So what we do in our field is we change and input,
私たちの分野では積極的な化学療法を用いて
11:40
we give aggressive chemotherapy,
インプットを変えようとします
11:43
and we say, "Did that output get better? Did that pain improve, etc.?"
そしてアウトプットが改善されたか 痛みが改善したかと問います
11:45
And so, the problem is that it's not just one system,
難しいのは これが単一のシステムではなく
11:50
it's multiple systems on multiple scales.
スケールの異なる複数のシステムであることです
11:54
It's a system of systems.
複数のシステムからなるシステムです
11:57
And so, when you start to look at emergent systems,
癌新生の組織を
12:00
you can look at a neuron under a microscope.
顕微鏡で神経細胞を観察すると
12:02
A neuron under the microscope is very elegant
あちこちに突出した模様が
12:05
with little things sticking out and little things over here,
とてもみごとです
12:07
but when you start to put them together in a complex system,
しかしそれらを複雑なひとつのシステムとしてまとめると
12:10
and you start to see that it becomes a brain,
それらが脳となり
12:14
and that brain can create intelligence,
その脳が知能を形成し
12:16
what we're talking about in the body,
がんもそのような複雑なシステムのひとつとして
12:19
and cancer is starting to model it like a complex system.
体内で形成されていくことに気づきます
12:21
Well, the bad news is that these robust --
悪いニュースは これらの堅牢な
12:24
and robust is a key word --
ーそして堅牢ということがキーワードになりますー
12:27
emergent systems are very hard to understand in detail.
新たに生まれてくるシステムを詳しく理解するのは非常に難しいということです。
12:29
The good news is you can manipulate them.
一方で良いニュースはこれらのシステムに変化を加えることが出来る事です
12:33
You can try to control them
新生システムのすべての基本的な要素を理解しなくても
12:36
without that fundamental understanding of every component.
このシステムをコントロールしようとすることはできます
12:38
One of the most fundamental clinical trials in cancer
ニューイングランドジャーナルオブメディシン2月号に掲載された
12:41
came out in February in the New England Journal of Medicine,
最も重要ながんの臨床試験の一つで
12:44
where they took women who were pre-menopausal with breast cancer.
乳がんの中でも最悪のケースである
12:47
So, about the worst kind of breast cancer you can get.
閉経前の乳がん患者に
12:51
They had gotten their chemotherapy,
化学療法を受けさせた後
12:54
and then they randomized them,
患者達を無作為試験により
12:56
where half got placebo,
半数を偽薬のグループに
12:58
and half got a drug called Zoledronic acid that builds bone.
残りの半数に骨を形成するゾレドロン酸薬を投与しました
13:00
It's used to treat osteoporosis,
ゾレドロン酸は骨粗しょう症に使われる薬です
13:04
and they got that twice a year.
参加者はゾレドロン酸を年に2回投与されました
13:06
They looked and, in these 1,800 women,
これら1800人の女性らのデータから
13:08
given twice a year a drug that builds bone,
骨をつくる薬を年に2回投与するだけで
13:12
you reduce the recurrence of cancer by 35 percent.
がんそのものに触れることすらない薬により
13:15
Reduce occurrence of cancer by a drug
がんの再発率を35%も減少させることに
13:21
that doesn't even touch the cancer.
成功できたのです
13:23
So the notion, you change the soil, the seed doesn't grow as well.
例えれば土壌を変えてしまえば 種は実らないようなものです
13:25
You change that system,
だからシステムを変えれば
13:30
and you could have a marked effect on the cancer.
がんに対して著しい効果を発揮することができる
13:33
Nobody has ever shown -- and this will be shocking --
誰もが今まで気づかなかったのです ショッキングですが
13:35
nobody has ever shown that most chemotherapy
がんの細胞に実際に触れる
13:38
actually touches a cancer cell.
ほとんどの化学療法が
13:41
It's never been shown.
今まで一度も成し遂げれなかったことです
13:43
There's all these elegant work in the tissue culture dishes,
組織培養皿の上で行われる見事な技が
13:45
that if you give this cancer drug, you can do this effect to the cell,
このがんに薬を投与すれば細胞に効力を発揮することができる
13:48
but the doses in those dishes are nowhere near
培養皿の上の薬の量は
13:51
the doses that happen in the body.
人の体内に投与される量とは比べ物になりませんが
13:54
If I give a woman with breast cancer a drug called Taxol
乳がんを患う女性にタキソールという薬を投与すれば
13:58
every three weeks, which is the standard,
週に3回それが基準の量です
14:01
about 40 percent of women with metastatic cancer
40%の転移性がんを持つ女性が
14:03
have a great response to that drug.
素晴らしい反応を示します
14:05
And a response is 50 percent shrinkage.
その反応とは50%の収縮です
14:08
Well, remember that's not even an order of magnitude,
大きさの順序の問題ではありません
14:10
but that's a different story.
それはまた別問題です
14:12
They then recur, I give them that same drug every week.
がんは再発を重ね 毎週同じ薬を投与する
14:14
Another 30 percent will respond.
すると依然反応しなかった30%が反応する
14:18
They then recur, I give them that same drug
そしてまた再発し私は同じ薬を投与する
14:21
over 96 hours by continuous infusion,
96時間以上の静脈点滴を続けて
14:23
another 20 or 30 percent will respond.
残りの20%~30%の患者が反応します
14:26
So, you can't tell me it's working by the same mechanism in all three size.
異なる大きさのものは同じ仕組みでは
14:29
It's not. We have no idea the mechanism.
動いてはいないのです
14:33
So the idea that chemotherapy may just be disrupting
化学療法が
14:36
that complex system,
複雑なシステムを阻害するものという考え方で
14:39
just like building bone disrupted that system and reduced recurrence,
骨が形成されることによってシステムを妨害し再発を防いだように
14:42
chemotherapy may work by that same exact way.
化学療法も同じようにシステムの妨害によって効果を発揮するかもしれません
14:47
The wild thing about that trial also,
臨床試験のすごいところは
14:50
was that it reduced new primaries, so new cancers, by 30 percent also.
新しい主要ながんを30%も減少させたことです
14:53
So, the problem is, yours and mine, all of our systems are changing.
問題は あなたも私も 我々の身体のシステムは常に変化しているということです
15:02
They're dynamic.
これらは常に動的なのです
15:07
I mean, this is a scary slide, not to take an aside,
これは避けられない問題の恐ろしい一面です
15:09
but it looks at obesity in the world.
これは世界の肥満を現しています
15:12
And I'm sorry if you can't read the numbers, they're kind of small.
数字が見えにくくて恐縮です
15:14
But, if you start to look at it, that red, that dark color there,
赤などの濃い色で示されている国の
15:17
more than 75 percent of the population
人口の75%以上が
15:21
of those countries are obese.
肥満です
15:24
Look a decade ago, look two decades ago: markedly different.
10年前 20年前を見てみると著しい違いがあります
15:27
So, our systems today are dramatically different
私たちのシステムは劇的な変遷を遂げているのです
15:31
than our systems a decade or two ago.
状況は20年前と全く変わっている
15:34
So the diseases we have today,
今日私たちが向き合っている病気は
15:38
which reflect patterns in the system over the last several decades,
数十年前のシステムによるパターンが反映されていますが
15:41
are going to change dramatically over the next decade or so
これからの十年かそこらで
15:45
based on things like this.
劇的に変化するでしょう
15:49
So, this picture, although it is beautiful, is a 40-gigabyte picture
これは40ギガバイトにも関わらず美しい
15:52
of the whole proteome.
プロテオムの全体像を映した画像です
16:02
So this is a drop of blood that has gone through a superconducting magnet,
これは超伝導電磁石を潜り抜けた血のしずくです
16:04
and we're able to get resolution
この解像度で見れます
16:08
where we can start to see all of the proteins in the body.
体中のすべてのタンパク質を見ることができます
16:10
We can start to see that system.
このようなシステムが見れるのです
16:14
Each of the red dots are where a protein has actually been identified.
赤い点はそれぞれタンパク質です
16:16
The power of these magnets, the power of what we can do here,
電磁石の力はここまで可能にしたのです
16:20
is that we can see an individual neutron with this technology.
このテクノロジーで個々の中性子を見れるのです
16:22
So, again, this is stuff we're doing with Danny Hillis
これが「応用プロテオミクス」というグループで
16:27
and a group called Applied Proteomics,
私たちがダニー・ヒリスと行っていることです
16:30
where we can start to see individual neutron differences,
個々の中性子の違いを観察し
16:32
and we can start to look at that system like we never have before.
今まで見た事もないような角度からシステムを見る事ができます
16:36
So, instead of a reductionist view, we're taking a step back.
要素だけを考える代わりに
一歩立ち戻りました
16:40
So this is a woman, 46 years old,
46歳の女性です
16:44
who had recurrent lung cancer.
肺がんを再発しました
16:48
It was in her brain, in her lungs, in her liver.
脳 肺 肝臓に再発が見られました
16:51
She had gotten Carboplatin Taxol, Carboplatin Taxotere,
カルボプラチンタキソール
カルボプラチンタキソテール
16:55
Gemcitabine, Navelbine:
ゲムシタビン
ナベルビンが投与されました
16:59
Every drug we have she had gotten, and that disease continued to grow.
それでも病気は悪くなるばかりでした
17:01
She had three kids under the age of 12,
この患者には3人も12歳以下の子がいるのに
17:06
and this is her CT scan.
CTスキャンです
17:10
And so what this is, is we're taking a cross-section of her body here,
患者の体の断面です
17:12
and you can see in the middle there is her heart,
中央の部分が心臓です
17:15
and to the side of her heart on the left there is this large tumor
左側に見えるのが大きな腫瘍です
17:18
that will invade and will kill her, untreated, in a matter of weeks.
もし治療しなければ数週間でこの腫瘍が死に至らしめるでしょう
17:22
She goes on a pill a day that targets a pathway,
がんシグナル伝達経路に焦点を当てる薬が一日に一度投与されます
17:28
and again, I'm not sure if this pathway was in the system, in the cancer,
経路はシステムかがんの中にあったのか実は定かではありませんが
17:33
but it targeted a pathway, and a month later, pow, that cancer's gone.
伝達経路をターゲットに治療した結果
一ヶ月後には見事にがんは消えました
17:37
Six months later it's still gone.
6ヶ月経ってもがんは消え去ったままです
17:43
That cancer recurred, and she passed away three years later from lung cancer,
しかしそのがんは再発し
患者は3年後に肺がんで亡くなりました
17:46
but she got three years from a drug
しかし彼女は薬のお陰で3年延命できたのです
17:51
whose symptoms predominately were acne.
彼女の主な症状は痤瘡(にきびのような皮膚炎)
17:55
That's about it.
それくらいです
17:57
So, the problem is that the clinical trial was done,
問題は臨床試験が終わった時
17:59
and we were a part of it,
—私たちはその臨床試験に関わり—
18:03
and in the fundamental clinical trial --
この基本的で
18:05
the pivotal clinical trial we call the Phase Three,
重要な第三相臨床試験で
18:07
we refused to use a placebo.
偽薬の使用を拒否しました
18:09
Would you want your mother, your brother, your sister
あなたのお母さんや兄弟が
18:12
to get a placebo if they had advanced lung cancer and had weeks to live?
末期の肺がんで数週間の命だとしたら偽薬を使わせますか?
18:14
And the answer, obviously, is not.
答えは明らかにノーでしょう
18:18
So, it was done on this group of patients.
このグループには偽薬ではない薬を投与しました
18:20
Ten percent of people in the trial had this dramatic response that was shown here,
10%の患者がここで見られるような劇的な反応を示したのです
18:22
and the drug went to the FDA,
この薬は米国食品医薬品局(FDA)に送られました
18:28
and the FDA said, "Without a placebo,
FDAではどうやって偽薬無しの試験で
18:31
how do I know patients actually benefited from the drug?"
この薬によって良い結果が得られたと言えるのかと
18:33
So the morning the FDA was going to meet,
FDAの会議があった朝
18:38
this was the editorial in the Wall Street Journal.
これがウォールストリートジャーナルの社説に載りました
["FDAから患者へ案内:ドロップ・デッド"]
18:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
18:43
And so, what do you know, that drug was approved.
しかしながらこの薬は認可されたのです
18:45
The amazing thing is another company did the right scientific trial,
驚くべき事には 他の会社が正しい方法で 偽薬と薬とを
18:49
where they gave half placebo and half the drug.
それぞれ半数ずつの患者に投与し 臨床試験を行っていたためでした
18:53
And we learned something important there.
そこで重要なことがわかりました
18:56
What's interesting is they did it in South America and Canada,
この研究は偽薬の処方が
より倫理的とされる
18:58
where it's "more ethical to give placebos."
南米やカナダで行われました
19:01
They had to give it also in the U.S. to get approval,
薬の認可を受ける為 最終的には米国でも偽薬を使った試験が
19:04
so I think there were three U.S. patients
行われたので アメリカでも ニューヨーク州北部で少なくとも
19:06
in upstate New York who were part of the trial.
3人の患者が臨床試験に参加したはずです
19:08
But they did that, and what they found
その臨床試験により
19:10
is that 70 percent of the non-responders
薬に反応を見せなかった患者の70%が
19:12
lived much longer and did better than people who got placebo.
偽薬を受け取った患者より元気で長生きしました
19:15
So it challenged everything we knew in cancer,
これは私たちががんについて知っていたすべてに疑問を投げかけました
19:20
is that you don't need to get a response.
反応を得る必要はない
19:23
You don't need to shrink the disease.
がんを縮小させる必要はない
19:25
If we slow the disease, we may have more of a benefit
ただ進行を遅らせるだけで がんを縮小させるよりも
19:27
on patient survival, patient outcome, how they feel,
患者の生存率、アウトカム、精神状態などについてより多くの恩恵が
19:31
than if we shrink the disease.
得られるのかもしれないのです
19:35
The problem is that, if I'm this doc, and I get your CT scan today
問題は私が医師でCTスキャンを行い
19:37
and you've got a two centimeter mass in your liver,
患者の肝臓に2cmの腫瘍が確認されるとします
19:40
and you come back to me in three months and it's three centimeters,
3ヵ月後の検診でその腫瘤は3cmになっていた
19:43
did that drug help you or not?
果たして薬は効果があったのか?
19:46
How do I know?
何を基準に判断できるでしょう
19:48
Would it have been 10 centimeters, or am I giving you a drug
薬を投与しなければ10cmになっていたでしょうか それとも薬が
19:50
with no benefit and significant cost?
何の効果も無くコストだけがかかっていたとしたら?
19:54
So, it's a fundamental problem.
これは根本的な問題なのです
19:57
And, again, that's where these new technologies can come in.
ここで新しいテクノロジーが役に立ちます
19:59
And so, the goal obviously is that you go into your doctor's office --
目標は医師の診察を受けに行って
20:04
well, the ultimate goal is that you prevent disease, right?
究極の目標は
20:08
The ultimate goal is that you prevent any of these things from happening.
すべての病気を防ぐことですよね?
20:11
That is the most effective, cost-effective,
それが最も効果的でコストのかからない
20:15
best way we can do things today.
今日 最適の方法なのです。
20:18
But if one is unfortunate to get a disease,
しかし 不運にも病気にかかってしまったら
20:20
you'll go into your doctor's office, he or she will take a drop of blood,
検診で採血すれば
20:23
and we will start to know how to treat your disease.
その病気と闘う方法がわかるのです
20:26
The way we've approached it is the field of proteomics,
我々はプロテオミクスの分野に取り組み
20:31
again, this looking at the system.
システムを観察し
20:34
It's taking a big picture.
全体像を把握しようとしています
20:36
The problem with technologies like this is
このような技術につきものの問題は
20:38
that if one looks at proteins in the body,
体内のタンパク質を見た時に
20:41
there are 11 orders of magnitude difference
11段階にわたる差異があることです
20:43
between the high-abundant and the low-abundant proteins.
高濃度タンパク質と低濃度タンパク質の間には
20:46
So, there's no technology in the world that can span 11 orders of magnitude.
11段階の差異があり それを網羅する技術は未だありません
20:49
And so, a lot of what has been done with people like Danny Hillis and others
工学の原理を取り入れ ソフトウェアを取り入れ
20:54
is to try to bring in engineering principles, try to bring the software.
ダニー・ヒリスのような人々が多くを試みてきました
20:59
We can start to look at different components along this spectrum.
連続体の上にある色々な要素に目を向けられるようになりました
21:03
And so, earlier was talked about cross-discipline, about collaboration.
先程 分野を超えたコラボレーションの話題がありましたが
21:08
And I think one of the exciting things that is starting to happen now
今 始まっている事のひとつに
21:13
is that people from those fields are coming in.
様々な分野の人々が がんの研究に加わり始めています
21:16
Yesterday, the National Cancer Institute announced a new program
昨日 全米癌研究所が新しいプログラムを発表しました
21:19
called the Physical Sciences and Oncology,
物理科学と腫瘍学
21:22
where physicists, mathematicians, are brought in to think about cancer,
物理学者や数学者ががんの研究に加わり始めているのです
21:25
people who never approached it before.
今までがんの研究とは無関係だった研究者達です
21:29
Danny and I got 16 million dollars, they announced yesterday,
昨日発表されたのですが ダニーと私は1600万ドルを受け取り
21:32
to try to attach this problem.
この問題に取り組みます
21:35
A whole new approach, instead of giving high doses of chemotherapy
抗がん剤を大量に投与する代わりの全く新たなアプローチ
21:37
by different mechanisms,
違う仕組みに基づいた
21:41
to try to bring technology to get a picture of what's actually happening in the body.
体の中で何が起こっているかを画像で見るアプローチです
21:43
So, just for two seconds, how these technologies work --
ちょっとだけ これらの技術がどう機能するか
21:49
because I think it's important to understand it.
見て理解することは重要です
21:53
What happens is every protein in your body is charged,
体内のタンパク質が磁気を帯び
21:56
so the proteins are sprayed in, the magnet spins them around,
タンパク質が吹き付けられ 電磁器がそれらをかき回し
21:59
and then there's a detector at the end.
それらが取付けている
22:03
When it hit that detector is dependent on the mass and the charge.
質量と補充を調べる検出器にあたると
22:05
And so we can accurately -- if the magnet is big enough,
解像度がある程度のレベルであり
22:10
and your resolution is high enough --
磁石が十分な大きさであれば正確に
22:13
you can actually detect all of the proteins in the body
体内のタンパク質の全てを検出することができ
22:15
and start to get an understanding of the individual system.
個々のシステムを理解し始める事が出来ます
22:18
And so, as a cancer doctor,
がんの専門医としては
22:22
instead of having paper in my chart, in your chart, and it being this thick,
病歴を紙に書いてまとめたこんなにぶ厚いカルテではなく
22:24
this is what data flow is starting to look like in our offices,
これからの診察室のデータはこういった画像により支配されるでしょう
22:29
where that drop of blood is creating gigabytes of data.
血のしずくがギガバイトのデータをつくりだす
22:33
Electronic data elements are describing every aspect of the disease.
電子によるデータの要素が病気をすべての角度から捉える
22:36
And certainly the goal is we can start to learn from every encounter
もちろん目標は患者との出会いから学ぶことです
22:40
and actually move forward, instead of just having encounter and encounter,
そして前進することです 根本的な学習なしに
22:44
without fundamental learning.
患者との出会いばかりを重ねるのではなく
22:49
So, to conclude, we need to get away from reductionist thinking.
結論としては要素だけを還元主義的に考えることから
脱却するべきです
22:51
We need to start to think differently and radically.
革命的な考え方をし始めなければなりません
22:57
And so, I implore everyone here: Think differently. Come up with new ideas.
皆さんに新たな視点を持ち 新しいアイデアを生み出して頂きたいのです
23:01
Tell them to me or anyone else in our field,
そして私を含め この研究分野の人々にそれを伝えて欲しいのです
23:05
because over the last 59 years, nothing has changed.
ここ59年来 何も変わっていないからです
23:08
We need a radically different approach.
私たちには革命的に違ったアプローチが必要です
23:11
You know, Andy Grove stepped down as chairman of the board at Intel --
インテルの取締役会長であったアンディ・グローブがその座から降りる時
23:14
and Andy was one of my mentors, tough individual.
アンディは良き師であり タフな人でありました
23:17
When Andy stepped down, he said,
アンディが退官する時 こう言いました
23:20
"No technology will win. Technology itself will win."
「どのテクノロジーではなくテクノロジーそのものが勝つ」
23:22
And I'm a firm believer, in the field of medicine and especially cancer,
医療界 特にがんに携わる者の一人として私は確信しています
23:25
that it's going to be a broad platform of technologies
幅広いプラットフォームのテクノロジーが
23:29
that will help us move forward
私たちを前進させ
23:32
and hopefully help patients in the near-term.
患者を近い将来 救うことを期待しています
23:34
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
23:36
Translated by Rinko Kawakami
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

David Agus - Cancer Doctor
Although a highly-accomplished conventional doctor, David Agus has embraced the future of medicine and is constantly exploring ways that new technologies can help in the fight against cancer.

Why you should listen

David Agus is a medical doctor and a Professor of Medicine at the University of Southern California. However, he is also the founder of a couple of game-changing medical initiatives. In 2006, he co-founded Navigenics with Dietrich Stephan, Ph.D., to form a company that would provide people with their individual genetic information, allowing them to act on any predispositions to disease that they might have and prevent onset. He also founded Oncology.com which was the largest cancer Internet resource and community.

Dr. Agus’ research is focused on the application of proteomics and genomics in the study of cancer, as well as developing new therapeutic treatments for cancer. He serves as Director of the USC Center for Applied Molecular Medicine and the USC Westside Prostate Cancer Center. Agus is also the recipient of several honors and awards, including the American Cancer Society Physician Research Award, a Clinical Scholar Award from the Sloan-Kettering Institute and the International Myeloma Foundation Visionary Science Award.

More profile about the speaker
David Agus | Speaker | TED.com