10:50
TED2013

Jack Andraka: A promising test for pancreatic cancer ... from a teenager

ジャック・アンドレイカ: 有望な膵臓がん検査 ― なんとティーンエージャーが開発

Filmed:

85%以上もの膵臓がんが2%未満の生存率しかない手遅れの状態で発見されます。なぜこんなことになるのか? ジャック・アンドレイカが、膵臓がんの早期発見を可能にする有望な方法を開発した過程を語ります。超安価、効果的、かつ侵襲性の低い方法を、なんと16歳の誕生日を迎える前に作り出しました。

- Cancer detector inventor
A paper on carbon nanotubes, a biology lecture on antibodies and a flash of insight led 15-year-old Jack Andraka to design a cheaper, more sensitive cancer detector. Full bio

Have you ever experienced a moment in your life
みなさんはこんなことを
経験したことがありますか?
00:12
that was so painful and confusing
とにかく辛くて
混乱するような事に遭遇し
00:16
that all you wanted to do
起こったことを
できる限り調べて
00:19
was learn as much as you could to make sense of it all?
なんとしても理解するしかない
という気持ちになった経験はありますか?
00:21
When I was 13, a close family friend
13歳のとき
家族で親しくしてた
00:25
who was like an uncle to me
叔父さんのような人が
00:28
passed away from pancreatic cancer.
すい臓がんで
亡くなりました
00:30
When the disease hit so close to home,
本当に身近な人が
この疾患に襲われ
00:33
I knew I needed to learn more,
もっと知らなければと
感じたので
00:35
so I went online to find answers.
ネットに繋いで
答えを探しました
00:37
Using the Internet, I found a variety of statistics
インターネットを使って
すい臓がんの
00:40
on pancreatic cancer,
色んな統計を見つけました
00:43
and what I had found shocked me.
その統計は
衝撃的なものでした
00:45
Over 85 percent of all pancreatic cancers
すい臓がんの85%が
手遅れな段階でしか
00:47
are diagnosed late,
発見されず
00:51
when someone has less than a two percent chance of survival.
患者はたった2%以下の生存率しか
ないというのです
00:53
Why are we so bad at detecting pancreatic cancer?
なぜ すい臓がんを見つけるのが
こんなにヘタなのか?
00:57
The reason? Today's current modern medicine
理由?現在の現代医学が
使っている技術は
01:01
is a 60-year-old technique.
60年前のものを
使い続けているからです
01:05
That's older than my dad.
うちの父さんよりも年上です
01:07
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:09
But also, it's extremely expensive,
それだけでなくて
かなり高価です
01:13
costing 800 dollars per test,
判定毎に800ドルかかって
01:15
and it's grossly inaccurate,
その上 検査は
なはだしく不正確で
01:19
missing 30 percent of all pancreatic cancers.
すい臓がんの30%以上を
見落としてしまいます
01:21
Your doctor would have to be ridiculously suspicious
担当医が
検査の指示を出すには
01:25
that you have the cancer in order to give you this test.
バカバカしくなる程 患者を がんと
疑う必要があります
01:28
Learning this, I knew there had to be a better way.
これを知って もっと良い方法が
あるはずだという確信がありました
01:31
So I set up a scientific criteria
そして すい臓がんを
効果的に検出するために
01:35
as to what a sensor would have to look like
センサーが
満たすべきと考える
01:37
in order to effectively diagnose pancreatic cancer.
科学的な基準を
決めました
01:39
The sensor would have to be inexpensive, rapid,
センサーは
安く 速く
01:43
simple, sensitive, selective,
簡単で 高感度で
判定度が高く
01:47
and minimally invasive.
低侵襲でなければ
なりません
01:50
Now, there's a reason why this test
実は がん検査が
01:53
hasn't been updated in over six decades,
60年間も新しくならなかったのには
理由がありました
01:55
and that's because, when we're looking for pancreatic cancer,
それは すい臓がんを
検出しようとするときには
01:59
we're looking at your bloodstream,
体内を流れる血液を調べて
02:02
which is already abundant in all these tons and tons of protein,
既に山のようにある
豊富なタンパク質の中から
02:03
and you're looking for this miniscule difference
ごく少量に存在する
02:08
in this tiny amount of protein,
ある特定のタンパク質に発生する
02:10
just this one protein.
微妙な量の違いを探します
02:12
That's next to impossible.
ほとんど不可能なことです
02:13
However, undeterred due to my teenage optimism --
でも ティーンの楽観的な想いは
そんなことに屈しません
02:15
(Applause) —
(拍手)
02:19
I went online to a teenager's two best friends,
ティーンの「親友」の
Google とWikipedia を開けて
02:25
Google and Wikipedia.
調べ始めました
02:28
I got everything for my homework from those two sources.
宿題をするときは
この2つを使えば何でも分かります
02:30
And what I had found was an article
こんな記事を見つけました
02:34
that listed a database of over 8,000 different proteins
すい臓がんになると検出される
8,000種のタンパク質を
02:37
that are found when you have pancreatic cancer.
納めたデータベースがある
という記事でした
02:41
So I decided to go and make it my new mission
そして 新しいミッションができました
タンパク質データを全て調べて
02:43
to go through all these proteins and see which ones
この中のどれかが
すい臓がんを見つける
02:47
could serve as a biomarker for pancreatic cancer.
バイオマーカーとなるか
調べることにしました
02:50
And to make it a bit simpler for myself,
自分自身にとって
よりシンプルにする為に
02:52
I decided to map out a scientific criteria. And here it is.
科学的な基準を作ることにしました
こんな基準です
02:55
Essentially first, the protein would have to be found
何よりも第一に
そのタンパク質の血中レベルが
02:59
in all pancreatic cancers at high levels in the bloodstream
ごく初期の段階から
全てのすい臓がんの患者で高くなり
03:01
in the earliest stages, but also only in cancer.
がんである場合のみ
変化が見られるものでなければいけません
03:04
And so I'm just plugging and chugging through this gargantuan task,
僕は超膨大な作業を
どんどん淡々と進めて行き
03:09
and finally, on the 4,000th try,
4,000種を確認したところで
03:12
when I'm close to losing my sanity,
正気を失う寸前でしたが
03:15
I find the protein.
ついに タンパク質を
見つけました
03:17
And the name of the protein I'd located
やっと突き止めた
このタンパク質は
03:19
was called mesothelin,
メソテリンと呼ばれています
03:21
and it's just your ordinary, run-of-the-mill type protein,
どこにでもある ありふれた
タンパク質です
03:23
unless of course you have pancreatic,
すい臓 卵巣 肺のがん
03:26
ovarian or lung cancer,
でない場合はです
03:27
in which case it's found at these very high levels in your bloodstream.
がんになっている場合は
大幅に増加して発現します
03:29
But also the key is
これが重要な鍵となるのは
03:32
that it's found in the earliest stages of the disease,
疾患のごく初期に見つかることで
03:34
when someone has close to 100 percent chance
患者に100%に近い
生存率がある
03:37
of survival.
そんな時期です
03:39
So now that I'd found a reliable protein I could detect,
検出に使える信頼性の高い
タンパク質を見つけたので
03:40
I then shifted my focus to actually detecting that protein,
次は どうタンパク質を検出し
つまりはすい臓がんを
03:44
and, thus, pancreatic cancer.
見つけるのかということに
焦点を移しました
03:47
Now, my breakthrough came in a very unlikely place,
画期的な突破口は
予期しない所でやってきます
03:49
possibly the most unlikely place for innovation:
恐らく最も不釣り合いな所です
03:53
my high school biology class,
高校の生物の授業中
03:55
the absolute stifler of innovation.
イノベーションが
最高に抑制されている所
03:57
(Laughter) (Applause)
(笑)(拍手)
04:00
And I had snuck in this article on these things called
カーボンナノチューブの
この記事を
04:05
carbon nanotubes, and that's just a long, thin pipe of carbon
こっそり持ち込んでました
炭素で出来た長くて細い管です
04:08
that's an atom thick
原子1個分の厚さです
04:12
and one 50 thousandth the diameter of your hair.
みなさんの髪の毛の直径の
50,000分の1です
04:13
And despite their extremely small sizes,
極めて小さいものですが
04:16
they have these incredible properties.
非常に素晴らしい
特性があります
04:18
They're kind of like the superheroes of material science.
材料科学のスーパーヒーロー
みたいなものです
04:20
And while I was sneakily reading this article
生物の授業中に
僕がこっそりとこの記事を
04:22
under my desk in my biology class,
机の下で読んでいた一方で
04:25
we were supposed to be paying attention
きちんと聞くべき授業で
04:27
to these other kind of cool molecules called antibodies.
扱っていたのは 抗体という
別の 素晴らしい分子についてでした
04:28
And these are pretty cool because they only react
抗体がすごいのは
たった一つの
04:32
with one specific protein,
タンパク質にだけ
反応することです
04:34
but they're not nearly as interesting as carbon nanotubes.
でもナノチューブほどには
興味を引かれませんでした
04:36
And so then, I was sitting in class,
まぁだから ただ授業を
受けていたのですが
04:38
and suddenly it hit me:
突然
ひらめきました
04:42
I could combine what I was reading about,
この読んでいた
カーボンナノチューブと
04:44
carbon nanotubes,
授業で考えているべき抗体を
04:47
with what I was supposed to be thinking about, antibodies.
組み合わせられるかもしれないと
気付きました
04:48
Essentially, I could weave a bunch of these antibodies
本質的には 大量の抗体を
ナノチューブの網構造に
04:51
into a network of carbon nanotubes
編み込んで
04:54
such that you have a network
特定のタンパク質にだけ
04:56
that only reacts with one protein,
網構造が反応するようにした上で
04:58
but also, due to the properties of these nanotubes,
ナノチューブの特性を利用して
存在するタンパク質の量に応じて
05:00
it would change its electrical properties
電気特性が変化するように
05:03
based on the amount of protein present.
できそうだと
気が付きました
05:05
However, there's a catch.
ただし 問題がありました
05:08
These networks of carbon nanotubes are extremely flimsy,
ナノチューブの網構造は
極端にもろいのです
05:10
and since they're so delicate, they need to be supported.
網構造はとても壊れやすいので
維持する支えが必要でした
05:13
So that's why I chose to use paper.
この為 紙を使うことにしました
05:17
Making a cancer sensor out of paper
紙から がんの検査紙を作るのは
05:19
is about as simple as making chocolate chip cookies,
チョコクッキーを作るくらい
簡単にできます
05:21
which I love.
大好物ですが
05:23
You start with some water, pour in some nanotubes,
まず用意した水に
ナノチューブを加え
05:27
add antibodies, mix it up,
抗体も加えて
かき混ぜます
05:30
take some paper, dip it, dry it,
そこに紙を持ってきて
浸し 乾かしたら
05:33
and you can detect cancer.
これだけで
がんが検査できます
05:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:38
Then, suddenly, a thought occurred
そこで 急に気が付きました
05:45
that kind of put a blemish on my amazing plan here.
僕の素晴らしい研究計画に
ちょっとした影を落とすようなものです
05:48
I can't really do cancer research
がんの研究をするには
家のキッチンでは
05:53
on my kitchen countertop.
できないということです
05:54
My mom wouldn't really like that.
母にも不便かもしれません
05:56
So instead, I decided to go for a lab.
そこで その代わりに
研究所で研究しようと決めました
05:58
So I typed up a budget, a materials list,
そして 材料一覧
予算 研究予定表
06:01
a timeline, and a procedure,
研究手順を
書き上げました
06:03
and I emailed it to 200 different professors
そして それを
ジョンス・ホプキンス大学と
06:06
at Johns Hopkins University
国立衛生研究所の
06:08
and the National Institutes of Health,
200人の教授にメールしました
06:10
essentially anyone that had anything to do with pancreatic cancer.
基本的に すい臓がん関係の
研究者全員です
06:12
And I sat back waiting for these positive emails to be pouring in,
こんな了解のメールが
送られてくるのを待ってました
06:15
saying, "You're a genius!
「きみは天才だ!
06:18
You're going to save us all!"
これでみんなが救われる!」
06:19
And — (Laughter)
そして― (笑)
06:21
Then reality took hold,
でも 現実は甘くなくて
06:25
and over the course of a month,
1ヵ月ほどの間に
06:26
I got 199 rejections out of those 200 emails.
送った200件のメールに
199件の却下メールが届きました
06:29
One professor even went through my entire procedure,
ある教授は 研究手順の全てを
細かく確認して
06:33
painstakingly -- I'm not really sure where he got all this time --
― 一体どこにそんな時間が
あったのかと思いますが ―
06:36
and he went through and said why each and every step
手順の1つ1つ全て
こんな酷いものは無いという風に
06:39
was like the worst mistake I could ever make.
指摘してきたのです
06:43
Clearly, the professors did not have as high
僕の研究構想を
自分で思っていたほどには
06:46
of an opinion of my work as I did.
教授たちが高く評価していないのは
明らかでした
06:48
However, there was a silver lining.
でも 希望の兆しがありました
ある教授から
06:51
One professor said, "Maybe I might be able to help you, kid."
「私のところで キミのこと
手助けできるかもしれないよ」
06:54
So I went in that direction.
とのメールが届いたので
そっちへ向かいました
06:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:59
As you can never say no to a kid.
子供に だめと言うな!
というのに従うようでした
07:03
And so then, three months later,
それから 3ヵ月後
07:06
I finally nailed down a harsh deadline with this guy,
この人が絶対会える日を
やっと取りつけて
07:08
and I get into his lab,
彼の研究室へ行きました
07:11
I get all excited, and then I sit down,
僕は もの凄くウキウキして
イスに座り
07:12
I start opening my mouth and talking,
口火を切って
話し始めると
07:15
and five seconds later he calls in another Ph.D.
5秒もしないうちに
別の博士を呼びます
07:16
Ph.D.'s just flock into this little room,
こんな狭い研究室に
博士が何人も集まってきて
07:19
and they're just firing these questions at me,
僕を質問攻めにしました
07:23
and by the end, I kind of felt like I was in a clown car.
最後には すし詰めの満員電車
かのようでした
07:25
There were 20 Ph.D.'s plus me and the professor
20人の博士と
僕と教授が
07:28
crammed into this tiny office space
この小さな研究室に
詰め込まれ
07:29
with them firing these rapid-fire questions at me,
みんなで質問を
次から次へと投げかけて
07:32
trying to sink my procedure.
研究手順に
穴を開けようとします
07:35
How unlikely is that? I mean, pshhh.
こんなことってありますか?
どうとでもなれです
07:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:40
However, subjecting myself to that interrogation,
しかし この尋問に
さらされながらも
07:44
I answered all of their questions,
全ての質問に答えました
07:47
and I guessed on quite a few but I got them right,
かなりの数に勘で答えましたが
正答でした
07:48
and I finally landed the lab space I needed.
そうこうして ついに
研究場所を手に入れました
07:50
But it was shortly afterwards that I discovered
でも その後すぐに
気づくことになりました
07:55
my once brilliant procedure
一時は輝かしい手順と
思えた手順には
07:57
had something like a million holes in it,
おびただしい数の間違いが
ありました
07:59
and over the course of seven months,
7ヵ月以上の時間をかけて
08:01
I painstakingly filled each and every one of those holes.
1つ1つ丁寧に
全ての間違いを直していきました
08:03
The result? One small paper sensor
どうなったかって?
1つの小さな検査紙で
08:06
that costs three cents and takes five minutes to run.
費用は3セントで
5分でテストできるようになりました
08:09
This makes it 168 times faster,
この方法なら
168倍速く
08:12
over 26,000 times less expensive,
26,000分の1以下の費用で
08:16
and over 400 times more sensitive
400倍の感度で検査できます
08:19
than our current standard for pancreatic cancer detection.
現在の標準的な
検査方法と比べた場合です
08:21
(Applause)
(拍手)
08:24
One of the best parts of the sensor, though,
でも 最高なのは
この検査紙が
08:34
is that it has close to 100 percent accuracy,
100%に近い正確さで
検出できることと
08:36
and can detect the cancer in the earliest stages
患者が100%に近い
生存率がある
08:39
when someone has close to 100 percent chance of survival.
ごく初期のがんを
検出することができるところです
08:41
And so in the next two to five years,
ということは
今後2から5年以内には
08:45
this sensor could potentially lift for pancreatic cancer survival rates
この検査紙が
すい臓がんの生存率を
08:47
from a dismal 5.5 percent
悲惨な5.5%から
100%近くに
08:50
to close to 100 percent,
引き上げる可能性があり
08:52
and it would do similar for ovarian and lung cancer.
卵巣や肺のがんでも
同じように生存率を上げるでしょう
08:54
But it wouldn't stop there.
でも これで
終わりではありません
08:57
By switching out that antibody,
抗体の種類を変えることで
09:00
you can look at a different protein,
違うタンパク質を検出する様にすれば
09:01
thus, a different disease,
違う疾患を検出できます
09:03
potentially any disease in the entire world.
潜在的に 世界中のどんな疾患でも
検出出来るでしょう
09:05
So that ranges from heart disease
心臓疾患に始まり
09:08
to malaria, HIV, AIDS,
マラリヤ HIV AIDSまで
09:10
as well as other forms of cancer -- anything.
また 他の種類のがんだったり
何にでも使えます
09:13
And so hopefully one day
いつの日か
こうなればと願います
09:16
we can all have that one extra uncle,
以前は助からなかった
1人の叔父さんが助かり
09:18
that one mother, that one brother, sister,
母親が助かり
兄弟が姉妹が助かり
09:20
we can have that one more family member to love,
愛すべき家族の一員が
助かるよう願います
09:23
and that our hearts will be rid of that one disease burden
すい臓 卵巣 肺のがん
の疾患のことを考えて悩まされ
09:26
that comes from pancreatic, ovarian and lung cancer,
心配することがなくなるように
そしてどんな疾患にも
09:31
and potentially any disease,
苦しまなくても良くなるように
と願います
09:34
that through the Internet anything is possible.
インターネットを使えば
何だって可能です
09:36
Theories can be shared,
理論を人に伝え
共有しても良くて
09:39
and you don't have to be a professor
価値あるアイデアと
評価されるのに
09:40
with multiple degrees to have your ideas valued.
複数の学位を持った
教授である必要はありません
09:42
It's a neutral space,
中立的な場所で
09:45
where what you look like, age or gender,
見た目や年齢や
ジェンダーが何であれ
09:46
it doesn't matter.
影響はなく
09:49
It's just your ideas that count.
アイデアだけが重視されます
09:50
For me, it's all about looking at the Internet
僕の場合には
インターネットに対して
09:52
in an entirely new way
全く新しい見方を
したのが全てでした
09:55
to realize that there's so much more to it
ネットはもっと別の
使い方ができて
09:57
than just posting duck-face pictures of yourself online.
皆さんのふざけた顔の写真を
アップロードする以上に 使い方によっては
09:59
You could be changing the world.
世界を変えていけるかもしれないと
気付きました
10:04
So if a 15-year-old
もし すい臓が何かさえも
10:08
who didn't even know what a pancreas was
知らなかった15才の子が
10:10
could find a new way to detect pancreatic cancer,
新しいすい臓がんの
検査法を発見できたとしたら
10:13
just imagine what you could do.
皆さんなら何ができるか
想像してください
10:16
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
10:19
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:20
Translated by Akinori Oyama
Reviewed by Akiko Hicks

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jack Andraka - Cancer detector inventor
A paper on carbon nanotubes, a biology lecture on antibodies and a flash of insight led 15-year-old Jack Andraka to design a cheaper, more sensitive cancer detector.

Why you should listen

After Andraka’s proposal to build and test his idea for a pancreatic cancer detector was rejected from 199 labs, the teen landed at Johns Hopkins. There, he built his device using inexpensive strips of filter paper, carbon nanotubes and antibodies sensitive to mesothelin, a protein found in high levels in people with pancreatic cancer. When dipped in blood or urine, the mesothelin adheres to these antibodies and is detectable by predictable changes in the nanotubes’ electrical conductivity.

In preliminary tests, Andraka’s invention has shown 100 percent accuracy. It also finds cancers earlier than current methods, costs a mere 3 cents and earned the high schooler the 2012 Intel Science Fair grand prize.

More profile about the speaker
Jack Andraka | Speaker | TED.com