sponsored links
TED2014

Sarah Lewis: Embrace the near win

サラ・ルイス: 「あと一歩」を大事にしよう

March 20, 2014

美術史家のサラ・ルイスは、最初に就いた美術館での仕事中、ある芸術家の研究から重要なことに気づきました。それは、「すべての作品が完全な傑作というわけではない」ということです。彼女が私たちに問いかけるのは、私たちの人生における「ほぼ失敗」や「あと一歩」の役割です。成功や熟達の追求において私たちを突き動かしているのは、実はこの「あと一歩」なのでしょうか。

Sarah Lewis - Writer
Art historian and critic Sarah Lewis celebrates creativity and shows how it can lead us through fear and failure to ultimate success. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I feel so fortunate that my first job
私は とても運の良いことに
00:13
was working at the Museum of Modern Art
初めての仕事が
ニューヨーク近代美術館での
00:15
on a retrospective of painter Elizabeth Murray.
画家エリザベス・マーレイ回顧展でした
00:17
I learned so much from her.
マーレイから多くのことを学びました
00:21
After the curator Robert Storr
学芸員のロバート・ストアが
00:23
selected all the paintings
マーレイの生涯にわたる
00:25
from her lifetime body of work,
全作品の中から
展示作品を選んだ後
00:27
I loved looking at the paintings from the 1970s.
私は1970年代の作品に
釘付けになっていました
00:29
There were some motifs and elements
そのモチーフや要素のいくつかは
00:33
that would come up again later in her life.
彼女の人生において
後々また現れてくるものでした
00:36
I remember asking her
彼女に 当時の作品を
00:39
what she thought of those early works.
どう思うか 尋ねたのを覚えています
00:41
If you didn't know they were hers,
知らない人が見たら
00:43
you might not have been able to guess.
彼女のものとは
思えないような作品です
00:45
She told me that a few didn't quite meet
彼女は言いました
「自分の望む作品の基準に
00:47
her own mark for what she wanted them to be.
達していないものが2、3ある」
00:50
One of the works, in fact,
実際 そのうちの一作は
00:54
so didn't meet her mark,
彼女の基準をはるかに下回り
00:55
she had set it out in the trash in her studio,
アトリエのゴミ置き場に
出しておいたのですが
00:57
and her neighbor had taken it
作品に価値を認めた近所の人が
01:00
because she saw its value.
拾ったものでした
01:02
In that moment, my view of success
それを聞いた瞬間
私の成功や創造性についての
01:04
and creativity changed.
考え方が変わりました
01:07
I realized that success is a moment,
成功とはある瞬間のことですが
01:10
but what we're always celebrating
私たちが称賛するのは決まって
01:12
is creativity and mastery.
創造性と熟達なのだと気づきました
01:14
But this is the thing: What gets us to convert success
では成功を熟達へと変換するのに
01:18
into mastery?
必要なのは何でしょう
01:22
This is a question I've long asked myself.
これは私が長い間
自分に問いかけている疑問です
01:24
I think it comes when we start to value
それは私たちが
「あと一歩」という贈り物を
01:27
the gift of a near win.
尊重するところから
始まるのではないでしょうか
01:30
I started to understand this when I went
私がこれを理解し始めたのは
01:33
on one cold May day
ある5月の寒い日
アーチェリーの
01:35
to watch a set of varsity archers,
代表チームを見に行った時のことです
01:37
all women as fate would have it,
何の因果か 全員女子選手で
01:40
at the northern tip of Manhattan
場所はマンハッタンの最北端
01:42
at Columbia's Baker Athletics Complex.
コロンビア大学のベイカー競技場でした
01:44
I wanted to see what's called archer's paradox,
私が見たかったのは
射手のパラドックスと呼ばれる―
01:48
the idea that in order to actually hit your target,
実際に的に当てるためには
01:51
you have to aim at something slightly skew from it.
少し外して狙わなければならない
という矛盾した考えです
01:54
I stood and watched as the coach
コーチがシルバーのワゴン車に
01:59
drove up these women in this gray van,
乗せて来た選手たちが
落ち着きつつも
02:01
and they exited with this kind of relaxed focus.
集中した様子で出て行くのを
じっと見ていました
02:03
One held a half-eaten ice cream cone in one hand
ある選手は
片手に食べかけのアイスクリーム
02:06
and arrows in the left with yellow fletching.
左手には黄色い羽のついた
矢を持っていました
02:09
And they passed me and smiled,
選手たちは私の前を通る時は
にこやかで
02:12
but they sized me up as they
しかし私を品定めして
02:15
made their way to the turf,
射場へ向かいました
02:16
and spoke to each other not with words
選手同士は言葉ではなく
02:18
but with numbers, degrees, I thought,
角度らしき数字や姿勢を使って
02:20
positions for how they might plan
どうやって的中させるつもりか
話し合っていました
02:22
to hit their target.
どうやって的中させるつもりか
話し合っていました
02:24
I stood behind one archer as her coach
コーチが選手の様子を見ながら
02:26
stood in between us to maybe assess
誰に助けが必要か見極める中
02:29
who might need support, and watched her,
私はその後ろに立って
ある選手を見ていました
02:31
and I didn't understand how even one
私には10点を狙おうすること自体
02:33
was going to hit the ten ring.
理解ができませんでした
02:35
The ten ring from the standard 75-yard distance,
75ヤード(70m)離れて狙う
10点の得点帯は
02:38
it looks as small as a matchstick tip
腕をいっぱいに伸ばした先の
02:41
held out at arm's length.
マッチ棒の頭ほどの小ささです
02:44
And this is while holding 50 pounds of draw weight
さらにそれを
撃つごとに50ポンド(23kg)の
02:46
on each shot.
負荷がかかる弓を持って
狙うわけです
02:49
She first hit a seven, I remember, and then a nine,
彼女は最初に7点
続いて9点に的中しました
02:52
and then two tens,
そのあと10点を2つ
02:54
and then the next arrow
次の矢は
02:56
didn't even hit the target.
的から外れました
02:57
And I saw that gave her more tenacity,
外したことで さらに粘り強さを発揮し
02:59
and she went after it again and again.
彼女はその後
何度も行射を続けました
03:01
For three hours this went on.
そんなことが3時間も続きました
03:04
At the end of the practice, one of the archers
練習後 ある選手は
03:07
was so taxed that she lied out on the ground
疲れ切って地面に寝転がり
03:09
just star-fished,
大の字になって
03:12
her head looking up at the sky,
空を仰ぎ
T.S.エリオットなら
03:14
trying to find what T.S. Eliot might call
『回る世界の静止点』とでも
呼んだであろう―
03:16
that still point of the turning world.
何かを探していました
03:18
It's so rare in American culture,
使命に関わることが
03:22
there's so little that's vocational about it anymore,
ほぼなくなってしまった
現代のアメリカ文化において
03:24
to look at what doggedness looks like
これほどまでに厳格な根気強さを
03:27
with this level of exactitude,
目の当たりにすることは
大変まれです
03:30
what it means to align your body posture
3時間 矢を的中させるために
03:32
for three hours in order to hit a target,
姿勢を調整し
03:34
pursuing a kind of excellence in obscurity.
人知れず ある種の卓越性を
追い求めるのです
03:38
But I stayed because I realized I was witnessing
しかし私はじっとしていました
03:42
what's so rare to glimpse,
自分は今
めったにお目にかかれない―
03:44
that difference between success and mastery.
成功と熟達の違いを
目撃しているのだと思ったからです
03:46
So success is hitting that ten ring,
成功とは10点を取ることですが
03:50
but mastery is knowing that it means nothing
熟達とは
それが何度でも
03:53
if you can't do it again and again.
再現できなければ
無意味だと知ることです
03:55
Mastery is not just the same as excellence, though.
ただし熟達は卓越とも違います
03:59
It's not the same as success,
成功とも違います
04:02
which I see as an event,
そういう事象として目に見える
04:04
a moment in time,
ある瞬間のことや
04:06
and a label that the world confers upon you.
世界が与え給うラベルのことでは
ありません
04:08
Mastery is not a commitment to a goal
熟達とはゴールするためではなく
04:11
but to a constant pursuit.
追求を続けるために
身を削ることです
04:14
What gets us to do this,
そのために必要なのは
04:17
what get us to forward thrust more
もっと強く突き進むために必要なのは
04:19
is to value the near win.
「あと一歩」を尊重することです
04:22
How many times have we designated something
他の人が 古典だ 傑作だと
04:25
a classic, a masterpiece even,
決め付けてしまった作品で
04:28
while its creator considers it hopelessly unfinished,
作者は それを まったくの未完成
問題や欠点だらけ
04:30
riddled with difficulties and flaws,
言い換えれば「あと一歩」だと
04:34
in other words, a near win?
考えている なんて例は
いくらでもあります
04:36
Elizabeth Murray surprised me
私にとって
エリザベス・マーレイの
04:39
with her admission about her earlier paintings.
初期の作品についての告白は
意外でした
04:41
Painter Paul Cézanne so often
thought his works were incomplete
画家ポール・セザンヌは
自分の作品を不完全と考え
04:44
that he would deliberately leave them aside
いつかまた再開するつもりで
04:48
with the intention of picking them back up again,
意図的に作品を脇へ置くことが
よくありました
04:50
but at the end of his life,
その結果 生涯にわたり
04:52
the result was that he had only signed
彼がサインしたのは
04:54
10 percent of his paintings.
作品中のわずか1割でした
04:56
His favorite novel was "The [Unknown]
Masterpiece" by Honoré de Balzac,
彼はオノレ・ド・バルザックの小説
『知られざる傑作』が好きでしたが
04:59
and he felt the protagonist was the painter himself.
その主人公を自分自身のように
感じていました
05:03
Franz Kafka saw incompletion
フランツ・カフカは
05:09
when others would find only works to praise,
周りが作品を大絶賛する中
不完全に目を向けていました
05:11
so much so that he wanted all of his diaries,
だから自分が死んだら
05:14
manuscripts, letters and even sketches
日記や原稿
手紙やスケッチに至るまで
05:16
burned upon his death.
すべて燃やして欲しいと頼んでいました
05:19
His friend refused to honor the request,
友人はこの頼みを断りました
05:21
and because of that, we now have all the works
そのおかげで私たちは今日
05:24
we now do by Kafka:
カフカの全作品が手に入るのです
05:25
"America," "The Trial" and "The Castle,"
『アメリカ』『審判』
そして『城』に至っては
05:27
a work so incomplete it even stops mid-sentence.
未完も未完
文の途中で止まっています
05:30
The pursuit of mastery, in other words,
熟達の追求とは 言い換えれば
05:34
is an ever-onward almost.
限りなく前進を続ける「もう少し」です
05:37
"Lord, grant that I desire
「神よ私の望みが
自分の力の範囲を
05:41
more than I can accomplish,"
超えてしまうことを許したまえ」
05:43
Michelangelo implored,
ミケランジェロの懇願は
05:45
as if to that Old Testament God on the Sistine Chapel,
システィーナ礼拝堂の天井画の神に
向けられたかのようでした
05:47
and he himself was that Adam
指先を伸ばしても
神の手に届かない
05:50
with his finger outstretched
アダムのその姿は
05:52
and not quite touching that God's hand.
ミケランジェロ自身だったのでしょう
05:54
Mastery is in the reaching, not the arriving.
熟達は到達にあるのではなく
その手を伸ばすところにあります
05:58
It's in constantly wanting to close that gap
今の自分と
なりたい自分との間にある
06:03
between where you are and where you want to be.
差を縮めようと
求め続けるところにあるのです
06:06
Mastery is about sacrificing for your craft
熟達とはキャリアのためではなく
06:10
and not for the sake of crafting your career.
自分の技術のために
すべてを捧げることです
06:14
How many inventors and untold entrepreneurs
発明家や起業家には
この現象を体験している人が
06:18
live out this phenomenon?
何人もいます
06:21
We see it even in the life
不屈の北極探検家―
06:24
of the indomitable Arctic explorer Ben Saunders,
ベン・ソーンダースの人生にも
見受けられます
06:25
who tells me that his triumphs
彼は自分の功績を
06:28
are not merely the result
単なる偉業達成ではなく
06:30
of a grand achievement,
「あと一歩」の積み重ねが
06:32
but of the propulsion of a lineage of near wins.
背中を押した結果だと言います
06:33
We thrive when we stay at our own leading edge.
私たちは自分の限界と闘って
成長します
06:38
It's a wisdom understood by Duke Ellington,
デューク・エリントンには
それがわかっていました
06:42
who said that his favorite song out of his repertoire
彼のレパートリーのうち
お気に入りは
06:45
was always the next one,
常に次回作
06:48
always the one he had yet to compose.
常に これから作る曲だと言っていました
06:50
Part of the reason that the near win
「あと一歩」が
06:54
is inbuilt to mastery
熟達に組み込まれているのは
06:56
is because the greater our proficiency,
わかったつもりでいた事柄について
06:58
the more clearly we might see
全然わかっていないということが
07:00
that we don't know all that we thought we did.
上達に伴って歴然となってくるためです
07:02
It's called the Dunning–Kruger effect.
これはダニング=クルーガー効果と
呼ばれます
07:06
The Paris Review got it out of James Baldwin
パリス・レビュー誌の取材で
ジェイムズ・ボールドウィンは
07:08
when they asked him,
「知識とともに
07:11
"What do you think increases with knowledge?"
増えるものは何だと思うか」と問われ
07:12
and he said, "You learn how little you know."
こう答えました
「自分がいかに無知か 思い知ること」
07:15
Success motivates us, but a near win
成功は私たちをやる気にさせますが
07:20
can propel us in an ongoing quest.
「あと一歩」は果てしない追求への
原動力に なり得ます
07:22
One of the most vivid examples of this comes
その最も明らかな例の一つは
07:25
when we look at the difference
オリンピック後の
07:27
between Olympic silver medalists
銀メダリストと銅メダリストの
07:29
and bronze medalists after a competition.
違いに現れています
07:31
Thomas Gilovich and his team from Cornell
コーネル大学のトーマス・ギロビッチと
研究チームが
07:34
studied this difference and found
この違いを研究し
わかったのは
07:36
that the frustration silver medalists feel
銅メダリストが
07:38
compared to bronze, who are typically a bit
メダルの獲れない4位を免れて
07:41
more happy to have just not received fourth place
比較的満足することが多いのに対し
07:43
and not medaled at all,
銀メダリストは不満を感じ
07:45
gives silver medalists a focus
その不満があるからこそ
07:47
on follow-up competition.
次の大会を目標にするということです
07:49
We see it even in the gambling industry
ギャンブルの業界は
07:51
that once picked up on this phenomenon
この「あと一歩」の現象に気づき
07:54
of the near win
この「あと一歩」の現象に気づき
07:56
and created these scratch-off tickets
「あと一歩」の確率が普通より高い
07:57
that had a higher than average rate of near wins
インスタントくじを生み出しました
07:59
and so compelled people to buy more tickets
次々と買いたくなってしまうことから
08:03
that they were called heart-stoppers,
心臓に悪いくじと呼ばれ
08:06
and were set on a gambling industry set of abuses
1970年代
イギリスのギャンブル業界で
08:08
in Britain in the 1970s.
一連の不正を招きました
08:11
The reason the near win has a propulsion
「あと一歩」に駆り立てられる理由は
08:14
is because it changes our view of the landscape
それが私たちの物の見方を変え
08:16
and puts our goals, which we tend to put
普段なら遠くに置くようなゴールを
08:19
at a distance, into more proximate vicinity
今いるところの すぐ傍に
08:22
to where we stand.
持って来てしまうからです
08:24
If I ask you to envision what a
great day looks like next week,
もし皆さんに
来週中の最高の日を描いてもらったら
08:26
you might describe it in more general terms.
皆さんは大雑把に説明するでしょう
08:29
But if I ask you to describe a
great day at TED tomorrow,
でも もし明日のTEDで起きる
最高の日を説明してもらったら
08:33
you might describe it with granular, practical clarity.
詳細で現実的に
はっきりと説明するでしょう
08:37
And this is what a near win does.
これが「あと一歩」の仕業です
08:40
It gets us to focus on what, right now,
間近に迫っているという感じがあるから
08:42
we plan to do to address that mountain in our sights.
今こそ計画に本腰を入れよう
という気が起きるのです
08:44
It's Jackie Joyner-Kersee, who in 1984
ジャッキー・ジョイナー=カーシーは
1984年
08:49
missed taking the gold in the heptathlon
七種競技において3分の1秒差で
08:52
by one third of a second,
金メダルを逃しましたが
08:54
and her husband predicted that would give her
彼女の夫は このことが次の大会で
08:57
the tenacity she needed in follow-up competition.
彼女に必要な粘り強さをもたらすと
予言しました
08:59
In 1988, she won the gold in the heptathlon
1988年
彼女は七種競技で金メダルを獲り
09:02
and set a record of 7,291 points,
7291点という記録を樹立しました
09:06
a score that no athlete has come very close to since.
今日まで どの選手も
遠く及ばない得点です
09:10
We thrive not when we've done it all,
私たちが成長するのは
やり遂げた時ではなく
09:15
but when we still have more to do.
課題を残している時です
09:18
I stand here thinking and wondering
私はここに立ち 考えています
09:21
about all the different ways
「あと一歩」の生み出し方は
09:23
that we might even manufacture a near win
この会場の中だけでも
09:25
in this room,
様々あるでしょう
09:27
how your lives might play this out,
皆さんの人生にどう影響するのでしょう
09:29
because I think on some gut level we do know this.
というのも我々は
感覚的に知っていると思うのです
09:31
We know that we thrive when we stay
私たちは自分の限界と闘った時に
09:36
at our own leading edge,
成長することを知っています
09:37
and it's why the deliberate incomplete
だからこそ故意の未完成が
09:39
is inbuilt into creation myths.
創世神話に組み込まれているのです
09:41
In Navajo culture, some craftsmen and women
ナバホの文化では
職人や女性が
09:44
would deliberately put an imperfection
織物や陶磁器に
09:46
in textiles and ceramics.
わざと不完全を入れました
09:49
It's what's called a spirit line,
「魂の道」と呼ばれる―
09:50
a deliberate flaw in the pattern
既存の型に わざと入れた欠陥です
09:53
to give the weaver or maker a way out,
これは作り手に
逃げ道を与えると同時に
09:55
but also a reason to continue making work.
彼らが仕事を続ける理由にもなるのです
09:58
Masters are not experts because they take
達人は名人と違い
10:03
a subject to its conceptual end.
作品を概念の果てにまで導きます
10:05
They're masters because they realize
達人が達人である所以は
10:07
that there isn't one.
果てなどないと
知っているところにあります
10:09
Now it occurred to me, as I thought about this,
そう考えていたら
ふと理由がわかりました
10:12
why the archery coach
あのアーチェリーのコーチが
10:15
told me at the end of that practice,
練習後 選手に聞こえないように
10:17
out of earshot of his archers,
私に こう言った理由です
10:19
that he and his colleagues never feel
彼もコーチ仲間も
チームのために
10:21
they can do enough for their team,
十分できていると感じたことはない
10:23
never feel there are enough visualization techniques
可視化技術が十分だと
思ったこともなければ
10:25
and posture drills to help them overcome
選手に付いて回る「あと一歩」を
克服させるための
10:28
those constant near wins.
姿勢の訓練も十分でない
10:31
It didn't sound like a complaint, exactly,
不平を言っているわけではなく
10:33
but just a way to let me know,
ただ私にそっと伝えようと
10:36
a kind of tender admission,
告白しているようでした
10:38
to remind me that he knew
he was giving himself over
それで私は彼が
留まるところを知らず
10:40
to a voracious, unfinished path
常に上昇を求める でこぼこ道に
自分のすべてを
10:43
that always required more.
捧げる覚悟なのだと
改めて思いました
10:46
We build out of the unfinished idea,
私たちは過去の自分自身を含む
10:49
even if that idea is our former self.
荒削りの考えを基に成り立っています
10:52
This is the dynamic of mastery.
これこそが熟練の力です
10:57
Coming close to what you thought you wanted
求めていたはずのものに
近づくことで
11:00
can help you attain more than you ever dreamed
過去に夢見た以上のところへ
11:03
you could.
到達することがあるのです
11:05
It's what I have to imagine Elizabeth Murray
それこそが あのギャラリーで
初期の作品を見て
11:07
was thinking when I saw her smiling
微笑んでいたエリザベス・マーレイの
11:10
at those early paintings one day
思いだったのではないかと
11:12
in the galleries.
想像せずにはいられません
11:14
Even if we created utopias, I believe
仮に理想郷が出来上がったとしても
11:17
we would still have the incomplete.
そこには やはり不完全があるでしょう
11:20
Completion is a goal,
完成はゴールですが
11:23
but we hope it is never the end.
それでジ・エンドとは思いたくないのです
11:25
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
11:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:32
Translator:Emi Kamiya
Reviewer:Yumi Wagatsuma

sponsored links

Sarah Lewis - Writer
Art historian and critic Sarah Lewis celebrates creativity and shows how it can lead us through fear and failure to ultimate success.

Why you should listen

Curator and critic Sarah Lewis has emerged as a cultural powerhouse for her fresh perspectives on the dialogue between culture, history, and identity. In 2010, she co-curated the groundbreaking SITE Santa Fe biennial, a platform celebrating artists melding the “homespun and the high-tech.” She has served on Obama’s National Arts Policy Committee, and as a curatorial advisor for Brooklyn’s high-profile Barclays Center. 

Her debut book The Rise analyzes the idea of failure, focusing on case studies that reveal how setbacks can become a tool enabling us to master our destinies. As she says: "The creative process is actually how we fashion our lives and follow other pursuits. Failure is not something that might be helpful; it actually is the process." — Art21.org.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.