sponsored links
TED2006

Amy Smith: Simple designs to save a life

エイミー・スミス:生活を支える仕組み

February 24, 2006

発展途上国では、家庭内の調理で発生する煙により年間200万人もの子供が亡くなっている。MITのエンジニアであるエイミー・スミスは素晴らしくそして単純な、農業廃材を衛生的に燃焼する炭へと変えるという解決策を紹介する。

Amy Smith - inventor, engineer
Amy Smith designs cheap, practical fixes for tough problems in developing countries. Among her many accomplishments, the MIT engineer received a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2004 and was the first woman to win the Lemelson-MIT Prize for turning her ideas into inventions. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
"発明"ということで
特別な思い入れのある
00:25
In terms of invention,
00:26
I'd like to tell you the tale
of one of my favorite projects.
プロジェクトのお話を
させて頂きます
00:29
I think it's one of the most exciting
that I'm working on,
いま手掛けてる中では
最もワクワクするもので
とてもシンプルな内容ですが
00:32
but I think it's also the simplest.
世界中に計り知れない程の
影響をもたらすかもしれません
00:34
It's a project that has the potential
to make a huge impact around the world.
実は地上で最も大きな健康問題
のひとつについての取り組みです
00:39
It addresses one of the biggest
health issues on the planet,
5歳以下の子供達を
死に至らしめる1番の原因は
00:42
the number one cause of death
in children under five.
水を媒介とする病気でしょうか?
下痢や栄養失調でしょうか?
00:46
Which is ...?
00:48
Water-borne diseases?
Diarrhea? Malnutrition?
違います! 1番の原因は
室内での調理からでる煙による
00:51
No.
00:53
It's breathing the smoke
from indoor cooking fires --
急性呼吸器感染症です
みなさん、信じられますか?
00:57
acute respiratory infections
caused by this.
01:00
Can you believe that?
私は相当ショックを受け
愕然としました
01:02
I find this shocking
and somewhat appalling.
より害の少ない調理用燃料を
作り出せないものでしょうか?
01:05
Can't we make
cleaner burning cooking fuels?
より安全なストーブを
開発できないでしょうか?
01:08
Can't we make better stoves?
いったい何が毎年2百万人もの死を
引き起こすのでしょう?
01:10
How is it that this can lead
to over two million deaths every year?
ビル・ジョイが炭のナノチューブ
の不思議について
01:14
I know Bill Joy was talking to you
about the wonders of carbon nanotubes,
お話をされていましたね
そこで私は炭化した
大きなチューブについて
01:18
so I'm going to talk to you
about the wonders of carbon macro-tubes,
つまり 炭の不思議について
お話したいと思います
01:22
which is charcoal.
01:23
(Laughter)
これはハイチ共和国の田舎の写真
98%の森林が伐採されました
01:25
So this is a picture of rural Haiti.
01:27
Haiti is now 98 percent deforested.
実はこうした光景は
ハイチではよく目にします
01:31
You'll see scenes like this
all over the island.
森林伐採は多くの環境問題
を引き起こします
01:34
It leads to all sorts
of environmental problems
やがてハイチに住む全ての人々に
悪影響をもたらします
01:37
and problems that affect people
throughout the nation.
01:41
A couple years ago
there was severe flooding
数年前 何千人もの死者をだした
深刻な洪水がありました
01:43
that led to thousands of deaths --
土壌を守るための森林が
01:45
that's directly attributable to the fact
丘からなくなったことに起因します
01:47
that there are no trees on the hills
to stabilize the soil.
雨が降ると 雨水が川へ満ち溢れ
洪水を起こすのです
01:50
So the rains come --
01:51
they go down the rivers
and the flooding happens.
今日ここまで森林が減って
きた原因の1つに
01:54
Now one of the reasons
why there are so few trees is this:
人が"料理する"ことと関係があります
その為に
01:58
people need to cook,
01:59
and they harvest wood
and they make charcoal in order to do it.
人は木を切り 木炭を作ります
人々が決して環境問題に
無頓着だからではありません
02:03
It's not that people are ignorant
to the environmental damage.
むしろ 皆とてもよく理解しています
ただ他の選択肢がないのが現状です
02:06
They know perfectly well,
but they have no other choice.
ハイチでは化石燃料が
簡単に手に入りませんし
02:09
Fossil fuels are not available,
太陽熱では美味しく調理
することもできません
02:11
and solar energy doesn't cook the way
that they like their food prepared.
02:16
And so this is what they do.
だから こうした現状があります
ハイチではこのような家族に
出会うことは珍しくありません
02:18
You'll find families like this who go out
into the forest to find a tree,
彼らは木を追い求めて森へ向かい
木を切り倒し 木炭を作るのです
02:22
cut it down and make charcoal out of it.
言うまでもなく 調理用の
代替燃料を探すため
02:26
So not surprisingly,
02:28
there's a lot of effort that's been done
to look at alternative cooking fuels.
多くの努力がなされています
4年ほど前 ある学生チームを
引き連れて ハイチへ向かい
02:33
About four years ago, I took
a team of students down to Haiti
平和部隊のボランティア
と共に活動しました
02:36
and we worked with
Peace Corps volunteers there.
02:39
This is one such volunteer
その中に
こんなボランティアがいました
02:40
and this is a device that he had built
in the village where he worked.
これは彼がいた村で
彼が作った装置です
02:44
And the idea was
that you could take waste paper;
仕組みは 古紙を圧縮し
燃料として使用できる
塊を作ることですが
02:47
you could compress it
02:48
and make briquettes
that could be used for fuel.
困ったことに この装置は
とても動作が遅かったのです
02:51
But this device was very slow.
そこでエンジニアの生徒達が
02:53
So our engineering students
went to work on it
単純な改良に取りかかりました
02:56
and with some very simple changes,
02:58
they were able to triple
the throughput of this device.
すると実に3倍の速さになったのです
03:01
So you could imagine
they were very excited about it.
生徒達がとても喜んだことは
容易に想像できるでしょう
生徒達はその燃料を実験用に
MITに持ち帰りました
03:03
And they took the briquettes back to MIT
so that they could test them.
実験室で明らかになったことは
この塊は燃えませんでした
03:08
And one of the things
that they found was they didn't burn.
生徒達は少しショックを受けました
03:12
So it was a little
discouraging to the students.
03:15
(Laughter)
実際 その塊をよく見てみると
ここに見えると思いますが
03:17
And in fact, if you look closely,
03:19
right here you can see
it says, "US Peace Corps."
”アメリカ平和部隊”と書いてあるでしょ
実は この村には
古紙は存在しませんでした
03:23
As it turns out, there actually wasn't
any waste paper in this village.
このボランティアが村へ持ち帰った
アメリカ政府の書類(古紙)の
03:26
And while it was a good use
of government paperwork
03:30
for this volunteer to bring it
back with him to his village,
稀にみる"再利用"の良い事例ですが
(笑い)
なにせこのアメリカ政府の書類は
村から800キロも離れていました
03:33
it was 800 kilometers away.
従って なにか別の良い方法で
03:35
And so we thought perhaps
there might be a better way
03:38
to come up with
an alternative cooking fuel.
料理用の代替燃料を作り出す
必要性を感じました
私たちが実現したかった事は
03:41
What we wanted to do
is we wanted to make a fuel
03:43
that used something that was
readily available on the local level.
その地域で簡単に手に入る原料を
使った燃料の生成です
ハイチでも よくみかける
小規模の砂糖精製工場です
03:46
You see these all over Haiti as well.
03:48
They're small-scale sugar mills.
03:50
And the waste product from them
サトウキビから
ジュースを搾り取ったあとのカスは
“バガス”と呼ばれてます
03:51
after you extract the juice
from the sugarcane
03:54
is called "bagasse."
バガスは 他の何の役にも立ちません
栄養素も残っていませんので
03:55
It has no other use.
03:57
It has no nutritional value,
so they don't feed it to the animals.
家畜に与えることもできません
04:00
It just sits in a pile near the sugar mill
until eventually they burn it.
砂糖精製工場の横に 焼却時まで
ただただ山積みになっています
私たちがやりたかった事は
04:05
What we wanted to do was
we wanted to find a way
この資源ゴミを活かす方法をみつけ
04:07
to harness this waste resource
and turn it into a fuel
木炭のように人々が
簡単に調理できる燃料に
04:10
that would be something
that people could easily cook with,
まるで木炭のように
生まれ変えることでした
04:13
something like charcoal.
そこで数年 研究に没頭しました
04:16
So over the next couple of years,
04:17
students and I worked
to develop a process.
まずサトウキビの搾りカスを集め
04:21
So you start with the bagasse,
and then you take a very simple kiln
55ガロンのドラム缶で作った
シンプルな窯を使いました
04:25
that you can make out of
a waste fifty five-gallon oil drum.
しばらくして 窯に火を入れ
04:28
After some time, after setting it on fire,
04:30
you seal it to restrict the oxygen
that goes into the kiln,
窯の中に酸素が
入らないよう密閉します
すると炭化された物質ができます
04:34
and then you end up
with this carbonized material here.
しかし このままのでは
燃料として使えません
04:38
However, you can't burn this.
04:40
It's too fine and it burns too quickly
to be useful for cooking.
粒子が細かく一瞬で燃え尽きるので
調理には向いていませんでした
さらに実用化する為の研究を続け
04:44
So we had to try to find a way
to form it into useful briquettes.
好都合なことに学生達の中に
ひとりガーナ出身者がおり
04:49
And conveniently,
one of my students was from Ghana,
“ココンテ”と呼ばれる 彼の母親が
昔つくった料理を覚えていました
04:52
and he remembered a dish his mom
used to make for him called "kokonte,"
04:55
which is a very sticky porridge
made out of the cassava root.
とても粘り気のあるお粥のようで
キャッサバイモの根が原料でした
04:59
And so what we did was we looked,
私達はキャッサバイモの調査をかけ
05:01
and we found that cassava
is indeed grown in Haiti,
"マニオック"という別名でハイチでも栽培
されていることを突き止めました
05:04
under the name of "manioc."
実際 キャッサバイモは
世界中どこでも栽培されてました
05:06
In fact, it's grown all over the world --
ユッカ、タピオカ、マニオック、
キャッサバイモ すべて同じものです
05:08
yucca, tapioca, manioc, cassava,
it's all the same thing --
05:11
a very starchy root vegetable.
とてもでんぷん質な根菜です
それを使えば とても濃く
粘り気のあるお粥を作れますし
05:13
And you can make a very thick,
sticky porridge out of it,
このお粥を使えば 炭化したサトウキビの
カスをしっかり接着することもできます
05:16
which you can use to bind together
the charcoal briquettes.
それがまさしく私たちの"発明"です
そして直ぐにハイチへ飛び発ちました
05:20
So we did this. We went down to Haiti.
彼らが“エコール デ シェーボン”
05:24
These are the graduates
of the first Ecole de Charbon,
つまり 炭の学校の初めての卒業生
そして ー
05:26
or Charcoal Institute.
(笑い)
05:28
And these --
05:29
(Laughter)
ー そうです 私は MIT だけでなく
実は CIT でも教鞭を執っています
05:31
That's right. So I'm actually
an instructor at MIT as well as CIT.
そして これが私たちが作ったものです
05:37
And these are the briquettes that we made.
それでは 皆様を異なる大陸へ!
ここはインドです
05:40
Now I'm going to take you
to a different continent.
05:43
This is India
これはインドで一般的に使われてる
調理用燃料 牛の糞です
05:45
and this is the most commonly used
cooking fuel in India.
05:48
It's cow dung.
ハイチ以上に 本当に
けむたい煙をだすんです
05:49
And more than in Haiti,
this produces really smoky fires,
牛の糞やバイオマスを燃料
として調理をすることで
05:53
and this is where you see
the health impacts
05:56
of cooking with cow dung
and biomass as a fuel.
深刻な健康被害がでることに
ご理解いただけると思います
特に 子供や女性が
影響を受けやすいです
06:01
Kids and women
are especially affected by it,
06:03
because they're the ones
who are around the cooking fires.
なぜなら彼らこそ調理の
火の側にいるからです
私たちはインドでこの炭を作る
06:06
So we wanted to see
06:07
if we could introduce
this charcoal-making technology there.
技術を紹介できるか
確かめたかったんです
ところがインドにはサトウキビも
06:11
Well, unfortunately,
they didn't have sugarcane
キャッサバイモもありませんでした
しかし私たちも諦めませんでした
06:13
and they didn't have cassava,
06:15
but that didn't stop us.
すぐさまその地域で手に入る生物資源
(バイオマス)について調査しました
06:16
What we did was we found what were
the locally available sources of biomass.
インドには麦わらもありましたし
稲わらもみつかりました
06:20
And there was wheat straw
and there was rice straw in this area.
"つなぎ"として利用したものは
06:24
And what we could use as a binder
was actually small amounts of cow manure,
少量の牛の糞でした
もともと牛の糞自体
インドでは燃料代わりでしたね
06:27
which they used ordinarily for their fuel.
様々な比較テストを行い
06:31
And we did side-by-side tests,
06:33
and here you can see
the charcoal briquettes
炭の塊ができました
これは牛の糞です
06:36
and here the cow dung.
こちらの方がとても調理用燃料として
きれいなことがお分かり頂けるでしょう
06:37
And you can see that it's a lot cleaner
burning of a cooking fuel.
実際 お湯を沸かすのも早いんですよ
06:40
And in fact, it heats the water
a lot more quickly.
06:43
And so we were very happy, thus far.
ここまでは目論み通りでしたが
あとから判明したことで
06:45
But one of the things that we found
06:47
was when we did side-by-side
comparisons with wood charcoal,
木炭との比較テストを行うと
06:50
it didn't burn as long.
燃焼時間が短いことが分かりました
そして塊は少し脆く 調理中にも
06:51
And the briquettes crumbled a little bit
燃焼力が徐々に弱まること
も分かりました
06:53
and we lost energy as they fell apart
as they were cooking.
私達はハイチで作った
木炭にも負けない
06:57
So we wanted to try to find a way
to make a stronger briquette
07:00
so that we could compete with
wood charcoal in the markets in Haiti.
より競争力のある丈夫な燃料を
作る方法をみつけたかった
早速 MIT に戻りインストロン
実験機を使って
07:04
So we went back to MIT,
07:06
we took out the Instron machine
より良いパフォーマンスを出せる
燃料の塊を作るための
07:09
and we figured out
what sort of forces you needed
最適な圧縮率を
07:11
in order to compress
a briquette to the level
丹念に調べ上げました
07:13
that you actually are getting
improved performance out of it?
実験室では生徒が検証しつつ
それと平行作業で
07:17
And at the same time that we had
students in the lab looking at this,
ハイチでは地域パートナーが
プロセス改善に努め
07:20
we also had community partners in Haiti
working to develop the process,
インドでも横展開
できるようにしました
07:27
to improve it and make it more accessible
to people in the villages there.
その後
07:33
And after some time,
燃料をつくるための安価な
プレス機を開発しました
07:34
we developed a low-cost press
that allows you to produce charcoal,
完成した燃料は以前より長く燃え
木炭に比べ さらに衛生的でした
07:39
which actually now burns not only --
07:43
actually, it burns longer,
cleaner than wood charcoal.
ついにハイチの市場で
売買できる燃料よりも
07:46
So now we're in a situation
where we have a product,
07:49
which is actually better than what
you can buy in Haiti in the marketplace,
高性能燃料を作り上げる
ことに成功しました
実に素晴らしい成果でしょう?
07:53
which is a very wonderful place to be.
残念ながら ハイチだけでも毎年3000万
もの木々が自然破壊されています
07:58
In Haiti alone, about 30 million trees
are cut down every year.
08:03
There's a possibility
of this being implemented
もし このプロジェクトが実施されれば
木々の大部分を救える可能性があります
08:05
and saving a good portion of those.
さらに燃料から得られる収益は
2億6千万ドルにものぼります
08:08
In addition, the revenue generated
from that charcoal is 260 million dollars.
ハイチにとっては大きな額です ー
08:14
That's an awful lot
for a country like Haiti --
人口わずか8百万人
08:17
with a population of eight million
平均収入400ドル以下の国にとっては
08:18
and an average income
of less than 400 dollars.
ハイチにつぎ インドでも炭燃料
プロジェクトを推進できました
08:23
So this is where we're also moving ahead
with our charcoal project.
08:27
And one of the things
that I think is also interesting,
興味深いことに
カリフォルニア大学バークリー校に
リスク分析が専門の友人がいまして
08:29
is I have a friend up at UC Berkeley
who's been doing risk analysis.
08:34
And he's looked at the problem
of the health impacts
彼は 木そのものと
炭を燃やすことの
08:37
of burning wood versus charcoal.
健康被害を研究調査しました
08:39
And he's found that worldwide,
you could prevent a million deaths
彼の分析結果によれば
世界中の調理燃料を木から炭に
変えることで100万人もの死を
08:43
switching from wood
to charcoal as a cooking fuel.
防げることを発見しました
実に素晴らし発見ですね!
08:46
That's remarkable,
今までは木を切り倒すしか
方法はありませんでした
08:47
but up until now, there weren't ways
to do it without cutting down trees.
しかし今の我々なら
08:51
But now we have a way
08:52
that's using an agricultural
waste material to create a cooking fuel.
農業廃材を用い 調理用燃料を
作る手段があります
08:56
One of the really exciting things, though,
とてもワクワクすることに
先月ガーナへ旅行した時
のエピソードなんですが
08:58
is something that came out of the trip
that I took to Ghana just last month.
とても凄いことなんですよ!
09:02
And I think it's the coolest thing,
炭燃料プロジェクトよりもっと
原始的な技術で実現してました
09:05
and it's even lower tech
than what you just saw,
想像できますか?
それがこれです
09:07
if you can imagine such a thing.
09:09
Here it is.
いったい何でしょうか?
トウモロコシの穂軸を炭化したものです
09:11
So what is this?
09:12
This is corncobs turned into charcoal.
さらに素晴らしいことに
塊にしなくても扱える手軽さ ー
09:15
And the beauty of this is
that you don't need to form briquettes --
原材料のままの形なんです
これは私のノートパソコンですが
09:18
it comes ready made.
09:20
This is my $100 laptop, right here.
ニックのようにサンプル
を持って参りました
09:22
And actually, like Nick,
I brought samples.
(笑い)
09:26
(Laughter)
09:28
So we can pass these around.
会場の皆さんで回して見てください
機能的で 実地テスト済み
いつでも出荷できます
09:32
They're fully functional,
field-tested, ready to roll out.
09:36
(Laughter)
この技術の素晴らしいところは
09:40
And I think one of the things
09:41
which is also remarkable
about this technology,
簡単に技術移転できる点です
09:45
is that the technology
transfer is so easy.
サトウキビの炭化物の場合
09:48
Compared to the sugarcane charcoal,
燃料を塊にする為の
技術者育成が必須ですし
09:50
where we have to teach people
how to form it into briquettes
接着剤を作るのに多くの
手間を必要としますが
09:53
and you have the extra step
of cooking the binder,
これは始めから塊なんです
09:56
this comes pre-briquetted.
だから 今 私の人生の中で一番
エキサイティングなことなんです
09:57
And this is about the most exciting
thing in my life right now,
私の人生で"一番"というと少し
寂しいコメントに聞こえますが
10:00
which is perhaps
a sad commentary on my life.
(笑い)
10:03
(Laughter)
でも 一度 手に取ってみると
最前列の皆さんのように
10:06
But once you see it,
like you guys in the front row --
そうです すごいですよね
とにかく ー
10:08
All right, yeah, OK.
10:09
So anyway --
(笑い)
10:11
(Laughter)
ー これはロバート・ライトが言ってた
10:13
Here it is.
10:14
And this is, I think, a perfect example
ゼロサムゲームではない
完璧な例だと思います
10:16
of what Robert Wright was talking about
in those non-zero-sum things.
健康面での利益に加え
10:22
So not only do you have health benefits,
環境面の利益もあります
10:24
you have environmental benefits.
さらにとても信じ難い事に
10:26
But this is one
of the incredibly rare situations
経済的な利益まであるのです
10:30
where you also have economic benefits.
我々は廃材から調理用燃料を作れます
10:33
People can make their own cooking fuel
from waste products.
10:36
They can generate income from this.
そして収入を得ることができます
10:38
They can save the money
that they were going to spend on charcoal
今まで炭に使っていたはずの
お金を貯金に回すことができ
10:41
and they can produce excess
and sell it in the market
余分にできた炭は
市場を通じて
炭を作れない人たちに
商売ができます
10:43
to people who aren't making their own.
健康と経済 そして
環境と経済において
10:45
It's really rare
that you don't have trade-offs
トレードオフのない関係
はとても稀です
10:48
between health and economics,
or environment and economics.
10:51
So this is a project
that I just find extremely exciting
従って このプロジェクトは
とてもワクワクするだけでなく
このプロジェクトを通して どこまで
発展できるかがとても楽しみなのです
10:55
and I'm really looking forward
to see where it takes us.
さて これから作り上げようとする
未来像を思い描くとき
11:02
So when we talk about, now,
the future we will create,
必要なことは
11:06
one of the things
that I think is necessary
11:08
is to have a very clear vision
of the world that we live in.
今の私達の置かれている状況を十分に
認識することから始まります
ただ"我々"が今置かれている状況
という意味ではなく
11:12
And now, I don't actually mean
the world that we live in.
11:16
I mean the world where women
spend two to three hours everyday
世界のどこかで 女性が家族を養う為
穀物を製粉するのに
毎日2-3時間を使う状況がある
ということを認識すること
11:20
grinding grain for their families to eat.
世界のどこかでは
先進的な建築材というのは
11:24
I mean the world
where advanced building materials
手作りセメントでできた天井用タイル
を意味することを認識すること
11:26
means cement roofing tiles
that are made by hand,
そして世界のどこかでは
毎日10時間労働をしても
11:30
and where, when you work 10 hours a day,
11:32
you're still only earning
60 dollars in a month.
たった月60ドルしか稼げない
現実があることを認識することです
つまり 水を汲むのに女性や子供が
年間400億時間使っている現実があります
11:36
I mean the world
11:38
where women and children spend
40 billion hours a year fetching water.
言い換えると カリフォルニア州
に住むすべての就労者が
11:45
That's as if the entire workforce
of the state of California
一年間水汲みしかしないのに
等しい時間です
11:48
worked full time for a year
doing nothing but fetching water.
もし この会場がインドだとしたら
11:53
It's a place where,
for example, if this were India,
3人しか車を持てない状況であり
11:57
in this room, only three of us
would have a car.
この会場がアフガニスタンだとしたら
12:00
If this were Afghanistan,
一人しかインターネットの使い方
を知らない世界であり
12:02
only one person in this room
would know how the use the Internet.
この会場がザンビアだとすれば
300人が農家で
12:05
If this were Zambia --
12:08
300 of you would be farmers,
100人がエイズ感染者です
12:10
100 of you would have AIDS or HIV.
そしてこの会場の半分以上の方が
1日1ドル以下で生活しています
12:13
And more than half of you would be living
on less than a dollar a day.
こうした本質的な問題こそ
"解決策"が必要なんです
12:18
These are the issues that we
need to come up with solutions for.
こうした問題に気づき
目を向けられるよう エンジニアや
12:23
These are the issues that
we need to be training our engineers,
12:27
our designers, our business people,
our entrepreneurs to be facing.
デザイナー ビジネスマン 起業家達
を教育する必要があります
まさに私たちが見つけなければ
いけない解決策です
12:31
These are the solutions
that we need to find.
個人的に 特筆すべき分野と
して考えているのは
12:34
I have a few areas that I believe
are especially important that we address.
ひとつがマイクロファイナンスと
小規模事業の促進のための技術革新
12:40
One of them is creating technologies
12:42
to promote micro-finance
and micro-enterprise,
そうすることで貧困層の人々が
今ある困難な状況から
12:45
so that people who are living
below the poverty line
12:48
can find a way to move out --
抜け出すことができる筈ですが
現実はできていません
12:50
and that they're not doing it
彼らはこれまで通りの伝統的な籠編みや
養鶏などに従事したままです
12:51
using the same traditional
basket making, poultry rearing, etc.
12:55
But there are new technologies
and new products
しかし今や小規模で始められる
12:57
that they can make on a small scale.
新しい技術と商品があります
13:00
The next thing I believe
私達の次の目標は
貧しい農家のために農作物に
13:01
is that we need to create
technologies for poor farmers
付加価値をつける技術を
作り出すことです
13:05
to add value to their own crops.
我々自身 基本に立ち返り
戦略の見直しをすべきです
13:09
And we need to rethink
our development strategies,
農家に高等教育を与えることで
13:11
so that we're not promoting
educational campaigns
13:15
to get them to stop being farmers,
農家以外の職業に就いてもらう
ことを目指すのではなく
13:17
but rather to stop being poor farmers.
貧しいままの農家にならないように
武装すべきです
13:20
And we need to think
about how we can do that effectively.
これを効率的に展開できる方法
を編み出すべきです
こうした貧しい地域で暮らす人々に対し
13:24
We need to work with the people
in these communities
適切な資源と道具を提供し
彼ら自身のチカラで
13:26
and give them the resources
and the tools that they need
問題解決しなければなりません
それが最良の解決策なのです
13:29
to solve their own problems.
13:31
That's the best way to do it.
私達が外部から支援することで
彼らの問題解決をしてはなりません
13:32
We shouldn't be doing it from outside.
このような未来像をつくるべく
いま共に動かなければいけません
13:35
So we need to create this future,
and we need to start doing it now.
ご清聴 ありがとうございました
13:39
Thank you.
13:40
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:46
Chris Anderson: Thank you, incredible.
13:48
Stay here.
クリス・アンダーソン:えーと他に、他に誰か質問がある方がいないか確認する間に、
13:50
Tell us -- just while we see
if someone has a question --
従事された他のプロジェクトに関してもお話を伺えますか?
13:53
just tell us about one of the other things
that you've worked on.
エイミー・スミス:他のプロジェクトといえば、
13:57
Amy Smith: Some of the other
things we're working on
低コストでの水質検査の調査方法の開発です。
13:59
are ways to do low-cost
water quality testing,
そうすることで、ある社会の人々が自分自身でシステムを管理できるようになり、
14:01
so that communities can maintain
their own water systems,
いつそれらが起動しているかやどのように処理されるかも知ることができます。
14:04
know when they're working,
know when they treat them, etc.
14:07
We're also looking at low-cost
water-treatment systems.
私たちは低コストでの水質管理システムも調査しています。
1つの本当に注目すべき点は太陽による水の殺菌です。
14:10
One of the really exciting things
is looking at solar water disinfection
そしてその殺菌力の改善です。
14:13
and improving the ability
to be able to do that.
CA:規模を拡大するうえでの問題点はありますか?
14:16
CA: What's the bottleneck
preventing this stuff getting from scale?
企業家や投資家を見つける必要がありますか?
14:20
Do you need to find entrepreneurs,
or venture capitalists,
また規模を拡大する上で何が必要でしょうか?
14:24
or what do you need to take
what you've got and get it to scale?
AS:そうですね、多くの人がプロジェクトの前進に力を注いでいます。
14:28
AS: I think it's large numbers
of people moving it forward.
規模の拡大は困難なものです。
14:31
It's a difficult thing --
14:32
it's a marketplace
which is very fragmented
求めている人々は収入もなく分断化された人々です。
14:34
and a consumer population with no income.
ですので物事を進めるためにアメリカ方式では
14:37
So you can't use the same models
that you use in the United States
通じません。
14:40
for making things move forward.
14:42
And we're a pretty small staff,
またスタッフがとてもすくないんです。実は私だけなんです。
14:44
which is me.
14:45
(Laughter)
(笑い)
ですので、私ができることとして、学生への働きかけをおこなっています。
14:47
So, you know,
I do what I can with the students.
年間30人もの学生が現地へ行き、
14:49
We have 30 students a year
go out into the field
実行し前へ進もうとしています。
14:51
and try to implement this
and move it forward.
長期的な面でも行動をしております。
14:54
The other thing is you have to do things
with a long time frame,
2,3年で解決するとはおもっていません。
14:57
as, you know, you can't expect to get
something done in a year or two years;
5年先、10年先をみていなければなりません。
15:01
you have to be looking
five or 10 years ahead.
このようなビジョンがあれば、前へ進んでいけると考えております。
15:03
But I think with the vision to do that,
we can move forward.
Translator:Akira Miyamura
Reviewer:Masaki Uchihashi

sponsored links

Amy Smith - inventor, engineer
Amy Smith designs cheap, practical fixes for tough problems in developing countries. Among her many accomplishments, the MIT engineer received a MacArthur "genius" grant in 2004 and was the first woman to win the Lemelson-MIT Prize for turning her ideas into inventions.

Why you should listen

Mechanical engineer Amy Smith's approach to problem-solving in developing nations is refreshingly common-sense: Invent cheap, low-tech devices that use local resources, so communities can reproduce her efforts and ultimately help themselves. Smith, working with her students at MIT's D-Lab, has come up with several useful tools, including an incubator that stays warm without electricity, a simple grain mill, and a tool that converts farm waste into cleaner-burning charcoal.

The inventions have earned Smith three prestigious prizes: the B.F. Goodrich Collegiate Inventors Award, the MIT-Lemelson Prize, and a MacArthur "genius" grant. Her course, "Design for Developing Countries," is a pioneer in bringing humanitarian design into the curriculum of major institutions. Going forward, the former Peace Corps volunteer strives to do much more, bringing her inventiveness and boundless energy to bear on some of the world's most persistent problems.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.