sponsored links
TED2015

Kailash Satyarthi: How to make peace? Get angry

カイラシュ・サティーアーティ: 怒りで世界に平和をもたらす方法

March 25, 2015

インドの上級カースト出身の若者が、どうやって8万3千人もの子供達を奴隷労働から救い出したのでしょうか?ノーベル平和賞受賞者のカイラシュ・サティーアーティが提案する、より良い世界を作る為の予期せぬアドバイスとは、「不条理な事に対して憤れ」です。サティーアーティが怒りから生まれたアイデアを行動に移し、生涯をかけてどのように平和に尽力してきたか、力強く語ります。

Kailash Satyarthi - Children’s rights activist
2014 Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi is a tireless activist fighting to protect the rights of voiceless children everywhere. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Today, I am going to talk about anger.
今日は怒りについてお話しします
00:12
When I was 11,
私が11歳のとき
00:20
seeing some of my friends
leaving the school
何人かの友人が学校を去って行きました
00:22
because their parents
could not afford textbooks
親が教科書代を支払えなかったからです
00:26
made me angry.
これに私は憤りを覚えました
00:30
When I was 27,
私が27歳のとき
00:35
hearing the plight
of a desperate slave father
ある奴隷の苦境を聞きました
00:37
whose daughter was
about to be sold to a brothel
彼の娘が売春宿に
売られようとしていたのです
00:43
made me angry.
これに私は憤りを覚えました
00:48
At the age of 50,
私が50歳のとき
00:52
lying on the street,
in a pool of blood,
道ばたで血を流しながら横たわる
00:54
along with my own son,
自分の息子のそばで
00:59
made me angry.
私は憤りを感じていました
01:02
Dear friends, for centuries
we were taught anger is bad.
怒りはいけないものだ
と何世紀も言われてきました
01:07
Our parents, teachers, priests --
親や先生や聖職者の方々が
01:13
everyone taught us how to control
and suppress our anger.
怒りを制御して抑える方法を
我々に教えてきました
01:15
But I ask why?
でも なぜ?
01:24
Why can't we convert our anger
for the larger good of society?
なぜ怒りを社会の為に
使えないのでしょうか?
01:27
Why can't we use our anger
我々の怒りを
01:32
to challenge and change
the evils of the world?
悪に立ち向かい 世の中を変える為に
使えないでしょうか?
01:33
That I tried to do.
私はそうしようとして来ました
01:41
Friends,
みなさん
01:45
most of the brightest ideas
came to my mind out of anger.
私の最善のアイデアとは
その多くが 自らの怒りの産物です
01:49
Like when I was 35 and sat
in a locked-up, tiny prison.
35歳の時 小さな留置所に
閉じ込められた時もそうでした
01:55
The whole night, I was angry.
その夜 私は一晩中怒りを感じていました
02:06
But it has given birth to a new idea.
でも そこで新しいアイデアが生まれたのです
02:09
But I will come to that later on.
この話は後ほど お話しします
02:12
Let me begin with the story
of how I got a name for myself.
私の名前の由来からお話しします
02:15
I had been a big admirer
of Mahatma Gandhi since my childhood.
私は子供の頃から
マハトマ・ガンディーを尊敬していました
02:25
Gandhi fought and lead
India's freedom movement.
ガンディーはインドの独立運動を
率いて 闘いました
02:30
But more importantly,
もっと大切な事は
02:37
he taught us how to treat
the most vulnerable sections,
もっとも虐げられている
最下層階級の人々に対して
02:39
the most deprived people,
with dignity and respect.
尊厳と敬意を持って接する事を
彼が教えてくれたことです
02:45
And so, when India was celebrating
インドが祝う
02:51
Mahatma Gandhi's
birth centenary in 1969 --
1969年のマハトマ・ガンディー
生誕百周年の時でした
02:56
at that time I was 15 --
—私は15歳で—
02:59
an idea came to my mind.
ある考えが浮かびました
03:01
Why can't we celebrate it differently?
他のやり方でこの日を祝えないだろうかと
03:05
I knew, as perhaps
many of you might know,
皆さん方も多分ご存知のように
03:09
that in India, a large number of people
are born in the lowest segment of caste.
インドでは多くの人が生まれながらに
カースト制の最下層階級にいて
03:14
And they are treated as untouchables.
不可触民として扱われています
03:24
These are the people --
これらの人々は
03:27
forget about allowing them
to go to the temples,
寺院に足を踏み入れる事は勿論
03:28
they cannot even go into the houses
and shops of high-caste people.
上層階級の人の店や家に
入る事さえ許されていません
03:32
So I was very impressed with
the leaders of my town
それで私は町の政治指導者達に
とても感心していました
03:40
who were speaking very highly against
the caste system and untouchability
彼らはカースト制と不可触民
という階級に強く反対し
03:45
and talking of Gandhian ideals.
ガンディーの理想を唱えていたからです
03:49
So inspired by that, I thought,
let us set an example
それに勇気づけられた私は
自ら行動に移そうと思いました
03:53
by inviting these people to eat food
cooked and served
その方法とは この指導者達を
招待して 不可触民が作る料理を
03:56
by the untouchable community.
食べてもらおうというものです
04:03
I went to some low-caste,
so-called untouchable, people,
いわゆる不可触民と呼ばれる
下層階級の人々の所へ行き
04:06
tried to convince them,
but it was unthinkable for them.
説得を試みましたが
彼らには考えられない事でした
04:13
They told me, "No, no. It's not possible.
It never happened."
「それはあり得ないよ
そんな事はあったためしがない」と
04:17
I said, "Look at these leaders,
でも私は言いました
04:22
they are so great,
they are against untouchability.
「この指導者たちは
あなた方の味方です
04:24
They will come. If nobody comes,
we can set an example."
きっと来ます 誰も来なくても
模範を示すことは出来ます」
04:27
These people thought that I was too naive.
誰もが私は繊細すぎると思いました
04:32
Finally, they were convinced.
やっと彼らを説得すると
04:39
My friends and I took our bicycles
and invited political leaders.
友達と一緒に自転車で回って
政治指導者達を招待しました
04:42
And I was so thrilled, rather, empowered
とても興奮しましたが 何よりも
04:49
to see that each one of them
agreed to come.
全員が招待を受けてくれたのに
力づけられました
04:52
I thought, "Great idea.
We can set an example.
「よかった これで皆に模範を示し
04:59
We can bring about change in the society."
社会に変化をもたらす事が出来る」
と私は思っていました
05:01
The day has come.
その日が来ました
05:07
All these untouchables,
three women and two men,
不可触民の女性3人と男性2人が
05:09
they agreed to come.
協力してくれました
05:15
I could recall that they had used
the best of their clothes.
今でも覚えているのは 彼らは
自分達の一番の衣装を身に纏い
05:19
They brought new utensils.
新しい食器を持参し
05:26
They had taken baths
hundreds of times
来る前に 何度も体を洗った という事です
05:29
because it was unthinkable
for them to do.
なぜなら こういう事は
彼らには身に余る事だからです
05:32
It was the moment of change.
変化の瞬間でした
05:35
They gathered. Food was cooked.
皆が集まり食事の準備ができ
05:39
It was 7 o'clock.
7時になりました
05:42
By 8 o'clock, we kept on waiting,
8時まで待ち続けました
05:44
because it's not very uncommon
that the leaders become late,
政治家達が1時間ほど遅れるのは
05:47
for an hour or so.
よくある事だったからです
05:52
So after 8 o'clock, we took our bicycles
and went to these leaders' homes,
8時を過ぎたので 我々は自転車に乗り
政治家達の家を回りました
05:55
just to remind them.
忘れているのだろうと思ったからです
06:01
One of the leader's wives told me,
1人の政治家の奥さんに
06:06
"Sorry, he is having some headache,
perhaps he cannot come."
「残念だけど 頭痛で行けないみたい」
と言われても
06:10
I went to another leader
次の家では そこの奥さんから
06:15
and his wife told me,
"Okay, you go, he will definitely join."
「先に行ってて 後で必ず行かせるから」
と言われたので
06:17
So I thought that the dinner
will take place,
「夕食会は出来そうだ
06:23
though not at that large a scale.
人数は少ないかもしれないけど」
と私は思いながら
06:27
I went back to the venue, which was
a newly built Mahatma Gandhi Park.
来た道を辿って 完成したばかりの
マハトマ・ガンディー記念公園まで戻りました
06:33
It was 10 o'clock.
10時になりました
06:40
None of the leaders showed up.
政治家は誰一人来ませんでした
06:43
That made me angry.
これに私は 憤り
06:47
I was standing, leaning against
Mahatma Gandhi's statue.
ガンディー像に寄りかかっていると
06:52
I was emotionally drained,
rather exhausted.
非常に感情的になり
かなり疲れを感じていました
07:01
Then I sat down where
the food was lying.
私は料理が置いてある床に座り
07:08
I kept my emotions on hold.
感情を圧し殺していたのですが
07:17
But then, when I took the first bite,
食べ物を口にしたとたん
07:19
I broke down in tears.
泣き出してしまいました
07:24
And suddenly I felt a hand on my shoulder.
すると不可触民の女性が
07:27
And it was the healing, motherly touch
of an untouchable woman.
母親のような優しさで労るように
私の肩に手をかけ こう言ったのです
07:31
And she told me,
"Kailash, why are you crying?
「カイラシュどうして泣くの?
07:37
You have done your bit.
あなたは大きな事をしたのよ
07:43
You have eaten the food
cooked by untouchables,
私たち不可触民が料理したものを
あなたは食べたのだから
07:45
which has never happened in our memory."
こんな事 今までなかったわ
07:48
She said, "You won today."
あなたは勝利者よ」と
07:53
And my friends, she was right.
皆さん 彼女は正しかったのです
07:57
I came back home, a little after midnight,
その日 真夜中を過ぎたころ家に戻ると
08:03
shocked to see that several
high-caste elderly people
驚いた事に そこには数人の
高位カーストの長老が
08:07
were sitting in my courtyard.
我が家の中庭に座っていて
08:12
I saw my mother and
elderly women were crying
私の母とお年寄りの女性達が泣きながら
08:14
and they were pleading
to these elderly people
長老達に懇願していたのです
08:17
because they had threatened
to outcaste my whole family.
私の家族全員を追放する
と脅かされていたからです
08:21
And you know, outcasting the family
is the biggest social punishment
カーストから家族が追放される事ほど
08:26
one can think of.
社会的屈辱はありません
08:31
Somehow they agreed to punish only me,
and the punishment was purification.
なんとか私だけが罰を受ければいい事になり
その罰とは私の身を清める事でした
08:35
That means I had to go 600 miles
away from my hometown
故郷から約千キロ離れた
08:40
to the River Ganges to take a holy dip.
聖なるガンジス川で沐浴し
08:45
And after that, I should organize a feast
for priests, 101 priests,
その後101人の僧侶達に
ごちそうを振るまい
08:49
wash their feet and drink that water.
彼らの足を洗い その水を飲む
というものでした
08:53
It was total nonsense,
全く馬鹿げた話で
08:58
and I refused to accept that punishment.
そんな罰は受けない と拒否しました
09:01
How did they punish me?
どうやって私は罰せられたでしょう?
09:05
I was barred from entering into my own
kitchen and my own dining room,
我が家の台所や食卓には
入る事すら許されず
09:07
my utensils were separated.
私の食器は家族のものとは別にされました
09:13
But the night when I was angry,
they wanted to outcaste me.
私が憤っていたその夜 長老達は
私を追放しようとしましたが
09:16
But I decided to outcaste
the entire caste system.
私の方がカースト制を完全に
追放する事を決心したのです
09:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:27
And that was possible because
the beginning would have been
そう出来たのは苗字を変えれば
09:32
to change the family name, or surname,
始められる事だったからです
09:37
because in India, most of the
family names are caste names.
インドでは殆どの名前はカースト名なので
09:39
So I decided to drop my name.
私の苗字を捨ててしまう事にしました
09:43
And then, later on, I gave
a new name to myself: Satyarthi,
その後 サティーアーティ
という名前にしました
09:46
that means, "seeker of truth."
この名前は「真理の探求者」という意味です
09:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:57
And that was the beginning
of my transformative anger.
それから私の怒りは形を変え始めました
10:01
Friends, maybe one of you can tell me,
皆さんの中で どなたか
10:05
what was I doing before becoming
a children's rights activist?
私が子供の人権活動家になる前
何をしていたか分かる方はいますか?
10:08
Does anybody know?
知っている方はいますか?
10:14
No.
いませんね
10:16
I was an engineer, an electrical engineer.
エンジニア—
電気技師でした
10:17
And then I learned how the energy
そこで私が学んだ事は
10:24
of burning fire, coal,
石炭などが燃える火
10:29
the nuclear blast inside the chambers,
原子炉の中での核分裂
10:33
raging river currents,
川の激流や
10:38
fierce winds,
強風等から起きるエネルギーは
10:41
could be converted into the light
and lives of millions.
何百万人の生活に使われる電気に変えられ
10:44
I also learned how the most
uncontrollable form of energy
また最も扱いにくい形のエネルギーは
10:50
could be harnessed for good
and making society better.
社会の為に末長く利用できる事を学びました
10:55
So I'll come back to the story of
when I was caught in the prison:
私が投獄された時の話に戻りましょう
11:04
I was very happy freeing
a dozen children from slavery,
奴隷労働から数十人の子供達を救い
11:11
handing them over to their parents.
親元へ返すという事に喜びを感じていました
11:15
I cannot explain my joy
when I free a child.
子供を1人でも解放できた時の喜びは
11:18
I was so happy.
言葉では言い表せません
11:23
But when I was waiting for my train
to come back to my hometown, Delhi,
ある日デリーに帰郷しようと
電車を待っていた時の事です
11:25
I saw that dozens of children
were arriving;
何十人もの子供が電車から
降りてくるのを見ました
11:30
they were being trafficked by someone.
人身売買された子供達です
11:34
I stopped them, those people.
私は 彼らを捕まえて
11:37
I complained to the police.
警察に届けたのです
11:40
So the policemen, instead of helping me,
すると警察は手を貸してくれるどころか
11:42
they threw me in this small,
tiny shell, like an animal.
私を小さな留置所に
動物のごとく投げ込んだのです
11:46
And that was the night of anger
私が憤った夜のことでした
11:53
when one of the brightest
and biggest ideas was born.
しかし ここで最高のアイデアが生まれたのです
11:54
I thought that if I keep on freeing 10
children, and 50 more will join,
「子供を10人解放し続けたなら50人になる
11:59
that's not done.
それがまだできていない
12:04
And I believed in the power of consumers,
でも消費者パワーを使えば
これが出来るんじゃないか」と
12:06
and let me tell you that this
was the first time
なんと これは世界初の取り組みで
12:09
when a campaign was launched by me
or anywhere in the world,
私は世界の消費者に呼びかけ
12:12
to educate and sensitize the consumers
「児童労働で作られた商品を拒否しよう」
12:17
to create a demand
for child-labor-free rugs.
というキャンペーンを始めたのです
12:21
In Europe and America,
we have been successful.
ヨーロッパやアメリカでは成功し
12:27
And it has resulted
in a fall in child labor
児童労働者が
12:30
in South Asian countries by 80 percent.
南アジア諸国で80%減少しました
12:35
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:38
Not only that, but this first-ever
consumer's power, or consumer's campaign
それだけでなく 前代未聞の
消費者パワーを使った 消費者キャンペーンは
12:44
has grown in other countries
and other industries,
他の国々の様々な業界にも広がっています
12:51
maybe chocolate, maybe apparel,
maybe shoes -- it has gone beyond.
チョコレート、服飾、靴の業界など
限りなく広がっているはずです
12:55
My anger at the age of 11,
私が11歳で憤った理由は
13:03
when I realized how important
education is for every child,
子供にとって教育が
どれほど大切か身にしみた時で
13:04
I got an idea to collect used books
and help the poorest children.
貧しい子供達のため
古本を集めるアイデアが生まれ
13:09
I created a book bank at the age of 11.
私は11歳で本の銀行を作りました
13:17
But I did not stop.
それでは満足せずに
13:22
Later on, I cofounded
後に
13:23
the world's single largest civil society
campaign for education
世界最大の教育のための市民社会
キャンペーンを共同設立しました
13:25
that is the Global Campaign for Education.
Global Campaign for Educationです
13:30
That has helped in changing
the whole thinking towards education
これは教育に対する考え方を大きく変え
13:34
from the charity mode
to the human rights mode,
慈善モードから人権モードに変容させ
13:38
and that has concretely helped
the reduction of out-of-school children
実質的に非就学児童を
13:41
by half in the last 15 years.
過去15年で半減させました
13:45
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:49
My anger at the age of 27,
私が27歳の時の憤りは
13:55
to free that girl who was about
to be sold to a brothel,
売春宿へ送られようとしていた女の子を
助けたいという気持ちからでした
13:58
has given me an idea
そこから生まれたアイデアは
14:04
to go for a new strategy
of raid and rescue,
現場を奇襲して性奴隷となっている
14:08
freeing children from slavery.
子供達を救い出す事です
14:13
And I am so lucky and proud to say
that it is not one or 10 or 20,
我々が誇りを持って言えるのは
嬉しい事に10人とか20人とかでなく
14:16
but my colleagues and I have been able
to physically liberate 83,000 child slaves
これまでに8万3千人もの子供達を
児童奴隷労働から救い出し
14:22
and hand them over
back to their families and mothers.
家族の元へ返す事が出来ました
14:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:31
I knew that we needed global policies.
世界的な規制が必要だと知っていたので
14:37
We organized the worldwide marches
against child labor
児童労働反対の世界的抗議行進を計画し
14:39
and that has also resulted in
a new international convention
最悪の状況下にいる子供達を保護するための
新しい国際条約の採択に至りました
14:42
to protect the children
who are in the worst forms.
最悪の状況下にいる子供達を保護するための
新しい国際条約の採択に至りました
14:48
And the concrete result was that
the number of child laborers globally
その具体的な成果として
世界の児童労働者の数は
14:54
has gone down by one third
in the last 15 years.
この15年で3分の1になりました
14:58
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:03
So, in each case,
それぞれのケースで
15:08
it began from anger,
怒りから始まり
15:11
turned into an idea,
そこからアイデアが生まれ
15:15
and action.
それを行動に移しました
15:17
So anger, what next?
怒りの次は?
15:21
Idea, and --
アイデア その次は・・・
15:24
Audience: Action
聴衆:行動!
15:26
Kailash Satyarthi: Anger, idea, action.
Which I tried to do.
怒り、アイデア、行動
これが私がしようとした事です
15:28
Anger is a power, anger is an energy,
怒りとはパワーで
エネルギーがあります
15:34
and the law of nature is that energy
自然の法則ではエネルギーは
15:36
can never be created and never
be vanished, can never be destroyed.
姿は変わっても決して消え去る事も
破壊される事も有りません
15:39
So why can't the energy of anger
be translated and harnessed
では怒りのエネルギーを
15:44
to create a better and beautiful world,
a more just and equitable world?
もっと美しい公正な社会を作る為に
利用できないでしょうか?
15:51
Anger is within each one of you,
怒りは誰にでも有ります
15:56
and I will share a secret
for a few seconds:
ちょっとした秘密をお教えしましょう
15:59
that if we are confined in
the narrow shells of egos,
エゴと利己心の渦巻く小さな殻の中に
16:05
and the circles of selfishness,
閉じこもっていると
16:12
then the anger will turn out to be
hatred, violence, revenge, destruction.
いかりは 憎しみ、暴力、復讐
破壊に変わって行きます
16:17
But if we are able to break the circles,
でも その悪循環を断ち切る事が出来たなら
16:25
then the same anger could turn
into a great power.
その怒りを偉大なパワーに
変貌させられるのです
16:28
We can break the circles
by using our inherent compassion
誰もが持つ思いやりで その循環を断ち切り
16:34
and connect with the world through
compassion to make this world better.
この世界をよくする為 思いやりを持って
世界と繋がる事が出来ます
16:38
That same anger could be
transformed into it.
同じ怒りを このように一変させられるのです
16:42
So dear friends, sisters and brothers,
again, as a Nobel Laureate,
そこで親愛なる皆さん もう一度
ノーベル平和賞受賞者として奨励します
16:46
I am urging you to become angry.
皆さん 怒ってください
16:51
I am urging you to become angry.
皆さん 怒ってください
16:55
And the angriest among us
そして一番怒っている人が
16:59
is the one who can transform his anger
into idea and action.
その怒りをアイデア そして行動へと
変貌させられる人なのです
17:04
Thank you so much.
ありがとうございました
17:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:14
Chris Anderson: For many years,
you've been an inspiration to others.
クリス・アンダーソン:長年 多くの人々の
インスピレーションとなって来られたのですが
17:26
Who or what inspires you and why?
誰に 何に 勇気づけられて来たのですか?
そしてその理由は?
17:30
KS: Good question.
いい質問です
17:34
Chris, let me tell you,
and that is the truth,
クリス 実をいうと
17:36
each time when I free a child,
母親の元へ戻れる希望を
失った子供を1人でも救って
17:40
the child who has lost all his hope
that he will ever come back to his mother,
母親の元へ戻れる希望を
失った子供を1人でも救って
17:44
the first smile of freedom,
その子が自由になった時
見せる最初の笑顔と
17:48
and the mother who has lost all hope
わが子をもう二度と
抱きしめることができないと
17:53
that the son or daughter
can ever come back and sit in her lap,
希望を失っていた母親が
17:55
they become so emotional
再会の時 感極まって頬をつたう
最初の喜びの涙
18:02
and the first tear of joy
rolls down on her cheek,
再会の時 感極まって頬をつたう
最初の喜びの涙
18:04
I see the glimpse of God in it --
this is my biggest inspiration.
そこに神聖なるものを見出し これが
私の一番の原動力となっています
18:09
And I am so lucky that not once,
as I said before, but thousands of times,
本当に有り難い事に 幾度となく
18:12
I have been able to witness my God
in the faces of those children
子供達の顔に神聖なるものを見てきました
18:17
and they are my biggest inspirations.
彼らが一番私を勇気づけてくれています
18:21
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
18:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:25
Translator:Reiko O Bovee
Reviewer:Mari Arimitsu

sponsored links

Kailash Satyarthi - Children’s rights activist
2014 Nobel Peace Prize winner Kailash Satyarthi is a tireless activist fighting to protect the rights of voiceless children everywhere.

Why you should listen
Nobel Laureate Kailash Satyarthi has been leading the global fight against child slavery for over three decades.  As the founder of a grassroots nonprofit, Bachpan Bachao Andolan, or Save Childhood Movement, he has rescued more than 80,000 Indian children to date from various forms of exploitation from child labor to child trafficking.

Kailash’s work has involved organizing almost weekly raid, rescue and recovery missions on workplaces that employ and enslave children. Since 2001, Satyarthi’s has risked his own life to rescue these children and has convinced families in more than 300 Indian villages to avoid sending their children to work, and instead putting them in school.
 
Satyarthi’s has also managed to grab and retain the world’s attention on the problem. He organized the Global March Against Child Labor in the 1990s to raise awareness and free millions of children shackled in various forms of modern slavery. His activism was also instrumental in the adoption of Convention No. 182 by the International Labour Organization, a statue that's become a guideline for many governments on child labor.
 
In 2014, he and Malala Yousafzai were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for “their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.