13:36
TEDGlobalLondon

Tony Wyss-Coray: How young blood might help reverse aging. Yes, really

トニー・ウィス=コレイ: 若い血液で若返る方法 — まさに文字通り

Filmed:

トニー・ウィス=コレイは、加齢が人体、脳にどのようにインパクトを与えているかを研究しています。この耳を疑うばかりのトークで、彼はスタンフォードでの研究や、他の研究者達の新しい研究結果を交えながら、加齢に伴う問題の解決法は、実は私達自身の中に存在するかもしれないと語ります。

- Brain scientist
At his lab at Stanford School of Medicine, Tony Wyss-Coray studies aging -- and potential cures for it. Full bio

これは16世紀に描かれた
ルーカス・クラナッハ (父) の絵です
00:13
This is a painting from the 16th century
from Lucas Cranach the Elder.
有名な「不老の泉」が描かれています
00:18
It shows the famous Fountain of Youth.
この水で沐浴したり この水を呑んだりすると
健康になり若くなるというものです
00:21
If you drink its water or you bathe in it,
you will get health and youth.
どの文明のどの文化でも人々は
永遠なる若さを求めて夢見てきました
00:27
Every culture, every civilization
has dreamed of finding eternal youth.
アレキサンダー大王や
探検家のポンセ・デ・レオンは
00:34
There are people like Alexander the Great
or Ponce De León, the explorer,
「不老の泉」を生涯捜し続けましたが
00:38
who spent much of their life
chasing the Fountain of Youth.
見つけられませんでした
00:42
They didn't find it.
でも この話は これで終わりでしょうか?
00:45
But what if there was something to it?
「不老の泉」の話には
何かが隠されているのでは?
00:48
What if there was something
to this Fountain of Youth?
今日は加齢医学研究における
驚くべき発展をお話しします
00:51
I will share an absolutely amazing
development in aging research
この事は加齢に関しての私たちの考えや
00:56
that could revolutionize
the way we think about aging
未来の加齢に伴う疾患の治療法に
革命的貢献をするでしょう
01:00
and how we may treat age-related
diseases in the future.
最近行われた成長に関する
01:04
It started with experiments that showed,
数々の実験研究から始まったことですが
01:06
in a recent number
of studies about growing,
若齢マウスから得た血液を
注入された老齢マウスは若返る
01:09
that animals -- old mice --
that share a blood supply with young mice
という事が分かったのです
01:16
can get rejuvenated.
人間では二重胎児に
見られる事に似ていますが
01:18
This is similar to what you might see
in humans, in Siamese twins,
ちょっとゾッとする話ですね
01:22
and I know this sounds a bit creepy.
2007年 幹細胞研究者トム・ランドが
01:25
But what Tom Rando, a stem-cell
researcher, reported in 2007,
老齢マウスが若齢マウスと
血液循環系を共有すると
01:31
was that old muscle from a mouse
can be rejuvenated
老齢マウスの筋肉が若返った
という研究発表をし その数年後
01:34
if it's exposed to young blood
through common circulation.
ハーバードでエイミー・ウェイジャーズが
この再現実験に成功しました
01:39
This was reproduced by Amy Wagers
at Harvard a few years later,
他の研究者達も同じような若返り効果を
01:44
and others then showed that similar
rejuvenating effects could be observed
膵臓 肝臓そして心臓に観察した
と報告していますが
01:49
in the pancreas, the liver and the heart.
他のラボをも含む私たち研究者達が
最も関心を持っている事は
01:52
But what I'm most excited about,
and several other labs as well,
脳にもこれを応用する
というその可能性です
01:57
is that this may even apply to the brain.
つまり老齢マウスが
並体結合と呼ばれる技術で
02:00
So, what we found is that an old mouse
exposed to a young environment
若齢マウスの影響を受けると
02:06
in this model called parabiosis,
脳が若返り機能が良くなる
02:09
shows a younger brain --
という事が分かりました
02:10
and a brain that functions better.
繰り返しますが
02:13
And I repeat:
血液循環系を若齢マウスと共有する事で
老齢マウスは若い血液を得て
02:15
an old mouse that gets young blood
through shared circulation
脳は若返り 機能が亢進するのです
02:21
looks younger and functions
younger in its brain.
私たちが歳を取ると
02:25
So when we get older --
あらゆる認知面で変化が見られます
02:27
we can look at different aspects
of human cognition,
このスライドでは
02:30
and you can see on this slide here,
論理的思考 言語能力などの推移を
見る事ができます
02:32
we can look at reasoning,
verbal ability and so forth.
50〜60才あたりでは
これらの機能損傷は見られません
02:35
And up to around age 50 or 60,
these functions are all intact,
今 こうやって見渡して見ると
私たちはまだ大丈夫みたいですが
02:41
and as I look at the young audience
here in the room, we're all still fine.
(笑)
02:45
(Laughter)
これらの線が下がって行くのを
見るのは怖いですね
02:46
But it's scary to see
how all these curves go south.
歳を取るにつれ
02:50
And as we get older,
アルツハイマーなどの病気が
起きる事があります
02:52
diseases such as Alzheimer's
and others may develop.
この様な病気では
ニューロン同士を繋げる
02:57
We know that with age,
the connections between neurons --
シナプス間に隙間が出来
ニューロン間の通信が悪くなり
03:00
the way neurons talk to each other,
the synapses -- they start to deteriorate;
ニューロンの死滅
脳の萎縮へと進みます
03:05
neurons die, the brain starts to shrink,
こうして加齢に伴い 神経変性疾患に
罹り易くなる事は分かっていますが
03:08
and there's an increased susceptibility
for these neurodegenerative diseases.
ここで大きな問題が1つあります
03:13
One big problem we have -- to try
to understand how this really works
それがどのように起きているのかを
分子、機能レベルで
03:18
at a very molecular, mechanistic level --
ヒトの生体を使い実験して
詳しく脳内を見る事ができない事です
03:21
is that we can't study the brains
in detail, in living people.
私たちは認知テストをしたり
脳画像を撮ったり
03:26
We can do cognitive tests,
we can do imaging --
あらゆる最先端のテストができますが
03:29
all kinds of sophisticated testing.
加齢に伴い 又は 病気が原因で
03:31
But we usually have to wait
until the person dies
どの様に脳が変化したかを実際に見るには
その人の死を待つしかないのです
03:35
to get the brain and look at how it really
changed through age or in a disease.
これが神経病理学者が行っていることです
03:40
This is what neuropathologists
do, for example.
それでは 脳を大きな生体の一部
03:44
So, how about we think of the brain
as being part of the larger organism.
体全体の一部として考えると
03:50
Could we potentially understand more
脳内で起きていることが
03:52
about what happens in the brain
at the molecular level
分子レベルで もっと良く
理解できるのではないでしょうか?
03:55
if we see the brain
as part of the entire body?
体の老化や病気が
脳に影響を与えるのでしょうか?
03:59
So if the body ages or gets sick,
does that affect the brain?
又その逆の視点から 脳の老化は
体の他の部分に影響するのでしょうか?
04:03
And vice versa: as the brain gets older,
does that influence the rest of the body?
身体の全組織を結合しているのは
04:09
And what connects all the different
tissues in the body
循環組織です
04:12
is blood.
血液は酸素を運ぶ赤血球細胞や
04:14
Blood is the tissue that not only carries
cells that transport oxygen, for example,
04:20
the red blood cells,
感染症と闘う免疫細胞だけでなく
04:21
or fights infectious diseases,
シグナル伝達分子すなわち
04:23
but it also carries messenger molecules,
ホルモンのような
04:27
hormone-like factors
that transport information
細胞や組織間の情報伝達をする
因子をも運搬します
04:31
from one cell to another,
from one tissue to another,
脳においても同様です
04:36
including the brain.
加齢と病気による血液の変化を見れば
04:37
So if we look at how the blood
changes in disease or age,
脳に関して何か分かるかもしれません
04:42
can we learn something about the brain?
歳を取るにつれ血液は変化し
04:45
We know that as we get older,
the blood changes as well,
ホルモン様因子が変わる事が分かっています
04:50
so these hormone-like factors
change as we get older.
体組織の成長や維持に必要な因子は
04:53
And by and large,
factors that we know are required
概して歳を取るにつれ
04:57
for the development of tissues,
for the maintenance of tissues --
減少し始めます
05:01
they start to decrease as we get older,
と同時に怪我や炎症の修復に携わる因子が増え
05:04
while factors involved in repair,
in injury and in inflammation --
と同時に怪我や炎症の修復に携わる因子が増え
05:08
they increase as we get older.
良い因子と悪い因子のバランスが
崩れて来るとも言えます
05:10
So there's this unbalance of good
and bad factors, if you will.
この現象を私たちの次の実験で
05:16
And to illustrate what we can do
potentially with that,
理解して頂きたいと思います
05:20
I want to talk you through
an experiment that we did.
健康な20才から89才までの人々から
05:22
We had almost 300 blood samples
from healthy human beings
300近くの血液サンプルを採り
05:26
20 to 89 years of age,
組織間の情報伝達をする百以上の因子
05:28
and we measured over 100
of these communication factors,
ホルモン様タンパク質を測定しました
05:32
these hormone-like proteins that
transport information between tissues.
それでまず最初に
05:37
And what we noticed first
若齢者と老齢者の間では
05:38
is that between the youngest
and the oldest group,
約半分の因子が大きく違っている事が
分かったのです
05:41
about half the factors
changed significantly.
これらの因子の変化から見ると
ヒトの生体環境は
05:45
So our body lives in a very
different environment as we get older,
加齢に伴い大きく変わるという事です
05:48
when it comes to these factors.
これから統計を取り
生物情報学のプログラムを用い
05:50
And using statistical
or bioinformatics programs,
逆算し およその年齢推定を
可能にしてくれる そんな因子を
05:53
we could try to discover
those factors that best predict age --
発見できるかもしれません
05:58
in a way, back-calculate
the relative age of a person.
それが どんなものか
このグラフで分かります
06:02
And the way this looks
is shown in this graph.
横軸は被験者の実年齢を表します
06:05
So, on the one axis you see
the actual age a person lived,
横軸は被験者の実年齢を表します
06:11
the chronological age.
つまり何年前に生まれたかです
06:12
So, how many years they lived.
そして先程のたんぱく質因子から
06:14
And then we take these top factors
that I showed you,
被験者のおよその年齢を割り出します
06:16
and we calculate their relative age,
their biological age.
この様に 推定年齢は
実年齢にとても近いのです
06:22
And what you see is that
there is a pretty good correlation,
こうして大体の年齢を推定できるのです
06:26
so we can pretty well predict
the relative age of a person.
でも本当にすごいのは
そのはずれ値なんです
06:29
But what's really exciting
are the outliers,
「変わり者」とはそんなもんです
06:33
as they so often are in life.
ここに緑色でハイライトしてあるのは
06:35
You can see here, the person
I highlighted with the green dot
70才位の人ですが
06:40
is about 70 years of age
私たちの測定が正しければ
この人の生物学的年齢は
06:43
but seems to have a biological age,
if what we're doing here is really true,
ほんの45才でしかないのです
06:48
of only about 45.
この人は実年齢より
ずっと若く見えるのでしょうか?
06:50
So is this a person that actually
looks much younger than their age?
それよりもっと重要な事は この人は
加齢に伴う病気に罹るリスクが低く
06:54
But more importantly: Is this a person
who is maybe at a reduced risk
百才まで いやそれよりもっと
06:58
to develop an age-related disease
and will have a long life --
長生きするのでしょうか?
07:02
will live to 100 or more?
一方 赤でハイライトされたこの人は
07:04
On the other hand, the person here,
highlighted with the red dot,
40才にもなっていないのに
生物学的年齢は65才です
07:08
is not even 40,
but has a biological age of 65.
この人は加齢に伴う病気に罹る
リスクが高いのでしょうか?
07:13
Is this a person at an increased risk
of developing an age-related disease?
私たちのラボでは これらの
因子の研究を更に進めています
07:18
So in our lab, we're trying
to understand these factors better,
多くの研究団体が真の加齢因子を
07:22
and many other groups
are trying to understand,
突き止めようとしています
07:24
what are the true aging factors,
それらの因子から何かが分かり
加齢による病の予測ができるでしょうか?
07:26
and can we learn something about them
to possibly predict age-related diseases?
このグラフは ただ相関関係を示し
07:32
So what I've shown you so far
is simply correlational, right?
これら因子は加齢に伴い変化する
と言えるだけで
07:36
You can just say,
"Well, these factors change with age,"
加齢に働きかけるかどうかは
これからは良く分かりません
07:40
but you don't really know
if they do something about aging.
次にお見せするのは
画期的な研究結果で
07:45
So what I'm going to show you now
is very remarkable
これらの因子が組織の老化を
調節できることを示唆しています
07:48
and it suggests that these factors
can actually modulate the age of a tissue.
並体結合と呼ばれるモデルに戻りましょう
07:53
And that's where we come back
to this model called parabiosis.
マウスを使っての並体結合は
07:57
So, parabiosis is done in mice
手術で2匹のマウスを結合させ
07:59
by surgically connecting
the two mice together,
血液循環系を共有させるというものです
08:04
and that leads then
to a shared blood system,
ここで「若いマウスの血液が
どうして老いたマウスの脳に影響するの?」
08:07
where we can now ask,
"How does the old brain get influenced
という疑問が湧くでしょう
08:11
by exposure to the young blood?"
これを明らかにする為
08:14
And for this purpose, we use young mice
ヒトの年齢にして20才と65才位に相当する
08:16
that are an equivalency
of 20-year-old people,
2匹の若齢マウスと老齢マウスを使いました
08:19
and old mice that are roughly
65 years old in human years.
これで私たちは実に貴重な発見をしました
08:24
What we found is quite remarkable.
ニューロン新生を行う神経幹細胞が
08:27
We find there are more neural stem cells
that make new neurons
老いたマウスの脳に増え
08:31
in these old brains.
ニューロンを結合するシナプスの活動が
08:33
There's an increased
activity of the synapses,
活発になり
08:35
the connections between neurons.
新しい記憶形成に携わる遺伝子が増え
08:38
There are more genes expressed
that are known to be involved
新しい記憶形成に携わる遺伝子が増え
08:41
in the formation of new memories.
ひどい炎症を起こす事が少なくなりました
08:43
And there's less of this bad inflammation.
でもマウスの脳への細胞混入は
観察されていません
08:47
But we observed that there are no cells
entering the brains of these animals.
循環系を共有している間
08:53
So when we connect them,
このモデルでは老齢マウスの脳に
細胞が混入していないので
08:55
there are actually no cells
going into the old brain, in this model.
血液中の成分がその因子だと論理づけ
09:01
Instead, we've reasoned, then,
that it must be the soluble factors,
血液内の血漿を採取し
09:05
so we could collect simply the soluble
fraction of blood which is called plasma,
若齢 又は 老齢マウスの血漿を
マウスに注入して調べ
09:09
and inject either young plasma
or old plasma into these mice,
若返り効果を再現することができました
09:13
and we could reproduce
these rejuvenating effects,
これはマウスの記憶を
09:16
but what we could also do now
テストして証明できました
09:17
is we could do memory tests with mice.
ヒトと同じ様にマウスも
加齢に伴い記憶障害が起きます
09:20
As mice get older, like us humans,
they have memory problems.
ただ それは検知し難いのですが
09:24
It's just harder to detect them,
このあと その方法をお見せします
09:26
but I'll show you in a minute
how we do that.
それから これを一歩進めて
09:28
But we wanted to take this
one step further,
ヒトにも応用できる様にしたいと思いました
09:31
one step closer to potentially
being relevant to humans.
今からお見せするのは 未公開の研究結果です
09:35
What I'm showing you now
are unpublished studies,
ここでは若いヒトの血漿と
コントロールに生理食塩水を使い
09:38
where we used human plasma,
young human plasma,
老いたマウスに
09:43
and as a control, saline,
その血漿を注入します
09:45
and injected it into old mice,
これで その老齢マウスを
若返らせ マウスの学習能力を
09:47
and asked, can we again
rejuvenate these old mice?
向上させられるでしょうか?
09:52
Can we make them smarter?
それを調べる為に「バーンズ迷路」
と呼ばれるテストをしました
09:54
And to do this, we used a test.
It's called a Barnes maze.
これは穴が幾つも開けられた大きなテーブルに
09:57
This is a big table
that has lots of holes in it,
穴を識別する為のマークが
周りにつけてあり
10:00
and there are guide marks around it,
このステージのように
まぶしい光が照らされています
10:04
and there's a bright light,
as on this stage here.
マウスは大嫌いな まぶしい光から逃れようと
10:06
The mice hate this and they try to escape,
赤い矢印が示す 唯一の穴を捜します
10:09
and find the single hole that you see
pointed at with an arrow,
その穴の下には管が繋がれていて
10:14
where a tube is mounted underneath
マウスは その暗い穴の中で
安心できる様になっています
10:16
where they can escape
and feel comfortable in a dark hole.
まず最初に数日間マウスに
10:19
So we teach them, over several days,
マークに従い
その穴を捜す学習をさせます
10:21
to find this space
on these cues in the space,
私たちが1日中
10:24
and you can compare this for humans,
買い物をした後 駐車場で
自分の車を捜すようなものです
10:27
to finding your car in a parking lot
after a busy day of shopping.
(笑)
10:31
(Laughter)
なかなか見つけられない人も
たぶん多い事でしょう
10:32
Many of us have probably had
some problems with that.
では老齢マウスを見てみましょう
10:36
So, let's look at an old mouse here.
これは記憶障害がある老齢マウスです
10:38
This is an old mouse
that has memory problems,
これを見ると分かりますが
10:41
as you'll notice in a moment.
穴毎を覗き回っていて
最後に学習した場所を
10:43
It just looks into every hole,
but it didn't form this spacial map
見つける手助けとなる
場所の地理的把握ができていません
10:48
that would remind it where it was
in the previous trial or the last day.
それと全く対照的に
この同じ歳の兄弟は
10:53
In stark contrast, this mouse here
is a sibling of the same age,
3日毎に若いヒトの血漿を少量
10:59
but it was treated with young
human plasma for three weeks,
3週間注入されたマウスですが
11:04
with small injections every three days.
ご覧の様に「ここは何処?」
とでも言うかの様に見回すと
11:07
And as you noticed, it almost
looks around, "Where am I?" --
真っすぐに正解の穴へ向かいます
11:11
and then walks straight
to that hole and escapes.
その穴の場所を覚えていたのです
11:14
So, it could remember where that hole was.
この老齢マウスは確かに若返ったみたいに
11:18
So by all means, this old mouse
seems to be rejuvenated --
脳機能は若齢マウスのそれのようです
11:22
it functions more like a younger mouse.
これが示唆している事は
11:24
And it also suggests
that there is something
若いマウスの血漿だけでなく
若いヒトの血漿にも
11:27
not only in young mouse plasma,
but in young human plasma
老いた脳を助ける可能性が
あるという事です
11:32
that has the capacity
to help this old brain.
要約すると
11:36
So to summarize,
老齢マウスの脳は
手の施しようがないのではなく
11:38
we find the old mouse, and its brain
in particular, are malleable.
可塑性を持たせることができる
という事が分かりました
11:42
They're not set in stone;
we can actually change them.
若返らすことが出来るのです
11:45
It can be rejuvenated.
若い血液内の因子が老化を逆行させます
11:47
Young blood factors can reverse aging,
それから お見せしなかったのですが
11:50
and what I didn't show you --
並体結合で 若齢マウスは
老齢マウスとは逆の影響を受け
11:52
in this model, the young mouse actually
suffers from exposure to the old.
老齢マウスの血液因子が
若齢マウスの老化を加速化させます
11:57
So there are old-blood factors
that can accelerate aging.
ここで最も重要なのはヒトにも
同じような因子がある可能性です
12:01
And most importantly,
humans may have similar factors,
若いヒトの血液でも
同じような効果があるのですから
12:06
because we can take young human
blood and have a similar effect.
老いたヒトの血液では この効果がなく
12:10
Old human blood, I didn't show you,
does not have this effect;
老いたマウスは若返りません
12:14
it does not make the mice younger.
では この魔法をヒトに使えるでしょうか?
12:17
So, is this magic transferable to humans?
今スタンフォードで
小さな臨床研究をやっています
12:20
We're running a small
clinical study at Stanford,
そこでは軽症のアルツハイマー病患者に
12:24
where we treat Alzheimer's patients
with mild disease
若い20才のボランティアからの血漿で
治療を試みています
12:28
with a pint of plasma
from young volunteers, 20-year-olds,
週に1回の血漿注入を4週間続け
12:34
and do this once a week for four weeks,
MRIで画像を撮り
12:37
and then we look
at their brains with imaging.
患者の認知度をテストし
12:41
We test them cognitively,
患者の介護者に
患者の日常生活について訊ねます
12:42
and we ask their caregivers
for daily activities of living.
この治療でなんらかの効果が現れれば
12:46
What we hope is that there are
some signs of improvement
と私たちは願っています
12:50
from this treatment.
この治療が効くなら 私たちも
12:52
And if that's the case,
that could give us hope
マウスでの若返り効果はヒトにもあり得る
12:55
that what I showed you works in mice
という希望が持てるでしょう
12:57
might also work in humans.
私たちは永遠の命は望めませんが
13:00
Now, I don't think we will live forever.
この研究で発見した事は
13:03
But maybe we discovered
「不老の泉」は私たち自身の中にある
という事かもしれません
13:06
that the Fountain of Youth
is actually within us,
それが枯渇してしまうだけなので
13:09
and it has just dried out.
それを ちょっと復活させたいなら
13:11
And if we can turn it
back on a little bit,
私たちは若返りに力を
貸してくれる因子を捜し出し
13:14
maybe we can find the factors
that are mediating these effects,
そんな因子を人工的に生産して
13:19
we can produce these factors synthetically
アルツハイマーなどの
加齢に伴う病気を
13:21
and we can treat diseases of aging,
such as Alzheimer's disease
治す事ができるのです
13:25
or other dementias.
ありがとうございました
13:27
Thank you very much.
(拍手)
13:28
(Applause)
Translated by Reiko Bovee
Reviewed by Eriko T.

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Tony Wyss-Coray - Brain scientist
At his lab at Stanford School of Medicine, Tony Wyss-Coray studies aging -- and potential cures for it.

Why you should listen

Professor of neurology at Stanford, Tony Wyss-Coray oversees an eponymous lab which studies immune and injury responses in aging and neurodegeneration.

Wyss-Coray initially studied at the Institute of Clinical Immunology at the University of Bern in Switzerland, but he now lives and works in California. At Stanford since 2002, he's also a health scientist at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. Deeply interested in figuring out ways to combat diseases such as Alzheimer's, he serves on the scientific advisory board for the Alzheimer Research Consortium and on the international advisory board for Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine. In 2013, he was given a Transformative Research Award by the director of the National Institutes of Health.

More profile about the speaker
Tony Wyss-Coray | Speaker | TED.com