sponsored links
TED2015

Siddhartha Mukherjee: Soon we'll cure diseases with a cell, not a pill

シッダールタ・ムカジー: 疾病が薬ではなく細胞によって治療される近未来

March 18, 2015

現在の疾病治療は6つの言葉に集約されるー「病気に・なる・薬を・飲む・病原体を・殺す」。これに対してシッダールタ・ムカジー医師は、病気を治癒する方法がすっかり変わってしまうであろう医学の未来を紹介します。

Siddhartha Mukherjee - Cancer physician and writer
When he’s not ferreting out the links between stem cells and malignant blood disease, Siddhartha Mukherjee writes and lectures on the history (and future) of medicine. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
皆さんに医学の未来のことを
お話ししましょう
00:12
I want to talk to you
about the future of medicine.
ただその前に その過去についても
ご紹介させてください
00:16
But before I do that, I want to talk
a little bit about the past.
医学の近代史の大半
00:20
Now, throughout much
of the recent history of medicine,
私たちは病気とその治療を
00:24
we've thought about illness and treatment
極めて単純なモデルに基づいて
考えてきました
00:28
in terms of a profoundly simple model.
実際に そのモデルは
単純すぎて
00:31
In fact, the model is so simple
6つの言葉で表せるほどです
00:34
that you could summarize it in six words:
「病気に・なる・薬を・飲む・病原体を・殺す」
00:37
have disease, take pill, kill something.
さて このモデルが優勢である理由は
00:42
Now, the reason
for the dominance of this model
もちろん 抗生物質のおかげです
00:47
is of course the antibiotic revolution.
みなさんはご存じないかも知れませんが
00:50
Many of you might not know this,
but we happen to be celebrating
今年は米国に抗生物質が導入されてから
100周年の節目です
00:53
the hundredth year of the introduction
of antibiotics into the United States.
みなさんも
00:57
But what you do know
抗生物質が治療のあり方をすっかり
変えてしまったことをご存じでしょう
00:59
is that that introduction
was nothing short of transformative.
自然界に由来する
あるいは研究室で人工的に合成された
01:04
Here you had a chemical,
either from the natural world
化学物質があり
01:08
or artificially synthesized
in the laboratory,
それは身体を駆け巡り
01:11
and it would course through your body,
標的を見つけ
01:14
it would find its target,
狙いを定めるー
01:17
lock into its target --
微生物か その一部かー
01:19
a microbe or some part of a microbe --
それから 鍵と鍵穴を解除してしまう
01:21
and then turn off a lock and a key
驚くべき巧みさと特異性で
01:25
with exquisite deftness,
exquisite specificity.
そのようにして
以前なら 死に至る病だった
01:29
And you would end up taking
a previously fatal, lethal disease --
肺炎や 梅毒 そして結核といった病気は
01:33
a pneumonia, syphilis, tuberculosis --
治療可能な疾患となりました
01:36
and transforming that
into a curable, or treatable illness.
肺炎なら
01:41
You have a pneumonia,
ペニシリンを投与し
01:44
you take penicillin,
すると病原菌は死んで
01:45
you kill the microbe
病気は治るのです
01:47
and you cure the disease.
これは非常に魅力的なアイデアで
01:49
So seductive was this idea,
鍵と鍵穴のたとえも  何かを殺すということも
わかりやすかったので
01:52
so potent the metaphor of lock and key
01:56
and killing something,
01:58
that it really swept through biology.
あっという間に
生物学界を席巻しました
他に類を見ないような
変革でした
02:00
It was a transformation like no other.
それから100年
02:03
And we've really spent the last 100 years
私たちはこの単純なモデルを
何度も繰り返し
02:07
trying to replicate that model
over and over again
非感染性疾患や
糖尿病、高血圧、心疾患といった
02:10
in noninfectious diseases,
慢性疾患の治療においても
再現しようとしてきました
02:11
in chronic diseases like diabetes
and hypertension and heart disease.
確かに効果はありましたが
部分的なものでした
02:16
And it's worked,
but it's only worked partly.
ご説明しましょう
02:20
Let me show you.
人体で起こりうる
02:22
You know, if you take the entire universe
あらゆる全ての
化学反応を考えてみましょう
02:25
of all chemical reactions
in the human body,
02:29
every chemical reaction
that your body is capable of,
ほとんどの人はその種類は
数百万の単位だろうと考えます
02:32
most people think that that number
is on the order of a million.
ここでは100万とします
02:35
Let's call it a million.
では 質問です
02:36
And now you ask the question,
「あらゆる医薬品化合物、
医薬品を使うと
02:38
what number or fraction of reactions
02:41
can actually be targeted
この反応のうち どれだけが標的となるのだろう?」
02:42
by the entire pharmacopoeia,
all of medicinal chemistry?
答えはたった250です
02:47
That number is 250.
その他は未だ
謎に包まれています
02:51
The rest is chemical darkness.
言い換えれば この鍵と鍵穴の
メカニズムで標的にできるのは
02:54
In other words, 0.025 percent
of all chemical reactions in your body
体内で起こる化学反応のうち
たった0.025%だけというわけです
03:00
are actually targetable
by this lock and key mechanism.
ヒトの生理学的現象は例えてみると
03:05
You know, if you think
about human physiology
広大な電話回線網のようです
03:08
as a vast global telephone network
交信し合うノード(節点)
そして交信し合う部分たち
03:12
with interacting nodes
and interacting pieces,
医薬化合物は
03:16
then all of our medicinal chemistry
ある片隅にある
03:19
is operating on one tiny corner
ネットワークの端 ―
末端で作用します
03:21
at the edge, the outer edge,
of that network.
医薬品化学の全てといっても
03:24
It's like all of our
pharmaceutical chemistry
カンザスのウィチタ局の
電話交換手が
03:28
is a pole operator in Wichita, Kansas
10から15の回線を操っている
というようなものです
03:32
who is tinkering with about
10 or 15 telephone lines.
これをどう考えたら良いでしょう?
03:36
So what do we do about this idea?
この考え方を新たなものに
変えてしまったら?
03:39
What if we reorganized this approach?
実際 自然界は私たちに
03:43
In fact, it turns out
that the natural world
全く違ったやり方で
病気について考えるように
03:47
gives us a sense of how one
might think about illness
教えてくれるのです
03:52
in a radically different way,
疾病、薬、標的
といったような考え方ではなくー
03:54
rather than disease, medicine, target.
自然界は階層的に
上へ上へと成り立っています
03:58
In fact, the natural world
is organized hierarchically upwards,
下へ ではなく上へと
04:02
not downwards, but upwards,
その成り立ちは自律的、半自発的である
構成単位 細胞から始まります
04:04
and we begin with a self-regulating,
semi-autonomous unit called a cell.
これら自律的、半自発的構成単位は
04:11
These self-regulating,
semi-autonomous units
同じく自律的、半自発的な
構成単位 「臓器」を生み出し
04:14
give rise to self-regulating,
semi-autonomous units called organs,
それらが集まり
「ヒト」を作り出します
04:19
and these organs coalesce
to form things called humans,
ヒトは自然環境の中に居住し
04:23
and these organisms
ultimately live in environments,
自然環境もまた部分的に
自律的、半自発的だと言えます
04:27
which are partly self-regulating
and partly semi-autonomous.
下ではなく上へ向かって伸びる
この階層スキームの良いところは
04:32
What's nice about this scheme,
this hierarchical scheme
04:35
building upwards rather than downwards,
04:38
is that it allows us
to think about illness as well
病気についてもまた
別の考え方ができるようになることです
04:41
in a somewhat different way.
がんを例にとってみましょう
04:44
Take a disease like cancer.
1950年代から
04:47
Since the 1950s,
鍵と鍵穴モデルをがんに適用しようと
手あたり次第試みました
04:49
we've tried rather desperately to apply
this lock and key model to cancer.
ガン細胞を殺そうと
04:54
We've tried to kill cells
あらゆる化学療法や標的治療を用いて
04:57
using a variety of chemotherapies
or targeted therapies,
ご存知の通り効果がありました
05:02
and as most of us know, that's worked.
白血病のような病気や
05:04
It's worked for diseases like leukemia.
ある種の乳がんに対しては
有効でした
05:06
It's worked for some forms
of breast cancer,
しかし やがてこのアプローチの
限界が見えてきました
05:08
but eventually you run
to the ceiling of that approach.
ごく最近 この十数年来は
05:12
And it's only in the last 10 years or so
免疫系を利用することを考え始めています
05:15
that we've begun to think
about using the immune system,
がん細胞は他のどこにでもなく
05:18
remembering that in fact the cancer cell
doesn't grow in a vacuum.
人間の体の中で育つのですから
05:21
It actually grows in a human organism.
身体の機能を利用して
05:23
And could you use the organismal capacity,
免疫系にがんを攻撃させるように
できないだろうか?
05:25
the fact that human beings
have an immune system, to attack cancer?
これは いくつかの素晴らしい
がん治療薬に結びつきました
05:28
In fact, it's led to the some of the most
spectacular new medicines in cancer.
そして 最後に自然環境という
階層がありましたね?
05:34
And finally there's the level
of the environment, isn't there?
私たちはがんが環境に
影響を及ぼすとは考えませんが
05:37
You know, we don't think of cancer
as altering the environment.
環境が非常にがんを引き起こしやすい
例があります
05:40
But let me give you an example
of a profoundly carcinogenic environment.
刑務所です
05:45
It's called a prison.
孤独感、抑うつ状態
監禁状態
05:47
You take loneliness, you take depression,
you take confinement,
それらに加えて
05:53
and you add to that,
一片の白紙にくるまれた
05:55
rolled up in a little
white sheet of paper,
最も強力な神経刺激作用を有する物質である
ニコチンを
05:58
one of the most potent neurostimulants
that we know, called nicotine,
つまり最も嗜癖性の強い物質を加えると
06:02
and you add to that one of the most potent
addictive substances that you know,
がんを引き起こしやすい
環境が生まれます
06:07
and you have
a pro-carcinogenic environment.
しかしがんを抑制しやすい
環境というのもあります
06:11
But you can have anti-carcinogenic
environments too.
そうした環境を作り出す努力も
なされてきました
06:13
There are attempts to create milieus,
乳がんにおいてホルモン環境を変えたり
といったことです
06:16
change the hormonal milieu
for breast cancer, for instance.
私たちは他のがんに対して
代謝環境を変えようとしてみています
06:20
We're trying to change the metabolic
milieu for other forms of cancer.
あるいは他の疾患
例えば 鬱を例にとってみましょう
06:23
Or take another disease, like depression.
同じように 上へ上へと
階層を辿ります
06:26
Again, working upwards,
1960〜70年代より
私たちは必死に
06:28
since the 1960s and 1970s,
we've tried, again, desperately
神経細胞の間で機能する分子である
06:32
to turn off molecules
that operate between nerve cells --
セロトニン、ドーパミンを
抑制する方法を探し
06:37
serotonin, dopamine --
鬱を治療しようとして来ました
06:39
and tried to cure depression that way,
それは効果がありましたが
限界に達しました
06:41
and that's worked,
but then that reached the limit.
今や どうやら臓器 すなわち脳の
06:44
And we now know that what you
really probably need to do
生理機能を変えることが必要だと分かりました
06:47
is to change the physiology
of the organ, the brain,
配線し直し 形を直すのです
06:50
rewire it, remodel it,
そして 研究に研究を重ねて
話し合い療法が
06:52
and that, of course,
we know study upon study has shown
その方法なのだと判明しました
06:55
that talk therapy does exactly that,
研究に次ぐ研究で明らかになったのは
06:56
and study upon study
has shown that talk therapy
話し合い療法と投薬を組み合わせることが
06:59
combined with medicines, pills,
どちらか一方単独よりも効果的だ
ということです
07:02
really is much more effective
than either one alone.
鬱状態を変えてしまうような
環境を作り出すことは可能でしょうか?
07:05
Can we imagine a more immersive
environment that will change depression?
鬱を誘発するシグナルを
ブロックしてしまうことは?
07:09
Can you lock out the signals
that elicit depression?
この階層的に連鎖した組織を
上へと登っていきましょう
07:13
Again, moving upwards along this
hierarchical chain of organization.
おそらく 本当に大切なことは
07:19
What's really at stake perhaps here
薬剤そのものではなく
治療を例える方法なのです
07:22
is not the medicine itself but a metaphor.
腎不全や糖尿病、高血圧
骨関節炎といった
07:25
Rather than killing something,
慢性的な変性疾患の場合
07:27
in the case of the great
chronic degenerative diseases --
何か病原体を殺す
というよりも
07:31
kidney failure, diabetes,
hypertension, osteoarthritis --
多分 私たちは 何かを成長させる
という例えを使うべきなのです
07:34
maybe what we really need to do is change
the metaphor to growing something.
そして きっとそれこそが
07:38
And that's the key, perhaps,
私たちの医学の考え方を
再構成する鍵なのです
07:40
to reframing our thinking about medicine.
さて この変革するというアイデア
07:42
Now, this idea of changing,
観点をシフトさせるということは
07:46
of creating a perceptual
shift, as it were,
10年ほど前に私に突如起こった
私的な事件から始まりました
07:48
came home to me to roost in a very
personal manner about 10 years ago.
10年ほど前ー
私は人生の殆どランニングをしてきましたがー
07:52
About 10 years ago --
I've been a runner most of my life --
土曜の朝も走りに出かけました
07:54
I went for a run, a Saturday morning run,
家に戻ると
体が動かなくなっていて
07:56
I came back and woke up
and I basically couldn't move.
右膝は腫れ上がり
07:59
My right knee was swollen up,
あの嫌な感じの
骨が軋む音が聞こえました
08:01
and you could hear that ominous crunch
of bone against bone.
医師の特権で自分のMRIをオーダーできるので
08:06
And one of the perks of being a physician
is that you get to order your own MRIs.
翌週にはMRIを撮りました
08:10
And I had an MRI the next week,
and it looked like that.
すると骨の間の半月板軟骨組織が
08:14
Essentially, the meniscus of cartilage
that is between bone
完全に裂けており
骨自体も砕けてしまっていたのです
08:19
had been completely torn
and the bone itself had been shattered.
私に同情している皆さんに
08:22
Now, if you're looking at me
and feeling sorry,
お伝えします
08:25
let me tell you a few facts.
もし私が観客の皆さんの
MRIを撮るとすると
08:27
If I was to take an MRI
of every person in this audience,
6割の方の骨に変異があったり
08:31
60 percent of you would show signs
軟骨がこのように変性したり
という兆候が見つかります
08:33
of bone degeneration
and cartilage degeneration like this.
70歳までに85%の女性は
08:36
85 percent of all women by the age of 70
中度から強度の
軟骨変性が見られます
08:39
would show moderate to severe
cartilage degeneration.
この中の50~60%の男性も
08:43
50 to 60 percent
of the men in this audience
同様です
08:45
would also have such signs.
ですからこれは非常に
よくある疾患なのです
08:46
So this is a very common disease.
二番目の医師の特権は
08:48
Well, the second perk of being a physician
自分の疾病について研究ができること
08:50
is that you can get
to experiment on your own ailments.
それで10年ほど前から
08:53
So about 10 years ago we began,
私たちはこの軟骨変性のプロセスを
研究室に持ち込んで
08:56
we brought this process
into the laboratory,
簡単な実験を始めました
08:58
and we began to do simple experiments,
この変性について
機械的な治療を試みました
09:00
mechanically trying
to fix this degeneration.
軟骨の退行変性を逆行させるために
09:03
We tried to inject chemicals
into the knee spaces of animals
動物の膝に化学物質の注射を試みました
09:08
to try to reverse cartilage degeneration,
このとても長く辛いプロセスは結局
09:10
and to put a short summary
on a very long and painful process,
何も生み出しませんでした
09:15
essentially it came to naught.
何も起こらなかったのです
09:17
Nothing happened.
そして7年ほど前
オーストラリアから学生が研究に来ました
09:18
And then about seven years ago,
we had a research student from Australia.
オーストラリア人たちの良いところは
09:23
The nice thing about Australians
常に世界を逆さまに見ているということです
09:25
is that they're habitually used to
looking at the world upside down.
(笑)
09:28
(Laughter)
ダンは言いました
「ひょっとしたら機械的な問題じゃなく
09:29
And so Dan suggested to me, "You know,
maybe it isn't a mechanical problem.
化学物質の問題でもなく
幹細胞に問題があるのかも知れませんね」
09:33
Maybe it isn't a chemical problem.
Maybe it's a stem cell problem."
言い換えると
彼には2つの仮説がありました
09:39
In other words, he had two hypotheses.
一つ目は 骨格幹細胞というものの存在
09:41
Number one, there is such a thing
as a skeletal stem cell --
骨格幹細胞は全脊椎、骨、軟骨や
09:45
a skeletal stem cell that builds up
the entire vertebrate skeleton,
骨格の線維を形成します
09:48
bone, cartilage and the fibrous
elements of skeleton,
ちょうど血液の幹細胞や
09:51
just like there's a stem cell in blood,
神経系の幹細胞があるように
09:53
just like there's a stem cell
in the nervous system.
二つ目は おそらくこの幹細胞の変性や機能異常が
09:55
And two, that maybe that, the degeneration
or dysfunction of this stem cell
骨軟骨関節炎といった非常によく見られる
疾患を引き起こしているのだということ
09:59
is what's causing osteochondral arthritis,
a very common ailment.
つまり 私たちは ずっと
治療薬を求めていたところが
10:02
So really the question was,
were we looking for a pill
実は探すべきものは細胞だったのでは
ないかということです
10:06
when we should have really
been looking for a cell.
それで疾患モデルを変え
10:08
So we switched our models,
骨格幹細胞を探し始めたのです
10:11
and now we began
to look for skeletal stem cells.
長い話をはしょると
10:15
And to cut again a long story short,
およそ5年前にこれらの細胞を見つけました
10:17
about five years ago,
we found these cells.
骨の内部に存在します
10:21
They live inside the skeleton.
模式図と本物の画像です
10:24
Here's a schematic and then
a real photograph of one of them.
白いのが骨で
10:27
The white stuff is bone,
これらの赤い柱と黄色の細胞は
10:29
and these red columns that you see
and the yellow cells
一つの骨格幹細胞から現れた細胞で
10:32
are cells that have arisen
from one single skeletal stem cell --
軟骨と骨の柱が
一つの細胞から出来てきています
10:35
columns of cartilage, columns of bone
coming out of a single cell.
これらは興味深い細胞で
四つの性質があります
10:38
These cells are fascinating.
They have four properties.
一つは それが予期された場所に
存在するということ
10:41
Number one is that they live
where they're expected to live.
骨の表面下
10:45
They live just underneath
the surface of the bone,
軟骨組織の下層です
10:48
underneath cartilage.
生物学では 場所が非常に重要です
10:49
You know, in biology,
it's location, location, location.
そしてそこから 特定の場所に
移動し 骨や軟骨となるのです
10:52
And they move into the appropriate areas
and form bone and cartilage.
それがまず一つ
10:56
That's one.
次にこの性質も面白いのですが
10:57
Here's an interesting property.
これを骨格から取り出し
10:59
You can take them out
of the vertebrate skeleton,
研究室の培養皿で培養できます
11:02
you can culture them
in petri dishes in the laboratory,
するとそれらは盛んに軟骨を
形成しようとします
11:04
and they are dying to form cartilage.
今まではどうやっても
軟骨を作り出せなかったのに
11:06
Remember how we couldn't
form cartilage for love or money?
これらの細胞は軟骨を
作りたくてたまらないのです
11:09
These cells are dying to form cartilage.
自らの周囲に軟骨の層を作り出します
11:11
They form their own furls
of cartilage around themselves.
それから三番目
11:14
They're also, number three,
骨折を驚異的に治癒します
11:16
the most efficient repairers
of fractures that we've ever encountered.
これは骨折したマウスの骨です
11:20
This is a little bone,
a mouse bone that we fractured
自然に治癒させています
11:23
and then let it heal by itself.
幹細胞は
黄色で示した骨と
11:25
These stem cells have come in
and repaired, in yellow, the bone,
白で示した軟骨を
ほぼ完全に修復しています
11:28
in white, the cartilage,
almost completely.
蛍光色素で染色すると
11:30
So much so that if you label them
with a fluorescent dye
それらが特殊な
細胞接着剤のように働き
11:34
you can see them like some kind
of peculiar cellular glue
骨折部位に集まり
11:38
coming into the area of a fracture,
局所的に働いたあと
活動を終えるのが観察できます
11:40
fixing it locally
and then stopping their work.
四番目は 最も不吉なものです
11:43
Now, the fourth one is the most ominous,
それはその数が
突然減少するということです
11:45
and that is that their numbers
decline precipitously,
唐突に 10分の1それから50分の1へ
老化と共に減少します
11:49
precipitously, tenfold,
fiftyfold, as you age.
結局 何が起こったのかというと
11:54
And so what had happened, really,
観点のシフトが生じたのでした
11:55
is that we found ourselves
in a perceptual shift.
治療薬の探求が
11:58
We had gone hunting for pills
理論を発見するという結果に行き着きました
12:01
but we ended up finding theories.
ある意味
12:04
And in some ways
私たちの研究は以下の概念に
基づいていたとは言えます
12:05
we had hooked ourselves
back onto this idea:
細胞、動物(個体)、環境
12:07
cells, organisms, environments,
まず 骨幹細胞から見ると
12:10
because we were now thinking
about bone stem cells,
関節炎を細胞レベルの疾病として考えています
12:13
we were thinking about arthritis
in terms of a cellular disease.
では 次の疑問です
臓器は?
12:17
And then the next question was,
are there organs?
体の外に 臓器を作り出すことは
可能でしょうか?
12:19
Can you build this
as an organ outside the body?
(体外で作った)軟骨を損傷部位に移植することは
できるでしょうか?
12:22
Can you implant cartilage
into areas of trauma?
そしてこれはおそらく
最も興味深い質問ですが
12:26
And perhaps most interestingly,
さらに階層を上へと昇りー
環境を作ることができるでしょうか?
12:28
can you ascend right up
and create environments?
骨は運動により再構築されますが
12:30
You know, we know
that exercise remodels bone,
誰もそのために運動しませんよね?
12:33
but come on, none of us
is going to exercise.
それなら 受動的に骨に力を加えたり
弛めたりすることで
12:36
So could you imagine ways of passively
loading and unloading bone
変性していく軟骨を再構築したり
再生したりできないでしょうか?
12:41
so that you can recreate
or regenerate degenerating cartilage?
もっと興味深く
重要な問いかけは
12:46
And perhaps more interesting,
and more importantly,
このモデルを更に広げて
医学の外へと応用できないかというものです
12:48
the question is, can you apply this model
more globally outside medicine?
ここで一貫して重要な概念は
「何かを殺すのではなく
12:51
What's at stake, as I said before,
is not killing something,
何かを育成すること」です
12:56
but growing something.
これは私たちが未来の医学を
どう捉えるかについて
12:58
And it raises a series of, I think,
some of the most interesting questions
一連の 検討すべき、最も興味ある
疑問を浮かび上がらせます
13:02
about how we think
about medicine in the future.
あなたの薬が錠剤ではなく
細胞になったらどうですか?
13:06
Could your medicine
be a cell and not a pill?
それはどうやって培養するでしょう?
13:10
How would we grow these cells?
細胞のがん化はどう防ぐのでしょう?
13:13
What we would we do to stop
the malignant growth of these cells?
細胞増殖の束縛を解くことの
問題点も耳にしてきましたが
13:16
We heard about the problems
of unleashing growth.
自殺遺伝子をそれらの細胞に組み込み
ストップをかけることは
13:20
Could we implant
suicide genes into these cells
可能でしょうか?
13:22
to stop them from growing?
「薬」が身体の外で生成された臓器であり
13:24
Could your medicine be an organ
that's created outside the body
それが移植される
そんなことは可能でしょうか?
13:28
and then implanted into the body?
変性をそれで
止めることができるでしょうか
13:30
Could that stop some of the degeneration?
もし臓器が記憶を
必要としたら?
13:33
What if the organ needed to have memory?
神経系疾患では
臓器が記憶を持っていた例があります
13:35
In cases of diseases of the nervous system
some of those organs had memory.
どうやってそうした記憶を
移植と共に戻すことが出来るでしょう?
13:40
How could we implant
those memories back in?
臓器は貯蔵できるのでしょうか?
13:42
Could we store these organs?
臓器はそれぞれの個人個人
専用に生成され
13:44
Would each organ have to be developed
for an individual human being
その体に戻されなければ
ならないのでしょうか?
13:47
and put back?
そして 難しい問いです
13:50
And perhaps most puzzlingly,
環境が薬となることができるでしょうか?
13:52
could your medicine be an environment?
環境を特許にできるでしょうか?
13:55
Could you patent an environment?
あらゆる文化で
13:57
You know, in every culture,
呪術師は環境を薬として
用いてきましたね
14:01
shamans have been using
environments as medicines.
そういう未来を
想像できるでしょうか
14:04
Could we imagine that for our future?
疾患治療モデルから話し始めましたので
14:07
I've talked a lot about models.
I began this talk with models.
モデル構築についてお話しして
締めくくりましょう
14:11
So let me end with some thoughts
about model building.
それは 科学者として当然行うことです
14:14
That's what we do as scientists.
建築家がモデルを作る時
14:16
You know, when an architect
builds a model,
ある世界の模型を示しています
14:19
he or she is trying to show you
a world in miniature.
しかし科学者がモデルを作る時
14:22
But when a scientist is building a model,
ある世界の例えを示しているのです
14:25
he or she is trying to show you
the world in metaphor.
そうして新たな見方を創造しようとします
14:29
He or she is trying to create
a new way of seeing.
つまり前者は大きさにおけるシフト
ところが後者は観点におけるシフトなのです
14:33
The former is a scale shift.
The latter is a perceptual shift.
抗生物質はそのような
観点のシフトをもたらし
14:38
Now, antibiotics created
such a perceptual shift
過去100年 私たちの
医学に対する考え方を
14:43
in our way of thinking about medicine
that it really colored, distorted,
完全に彩り 捻じ曲げてしまいました
14:47
very successfully, the way we've thought
about medicine for the last hundred years.
しかし 私たちには
未来の医学の新しいモデルが必要なのです
14:52
But we need new models
to think about medicine in the future.
それが大事なことなのです
14:56
That's what's at stake.
こんな言い方をよく見かけます
14:59
You know, there's
a popular trope out there
革新的なインパクトのあるー
15:02
that the reason we haven't had
the transformative impact
疾患治療法が無い理由は
15:06
on the treatment of illness
医薬品が
まだ十分に強力ではないからだ
15:08
is because we don't have
powerful-enough drugs,
それには一理あるでしょう
15:11
and that's partly true.
しかし本当の理由は
15:13
But perhaps the real reason is
医薬についての考え方が
まだ十分に強力ではないからです
15:15
that we don't have powerful-enough
ways of thinking about medicines.
新薬が現れるのは確かに
15:20
It's certainly true that
素晴らしいことです
15:22
it would be lovely to have new medicines.
しかし 根本的に大切なことは
これら三つの概念なのです
15:26
But perhaps what's really at stake
are three more intangible M's:
「メカニズム、モデル、メタファー(例え)」
15:31
mechanisms, models, metaphors.
ありがとうございました
15:35
Thank you.
(拍手)
15:36
(Applause)
クリス・アンダーソン:
その「例え」がとても気に入りました
15:45
Chris Anderson:
I really like this metaphor.
それはどう繋がるんですか?
15:48
How does it link in?
テクノロジー界にはパーソナル医療について
15:50
There's a lot of talk in technologyland
多くの話題がありますね
15:53
about the personalization of medicine,
これだけたくさんの医療データがあって
未来の治療では
15:55
that we have all this data
and that medical treatments of the future
あなた個人やあなたの遺伝子
その時の体調に特化するのでしょうか
15:59
will be for you specifically,
your genome, your current context.
そうしたものもあなたのモデルに
適用できるんでしょうか?
16:03
Does that apply to this model
you've got here?
シッダールタ・ムカジー:興味深い質問ですね
16:07
Siddhartha Mukherjee:
It's a very interesting question.
ええ 医療のパーソナル化も考えました
16:10
We've thought about
personalization of medicine
遺伝子学に基づいてね
16:12
very much in terms of genomics.
遺伝子は今日の医学において
またこの表現ですがー
16:14
That's because the gene
is such a dominant metaphor,
強力なメタファーですから
16:16
again, to use that same word,
in medicine today,
遺伝子は医療のパーソナライゼーションを
もたらすと思います
16:19
that we think the genome will drive
the personalization of medicine.
しかし もちろん遺伝子は
16:23
But of course the genome
is just the bottom
人間という存在の
長い連鎖の最下部ですが
16:26
of a long chain of being, as it were.
「最小の組織化された単位」はあくまでも細胞です
16:30
That chain of being, really the first
organized unit of that, is the cell.
ですからこの方法で 医学に何かを提供するとすれば
16:34
So, if we are really going to deliver
in medicine in this way,
細胞治療をパーソナライズすることを
考えなければならないのです
16:37
we have to think of personalizing
cellular therapies,
次に パーソナル臓器療法
16:40
and then personalizing
organ or organismal therapies,
そして究極的に 周囲の環境を
パーソナライズしてしまうことです
16:43
and ultimately personalizing
immersion therapies for the environment.
ですから全てのステージで
16:47
So I think at every stage, you know --
この例えが
根底にあるのです
16:50
there's that metaphor,
there's turtles all the way.
パーソナライゼーションがすべてについてきます
16:52
Well, in this, there's
personalization all the way.
クリス:あなたが「薬が細胞であるかもしれない」という時
それは錠剤ではないですね
16:55
CA: So when you say
medicine could be a cell
16:58
and not a pill,
それは自分の細胞でも有り得る
ということですか?
16:59
you're talking about
potentially your own cells.
シッダールダ:もちろんです
クリス:それが幹細胞に変換されー
17:02
SM: Absolutely.
CA: So converted to stem cells,
おそらくあらゆる薬や何かに対して
テストされ 準備される
17:04
perhaps tested against all kinds
of drugs or something, and prepared.
シッダールダ:そしてこれは実際に
私たちがやっていることなのです
17:09
SM: And there's no perhaps.
This is what we're doing.
実際に起こっていて
私たちは遺伝子学から
17:11
This is what's happening,
and in fact, we're slowly moving,
遠ざかるのではなく
17:15
not away from genomics,
but incorporating genomics
それを細胞、臓器、 環境などの
17:19
into what we call multi-order,
semi-autonomous, self-regulating systems,
多次、半自発、自律システムに統合するのです
17:24
like cells, like organs,
like environments.
クリス:ありがとうございました
17:26
CA: Thank you so much.
シッダールダ:こちらこそ ありがとうございました
17:28
SM: Pleasure. Thanks.
Translator:Eriko T.
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Siddhartha Mukherjee - Cancer physician and writer
When he’s not ferreting out the links between stem cells and malignant blood disease, Siddhartha Mukherjee writes and lectures on the history (and future) of medicine.

Why you should listen

While discussing a diagnosis with a patient, Siddhartha Mukherjee realized that there were no easy answers to the question, “What is cancer?” Faced with his hesitation, Mukherjee decided to do something about it.

Over the next six years, Mukherjee wrote the influential, Pulitzer-winning The Emperor of All Maladies, a 4,000-year “biography” of cancer. He collaborated with Ken Burns on a six-hour documentary for PBS based on his book, updating the story with recent discoveries in oncology.

In his new TED Book, The Laws of Medicine, he examines the three principles that govern modern medicine -- and every profession that confronts uncertainty and wonder.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.