13:04
TED Fellows Retreat 2015

Meklit Hadero: The unexpected beauty of everyday sounds

メクリト・ハデロ: 日常の音に隠された思いがけない美とは

Filmed:

シンガー・ソングライターのメクリト・ハデロが、鳥の歌声から、日常会話での声の抑揚、鍋の蓋の音まで、様々な例を挙げながら、あらゆる日常の音風景―静寂さえも―が音楽であると語ります。メクリトの言葉では、世界は音楽的表現で溢れており、私たちは既に音楽漬けになっているのです。

- Singer-songwriter
Meklit Hadero is an Ethiopian-American singer-songwriter living the cultural in-between, both in her own luminous compositions and as a co-founder of the Nile Project. Full bio

As a singer-songwriter,
シンガー・ソングライターをしていると
00:13
people often ask me about my influences
or, as I like to call them,
よく聞かれるのが
影響を受けてきた音楽のこと
00:15
my sonic lineages.
「音の血統」と呼んでいます
00:19
And I could easily tell you
わかりやすい答えを言えば
00:21
that I was shaped by the jazz
and hip hop that I grew up with,
聴いて育った
ジャズやヒップホップや
00:23
by the Ethiopian heritage of my ancestors,
私に流れるエチオピア人の血
00:26
or by the 1980s pop
on my childhood radio stations.
幼少期にラジオで流れていた
80年代ポップと言えますが
00:29
But beyond genre,
there is another question:
でも そういうジャンルの概念を超えて
考えてみてください
00:33
how do the sounds we hear every day
influence the music that we make?
私たちが毎日聞いている音が
作曲に与える影響とは?
00:37
I believe that everyday soundscape
私は 日常の音風景が
00:42
can be the most unexpected
inspiration for songwriting,
曲作りの意外なインスピレーションに
なると思っています
00:44
and to look at this idea
a little bit more closely,
この考え方を もう少し掘り下げて
00:48
I'm going to talk today
about three things:
3つのテーマについてお話します
00:50
nature, language and silence --
「自然」、「言語」 、そして「静寂」―
00:52
or rather, the impossibility
of true silence.
3つ目は 静寂というよりは
「完全な無音の不可能性」についてです
00:55
And through this I hope to give you
a sense of a world
そして皆さんには
私たちの住む世界には既に
00:59
already alive with musical expression,
音楽表現が息づいていることや
そこで私たち一人一人が
01:02
with each of us serving
as active participants,
知ってか知らずか
能動的な役目を果たしていることを
01:05
whether we know it or not.
気づいていただければと思います
01:09
I'm going to start today with nature,
but before we do that,
では 自然のお話から
でも その前に
01:12
let's quickly listen to this snippet
of an opera singer warming up.
発声練習中のオペラ歌手の声を
ちょっと聞いてみましょう
01:14
Here it is.
どうぞ
01:18
(Singing)
(歌声開始)
01:20
(Singing ends)
(歌声終了)
01:35
It's beautiful, isn't it?
美しい声ですよね
01:37
Gotcha!
引っかかった!
01:40
That is actually not the sound
of an opera singer warming up.
実は今の オペラ歌手じゃないんです
01:41
That is the sound of a bird
実際は 鳥の歌声なんです
01:45
slowed down to a pace
モリヒバリの鳴き声の速度を
01:47
that the human ear mistakenly
recognizes as its own.
人間の耳が 人の声と間違えるまで
落としたものです
01:49
It was released as part of Peter Szöke's
1987 Hungarian recording
1987年ハンガリーで録音された
ピーター・ソーケ作
01:54
"The Unknown Music of Birds,"
『知られざる鳥の音楽』の一部分です
01:58
where he records many birds
and slows down their pitches
この楽曲は 鳥の鳴き声を
スロー再生した音を何種類も使い
02:01
to reveal what's underneath.
隠された美を露わにしました
02:05
Let's listen to the full-speed recording.
フルスピードで聴いてみましょう
02:07
(Bird singing)
(鳥の歌声)
02:11
Now, let's hear the two of them together
頭の中で並べて比べられるように
02:15
so your brain can juxtapose them.
2種類を続けて聴いてみましょう
02:17
(Bird singing at slow then full speed)
(歌声 低速版とフルスピード版)
02:20
(Singing ends)
(終了)
02:38
It's incredible.
すごいでしょう
02:42
Perhaps the techniques of opera singing
were inspired by birdsong.
オペラ歌唱のテクニックは
鳥の声がヒントだったのかもしれません
02:43
As humans, we intuitively understand birds
to be our musical teachers.
人は直感的に 鳥たちが
音楽の師であると知っています
02:48
In Ethiopia, birds
are considered an integral part
エチオピアでは
鳥が音楽の起源に
02:54
of the origin of music itself.
欠かせない要素であると
考えられています
02:57
The story goes like this:
こういう物語があります
03:00
1,500 years ago, a young man
was born in the Empire of Aksum,
1500年前 アクサム帝国で生まれた
若い青年の話です
03:03
a major trading center
of the ancient world.
アクサムは大昔
商業の中心地でした
03:08
His name was Yared.
青年の名前はヤレド
03:11
When Yared was seven years old
his father died,
ヤレドが7歳のとき
父親が亡くなり
03:14
and his mother sent him to go live
with an uncle, who was a priest
母親は 彼を叔父の元に
送りました
03:17
of the Ethiopian Orthodox tradition,
叔父は
世界最古の教会の一つである
03:21
one of the oldest churches in the world.
エチオピア正教の神父でした
03:23
Now, this tradition has an enormous amount
of scholarship and learning,
エチオピア正教は伝統的に
学問や教育に大いに力を入れていたので
03:26
and Yared had to study and study
and study and study,
ヤレドは 死ぬほど
勉強させられることになりました
03:30
and one day he was studying under a tree,
ある日 木の下で勉強していると
03:33
when three birds came to him.
3羽の鳥が来て
03:36
One by one, these birds
became his teachers.
1羽1羽がそれぞれ
ヤレドの師になり
03:39
They taught him music -- scales, in fact.
音楽を―
というか音階を教えたのでした
03:42
And Yared, eventually
recognized as Saint Yared,
ヤレドは後に
聖人として世に知られますが
03:47
used these scales to compose
five volumes of chants and hymns
この音階を使って作った
5編の聖歌と賛美歌は
03:50
for worship and celebration.
礼拝や祭事に使われました
03:54
And he used these scales
to compose and to create
ヤレドはこの音階を作曲に利用し
03:56
an indigenous musical notation system.
エチオピア固有の記譜法も
考案しました
04:00
And these scales evolved
into what is known as kiñit,
この音階が
クニェッツ(kiñit) として知られるー
04:03
the unique, pentatonic, five-note,
modal system that is very much alive
5音音階式のモードに進化しました
このスタイルは現代のエチオピアでも
04:07
and thriving and still evolving
in Ethiopia today.
今だに頻繁に使われ
進化し続けています
04:13
Now, I love this story because
it's true at multiple levels.
さて 私の大好きなこの物語
様々な面で真実だとわかります
04:18
Saint Yared was a real, historical figure,
聖ヤレドは 歴史上に
実在した人物です
04:21
and the natural world
can be our musical teacher.
そして 自然界は 私達にとって
音楽の師でもあります
04:24
And we have so many examples of this:
例をあればきりがありません
04:29
the Pygmies of the Congo
tune their instruments
コンゴのピグミー族は
楽器を
04:31
to the pitches of the birds
in the forest around them.
森の鳥の鳴き声に
合わせて調律します
04:33
Musician and natural soundscape
expert Bernie Krause describes
自然の音風景の大家
音楽家バーニー・クラウスによれば
04:36
how a healthy environment
has animals and insects
健全な環境の下では
動物や虫たちの鳴き声が
04:39
taking up low, medium
and high-frequency bands,
低音、中音、高音域を
構成しており
04:42
in exactly the same way
as a symphony does.
これは交響楽と
まったく同じなのです
04:46
And countless works of music
were inspired by bird and forest song.
鳥や森の音に影響を受けた音楽は
数え切れないほどあります
04:50
Yes, the natural world
can be our cultural teacher.
そう 自然界が
人の文化の師になり得るのです
04:54
So let's go now to the uniquely
human world of language.
では 次に人間特有の
言語の世界を見てみましょう
05:00
Every language communicates
with pitch to varying degrees,
程度に差はあれど
どんな言語でも抑揚は重要です
05:05
whether it's Mandarin Chinese,
中国語ならば
05:08
where a shift in melodic inflection
gives the same phonetic syllable
同じ表記の音節も
声調が変われば
05:09
an entirely different meaning,
全く違う意味を持ってきます
05:13
to a language like English,
英語では
05:15
where a raised pitch
at the end of a sentence ...
文の語尾が上がれば
05:16
(Going up in pitch) implies a question?
(語尾を上げて)質問形になりますよね?
05:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:21
As an Ethiopian-American woman,
エチオピア系アメリカ人の私は
05:23
I grew up around the language
of Amharic, Amhariña.
アムハリク語を聞きながら
育ちました
05:24
It was my first language,
the language of my parents,
両親の母語で
私が最初に憶えた言葉であり
05:27
one of the main languages of Ethiopia.
エチオピアの主要な言語の
1つです
05:29
And there are a million reasons
to fall in love with this language:
本当にたくさんの魅力を持つ言語です
05:32
its depth of poetics,
its double entendres,
詩学性の深さや
二重の意味を持つ表現
05:35
its wax and gold, its humor,
表の意味と裏の意味
ユーモアに
05:38
its proverbs that illuminate
the wisdom and follies of life.
人間の叡智と愚かさを描写した
ことわざなど
05:41
But there's also this melodicism,
a musicality built right in.
それだけじゃなく 旋律性や
音感も強く埋め込まれた言語です
05:46
And I find this distilled most clearly
これが最も顕著に現れているのは
05:50
in what I like to call
emphatic language --
強調表現とでも呼びましょうか
05:52
language that's meant
to highlight or underline
何かを 明示したり強調したり
05:55
or that springs from surprise.
驚いたときに飛び出す表現です
05:57
Take, for example, the word: "indey."
例えば 「インデーィ」(indey) という単語
06:00
Now, if there are Ethiopians
in the audience,
この中にエチオピア出身の方がいれば
06:03
they're probably chuckling to themselves,
くすっとした方もいるのでは
06:05
because the word means
something like "No!"
この単語には 状況により
「まさか!」とか
06:07
or "How could he?" or "No, he didn't."
「どうして?」「ありえない!」
06:09
It kind of depends on the situation.
という意味になります
06:11
But when I was a kid,
this was my very favorite word,
私が子供のときは
この言葉が大好きでした
06:13
and I think it's because it has a pitch.
この言葉が持つ抑揚のせいだと思います
06:17
It has a melody.
メロディーがあるからです
06:20
You can almost see the shape
as it springs from someone's mouth.
誰かの口から飛び出した時の
音の形が見えるくらいに
06:21
"Indey" -- it dips, and then raises again.
「インデーィ」(indey)
すとんと落ちて 再び上昇します
06:24
And as a musician and composer,
when I hear that word,
ミュージシャンで作曲家の私は
この言葉を聞くと
06:28
something like this
is floating through my mind.
頭に浮かんでくるものがあります
こんな感じです
06:31
(Music and singing "Indey")
(歌と演奏)
06:35
(Music ends)
(音楽終了)
06:45
Or take, for example, the phrase
for "It is right" or "It is correct" --
他にも例えば 「その通り」とか
「正解」という意味の
06:48
"Lickih nehu ... Lickih nehu."
「リッキ ノウ」(Lickih nehu)
06:52
It's an affirmation, an agreement.
肯定や 同意を意味します
06:54
"Lickih nehu."
「リッキ ノウ」(Lickih nehu)
06:56
When I hear that phrase,
この表現を聞いたとき
06:58
something like this starts rolling
through my mind.
頭の中で流れ出すのがこれです
06:59
(Music and singing "Lickih nehu")
(歌と演奏)
07:04
(Music ends)
(音楽終了)
07:11
And in both of those cases,
what I did was I took the melody
今聞いた音楽の中で
私がしたことは
07:14
and the phrasing
of those words and phrases
両方とも 言葉の
メロディーを抜き出して
07:17
and I turned them into musical parts
to use in these short compositions.
音楽的パーツに変換し
小品を作曲したわけです
07:19
And I like to write bass lines,
ベースラインを考えるのが
好きなので
07:24
so they both ended up
kind of as bass lines.
結局 両方そうなりました
07:26
Now, this is based on the work
of Jason Moran and others
さて これは
ジェイソン・モラン達の作った
07:29
who work intimately
with music and language,
音楽と言語を密接に関連させた
作品が元になったのですが
07:32
but it's also something I've had
in my head since I was a kid,
私も実は小さい頃からずっと
思っていたことでした
07:35
how musical my parents sounded
両親が自分達同士や
私たち子供と話す時
07:38
when they were speaking
to each other and to us.
音楽みたいだなと
思っていました
07:40
It was from them
and from Amhariña that I learned
私は両親や
アムハリク語のおかげで
07:44
that we are awash in musical expression
私たちは音楽的表現に
どっぷり浸かっていること
07:46
with every word,
every sentence that we speak,
自分が発し 受け取る
言葉や文の一つ一つが
07:49
every word, every sentence
that we receive.
音楽的表現なのだということを
知ったのです
07:52
Perhaps you can hear it
in the words I'm speaking even now.
私が今こうやって話す言葉も
音楽に聞こえるのではないでしょうか
07:54
Finally, we go to the 1950s United States
では 最後に
1950年代のアメリカ
08:00
and the most seminal work
of 20th century avant-garde composition:
20世紀アヴァンギャルド音楽で
最も独創的な作品
08:02
John Cage's "4:33,"
ジョン・ケージの『4:33』
08:06
written for any instrument
or combination of instruments.
この曲は 対象の楽器や
その組み合わせを問いません
08:08
The musician or musicians are invited
to walk onto the stage
演奏する人やグループは
ストップウォッチを持って
08:12
with a stopwatch and open the score,
ステージに上がり 楽譜を開きます
08:16
which was actually purchased
by the Museum of Modern Art --
実はこの楽譜
ニューヨーク現代美術館が買ったんです
08:19
the score, that is.
この楽譜を です
08:22
And this score has not
a single note written
この楽譜には
音符がありません
08:24
and there is not a single note played
そして 4分33秒の間
08:28
for four minutes and 33 seconds.
奏でられる音も
一つもありません
08:30
And, at once enraging and enrapturing,
この作品は
憤りと歓喜を一度に掻き立てますが
08:34
Cage shows us that even
when there are no strings
弦が指ではじかれなくても
08:39
being plucked by fingers
or hands hammering piano keys,
ピアノ鍵盤が指で叩かれなくても
08:42
still there is music,
still there is music,
それでも それでも
それでも音楽なんだ と
08:47
still there is music.
伝えているのです
08:49
And what is this music?
では今この瞬間の音楽は何でしょう?
08:51
It was that sneeze in the back.
誰かが後ろでくしゃみをした音です
08:54
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:57
It is the everyday soundscape
that arises from the audience themselves:
観客席から生まれる
日常の音風景
08:58
their coughs, their sighs, their rustles,
their whispers, their sneezes,
咳や ため息 カサカサいう音
ひそひそ声や くしゃみ
09:03
the room, the wood
of the floors and the walls
さらに部屋
床や壁の木材などが
09:08
expanding and contracting,
creaking and groaning
温度の上下により
膨張し収縮し
09:10
with the heat and the cold,
きしんだり うなったり
09:13
the pipes clanking and contributing.
パイプが金属音を立てて
この音風景に加わります
09:14
And controversial though it was,
and even controversial though it remains,
この作品は当時 そして今も
物議を醸していますが
09:19
Cage's point is that there is no
such thing as true silence.
全くの無音 などというものはない
これがジョン・ケージの主張です
09:22
Even in the most silent environments,
we still hear and feel the sound
どんなに静かな環境だとしても
自分の心臓の鼓動は聞こえるし
09:28
of our own heartbeats.
感じるのですから
09:32
The world is alive
with musical expression.
世界は 音楽的表現に溢れ
生きており
09:34
We are already immersed.
そこに私たちはもう
浸かっているのです
09:38
Now, I had my own moment of,
let's say, remixing John Cage
私自身も このジョン・ケージ的瞬間を
体験しました
09:42
a couple of months ago
数ヶ月前のことです
09:46
when I was standing
in front of the stove cooking lentils.
コンロの前に立って
レンズ豆を料理していました
09:47
And it was late one night
and it was time to stir,
夜遅くのことでした
混ぜないといけなかったので
09:50
so I lifted the lid off the cooking pot,
鍋から蓋を取って
09:53
and I placed it onto
the kitchen counter next to me,
すぐ横のカウンターに置きました
09:55
and it started to roll back and forth
すると蓋が 前後に揺れて
09:58
making this sound.
こんな音を出したのです
10:00
(Sound of metal lid
clanking against a counter)
(金属の蓋がガチャガチャする音)
10:04
(Clanking ends)
(音終了)
10:10
And it stopped me cold.
私ははっとして
その場で固まりました
10:13
I thought, "What a weird, cool swing
that cooking pan lid has."
「鍋蓋って こんなに不思議でクールな
ノリが出せるのね」
10:15
So when the lentils were ready and eaten,
そう思った私は
料理ができて 食べ終わるやいなや
10:22
I hightailed it to my backyard studio,
裏庭にあるスタジオに直行して
10:26
and I made this.
この曲を作りました
10:30
(Music, including the sound
of the lid, and singing)
(鍋の蓋の音と歌の入った音楽)
10:33
(Music ends)
(音楽終了)
10:50
Now, John Cage
wasn't instructing musicians
さて ジョン・ケイジのねらいは
10:52
to mine the soundscape
for sonic textures to turn into music.
音風景の中の音の質感を意識して
作曲しろということではありませんでした
10:54
He was saying that on its own,
ただ 私たちの日常世界は
何もしなくたって
10:59
the environment is musically generative,
勝手に音楽を生み出すものだし
11:01
that it is generous, that it is fertile,
寛容で豊穣なこの世界で
私たちは既に
11:05
that we are already immersed.
音楽浸けになっているんだ
ということでした
11:09
Musician, music researcher, surgeon
and human hearing expert Charles Limb
作曲家・音楽研究家かつ外科医で
人間聴覚の権威 チャールズ・リムは
11:12
is a professor at Johns Hopkins University
ジョンズ・ホプキンズ大学の教授で
11:18
and he studies music and the brain.
音楽と脳との関係を研究しています
11:20
And he has a theory
彼の説によれば
11:24
that it is possible -- it is possible --
人間の聴覚器官は
11:27
that the human auditory system
actually evolved to hear music,
音楽を聴くために発達した
可能性があるそうです
11:30
because it is so much more complex
than it needs to be for language alone.
言語だけのための器官にしては
複雑すぎる造りをしているからです
11:36
And if that's true,
もし これが本当なら
11:41
it means that we're hard-wired for music,
人間という種にとって
生来音楽は欠かせないもので
11:43
that we can find it anywhere,
人は音楽をどこにでも見つけ出すし
11:46
that there is no such thing
as a musical desert,
音の砂漠なんていうものは存在しないし
11:48
that we are permanently
hanging out at the oasis,
人は永久に音楽のオアシスに
居るのだということです
11:51
and that is marvelous.
素晴らしいことです
11:55
We can add to the soundtrack,
but it's already playing.
サウンドトラックは既に流れています
音を足すことはできますけどね
11:58
And it doesn't mean don't study music.
音楽を学ぶなとは言っていません
12:02
Study music, trace your sonic lineages
and enjoy that exploration.
音楽を学び 自分の音の血統を辿り
それを楽しんで欲しいと思います
12:04
But there is a kind of sonic lineage
to which we all belong.
でも 私たち人間皆に共通する
音の血統もあるんです
12:09
So the next time you are seeking
percussion inspiration,
次回 パーカッションのリズムを
考えているとき
12:14
look no further than your tires,
as they roll over the unusual grooves
高速道路の不規則な継ぎ目を
通り過ぎるときに―
12:16
of the freeway,
車のタイヤが立てる音だとか
12:20
or the top-right burner of your stove
コンロの右上のバーナーが
12:22
and that strange way that it clicks
火をつけるときに立てる-
12:24
as it is preparing to light.
奇妙な音などが
その答えとなります
12:25
When seeking melodic inspiration,
曲の旋律を考えているときは
12:28
look no further than dawn
and dusk avian orchestras
日没や夜明けに
鳥たちが奏でるオーケストラや
12:30
or to the natural lilt
of emphatic language.
話し言葉の生き生きとした抑揚が
その答えとなります
12:33
We are the audience
and we are the composers
私たちは 聴衆であり
作曲家でもあるのです
12:37
and we take from these pieces
自然に聞こえてくる音楽を
12:40
we are given.
使えばいいわけです
12:41
We make, we make, we make, we make,
そして 創り出すときは
12:43
knowing that when it comes to nature
or language or soundscape,
自然や 言語や 音風景が
12:45
there is no end to the inspiration --
無限のインスピレーションを
与えてくれます
12:49
if we are listening.
私たちは 聴いてさえいればいいのです
12:52
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
12:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:56
Translated by Riaki Ponist
Reviewed by Claire Ghyselen

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Meklit Hadero - Singer-songwriter
Meklit Hadero is an Ethiopian-American singer-songwriter living the cultural in-between, both in her own luminous compositions and as a co-founder of the Nile Project.

Why you should listen

Meklit Hadero's music is imbued with poetry and multiplicity, from hybridized sounds of Tizita (haunting and nostalgic music) drawing from her Ethiopian heritage, to the annals of jazz, folk songs and rock & roll. Hadero describes her music as emanating from “in-between spaces,” and the result is a smoky, evocative world peopled by strong bass, world instruments and her soothing voice.

In the Nile Project, founded along with Egyptian ethnomusicologist Mina Girgis, Hadero set out to explore the music of the Nile basin, pulling influences from countries along the river, from Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan, and finally to Egypt. The project brings together hip-hop, traditional and contemporary music, with instruments and traditions old and new. As she says, "My work on a lot of levels is about multiplicity." Their new record is Aswan

About her own music, here's what people say:

“Soulful, tremulous and strangely cinematic, Meklit’s voice will implant scenes in your mind — a softly lit supperclub, a Brooklyn stoop, a sun-baked road. Close your eyes, listen and dream." -- Seattle Times

"Meklit… combines N.Y. jazz with West Coast folk and African flourishes, all bound together by her beguiling voice, which is part sunshine and part cloudy day.” -- Filter Magazine

More profile about the speaker
Meklit Hadero | Speaker | TED.com