15:50
TEDGlobal 2014

Andrés Ruzo: How I found a mythical boiling river in the Amazon

アンドレス・ルーソ: アマゾンで伝説の煮えたぎる川を見つけた話

Filmed:

アンドレス・ルーソがペルーに住む少年だった頃、祖父から聞いた話に奇妙な描写がありました。アマゾンの奥深く火で沸かしたように煮えたぎる川があるのだと。12年後、地球科学者として教育を受けた彼は、その煮えたぎる川を見つけようと南アメリカのジャングル深くへと分け入りました。すべてが地図に載り計測されているかのように見える今、既知と未知の境界に疑問を投げかけるその川への探検に加わって、世界にはまだまだ未解明の大きな謎があるのだという認識を新たにすることにしましょう。

- Geoscientist
Andrés Ruzo investigates the Earth's heat and the mystery of a boiling river in the Peruvian rainforest. Full bio

As a boy in Lima,
リマに育った子供として
00:13
my grandfather told me a legend
スペインによる
ペルー征服にまつわる伝説を
00:14
of the Spanish conquest of Peru.
祖父から
よく聞かされました
00:16
Atahualpa, emperor of the Inca,
had been captured and killed.
インカの皇帝アタワルパは
捕らえられ 殺されました
00:20
Pizarro and his conquistadors
had grown rich,
ピサロ率いる征服者達は
金持ちになりました
00:23
and tales of their conquest
and glory had reached Spain
彼らの征服と栄光の噂が
本国スペインに届くと
00:26
and was bringing new waves of Spaniards,
hungry for gold and glory.
金と栄誉に飢えたスペイン人が
さらに押し寄せました
00:29
They would go into towns and ask the Inca,
インカの町を訪れた彼らは
問いました
00:36
"Where's another civilization
we can conquer? Where's more gold?"
「征服できる文明はもっとないのか?
金はどこにある?」
00:38
And the Inca, out of vengeance, told them,
恨みを抱くインカ人は
こう教えました
00:42
"Go to the Amazon.
「アマゾンに行くがいい
00:46
You'll find all the gold you want there.
金なら欲しいだけ
手に入る
00:48
In fact, there is a city called Paititi --
El Dorado in Spanish --
実際 パイティティの町 —
スペイン語で エル・ドラード — は
00:51
made entirely of gold."
町そのものが
金でできている」
00:56
The Spanish set off into the jungle,
スペイン人達はジャングルの奧へと
入って行きましたが
00:59
but the few that return
come back with stories,
戻ってきた者はわずかで
彼らの持ち帰った話にあったのは —
01:01
stories of powerful shamans,
強い魔力を持つシャーマン
01:05
of warriors with poisoned arrows,
毒矢を放つ戦士
01:09
of trees so tall they blotted out the sun,
高くそびえて
太陽を覆い隠す木々
01:12
spiders that ate birds,
snakes that swallowed men whole
鳥を喰らうクモ
人を丸呑みにする大蛇
01:16
and a river that boiled.
そして煮えたぎる川です
01:21
All this became a childhood memory.
そんな話が 少年時代の記憶に
刻まれました
01:25
And years passed.
時は過ぎて
01:27
I'm working on my PhD at SMU,
私は今 南メソジスト大の
博士課程で
01:28
trying to understand
Peru's geothermal energy potential,
ペルーの地熱エネルギーの
可能性について研究していますが
01:31
when I remember this legend,
あの伝説のことを思い出して
01:35
and I began asking that question.
疑問に思い始めました
01:37
Could the boiling river exist?
煮えたぎる川なんて
本当にあるのだろうか?
01:40
I asked colleagues from universities,
いろんな仕事仲間に
聞いてみました
01:44
the government,
大学 政府
01:46
oil, gas and mining companies,
石油 ガス 鉱山会社
01:47
and the answer was a unanimous no.
みんな口をそろえて
「あるわけない」と言います
01:49
And this makes sense.
そりゃそうです
01:52
You see, boiling rivers
do exist in the world,
沸騰する川は
世の中に存在しますが
01:55
but they're generally
associated with volcanoes.
通常 火山地帯にあります
01:57
You need a powerful heat source
そのように大きな
地熱エネルギーの発現には
02:00
to produce such a large
geothermal manifestation.
強力な熱源が必要だからです
02:02
And as you can see from the red dots
here, which are volcanoes,
地図上の赤い点は
火山を表していますが
02:06
we don't have volcanoes in the Amazon,
アマゾンにも
ペルーの大部分にも
02:11
nor in most of Peru.
火山はありません
02:14
So it follows: We should not expect
to see a boiling river.
したがって沸騰する川など
期待すべくもないのです
02:16
Telling this same story
at a family dinner,
家族の晩ご飯の席で
この話をすると
02:21
my aunt tells me,
叔母さんが言うんです
02:25
"But no, Andrés, I've been there.
I've swum in that river."
「あら そんなことないわ アンドレス
そこに行って 泳いだことあるもの」
02:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:32
Then my uncle jumps in.
そこに叔父も加わります
02:36
"No, Andrés, she's not kidding.
「いや 嘘じゃないぞ
02:38
You see, you can only swim in it
after a very heavy rain,
泳げるのは
大雨の後だけだけどな
02:41
and it's protected by a powerful shaman.
それに魔力の強いシャーマンに
守られている
02:45
Your aunt, she's friends with his wife."
お前の叔母さんはな
彼の奥さんと友達なんだ」
02:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:51
"¿Cómo?" ["Huh?"]
(スペイン語) マジで?
02:53
You know, despite all
my scientific skepticism,
科学者としては
懐疑的でしたが
02:54
I found myself hiking into the jungle,
guided by my aunt,
気がつくと 叔母さんの案内で
ジャングルをハイキングしていました
02:56
over 700 kilometers away
from the nearest volcanic center,
一番近い火山から
700キロも離れた場所です
03:00
and well, honestly,
mentally preparing myself
正直 見ることになるのは
せいぜい
03:04
to behold the legendary
"warm stream of the Amazon."
伝説の「アマゾンの生温かい流れ」
だろうと思っていました
03:08
But then ...
しかし それから
03:14
I heard something,
何かが聞こえてきました
03:16
a low surge
低い轟きが
03:19
that got louder and louder
進んでいくにつれて
03:22
as we came closer.
徐々に大きくなっていきます
03:25
It sounded like ocean waves
constantly crashing,
絶えずくだけ続ける
波の音のようでした
03:28
and as we got closer, I saw smoke, vapor,
coming up through the trees.
さらに近づくと 木々の間から
湯気が漏れてきました
03:32
And then, I saw this.
そして 目にしたのが
この光景です
03:36
I immediately grabbed for my thermometer,
すぐに温度計を取り出して
測ってみると
03:41
and the average temperatures in the river
川の平均温度は
03:44
were 86 degrees C.
86℃でした
03:47
This is not quite
the 100-degree C boiling
100℃に沸騰しているわけでは
ありませんが
03:51
but definitely close enough.
ほとんど それに
近いものです
03:54
The river flowed hot and fast.
川の流れは熱く
速いものでした
03:58
I followed it upriver and was led by,
actually, the shaman's apprentice
シャーマンの弟子に連れられ
上流へと進み
04:02
to the most sacred site on the river.
その川の最も神聖な場所に
行きました
04:05
And this is what's bizarre --
奇妙なのは
04:07
It starts off as a cold stream.
川の水は はじめ冷たい
ということです
04:09
And here, at this site,
この場所が
04:11
is the home of the Yacumama,
水の母なる
ヤクママの棲み家 —
04:13
mother of the waters,
a giant serpent spirit
熱水と冷水を生み出す
04:15
who births hot and cold water.
巨大なヘビの精です
04:19
And here we find a hot spring,
ここに熱水泉がありました
04:22
mixing with cold stream water
underneath her protective motherly jaws
ヘビの精の 母なる口の下で
冷たい水の流れと混じり合い
04:26
and thus bringing their legends to life.
伝説に命が
与えられていました
04:31
The next morning, I woke up and --
翌朝 目を覚ますと —
04:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
04:38
I asked for tea.
お茶を頼みました
04:40
I was handed a mug, a tea bag
するとマグカップと
ティーバッグをよこして
04:42
and, well, pointed towards the river.
川の方を指します
04:44
To my surprise, the water was clean
and had a pleasant taste,
意外なことに 川の水は
澄んでいて良い味がしました
04:48
which is a little weird
for geothermal systems.
地熱系においては
少し奇妙なことです
04:52
What was amazing
驚いたのは
04:56
is that the locals had always
known about this place,
その場所が 地元の人には
ずっと知られていて
04:58
and that I was by no means
the first outsider to see it.
私がそれを見た最初のよそ者
でもないことでした
05:01
It was just part of their everyday life.
彼らの日常生活の
一部になっていました
05:05
They drink its water.
彼らはその水を飲み
05:09
They take in its vapor.
その蒸気を体に取り込み
05:11
They cook with it,
それで料理をし
05:14
clean with it,
洗濯をし
05:16
even make their medicines with it.
薬を作りさえします
05:17
I met the shaman,
シャーマンに会いましたが
05:21
and he seemed like an extension
of the river and his jungle.
彼は川やジャングルの
一部のように見えました
05:22
He asked for my intentions
彼は私の意図を問い
05:27
and listened carefully.
注意深く聞いていました
05:30
Then, to my tremendous relief --
そしてホッとしたことには —
05:33
I was freaking out,
to be honest with you --
正直おっかなびっくり
だったんですが
05:36
a smile began to snake across his face,
and he just laughed.
彼の顔に笑顔が広がり
笑い出したんです
05:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:44
I had received the shaman's blessing
to study the river,
その川を研究してよいという許しを
シャーマンから得ました
05:47
on the condition that after I take
the water samples
ただ1つ条件として
水のサンプルを採取し
05:52
and analyze them in my lab,
研究室で分析した後
05:55
wherever I was in the world,
そこが世界のどこであれ
05:57
that I pour the waters
back into the ground
その水を大地に
戻すということ
06:00
so that, as the shaman said,
そうすれば
06:04
the waters could find their way back home.
水は戻って来られるからと
06:06
I've been back every year
since that first visit in 2011,
2011年に初めて訪れて以来
私は毎年その場所に行っています
06:11
and the fieldwork has been exhilarating,
そこでの野外調査は
胸が躍ると同時に
06:14
demanding and at times dangerous.
きつく 時に危険もあります
06:18
One story was even featured
in National Geographic Magazine.
ナショナルジオグラフィック誌の
特集で取り上げられた話ですが
06:22
I was trapped on a small rock
about the size of a sheet of paper
便箋ほどの小さな岩の上で
身動きが取れなくなったことがあります
06:26
in sandals and board shorts,
海パンにサンダルという格好で
06:30
in between an 80 degree C river
80℃の川と
熱水泉に挟まれました
06:32
and a hot spring that, well,
looked like this, close to boiling.
ご覧のように
ほとんど沸騰しています
06:34
And on top of that,
it was Amazon rain forest.
そこへ持ってきて
アマゾンは熱帯雨林です
06:39
Pshh, pouring rain, couldn't see a thing.
ザーッと大雨が来て
何も見えなくなりました
06:43
The temperature differential
made it all white. It was a whiteout.
温度差のため
辺り一面真っ白です
06:45
Intense.
凄まじい体験でした
06:50
Now, after years of work,
何年もの調査の末に
06:54
I'll soon be submitting my geophysical
and geochemical studies for publication.
私は地球物理・地球化学的研究の
論文発表をしようとしています
06:56
And I'd like to share, today,
with all of you here, on the TED stage,
その発見の中の
いくつかを
07:03
for the first time,
some of these discoveries.
このTEDの場で
初めて公開しようと思います
07:07
Well, first off, it's not a legend.
まず初めに
これは伝説ではありません
07:11
Surprise!
驚きでしょ!
07:14
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:15
When I first started the research,
この研究を始めた頃は
07:18
the satellite imagery was too
low-resolution to be meaningful.
衛星画像の解像度が低く
役に立ちませんでした
07:20
There were just no good maps.
ちゃんとした地図が
なかったんです
07:23
Thanks to the support
of the Google Earth team,
グーグルアース開発チームのお陰で
07:25
I now have this.
今や この鮮明さです
07:28
Not only that, the indigenous name
of the river, Shanay-timpishka,
この川の現地名である
「シャナイ・ティンピシュカ」には
07:31
"boiled with the heat of the sun,"
「太陽の熱で沸いた」
という意味があり
07:37
indicating that I'm not the first
to wonder why the river boils,
なぜ川が沸騰しているのか不思議に思ったのは
私が最初ではないことを示しています
07:41
and showing that humanity
has always sought to explain
人類は常に
周りの世界のことを
07:46
the world around us.
解き明かそうと
してきたんです
07:50
So why does the river boil?
ではなぜ この川は
沸騰しているのでしょう?
07:53
(Bubbling sounds)
(泡立つ音)
07:55
It actually took me three years
to get that footage.
この映像は 撮るのに
3年かかったんですよ
08:00
Fault-fed hot springs.
割れ目から熱水泉が
湧き出ています
08:04
As we have hot blood running
through our veins and arteries,
私たちの体の 動脈や静脈に
熱い血が流れているように
08:07
so, too, the earth has hot water
running through its cracks and faults.
地球の割れ目や断層にも
熱い水が流れているんです
08:11
Where these arteries come to the surface,
these earth arteries,
地球の動脈が
地表に出てくる場所では
08:17
we'll get geothermal manifestations:
様々な形で
地熱の発現が見られます
08:20
fumaroles, hot springs
and in our case, the boiling river.
噴気孔 熱水泉
そしてご覧の 沸騰する川です
08:23
What's truly incredible, though,
is the scale of this place.
でも本当にすごいのは
この場所の規模の大きさです
08:28
Next time you cross the road,
think about this.
今度道路を渡るときに
ちょっと思い出してください
08:33
The river flows wider than a two-lane road
この川は
ほとんどの部分で
08:36
along most of its path.
二車線の道路よりも幅があり
08:39
It flows hot for 6.24 kilometers.
6.24キロに渡って
熱湯が流れているんです
08:41
Truly impressive.
本当に大したものです
08:48
There are thermal pools
larger than this TED stage,
このTEDの舞台よりも広い
熱水溜まりがあり
08:51
and that waterfall that you see there
あの滝は落差が
08:54
is six meters tall --
6メートルあります
08:56
and all with near-boiling water.
水はほとんど
100℃に近い熱湯です
08:59
We mapped the temperatures
along the river,
私たちは川に沿って
温度を測定しました
09:04
and this was by far the most
demanding part of the fieldwork.
この野外調査で
一番大変だった部分です
09:06
And the results were just awesome.
結果はもう「スゲェ!」としか
言い様がありません
09:09
Sorry -- the geoscientist
in me coming out.
すいません
地球科学者の血が騒ぎました
09:13
And it showed this amazing trend.
水温はこのように
見事な推移を見せています
09:16
You see, the river starts off cold.
川は冷たい水で始まります
09:19
It then heats up, cools back down,
heats up, cools back down,
それから熱くなり 冷たくなり
熱くなり 冷たくなり
09:21
heats up again, and then has
this beautiful decay curve
再び熱くなって それから
このきれいな減衰曲線で推移し
09:24
until it smashes into this cold river.
右の冷たい川に
ぶち当たります
09:27
Now, I understand not all of you
are geothermal scientists,
皆さん地熱が専門じゃないのは
分かっているので
09:30
so to put it in more everyday terms:
日常の言葉を使って
説明しましょう
09:33
Everyone loves coffee.
皆さんコーヒーは好きですか?
09:36
Yes? Good.
好きですよね?
09:38
Your regular cup of coffee, 54 degrees C,
普通のホットコーヒーは
54℃です
09:40
an extra-hot one, well, 60.
エクストラホットだと60℃
09:44
So, put in coffee shop terms,
コーヒーショップの
言い方をすると
09:46
the boiling river plots like this.
この川の温度は
こうなります
09:49
There you have your hot coffee.
ここがホット
09:52
Here you have your extra-hot coffee,
ここがエクストラホットです
09:54
and you can see
that there's a bit point there
ご覧のように
この川には
09:56
where the river is still hotter
than even the extra-hot coffee.
エクストラホットよりも
熱い部分があるんです
09:58
And these are average water temperatures.
これ平均温度ですからね
10:01
We took these in the dry season to ensure
the purest geothermal temperatures.
地熱そのものの温度を確かめるため
乾期に測定しました
10:03
But there's a magic number here
that's not being shown,
ここに出ていない
特別な温度があって
10:08
and that number is 47 degrees C,
それは47℃です
10:11
because that's where things start to hurt,
火傷をし始める温度です
10:14
and I know this from very
personal experience.
個人的な体験から
私にはよく分かります
10:17
Above that temperature,
you don't want to get in that water.
これより熱いお湯には
入らないことです
10:22
You need to be careful.
注意しないと
10:25
It can be deadly.
本当に危険です
10:26
I've seen all sorts of animals fall in,
この川に落ちた
様々な動物を見ましたが
10:28
and what's shocking to me,
is the process is pretty much the same.
起きることは どの動物でも
ほとんど一緒です
10:31
So they fall in and the first thing
to go are the eyes.
川に落ちて最初に
やられるのが目です
10:35
Eyes, apparently, cook very quickly.
They turn this milky-white color.
目は熱に弱く
すぐ乳白色に変わります
10:38
The stream is carrying them.
水に流され
10:41
They're trying to swim out,
but their meat is cooking on the bone
出ようともがきますが
高温のため
10:43
because it's so hot.
骨付きのまま
煮えていきます
10:46
So they're losing power, losing power,
どんどん力を失っていき
10:47
until finally they get to a point
where hot water goes into their mouths
やがて熱湯が口からも入って
10:49
and they cook from the inside out.
すっかり茹で上がってしまいます
10:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:55
A bit sadistic, aren't we?
ちょっとサディスティックでしたかね?
11:00
Jeez.
いやはや
11:02
Leave them marinating for a little longer.
もうしばらく漬け込んでおくと
こうなります
11:05
What's, again, amazing
are these temperatures.
この温度のなせる技です
11:09
They're similar to things that I've seen
on volcanoes all over the world
イエローストーンや
11:12
and even super-volcanoes like Yellowstone.
世界の火山地帯でも
似たものを見ましたが
11:15
But here's the thing:
問題は —
11:18
the data is showing
that the boiling river exists
この沸騰する川が
火山活動とは無縁なことを
11:22
independent of volcanism.
データが示していることです
11:27
It's neither magmatic
or volcanic in origin,
マグマや火山を
熱源とするわけではなく
11:30
and again, over 700 kilometers away
from the nearest volcanic center.
火山からは700キロ以上
離れているんです
11:35
How can a boiling river exist like this?
こんな沸騰する川がどうして
存在するのでしょう?
11:42
I've asked geothermal experts
and volcanologists for years,
これまで地熱の専門家や火山学者に
いろいろ聞いてきましたが
11:47
and I'm still unable to find another
non-volcanic geothermal system
非火山性の地熱系で
これほどの規模のものは
11:50
of this magnitude.
他に例がありません
11:55
It's unique.
世界的に見ても
11:59
It's special on a global scale.
独特で類を見ないのです
12:01
So, still -- how does it work?
どうなっているのでしょう?
12:06
Where do we get this heat?
この熱はいったい
どこから来るのか?
12:10
There's still more research to be done
問題をきちんと押さえ この地熱系のことを
もっと良く理解するには
12:13
to better constrain the problem
and better understand the system,
さらに研究が必要ですが
12:15
but from what the data is telling us now,
データを見て
今言えるのは
12:18
it looks to be the result
of a large hydrothermal system.
これは大きな熱水系によるものらしい
ということです
12:20
Basically, it works like this:
説明しましょう
12:25
So, the deeper you go
into the earth, the hotter it gets.
地下深くへ行くほど
温度は高くなります
12:26
We refer to this
as the geothermal gradient.
これを「地温勾配」と
呼んでいます
12:29
The waters could be coming
from as far away as glaciers in the Andes,
水は遠くアンデス山脈の氷河に
端を発するのかもしれません
12:33
then seeping down deep into the earth
それから地下深くを流れ
12:38
and coming out to form the boiling river
地温勾配によって
熱せられた後に
12:40
after getting heated up
from the geothermal gradient,
地上に出て来て
沸騰する川になります
12:43
all due to this unique geologic setting.
すべてはこの場所の
独特な地形によるものです
12:47
Now, we found
that in and around the river --
この川の中や周辺で —
12:50
this is working with colleagues
これはナショジオ誌の
スペンサー・ウェルズと
12:53
from National Geographic,
Dr. Spencer Wells,
カリフォルニア大学デービス校の
ジョン・アイゼンとの
12:54
and Dr. Jon Eisen from UC Davis --
共同研究なんですが —
12:57
we genetically sequenced
the extremophile lifeforms
この川の中や周辺に生息する
12:59
living in and around the river,
and have found new lifeforms,
極限微生物の
DNAを分析して
13:03
unique species living
in the boiling river.
この沸騰する川に固有の
生物種が見つかりました
13:07
But again, despite all of these studies,
all of these discoveries and the legends,
これらの研究 発見
伝説を経てもなお
13:12
a question remains:
残る疑問があります
13:18
What is the significance
of the boiling river?
この沸騰する川に
どんな重要性があるのか?
13:21
What is the significance
of this stationary cloud
このジャングルの一区画の上に
常に浮かんでいる雲に
13:26
that always hovers
over this patch of jungle?
どんな重要性があるのか?
13:31
And what is the significance
子供の頃に聞いた
伝説の一節に
13:35
of a detail in a childhood legend?
どんな重要性があるのか?
13:38
To the shaman and his community,
it's a sacred site.
シャーマンと地元コミュニティにとっては
神聖な場所です
13:43
To me, as a geoscientist,
地熱学者の私にとっては
13:47
it's a unique geothermal phenomenon.
きわめて独特な地熱現象です
13:49
But to the illegal loggers
and cattle farmers,
しかし違法森林伐採業者や
牧畜業者には
13:54
it's just another resource to exploit.
乱用できる資源の
1つにすぎません
13:57
And to the Peruvian government,
it's just another stretch
ペルー政府にとっては
14:02
of unprotected land ready for development.
開発できる保護されていない土地の
1つにすぎません
14:06
My goal is to ensure
that whoever controls this land
私の目標は この土地を管理する
ことになるのが 誰であるにせよ
14:14
understands the boiling river's
uniqueness and significance.
沸騰する川の独特さと重要性を
分かってもらうことです
14:17
Because that's the question,
そここそが
14:22
one of significance.
大事なところだからです
14:25
And the thing there is,
そして肝心なことは
14:28
we define significance.
重要性を決めるのは
私たちだということです
14:32
It's us. We have that power.
私たち自身なんです
私たちには その力があります
14:34
We are the ones who draw that line
神聖なものと 何でもないものの間に
線を引くのは
14:37
between the sacred and the trivial.
私たちなんです
14:40
And in this age,
あらゆるものが
地図に載り
14:43
where everything seems mapped,
measured and studied,
測られ
調べられている時代 —
14:46
in this age of information,
この情報の時代にあって
14:51
I remind you all that discoveries
are not just made
皆さんに分かって欲しいのは
14:54
in the black void of the unknown
発見は未知の暗い深淵の中でだけ
なされるのではなく
14:58
but in the white noise
of overwhelming data.
圧倒されるデータのホワイトノイズの中からも
なされるということです
15:04
There remains so much to explore.
探求すべきものは
まだまだ残されています
15:09
We live in an incredible world.
我々は すごい世界に
いるんです
15:13
So go out.
だから出かけましょう
15:17
Be curious.
好奇心を持って
15:20
Because we do live in a world
私たちが生きているのは
15:23
where shamans still sing
to the spirits of the jungle,
シャーマンが森の精に歌い
15:27
where rivers do boil
川は煮えたぎり
15:32
and where legends do come to life.
伝説のものが現実にある
世界なんですから
15:35
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
15:39
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:40
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Hiroko Kawano

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Andrés Ruzo - Geoscientist
Andrés Ruzo investigates the Earth's heat and the mystery of a boiling river in the Peruvian rainforest.

Why you should listen
Andrés Ruzo is a tri-citizen who grew up among Nicaragua, Peru and Texas -- which helped him see that most of the world's problems are not confined by geographic or cultural borders. While trying to imagine solutions, he realized the way we produce and use energy lies at the root of many of our biggest issues. Combined with his memories of summers on his family's farm on Nicaragua's Casita volcano, playing in the fumarole fields, this prompted him to pursue a PhD in geophysics at SMU, focusing on geothermal studies. He is also a National Geographic Young Explorer.

Investigating a childhood legend led him to the Shanay-timpishka, the "Boiling River" of the Amazon, and a sacred site to the indigenous tribes, where the water can reach over 95 °C (203 °F). The greatest mystery of this place: How can a "boiling river" exist 700 km (435 miles) from the nearest volcanic center?
More profile about the speaker
Andrés Ruzo | Speaker | TED.com