sponsored links
TED Talks Live

Hector Garcia: We train soldiers for war. Let's train them to come home, too

ヘクター・ガルシア: 戦争に向かわせる訓練だけなく 故郷に帰す訓練も実施しよう

November 4, 2015

戦場に送り出される前の兵士は、極度に危険な環境で任務を果たすための訓練を受けます。でも兵士には、戦場から市民生活に戻るための訓練も必要だと、心理学者のヘクター・ガルシアは言います。戦場に向かう前の兵士の準備と同じやり方で、ガルシアはPTSD(心的外傷後ストレス障害)に苦しむ退役軍人が元の生活に戻れるような訓練を手助けしています。

Hector Garcia - Psychologist
Hector A. Garcia has spent his career as a frontline psychologist delivering evidence-based psychotherapies to veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Carlos,
カルロスは
00:12
the Vietnam vet Marine
ベトナム戦争の元海兵隊員で
00:14
who volunteered for three tours
and got shot up in every one.
戦時中に志願兵として3度戦地に渡り
そのたびに銃撃を受けました
00:15
In 1971, he was medically retired
1971年 医師の診断で退役に至るも
00:20
because he had so much
shrapnel in his body
その体には 銃弾の破片が
数多く残っており
00:22
that he was setting off metal detectors.
金属探知機が作動するほどでした
00:24
For the next 42 years,
he suffered from nightmares,
その後42年間にわたり
彼は悪夢に苦しみました
00:28
extreme anxiety in public,
公共の場では極度の不安に陥り
00:31
isolation, depression.
孤独感やうつの症状に苛まれました
00:33
He self-medicated with alcohol.
治療と称して酒に溺れました
00:35
He was married and divorced three times.
結婚と離婚は
3度繰り返しました
00:37
Carlos had post-traumatic stress disorder.
カルロスはPTSDを
抱えていたのです
00:40
Now, I became a psychologist
to help mitigate human suffering,
私が心理学者になったのは
心に傷を負った人々を助けるためで
00:43
and for the past 10 years, my target
has been the suffering caused by PTSD,
ここ10年はPTSDで苦しむ患者を
対象に診療を行っており
00:47
as experienced by veterans like Carlos.
カルロスのような
退役軍人を診てきました
00:52
Until recently, the science of PTSD
just wasn't there.
PTSDに関する専門知識は
ありませんでした
00:55
And so, we didn't know what to do.
そのため 治療方法は不明でした
01:00
We put some veterans on heavy drugs.
退役軍人の中には
薬漬けにされたり
01:03
Others we hospitalized
and gave generic group therapy,
入院させられ一般的な
集団療法を受けた者もいれば
01:05
and others still we simply said to them,
ただこう言われた者もいます
01:08
"Just go home and try to forget
about your experiences."
「故郷に帰り
あの頃のことは忘れなさい」と
01:10
More recently, we've tried therapy dogs,
wilderness retreats --
つい最近では ドッグセラピーや
大自然での静養も試されています
01:15
many things which may
temporarily relieve stress,
その多くは
一時的なストレス解消になるでしょうが
01:18
but which don't actually eliminate
PTSD symptoms over the long term.
長期的にPTSDの症状を
解消するものではありません
01:21
But things have changed.
でも状況は変わりました
01:26
And I am here to tell you
that we can now eliminate PTSD,
今では症状の解消だけでなく
完全な治療ができるようになり
01:28
not just manage the symptoms,
退役軍人の多くが
01:33
and in huge numbers of veterans.
救われているのです
01:35
Because new scientific research
has been able to show,
最新の科学研究によって
01:36
objectively, repeatedly,
客観的で再現性のある結果が得られ
01:39
which treatments actually
get rid of symptoms and which do not.
何が効果的な治療方法なのかが
明らかになったのです
01:42
Now as it turns out,
現在 わかっているのは
01:45
the best treatments for PTSD use
many of the very same training principles
PTSDの最も効果的な治療方法は
01:47
that the military uses
in preparing its trainees for war.
戦場に兵士を送り出す訓練と
共通する部分が多いということです
01:52
Now, making war --
戦争を始めることは
01:58
this is something that we are good at.
私たちの得意分野です
02:00
We humans have been making war
since before we were even fully human.
戦争は有史以来
行われてきました
02:02
And since then, we have gone
from using stone and sinew
以来 石や腕力を使った武器に始まり
02:07
to developing the most sophisticated
and devastating weapon systems imaginable.
高性能で高い破壊力を備えた
ありとあらゆる武器が開発されています
02:11
And to enable our warriors
to use these weapons,
兵士がこうした武器を
使いこなせるよう
02:15
we employ the most cutting-edge
training methods.
最新の訓練方法が用いられます
02:18
We are good at making war.
戦争を始めることも
02:20
And we are good at training
our warriors to fight.
兵士に戦い方を教え込むのも
私たちは得意です
02:22
Yet, when we consider the experience
of the modern-day combat veteran,
でも現代の退役軍人の体験を
考えてみると
02:26
we begin to see that we
have not been as good
彼らを故郷へ帰す訓練は
02:30
at preparing them to come home.
上手くいっていないのです
02:33
Why is that?
なぜでしょうか?
02:35
Well, our ancestors lived
immersed in conflict,
私たちの先祖は
日常的に戦っていましたし
02:37
and they fought right where they lived.
戦闘はまさに生活の場で行われました
02:40
So until only very recently
in our evolutionary history,
発展を遂げる時代の中でも
故郷に帰る方法を学ぶ必要性は
02:43
there was hardly a need to learn
how to come home from war,
つい最近まで
ほとんどありませんでした
02:46
because we never really did.
帰ってくることがなかったからです
02:49
But thankfully, today,
今は 幸いなことに
02:53
most of humanity lives
in far more peaceful societies,
大半の人々は戦争とは程遠い
幸せな社会に暮らしており
02:54
and when there is conflict,
we, especially in the United States,
紛争が起きると
アメリカでは特に
02:57
now have the technology to put
our warriors through advanced training,
テクノロジーを活用して
兵士に高度な訓練を受けさせ
03:01
drop them in to fight
anywhere on the globe
地球上どこであろうと
戦地へと送り込み
03:05
and when they're done,
任務の完了後 飛行機で
03:07
jet them back to peacetime suburbia.
平和な郊外へと送り返すのです
03:09
But just imagine for a moment
what this must feel like.
でも それがどんな感じか
少し想像してみてください
03:12
I've spoken with veterans who've told me
退役軍人から聞いた話では
03:16
that one day they're in a brutal
firefight in Afghanistan
ある日には アフガニスタンで
悲惨な銃撃戦に遭遇し
03:18
where they saw carnage and death,
大虐殺や人の死を
目の当たりにしながら
03:22
and just three days later,
they found themselves
そのわずか3日後には
子どものサッカーの試合へ
03:25
toting an ice chest
to their kid's soccer game.
クーラーボックスを
担いでいったそうです
03:28
"Mindfuck" is the most common term.
「ぶったまげるような体験」
とよく言われます
03:32
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:35
It's the most common term
I've heard to describe that experience.
そんな体験を説明するのに
この言葉がよく使われています
03:36
And that's exactly what that is.
まさにその通りでしょう
03:39
Because while our warriors
spend countless hours training for war,
戦争に向かう兵士が
訓練に何時間も費やす一方で
03:41
we've only recently come to understand
つい最近やっとわかったのは
03:45
that many require training
on how to return to civilian life.
市民生活に戻る訓練を必要とする
多くの兵士がいることです
03:47
Now, like any training, the best
PTSD treatments require repetition.
どんな訓練にも言えますが
PTSDに一番効くのも繰り返しの作業です
03:51
In the military,
軍隊では
03:55
we don't simply hand trainees
Mark-19 automatic grenade launchers
訓練兵に銃をポンと手渡し
こう言う訳にはいきません
03:56
and say, "Here's the trigger,
here's some ammo and good luck."
「引金はここで 銃弾はここ
あとはよろしく」
04:00
No. We train them, on the range
and in specific contexts,
そうでなく 兵士は
様々な状況で訓練を受けます
04:03
over and over and over
何度も何度も訓練を繰り返して
04:07
until lifting their weapon
and engaging their target
非常に緊迫した如何なる状況でも
04:09
is so engrained into muscle memory
筋肉に刻まれた感覚のおかげで
04:12
that it can be performed
without even thinking,
無意識に武器を持ち上げて
04:14
even under the most stressful
conditions you can imagine.
迎撃できるようになるのです
04:16
Now, the same holds
for training base treatments.
訓練に基づいた治療でも
同じやり方が使えるのです
04:20
The first of these treatments
is cognitive therapy,
まず最初に行われるのは
認知療法ですが
04:23
and this is a kind
of mental recalibration.
これは心の状態を
修正するようなものです
04:27
When veterans come home from war,
戦地から帰還する兵士にとって
04:30
their way of mentally framing
the world is calibrated
外の世界は非常に危険な環境として
04:32
to an immensely
more dangerous environment.
認識されています
04:35
So when you try to overlay that mind frame
onto a peacetime environment,
そのような精神状態で
平和な環境に適合しようとすると
04:38
you get problems.
困ったことになります
04:43
You begin drowning in worries
about dangers that aren't present.
ありもしない危険を
気にするようになるのです
04:45
You begin not trusting family or friends.
家族や友人が信じられなくなります
04:49
Which is not to say there are no
dangers in civilian life; there are.
市民生活には全く危険がない
という訳ではありません
04:53
It's just that the probability
of encountering them
それでも戦闘時に比べて
04:58
compared to combat
危険に遭遇する可能性は
05:00
is astronomically lower.
天文学的に低くなります
05:02
So we never advise veterans
to turn off caution completely.
ですから退役軍人に対して
全く警戒心を持つなとは言いません
05:05
We do train them, however,
to adjust caution
そうでなく
場所に応じた警戒ができるようにと
05:08
according to where they are.
退役軍人に教え込むのです
05:11
If you find yourself
in a bad neighborhood,
危険な場所にいる時には
05:13
you turn it up.
警戒心は高くなるものです
05:16
Out to dinner with family?
家族との外食はどうでしょう?
05:17
You turn it way down.
警戒心はずっと低くなるものです
05:19
We train veterans to be fiercely rational,
完全に冷静になれるよう訓練を与え
05:21
to systematically gauge
the actual statistical probability
平和なアメリカで
爆弾テロに遭遇するような
05:25
of encountering, say, an IED
here in peacetime America.
実際の確率を
きちんと判断できるようにします
05:28
With enough practice,
those recalibrations stick.
十分な経験を積めば
そういった心の修正は身につきます
05:33
The next of these treatments
is exposure therapy,
次に行われるのは
疑似体験療法ですが
05:39
and this is a kind of field training,
これは実地訓練のようなもので
05:41
and the fastest of the proven
effective treatments out there.
効果が立証された治療法の中では
一番即効性があります
05:44
You remember Carlos?
カルロスを覚えていますか?
05:47
This was the treatment that he chose.
彼はこの治療法を選びました
05:49
And so we started off
by giving him exercises,
カルロスが手始めに受けた訓練は
05:51
for him, challenging ones:
難しいものでした
05:54
going to a grocery store,
スーパーマーケットや
05:55
going to a shopping mall,
going to a restaurant,
ショッピングモール、レストランに
行ったとき
05:57
sitting with his back to the door.
入り口に背を向けて
座る訓練だったのです
06:00
And, critically --
そして重要だったのは
06:03
staying in these environments.
こうした環境に留まることでした
06:04
Now, at first he was very anxious.
当初カルロスは
非常に不安げでした
06:07
He wanted to sit
where he could scan the room,
全体が見回せ
避難路を考えられる場所や
06:09
where he could plan escape routes,
武器の代わりに使えるものがある
06:11
where he could get his hands
on a makeshift weapon.
そんな場所に座りたがりました
06:13
And he wanted to leave, but he didn't.
彼は逃げたいとも思いましたが
逃げませんでした
06:16
He remembered his training
in the Marine Corps,
海軍時代の訓練を思い出して
06:20
and he pushed through his discomfort.
不安を乗り越えたのです
06:23
And every time he did this,
his anxiety ratcheted down a little bit,
訓練を繰り返すたびに
不安も少しずつ消えていきました
06:25
and then a little bit more
and then a little bit more,
少しずつ また少しずつ
不安は消えていきました
06:28
until in the end,
最終的には
06:31
he had effectively relearned
how to sit in a public space
公共の場に腰を下ろし
単純に楽しむ方法を
06:32
and just enjoy himself.
完全に思い出したのです
06:38
He also listened to recordings
of his combat experiences,
こうした訓練と同様
自身の戦闘体験の記録にも
06:41
over and over and over.
繰り返し何度も耳を傾けました
06:44
He listened until those memories
no longer generated any anxiety.
戦闘の記憶で不安に駆られなくなるまで
何度も耳を傾けたのです
06:47
He processed his memories so much
何度も記憶を辿ったおかげで
06:52
that his brain no longer needed
to return to those experiences
そういった体験を夢に見ることは
06:54
in his sleep.
一切なくなりました
06:58
And when I spoke with him
a year after treatment had finished,
治療を終えたカルロスと
1年ぶりに話した際
07:00
he told me,
こう言われたのです
07:03
"Doc, this is the first time in 43 years
「先生 悪夢を見なかったのは
この43年間で
07:05
that I haven't had nightmares."
初めてなんです」と
07:10
Now, this is different
than erasing a memory.
この治療は
記憶を消すのとは違います
07:13
Veterans will always remember
their traumatic experiences,
退役軍人が衝撃的な体験を
忘れることはありませんが
07:17
but with enough practice,
十分な経験を積めば
07:20
those memories are no longer as raw
or as painful as they once were.
以前よりも つらい気持ちや
苦しい気持ちを抱かなくなります
07:22
They don't feel emotionally
like they just happened yesterday,
衝撃的な体験に対して
昨日のことのように動揺しなくなるような
07:28
and that is an immensely
better place to be.
そういう状況が望ましいのです
07:31
But it's often difficult.
でも 大抵は難しいです
07:37
And, like any training,
it may not work for everybody.
どんな訓練にも言えることですが
誰にでも効果があるとは限りませんし
07:39
And there are trust issues.
信頼の問題もあります
07:43
Sometimes I'm asked,
たまにこう言われるのです
07:45
"If you haven't been there, Doc,
how can you help me?"
「戦争の経験がないのに
治してくれるんですか?」と
07:47
Which is understandable.
もっともな意見です
07:49
But at the point of returning
to civilian life,
でも市民生活に戻る際には
07:52
you do not require
somebody who's been there.
戦争の経験は必要はないのです
07:56
You don't require training
for operations on the battlefield;
戦場で活動する訓練が
必要なのではありません
07:59
you require training on how to come home.
故郷に帰ってくるための訓練が
必要なのです
08:02
For the past 10 years of my work,
これまで私が働いてきた10年間で
08:10
I have been exposed to detailed accounts
あらゆる類の最悪な体験に
08:13
of the worst experiences
that you can imagine,
耳を傾けてきました
08:15
daily.
毎日のように―
08:18
And it hasn't always been easy.
必ずしも簡単なことではありません
08:19
There have been times
where I have just felt my heart break
心が折れそうになったり
08:21
or that I've absorbed too much.
疲れたと思ったこともありました
08:25
But these training-based
treatments work so well,
でもこうした訓練に基づく治療は
非常に効果的で
08:27
that whatever this work takes out of me,
it puts back even more,
この仕事でどんなに消耗しても
それ以上に元気をもらうのです
08:31
because I see people get better.
回復する人の姿が見えるからです
08:34
I see people's lives transform.
人生が変わる様子も見えるのです
08:38
Carlos can now enjoy outings
with his grandchildren,
カルロスは今
孫と外出を楽しめるようになりました
08:42
which is something he couldn't even do
with his own children.
かつては自分の子供とでさえ
出来なかったことでした
08:45
And what's amazing to me
is that after 43 years of suffering,
素晴らしかったのは
43年にわたる苦しみを経たカルロスが
08:49
it only took him 10 weeks
of intense training to get his life back.
たった10週間の集中的な訓練で
人生を取り戻したことです
08:53
And when I spoke with him, he told me,
カルロスと話した時
こう言われました
08:57
"I know that I can't get those years back.
「過去に戻れないことは
わかっていますが
09:00
But at least now, whatever days
that I have left on this Earth,
少なくとも今は
自分に残された時間がどれだけでも
09:04
I can live them in peace."
平和な生活を送れるのです」と
09:09
He also said, "I hope that these
younger veterans don't wait
「若い世代が待たされずに
必要な支援が得られることを願います」
09:12
to get the help they need."
とも言いました
09:16
And that's my hope, too.
私もそう願っています
09:18
Because ...
なぜなら
09:20
this life is short,
人生は短いものです
09:22
and if you are fortunate enough
to have survived war
戦争や衝撃的な体験を乗り切れるほど
09:25
or any kind of traumatic experience,
運があるとすれば
09:28
you owe it to yourself
to live your life well.
良い人生を送る義務があるのです
09:30
And you shouldn't wait
to get the training you need
良い人生を送るのに必要な訓練を
09:34
to make that happen.
待っていてはいけません
09:37
Now, the best way of ending
human suffering caused by war
戦争で傷つく人をなくす
最良の方法は
09:40
is to never go to war.
戦争に行かせないことです
09:46
But we are just not there
yet as a species.
でも まだその段階には
至っていません
09:49
Until we are,
そのときが来るまで
09:51
the mental suffering that we create
in our sons and in our daughters
戦争に送り出される
若い世代が被る精神的な苦しみは
09:53
when we send them off to fight
軽減できるのです
09:58
can be alleviated.
軽減できるのです
10:00
But we must ensure that the science,
the energy level, the value
戦争に向かう兵士に注がれる
科学や熱量とその重要性は
10:03
that we place on sending them off to war
彼らを故郷に帰す訓練に対しても
10:09
is at the very least mirrored
少なくとも同じレベルで
10:13
in how well we prepare them
to come back home to us.
与えられるように
十分配慮しなければなりません
10:15
This much, we owe them.
彼らへの支援こそが必要なのです
10:19
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
10:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:23
Translator:Misato Noto
Reviewer:Shoko Takaki

sponsored links

Hector Garcia - Psychologist
Hector A. Garcia has spent his career as a frontline psychologist delivering evidence-based psychotherapies to veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Why you should listen

Hector A. Garcia is a psychologist with the Valley Coastal Bend Veterans Health Care System and a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UT Health San Antonio.

In his work as a researcher, Garcia examines barriers to PTSD care, masculine identity and its impact on PTSD treatment-seeking, and how occupational burnout impacts PTSD care providers, who daily hear detailed accounts of trauma. As a teacher and scientist, he explores how evolutionary psychology and biology have influenced human tendencies toward violence in religion.

Garcia's groundbreaking book, Alpha God: The Psychology of Religious Violence and Oppression, reveals how human evolutionary history has left us prone to religiously inspired bloodshed. In particular, he explains how men's competition over evolutionary resources -- especially sexual primacy and territorial control -- has too often been projected onto notions of God, resulting in religious warfare, the oppression of women and ecological devastation. His regular blog on Psychology Today examines the evolutionary psychology of violence, politics, religion and our everyday lives.


sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.