sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2005

Ashraf Ghani: How to rebuild a broken state

アシュラフガニによる崩壊国家の再建について

July 12, 2005

アシュラフガニによる、崩壊国家再建のための経済投資と発明構想の重要性についての熱演、そしてTED管理者であるクリスアンダーソンとアフガニスタンの未来について語る。

Ashraf Ghani - President-elect of Afghanistan
Ashraf Ghani, Afghanistan’s new president-elect, and his opponent, Abdullah Abdullah, will share power in a national unity government. He previously served as Finance Minister and as a chancellor of Kabul University. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
A public, Dewey long ago observed,
デューイはその昔、社会とは
00:25
is constituted through discussion and debate.
討論により構成されているものだと見聞しました。
00:28
If we are to call the tyranny of assumptions into question,
想定による圧制について疑問を投げかけ、
00:32
and avoid doxa, the realm of the unquestioned,
そして審問されないままのドクサを避けるためには、
00:38
then we must be willing to subject our own assumptions
私たち自身が持つ仮定を、討論や話し合いに
00:42
to debate and discussion.
さらさなければなりません。
00:45
It is in this spirit that I join into a discussion
なので私はここで討論を用いて、
00:49
of one of the critical issues of our time,
今の時代の大切な問題、つまり
00:54
namely, how to mobilize different forms of capital
様々な形式の資本をどのように国家建設のために
00:57
for the project of state building.
流通させるのかについて話したいと思います。
01:01
To put the assumptions very clearly:
その仮定を明確にします。
01:03
capitalism, after 150 years, has become acceptable,
150年経ち、資本主義は受け入れられるようになり、
01:06
and so has democracy.
民主主義も好まれるようになりました。
01:11
If we looked in the world of 1945
1945年の世界を覗いて、
01:13
and looked at the map of capitalist economies and democratic polities,
資本主義経済と民主主義国家の地図をみると、
01:17
they were the rare exception, not the norm.
これらが当時は異例だった事が分かります。
01:22
The question now, however,
しかし、ここでの疑問は
01:27
is both about which form of capitalism
どの形式の資本主義で
01:29
and which type of democratic participation.
そしてどの形式の民主主義かという事です。
01:34
But we must acknowledge
認識しなければならないのは、
01:38
that this moment has brought about
今この瞬間に、
01:40
a rare consensus of assumptions.
珍しく想定に関して意見の一致がある事です。
01:42
And that provides the ground
そしてその一致は行動への
01:45
for a type of action,
基盤となるのです。
01:48
because consensus of each moment
なぜならその瞬間ごとにある意見の一致が
01:50
allows us to act.
行動につながるからです。
01:52
And it is necessary, no matter how fragile
そしてどんなにもろく、
01:54
or how provisional our consensus,
一時的な意見の一致だとしても
01:57
to be able to move forward.
前に進まなければいけません。
02:00
But the majority of the world
世界の大半が
02:02
neither benefits from capitalism
資本主義や民主主義から
02:05
nor from democratic systems.
利益を得るわけではないのです。
02:07
Most of the globe
世界のほとんどで
02:13
experiences the state as repressive,
抑圧的な国家に統治されたことがあり、
02:15
as an organization that is concerned
そういった国家の懸念は
02:19
about denial of rights,
権利の拒否や、
02:22
about denial of justice,
正当性の否定であり、
02:24
rather than provision of it.
それらの支持ではないのです。
02:26
And in terms of experience of capitalism,
そして資本主義の経験の中には、
02:30
there are two aspects
2つの局面があり
02:33
that the rest of the globe experiences.
残りの世界はそれを経験します。
02:35
First, extractive industry.
まず最初に、搾取産業です。
02:37
Blood diamonds, smuggled emeralds,
紛争ダイアモンド、密輸されたエメラルド、
02:39
timber,
木材、
02:42
that is cut right from under the poorest.
最も貧しい場所から切りだされたもの。
02:45
Second is technical assistance.
次に技術支援です。
02:48
And technical assistance might shock you,
びっくりするかもしれませんが、技術支援は
02:51
but it's the worst form
現代において最低で
02:53
of -- today -- of the ugly face
見苦しい形での
02:55
of the developed world to the developing countries.
発展国から発展途上国への支援なのです。
02:58
Tens of billions of dollars
何十億ものドルが
03:02
are supposedly spent on building capacity
能力構築のため払われていると想像され、
03:04
with people who are paid up to 1,500 dollars a day,
そのため1日で最高1500ドル払われる人がいますが、
03:06
who are incapable
彼らは時に
03:10
of thinking creatively,
創造的あるいは組織的に
03:12
or organically.
考える事ができない人達です。
03:14
Next assumption --
次の想定−−
03:20
and of course the events of July 7,
そして7月7日の出来事について、
03:22
I express my deep sympathy, and before that, September 11 --
深い同情を感じ、そしてその前に9月11日が
03:24
have reminded us
思い出させてくれるのは、私たちが
03:27
we do not live in three different worlds.
3つの違った世界に住んでいるのではないという事です。
03:29
We live in one world.
1つの世界に住んでいるのです。
03:32
But that's easily said.
でもそれを言うのは簡単です。
03:36
But we are not dealing with the implications
私たちはその1つの世界が暗示するものを
03:39
of the one world that we are living in.
扱っているのではありません。
03:42
And that is that if we want to have one world,
そして、もし1つの世界を持つ事を望むなら
03:46
this one world cannot be based
その世界の基盤として
03:49
on huge pockets of exclusion,
大規模な排除や
03:51
and then inclusion for some.
その他への包括があってはいけません。
03:54
We must now finally come
今、最終的に私たちが
03:56
to think about the premises
真剣に考えなければいけないのは
03:58
of a truly global world,
真の国際的な世界の前提について、
04:00
in relationship to the regime of rights
そしてその世界での権利、
04:02
and responsibilities and accountabilities
そして責任や責務の
04:04
that are truly global in scope.
国際的な管理体制を視野に入れることです。
04:07
Otherwise we will be missing
そうしなければ、私たちは
04:09
this open moment in history,
この歴史で開かれた瞬間を、
04:12
where we have a consensus
私たちの意見が
04:14
on both the form of politics
政治そして
04:16
and the form of economics.
経済の体制について一致する瞬間を逃してしまうのです。
04:18
What is one of these organizations to pick?
そのうち、どの組織を選べばよいのでしょう?
04:21
We have three critical terms:
重要な条件が3つあります
04:23
economy,
経済、
04:25
civil society
市民社会、
04:27
and the state.
そして国家。
04:29
I will not deal with those first two, except to say
最初の2つについては話しませんが、
04:31
that uncritical transfer of assumptions,
いいかげんに想定を
04:34
from one context to another,
1つの状況から他へと移動させると
04:37
can only make for disaster.
それは大惨事になる事は言っておきます。
04:39
Economics
経済ですが、
04:42
taught in most of the elite universities
ほとんどのエリート大学で教えられているものは
04:45
are practically useless in my context.
私の背景からは、全く意味の無いものです。
04:48
My country is dominated
私の国は
04:51
by drug economy and a mafia.
マフィアや麻薬による経済に支配されています。
04:53
Textbook economics does not work in my context,
教科書にある経済はこのような状況では意味がありませんし、
04:56
and I have very few recommendations from anybody
誰も、どのようにして
04:58
as to how to put together a legal economy.
合法的な経済を組み立てればいいか教えてくれません。
05:01
The poverty of our knowledge
私たちの知識の貧しさは
05:04
must become the first basis
前に進む最初の基盤に
05:06
of moving forward,
ならなければいけません。
05:08
and not imposition of the framework
数学的なモデルを土台にして取り組む構想の
05:10
that works on the basis of mathematical modeling,
負担になってはいけません。
05:13
for which I have enormous respect.
尊敬はしていますが。
05:16
My colleagues at Johns Hopkins were among the best.
ジョンホプキンスにいる仲間は特に素晴らしいです。
05:18
Second,
そして2つ目に、
05:22
instead of debating endlessly
終わらない討論をして、
05:24
about what is the structure of the state,
国家の体制について話すよりも、
05:27
why don't we simplify
もっと簡潔にして
05:29
and say, what are a series of functions
訪ねるのです。どのような機能が
05:31
that the state in the 21st century must perform?
21世紀の国家に必要なのか?
05:33
Clare Lockhart and I are writing a book on this;
クレアロックハートと私はこれについて本を書いているので
05:36
we hope to share that much widely with --
皆さんと分け合えたらと思っています。
05:39
and third is that we could actually construct an index
そして3つめに、実際に指標を作成するのです。
05:41
to measure comparatively
比較しながら
05:44
how well these functions that we would agree on
必要だと合意された機能が様々な場所で
05:47
are being performed in different places.
どのように機能しているか測るのです。
05:50
So what are these functions?
その機能とは一体、何でしょう?
05:52
We propose 10.
私たちから10の提案があります。
05:54
And it's legitimate monopoly of means of violence,
まず合法的な暴力手段の独占、
05:56
administrative control, management of public finances,
行政管理、財政管理、
05:59
investment in human capital, provision of citizenship rights,
人的資本への投資、市民の権利の確保、
06:02
provision of infrastructure,
インフラストラクチャーの供給、
06:05
management of the tangible and intangible assets of the state
規則を通した上での国家の有体・無体資産の管理、
06:07
through regulation, creation of the market,
市場の創出、そして
06:10
international agreements, including public borrowing,
公的債務を含めた国際協定、
06:12
and then, most importantly, rule of law.
そして最も大切なのは、法の支配です。
06:15
I won't elaborate.
それについては詳しく話しません。
06:18
I hope the questions will give me an opportunity.
質問の際に話す機会があるでしょう。
06:20
This is a feasible goal,
これらは実現可能な目標なのです。
06:23
basically because, contrary to widespread assumption,
なぜなら、一般的な推測に反していますが、
06:25
I would argue that we know how to do this.
どのように実現できるのか私たちは知っているのです。
06:28
Who would have imagined that Germany
誰が想像できたでしょう、ドイツが
06:31
would be either united or democratic today,
今現在、統一された民主国家になることを。
06:33
if you looked at it from the perspective of Oxford of 1943?
もしも1943年のオックスフォードの視点から見ていたら無理だと言っていたでしょう。
06:36
But people at Oxford prepared for a democratic Germany
しかしオックスフォードの人達はドイツの民主化に備えていたし、
06:41
and engaged in planning.
計画にも力を入れていたのです。
06:44
And there are lots of other examples.
他にも例はたくさんあります。
06:47
Now in order to do this -- and this brings this group --
それを実現するためには、重要になるのが、
06:51
we have to rethink the notion of capital.
資本の概念について考え直さなければなりません。
06:55
The least important form of capital, in this project,
この計画の中で最も重要さにかける資本の形は
06:58
is financial capital -- money.
金融資本、つまりお金です。
07:02
Money is not capital in most of the developing countries.
ほとんどの発展途上国で、お金は資本ではありません。
07:06
It's just cash.
ただの現金なのです。
07:09
Because it lacks the institutional,
というのは、お金は制度的、
07:11
organizational, managerial forms
組織的、管理的な形状に欠けるため、
07:13
to turn it into capital.
資本にならないのです。
07:16
And what is required
必要なのは
07:19
is a combination of physical capital,
肉体資本や
07:22
institutional capital, human capital --
制度資本、人的資本、
07:24
and security, of course, is critical,
保安のバランスが大切なのです。
07:26
but so is information.
しかし情報も大切です。
07:29
Now, the issue that should concern us here --
ここで気にかけるべきなのは、
07:31
and that's the challenge
これこそが
07:34
that I would like to pose to this group --
先ほどの資本達に提起したい難問ですが、
07:36
is again, it takes 16 years
16年かかって
07:40
in your countries
あなた達の国では
07:43
to produce somebody with a B.S. degree.
やっと理学士の学位がとれるのです。
07:46
It takes 20 years
そして20年かかってから
07:49
to produce somebody with a Ph.D.
ようやく博士号を取る事ができます。
07:51
The first challenge is to rethink,
ここでの難問は、
07:53
fundamentally,
根本的に
07:56
the issue of the time.
時間の問題を考え直さなければいけません。
07:59
Do we need to repeat
私たちが相続したモダリティーを
08:02
the modalities that we have inherited?
繰り返す必要があるのでしょうか?
08:06
Our educational systems are inherited from the 19th century.
教育制度は19世紀から受け継いだものです。
08:08
What is it that we need to do fundamentally
根本的に、もう一度
08:14
to re-engage in a project,
力を入れて、迅速な
08:17
that capital formation is rapid?
資本創出するには何をしなければいけないのでしょう?
08:19
The absolute majority of the world's population
世界の人口の絶対多数が
08:22
are below 20,
20才以下で、
08:25
and they are growing larger and faster.
速い速度で増え続けています。
08:27
They need different ways
彼らには違った形で
08:31
of being approached,
アプローチする必要があります。
08:33
different ways of being enfranchised,
それぞれの方法で参政権を得たり、
08:35
different ways of being skilled.
それぞれに合った技術の学び方があるのです。
08:38
And that's the first thing.
それがまず最初。
08:40
Second is, you're problem solvers,
2つめに、あなたは問題を解決したくても、
08:42
but you're not engaging your global responsibility.
国際的な責任にしっかり目を向けていないのです。
08:45
You've stayed away
離れたままで
08:50
from the problems of corruption.
汚職を見逃してきたのです。
08:52
You only want clean environments in which to function.
機能できる汚れなき場所が欲しいだけなのです。
08:54
But if you don't think through the problems of corruption,
でもあなたが汚職について考えなければ
08:57
who will?
誰が考えるのでしょう?
09:00
You stay away from design for development.
あなたは開発の企画からも離れてしまっているのです。
09:03
You're great designers,
素晴らしい企画者なのに、
09:06
but your designs are selfish.
自分勝手な企画しかしないのです。
09:09
It's for your own immediate use.
自分の為になることだけです。
09:12
The world in which I operate
私がいる世界で、
09:15
operates with designs
デザインは
09:18
regarding roads, or dams,
道、ダム、そして
09:20
or provision of electricity
電気供給のための役割があるのに、
09:22
that have not been revisited in 60 years.
60年間改訂されなかったのです。
09:24
This is not right. It requires thinking.
おかしな事です。もっと考える必要があるのです。
09:28
But, particularly, what we need
でも、特に私たちにとって
09:31
more than anything else from this group
資本の中で他のなによりも必要なのは
09:33
is your imagination
あなたの想像力が
09:35
to be brought to bear on problems
問題に影響を与え、
09:37
the way a meme is supposed to work.
ミームのように機能するという事です。
09:39
As the work on paradigms, long time ago showed --
昔、パラダイムについての研究 --
09:43
Thomas Kuhn's work --
トーマス クーンの研究が唱えたように
09:46
it's in the intersection of ideas
アイデアの交差点で
09:48
that new developments --
新しい発展が
09:50
true breakthroughs -- occur.
本当の意味でやっと生まれるのです。
09:52
And I hope that this group
このグループが
09:54
would be able to deal with the issue of state and development
国家や開発と向き合い、そして
09:56
and the empowerment of the majority of the world's poor,
世界中の多くの貧しい人々の活性化を
09:59
through this means.
この方法で行ってくれる事を願っています。
10:01
Thank you.
ありがとうございます。
10:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:05
Chris Anderson: So, Ashraf, until recently,
アシュラフ、最近まで
10:14
you were the finance minister of Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンの財務大臣をやっていたそうですが、
10:17
a country right at the middle
世界で
10:19
of much of the world's agenda.
議題になっている国ですよね。
10:21
Is the country gonna make it?
これからこの国はどうなるのでしょう?
10:23
Will democracy flourish? What scares you most?
民主主義は広がるんでしょうか?あなたは何が一番怖い事だと思いますか?
10:25
Ashraf Ghani: What scares me most is -- is you,
私が最も恐れてるのは --あなたです。
10:29
lack of your engagement.
あなたが真剣に取り組んでいない事。
10:32
(Laughter)
(笑い声)
10:35
You asked me. You know I always give the unconventional answer.
聞いたのはあなたでしょ?私はいつも変わった答え方をしてしまうんです。
10:39
No. But seriously,
いえ、でもこれは本当です。
10:42
the issue of Afghanistan
アフガニスタンの問題は
10:44
first has to be seen as,
まず最初に
10:46
at least, a 10- to 20-year perspective.
10年から20年の期間を視野に入れて考えなければなりません。
10:48
Today the world of globalization
現代でのグローバリゼーションは
10:52
is on speed.
急速に進んでいます。
10:54
Time has been compressed.
時間は収縮されてしまったのです。
10:56
And space does not exist for most people.
空間というのは多くの人にとって、存在しないも同然です。
10:58
But in my world --
でも私の世界では
11:01
you know, when I went back to Afghanistan after 23 years,
23年経ってからアフガニスタンに戻ったときは、
11:03
space had expanded.
空間は広がっていたのです。
11:06
Every conceivable form of infrastructure had broken down.
もともとあったインフラはすべて崩壊していたのです。
11:08
I rode -- traveled --
運転したときも
11:11
travel between two cities that used to take three hours
昔は3時間で行けたはずの2つの都市なのに
11:13
now took 12.
今では12時間もかかってしまいます。
11:16
So the first is when the scale is that,
まず最初に、そのようなスケールの場合に
11:18
we need to recognize
認識しなければいけないのは
11:21
that just the simple things that are infrastructure --
インフラのようにシンプルに思える事でも
11:23
it takes six years to deliver infrastructure.
完成するのに6年はかかるという事です。
11:26
In our world.
私達の世界ではの話です。
11:28
Any meaningful sort of thing.
重要な事はすべて同じです。
11:30
But the modality of attention,
でも注目されるのは
11:33
or what is happening today, what's happening tomorrow.
今日や明日に起こっている事ばかりです。
11:36
Second is,
2つめに
11:39
when a country has been subjected
国が、
11:41
to one of the most immense, brutal forms of exercise of power --
大規模かつ残忍な権力に属していた時、
11:44
we had the Red Army
国には赤軍が
11:47
for 10 continuous years,
連続して10年間もいて
11:49
110,000 strong,
11万の兵を抱えていたのです。
11:51
literally terrorizing.
本当に恐ろしかったです。
11:54
The sky:
空‥
11:57
every Afghan
すべてのアフガニスタン人は
11:59
sees the sky as a source of fear.
空を恐怖として見るのです。
12:02
We were bombed
爆弾により
12:06
practically out of existence.
存在を消されてしまったも同然です。
12:08
Then, tens of thousands of people were trained in terrorism --
そして何万人もの人々がテロの訓練を受けたのです--
12:13
from all sides.
いろいろな側面から。
12:18
The United States, Great Britain, joined for instance,
例えば、アメリカ合衆国やイギリスは
12:20
Egyptian intelligence service
エジプトの情報機関に参加し、
12:22
to train thousands of people
何千人もの人々を
12:24
in resistance and urban terrorism.
都市テロに備えて訓練しました。
12:26
How to turn a bicycle
どのようにして自転車を
12:30
into an instrument of terror.
テロの道具にかえてしまうか。
12:32
How to turn a donkey, a carthorse, anything.
ロバや荷馬車など、何でもそうです。
12:35
And the Russians, equally.
ロシアも同じです。
12:38
So, when violence erupts
暴力が起こると、
12:40
in a country like Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンのような国では
12:42
it's because of that legacy.
歴史のせいだと言えます。
12:44
But we have to understand
しかし理解しないといけないのは
12:46
that we've been incredibly lucky.
私たちは実は幸運に恵まれて来たという事です。
12:48
I mean, I really can't believe how lucky I am here,
私は信じられないくらいに、
12:50
standing in front of you, speaking.
皆さんの前で話ができるのを幸運に思います。
12:53
When I joined as finance minister,
私が財務大臣になった時、
12:56
I thought that the chances of my living more than three years
3年以上生きられる確率は
13:00
would not be more than five percent.
5%未満だと思っていました。
13:03
Those were the risks. They were worth it.
そのリスクは、価値のあるものでした。
13:07
I think we can make it,
私たちなら出来るのです。
13:10
and the reason we can make it
なぜ出来るかと言うと、
13:12
is because of the people.
人々のおかげです。
13:14
You see, because, I mean -- I give you one statistic.
なぜか -- 統計の例をあげましょう。
13:16
91 percent of the men in Afghanistan,
アフガニスタンでは91%の男性と、
13:19
86 percent of the women,
86%の女性が
13:21
listen to at least three radio stations a day.
1日で最低3つのラジオ局を聞いています。
13:23
In terms of their discourse,
論議や、
13:27
in terms of their sophistication of knowledge of the world,
世界に対しての知識は
13:30
I think that I would dare say,
私から見ると
13:33
they're much more sophisticated
とても洗練されていて
13:36
than rural Americans with college degrees
大学を卒業したアメリカ人や
13:38
and the bulk of Europeans --
一部のヨーロッパの人よりも優れているでしょう。
13:43
because the world matters to them.
なぜかというと世界は彼らにとってとても重要だからです。
13:47
And what is their predominant concern?
そして彼らの最も心配な事とは何か?
13:50
Abandonment.
見捨てられる事です。
13:52
Afghans have become deeply internationalist.
アフガニスタン人はとても国際主義になりました。
13:54
You know, when I went back in December of 2001,
2001年の12月に帰ったときには、
13:58
I had absolutely no desire to work with the Afghan government
アフガニスタンの政府と仕事をする気など、全くありませんでした。
14:00
because I'd lived as a nationalist.
私は国家主義だったからです。
14:03
And I told them -- my people, with the Americans here --
私の国の人とアメリカ人は、別々だと
14:05
separate.
その時言いました。
14:08
Yes, I have an advisory position with the U.N.
私は国際連合で諮問役をしています。
14:10
I went through 10 Afghan provinces very rapidly.
急速にアフガニスタンで10州を訪れました。
14:13
And everybody was telling me it was a different world.
人々は口をそろえて、ここは違う世界だと言いました。
14:15
You know, they engage.
彼らは真剣に取り組んでいるのです。
14:18
They see engagement, global engagement,
そして彼らにとって、世界レベルで力を入れ取り組むことが
14:20
as absolutely necessary to the future of the ordinary people.
平凡な人々の未来にとって、とても重要な事なのです。
14:23
And the thing that the ordinary Afghan is most concerned with is --
そして平凡なアフガニスタン人が心配しているのは --
14:26
Clare Lockhart is here,
クレア ロックハートという人がここにいるのですが、
14:29
so I'll recite a discussion she had
彼女がアフガニスタン北地方の読み書きの出来ない
14:31
with an illiterate woman in Northern Afghanistan.
女の人と話したことをここで引用させてもらいます --
14:33
And that woman said she didn't care
その女の人は、テーブルに食べ物が
14:36
whether she had food on her table.
あるかはもう気にしていないと言いました。
14:38
What she worried about was whether there was a plan for the future,
彼女が心配していたのは未来の計画についてでした。
14:40
where her children could really have a different life.
彼女の子供達が違う生活をできる未来があるかという事。
14:43
That gives me hope.
私はそれに希望を感じました。
14:46
CA: How is Afghanistan
アフガニスタンはどのようにして
14:50
going to provide alternative income
代わりになる収入源を提供し、
14:52
to the many people
麻薬貿易により生計を立てている人達に
14:54
who are making their living off the drugs trade?
新しい生活を与えられるのでしょう?
14:56
AG: Certainly. Well, the first is,
そうですね。まず最初に、
14:58
instead of sending a billion dollars
何億ドルものお金を送りこんで
15:00
on drug eradication
麻薬撲滅を図ったり
15:03
and paying it to a couple of security companies,
警備保障会社に支払うのではなく、
15:05
they should give this hundred billion dollars
そのお金を
15:08
to 50
50の
15:10
of the most critically innovative companies in the world
世界中で最も改新的な会社に支払い、
15:13
to ask them to create one million jobs.
その会社に百万人分の仕事を生み出すように頼むべきです。
15:17
The key to the drug eradication is jobs.
麻薬撲滅へのキーは仕事なのです。
15:20
Look, there's a very little known fact:
ここで、あまりよく知られていない事実ですが、
15:22
countries that have a legal average income per capita of 1,000 dollars
一人当たりの所得が1000ドル以上の国は
15:24
don't produce drugs.
麻薬を生産していないのです。
15:27
Second, textile.
2つめは繊維工業です。
15:31
Trade is the key, not aid.
重要なのは貿易であり、援助であありません。
15:34
The U.S. and Europe
アメリカとヨーロッパは
15:37
should give us a zero percent tariff.
関税をゼロにするべきです。
15:39
The textile industry is incredibly mobile.
繊維工業は可動性の強い工業です。
15:41
If you want us to be able to compete with China and to attract investment,
もしアフガニスタンに、中国と競争し投資を誘致出来るようになって欲しいなら
15:44
we could probably attract
アフガニスタンはきっと
15:47
four to six billion dollars
40−60億ドル程、
15:49
quite easily in the textile sector,
簡単に繊維工業に引きつけられるでしょう。
15:51
if there was zero tariffs --
もし関税がなければの話です。
15:53
would create the type of job.
そして仕事も生み出されるでしょう。
15:55
Cotton does not compete with opium;
綿ではアヘンに勝てません。
15:58
a t-shirt does.
Tシャツでなら勝負ができるのです。
16:01
And we need to understand, it's the value chain.
それが価値連鎖だという事を理解する必要があります。
16:04
Look, the ordinary Afghan is sick and tired
いいですか、平凡なアフガニスタン人は
16:07
of hearing about microcredit.
マイクロクレジットについてもう聞き飽きています。
16:10
It is important,
大切な事ですが、
16:13
but what the ordinary women and men who engage in micro-production want
マイクロクレジットを受けている平凡な人々はもっと大規模な
16:15
is global access.
世界に参加する事を望んでいます。
16:18
They don't want to sell to the charity bazaars
チャリティーバザーで売る事は望んでませんし、
16:21
that are only for foreigners --
そこでは外国人しか買いにきてくれません。
16:25
and the same bloody shirt
そして同じシャツを
16:27
embroidered time and again.
何度も刺繍することも望んでないのです。
16:30
What we want is a partnership
私たちが欲しいのはパートナーシップであり、
16:32
with the Italian design firms.
イタリアのデザイン会社と協力する事です。
16:34
Yeah, we have the best embroiderers in the world!
アフガニスタンには世界で最も優れた刺繍のプロ達がいるんだから!
16:38
Why can't we do what was done with northern Italy?
イタリアの北地方で行われた事がなぜ私たちはできないのでしょう?
16:42
With the Put Out system?
問屋制家内工業のように?
16:44
So I think economically,
経済的には
16:48
the critical issue really is to now think through.
重要なのはしっかり考え抜く事です。
16:50
And what I will say here is that aid doesn't work.
そして私は、援助は意味がないとここできっぱり言います。
16:53
You know, the aid system is broken.
援助のシステムはもう崩壊してしまいました。
16:56
The aid system does not have the knowledge,
援助のシステムに、知識や
16:59
the vision, the ability.
ビジョン、そして才能などありません。
17:01
I'm all for it; after all, I raised a lot of it.
私は援助に賛成していました。実際にたくさん集めましたし。
17:03
Yeah, to be exact, you know,
もっと正確には、
17:06
I managed to persuade the world that
世界を相手に、私の国に275億ドルほど
17:08
they had to give my country 27.5 billion.
援助するようにと説得する事ができたのです。
17:10
They didn't want to give us the money.
世界はお金を渡したくなかったのです。
17:12
CA: And it still didn't work?
なのにうまくいかなかったのですか?
17:14
AG: No. It's not that it didn't work.
いいえ、援助がうまくいかなかったのではありません。
17:16
It's that a dollar of private investment,
それよりも、1ドルの私的投資が
17:18
in my judgment,
私の判断では
17:20
is equal at least to 20 dollars of aid,
20ドルの援助と同じ価値があり
17:22
in terms of the dynamic that it generates.
同じくらいの原動力をもたらすのです。
17:25
Second is that one dollar of aid could be 10 cents;
次に、1ドルの援助は10セント、
17:28
it could be 20 cents;
20セント、
17:31
or it could be four dollars.
または4ドルとかわらないのです。
17:33
It depends on what form it comes,
どのような形式で与えられるか、そして
17:35
what degrees of conditionalities are attached to it.
どのような条件が援助と共についてくるかによってかわるのです。
17:37
You know, the aid system, at first, was designed to benefit
援助システムは、最初から、利益が
17:40
entrepreneurs of the developed countries,
発展国の起業家に届くようにデザインされていて、
17:43
not to generate growth in the poor countries.
貧しい国の成長のためではなかったのです。
17:45
And this is, again, one of those assumptions --
これは、再びですが、仮定のうちの一つなのです。
17:50
the way car seats are an assumption
例えば車のシートが
17:52
that we've inherited in governments, and doors.
政府から受けた仮定と同じようなものです。ドアも。
17:55
You would think that the US government
あなたなら、アメリカの政府は
17:58
would not think that American firms needed subsidizing
アメリカの会社に助成金が必要だなんて考えないと思うでしょうが、
18:00
to function in developing countries, provide advice,
発展途上国で機能していくためのアドバイスなどを
18:03
but they do.
政府は提供してるのです。
18:06
There's an entire weight of history
多くの歴史が
18:08
vis-a-vis aid
援助に相対して
18:10
that now needs to be reexamined.
もう一度見直されなければなりません。
18:12
If the goal is to build states
目的が、国家建設で
18:14
that can credibly take care of themselves --
国がしっかり自身の責任をとれるようにする事なら
18:17
and I'm putting that proposition equally;
私の提案も平等にとらえているつもりなのに
18:20
you know I'm very harsh on my counterparts --
カウンターパートに対して私は厳しいですが
18:23
aid must end
援助は終わらなければなりません。
18:26
in each country in a definable period.
それぞれの国で限定された期間のうちに。
18:29
And every year there must be progress
そして毎年なければならないのは、
18:32
on mobilization of domestic revenue
国内収入の流動と、
18:35
and generation of the economy.
経済発生の進展です。
18:38
Unless that kind of compact is entered into,
そのような契約が交わされない限り
18:41
you will not be able to sustain the consensus.
意見の一致は長く続けられないでしょう。
18:44
Translator:Hikari Fukuda
Reviewer:Takeyasu Kanke

sponsored links

Ashraf Ghani - President-elect of Afghanistan
Ashraf Ghani, Afghanistan’s new president-elect, and his opponent, Abdullah Abdullah, will share power in a national unity government. He previously served as Finance Minister and as a chancellor of Kabul University.

Why you should listen

Ashraf Ghani became Afghanistan’s new president-elect on September 21, 2014. He will share power with Abdullah Abdullah in a national unity government. 

Before Afghanistan's President Karzai asked him, at the end of 2001, to become his advisor and then Finance Minister, Ghani had spent years in academia studying state-building and social transformation, and a decade in executive positions at the World Bank trying to effect policy in these two fields. In just 30 months, he carried out radical and effective reforms (a new currency, new budget, new tariffs, etc) and was instrumental in preparing for the elections of October 2004. In 2006, he was a candidate to succeed Kofi Annan as Secretary General of the United Nations, and one year later, was put in the running to head the World Bank. He served as Chancellor of Kabul University, where he ran a program on state effectiveness. His message to the world: "Afghanistan should not be approached as a charity, but as an investment." 

With Clare Lockhart, he ran the Institute for State Effectiveness, which examines the relationships among citizens, the state and the market. The ISE advises countries, companies, and NGOs; once focused mainly on Afghanistan, its mission has expanded to cover the globe.

In 2009, Ghani ran against Hamid Karzai in the 2009 Afghani presidential elections, emphasizing the importance of government transparency and accountability, strong infrastructure and economic investment, and a merit-based political system.

 


 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.