22:31
TED2004

Sergey Brin + Larry Page: The genesis of Google

セルゲイ・ブリンとラリー・ペイジ:Googleについて

Filmed:

Googleの共同創始者であるセルゲイ・ブリンとラリー・ペイジがGoogle検索シス テムの裏側を紹介してくれます。世界各地の検索状況、Google Foundationによる慈善活動、そしてイノベーションとユニークな職場環境など、Googleの体制についてお話します。

- Google Co-founder
Sergey Brin is half of the team that founded Google. Now he's leading the development of special projects like Google Glass. Full bio

- CEO of Google
Larry Page is the CEO and cofounder of Google, making him one of the ruling minds of the web. Full bio

Sergey Brin: I want to discuss a question
(セルゲイ・ブリン)皆さんがずっと
00:26
I know that's been pressing on many of your minds.
心に抱いている疑問に触れておきます
00:28
We spoke to you last several years ago.
以前お話ししたのは数年前です
00:30
And before I get started today,
皆さん気になるでしょうから
00:33
since many of you are wondering,
今日は講演を始める前に
00:35
I just wanted to get it out of the way.
その疑問を解決しておきます
00:38
The answer is boxers.
私はボクサーパンツです(クリントンはブリーフでしたが)
00:40
Now I hope all of you feel better.
すっきりしたところで
00:52
Do you know what this might be? Does anyone know what that is?
これが何だか分かる方?
00:54
Audience: Yes.
(観衆)はい
00:57
SB: What is it?
(セルゲイ)何でしょう?
00:58
Audience: It's people logging on to Google around the world.
(観衆)世界でグーグルを使っている人
01:00
SB: Wow, OK. I didn't really realize what it was when I first saw it.
(セルゲイ)正解! 私は最初分かりませんでしたが
01:02
But this is what helped me see it.
これを使うと簡単に把握できます
01:05
This is what we run at the office, that actually runs real time.
社内で計測してリアルタイムに更新しています
01:08
Here it's slightly logged.
この地域ではあまり検索していません
01:11
But here you can see around the world
これを見れば世界中の人々の
01:13
how people are using Google.
Google 使用状況が一目瞭然です
01:15
And every one of those rising dots
空へ延びるドットの一つ一つが
01:18
represents probably about 20, 30 searches,
20から30ほどの検索要求を
01:20
or something like that.
表しています
01:23
And they're labeled by color right now, by language.
色は言語を表しています
01:25
So you can see: here we are in the U.S.,
私たちのいるアメリカからは
01:29
and they're all coming up red.
赤いドットが突き上がっています
01:31
There we are in Monterey -- hopefully I can get it right.
ここモンテレーはこのあたりかな
01:33
You can see that Japan is busy at night,
日本は夜でも忙しいですね
01:35
right there.
ここですね
01:38
We have Tokyo coming in in Japanese.
東京では日本語で検索されています
01:40
There's a lot of activity in China.
中国は検索数が多いですね
01:43
There's a lot of activity in India.
インドも多いです
01:45
There's some in the Middle East, the little pockets.
中東にも少しあります 限られた地域だけです
01:48
And Europe, which is right now in the middle of the day,
ヨーロッパは 昼ぐらいですから
01:52
is going really strong with a whole wide variety of languages.
いろんな言語で盛んに検索されています
01:55
Now you can also see, if I turn this around here --
もう少し回転させると分かりますが ―
02:06
hopefully I won't shake the world too much.
あんまり地球を揺らさないようにしないと ―
02:14
But you can also see, there are places where there's not so much.
あまり検索していない地域もあります
02:17
Australia, because there just aren't very many people there.
オーストラリアです あんまり人がいないのです
02:20
And this is something that we should really work on,
もっと力を入れないといけない地域が
02:23
which is Africa, which is just a few trickles,
アフリカです わずかに光っている場所は
02:26
basically in South Africa and a few other urban cities.
南アフリカなどの都市部です
02:30
But basically, what we've noticed is these queries,
毎秒 何千と送り出されるこういった検索要求は
02:33
which come in at thousands per second,
電力さえ通っていれば
02:37
are available everywhere there is power.
どこからでも 発信できます
02:39
And pretty much everywhere there is power, there is the Internet.
電力とインターネットがあれば検索できます
02:42
And even in Antarctica -- well, at least this time of year --
南極大陸でも利用できます 少なくとも今の時期は
02:46
we from time to time will see a query rising up.
時々検索しているのを見て取れます
02:51
And if we had it plotted correctly,
もっと正確に描画すれば
02:53
I think the International Space Station would have it, too.
国際宇宙ステーションで検索しているのも見えるはずです
02:55
So this is
これは
03:06
some of the challenge that we have here,
現在 抱えている課題を表しています
03:09
is you can see that it's actually kind of hard to get the --
ちょっとこれでは見えにくいですね
03:13
there we go.
よし これは検索結果を届けるため
03:22
This is how we have to move the bits around
どうやって
03:24
to actually get the people the answers to their questions.
データを送っているか示しています
03:25
You can see that there's a lot of data running around.
莫大なデータが飛び交っています
03:27
It has to go all over the world: through fibers,
光ファイバーや衛星など さまざまな経路を通って
03:31
through satellites, through all kinds of connections.
世界中を巡らなければなりません
03:34
And it's pretty tricky for us to maintain the latencies
待ち時間をねらい通りに短くするのは かなりやっかいです
03:36
as low as we try to. Hopefully your experience is good.
皆さんが満足していただいているなら幸いです
03:41
But you can see also, once again -- so some places are much more wired
他より回線の多い地域もあります
03:45
than others, and you can see all the bandwidth across the U.S.,
アメリカ全土の回線容量が示されています
03:47
going up over to Asia, Europe in the other direction, and so forth.
アジアやヨーロッパなど各地につながっています
03:51
Now what I would like to do is just to show you
次に 1秒あたりではどうなるか
03:56
what one second of this activity would look like.
見ていただきましょう
03:59
And if we can switch to slides --
スライドに切り替えます
04:03
all right, here we go.
いきますよ
04:09
So this is slowed down.
ゆっくりと表示させていますが
04:11
This is what one second looks like.
これが1秒の世界です
04:17
And this is what we spend a lot of our time doing,
このような膨大な検索要求に
04:20
is just making sure that we can keep up
対応できるように
04:22
with this kind of traffic load.
かなりの時間を費やしてきました
04:24
Now, each one of those queries
この一つ一つの検索には
04:30
has an interesting life and tale of its own.
興味深い生活や物語が絡んでいます
04:32
I mean, it could be somebody's health,
つまり 健康や仕事など
04:34
it could be somebody's career, something important to them.
誰かにとって大切なものなのです
04:36
And it could potentially be something
その検索はもしかすると
04:39
as important as tomato sauce,
トマトソースと同じぐらい大切といえるかもしれません
04:43
or in this case, ketchup.
ここでは ケチャップと表現しましょう
04:48
So this is a query that we had --
これは ケチャップという名の
04:51
I guess it's a popular band that was more popular in some parts of the world than others.
特定の地域で特に人気があるバンドの検索数です
04:54
You can see that it got started right here.
左側が始まりです
04:57
In the U.S. and Spain, it was popular at the same time.
アメリカとスペインでは同時期に人気が出ましたが
05:00
But it didn't have quite the same pickup in the U.S.
アメリカでは スペインほどは
05:03
as it did in Spain.
火がつきませんでした
05:05
And then from Spain, it went to Italy,
スペインの次は イタリア
05:07
and then Germany got excited, and maybe right now the U.K. is enjoying it.
次にドイツが熱狂して 今楽しんでいるのはイギリスです
05:09
And so I guess the U.S. finally,
アメリカでもやっと
05:13
finally started to like it, too.
人気が高まってきたようです
05:15
And I just wanted to play it for you.
曲をかけてみましょう
05:18
Anyway, you can all enjoy it for yourselves --
あとはご自分で聴いてください
05:26
hopefully that search will work.
検索が役に立てばうれしいです
05:28
As a part of --
会社を成長させるために
05:31
you know, part of what we want to do to grow our company
検索数を増やしたい
05:35
is to have more searches.
というのもありますが
05:37
And what that means is we want to have
同時に もっと多くの人に
05:39
more people who are healthy and educated.
健康になり 教育を受けてもらいたいという思いもあります
05:41
More animals, if they start doing searches as well.
検索できるようになったら動物にもその恩恵を与えたいです
05:46
But partly, we want to make the world a better place,
そして いっそう良い世界を築きたいという思いもあります
05:50
and so one thing that we're embarking upon is the Google Foundation,
そういう思いから始めた事業の一つに Google Foundation があります
05:55
and we're in the process of setting that up.
現在 設立の真っ最中です
06:00
We also have a program already called Google Grants
既に稼働している Google Grants では
06:02
that now serves over 150 different charities around the world,
世界150のチャリティーを支援しています
06:05
and these are some of the charities that are on there.
スライドに載せたのは その一部です
06:08
And it's something I'm very excited to be a part of.
この一役を担えるのがとても嬉しいです
06:10
In fact, many of the organizations that are here --
ここに来られた たくさんの組織―
06:15
the Acumen Fund, I think ApproTEC we have running, I'm not sure if that one's up yet --
活動中か知りませんが Acumen Fund や Appro TEC もそうですし
06:17
and many of the people who have presented here are running through Google Grants.
講演者の多くが Google Grants を活用しています
06:23
They run Google ads, and we just give them the ad credit
各組織で用意した広告を Google が表示することで
06:26
so they can let organizations know.
その組織を認知してもらうのです
06:29
One of the earlier results that we got --
初期に成果を上げたのは
06:33
we have a Singaporean businessman who is now sponsoring a village
シンガポールの事業家でした 今 彼は
06:35
of 25 Vietnamese girls for their education,
25人の少女に教育を与えようとベトナムのある村を支援しています
06:38
and that was one of the earliest results. And as I said, now there have been
これは初期に上がった成果の一つです 今では数百の
06:42
many, many stories that have come in,
チャリティーを支援していますので
06:45
because we do have hundreds of charities in there,
もっと多くの成果が生まれています
06:47
and the Google Foundation will be an even broader endeavor.
Google Foundation はさらに強力な支援を進める予定です
06:49
Now does anybody know who this is?
これが誰か分かる方?
06:54
A-ha!
分かったかな?
07:00
Audience: Orkut.
(観衆)オーキット
07:01
SB: Yes! Somebody got it.
(セルゲイ)誰か答えてくれましたね
07:02
This is Orkut. Is anybody here on Orkut?
オーキットです Orkut(オーキット)を利用している方?
07:04
Do we have any?
いますか?
07:07
Okay, not very many people know about it.
多くはない
07:09
I'll explain it in a second.
では少し説明します
07:10
This is one of our engineers.
オーキットは我が社のエンジニアです
07:12
We find that they work better when they're submerged and covered with leaves.
我が社の見解では 葉っぱで覆うと社員の仕事がはかどるのです
07:14
That's how we churn those products out.
こうやって いろいろなサービスを生み出しています
07:19
Orkut had a vision to create a social network.
オーキットは ソーシャル・ネットワークを作る夢を抱いていました
07:22
I know all of you are thinking, "Yet another social network."
「またか」と思うでしょうが
07:27
But it was a dream of his, and we, basically,
それがオーキットの夢だったのです
07:29
when people really want to do something, well, we generally let them.
本気で何か始めたいという人には させることにしています
07:32
So this is what he built.
オーキットが作ったのがこちら
07:35
We just released it in a test phase last month,
先月 試行版を発表しましたから
07:38
and it's been taking off.
まもなく始動します
07:42
This is our VP of Engineering.
この人は 技術部門の副社長です
07:44
You can see the red hair, and I don't know if you can see the nose ring there.
髪が赤いですね 鼻ピアスは見えますか?
07:46
And these are all of his friends.
その横は全員 副社長の友達です
07:51
So this is how -- we just deployed it --
Orkut を普及させるために
07:54
we just decided that people would send each other invitations to get into the service,
招待状を送り合ってもらうことにして
08:01
and so we just had the people in our company initially send them out.
まずは 社員に送り主となってもらいました
08:04
And now we've grown to over 100,000 members.
今では会員数が10万人を超えるまでに成長しています
08:09
And they spread, actually, very quickly, even outside the U.S.
急拡大して アメリカ国外まで飛び火しています
08:13
You can see, even though the U.S. is still the majority here --
これで見るとアメリカがトップですが
08:16
though, by the way, search-wise, it's only about 30 percent of our traffic --
検索数では 全体の30パーセントにすぎません
08:19
but it's already going to Japan, and the U.K., and Europe,
すでに日本 イギリス ヨーロッパなど
08:23
and all the rest of the countries.
あらゆる国に広まっています
08:26
So it's a fun little project.
なかなか面白いプロジェクトです
08:28
There are a variety of demographics. I won't bore you with these.
人口統計は 退屈なので飛ばしましょう
08:30
But it's just the kind of thing that we just try out for fun
つまり 面白そうなことを試してみて
08:33
and see where it goes.
成り行きを見守るということです
08:36
And --
では ―
08:38
well, I'll leave you in suspense.
このスライドは何でしょうね
08:40
Larry, you can explain this one.
ラリー 話してくれ
08:42
Larry Page: Thank you, Sergey.
(ラリー・ペイジ)ありがとう セルゲイ
08:44
So one of the things -- both Sergey and I
セルゲイも 私も
08:47
went to a Montessori school,
モンテッソーリ学校に通っていました
08:49
and I think, for some reason,
いろいろあって
08:51
this has been incorporated in Google.
その精神が Google に取り込まれています
08:54
And Sergey mentioned Orkut, which is something that,
セルゲイからオーキットの話が出ましたが 彼は
08:57
you know, Orkut wanted to do in his time,
自由時間に Orkut を作るつもりでした
09:00
and we call this -- at Google, we've embodied this as "the 20 percent time,"
「20パーセントルール」で確保された時間です
09:04
and the idea is, for 20 percent of your time,
社員は 勤務時間の20パーセントを利用して
09:07
if you're working at Google, you can do what you think is the best thing to do.
一番やりたいことをやれるのです
09:10
And many, many things at Google have come out of that,
このシステムで数多くのサービスを生み出してきました
09:13
such as Orkut and also Google News.
Orkut もそう Google News もそうです
09:17
And I think many other things in the world also have come out of this.
世界中のあらゆるものは このシステムで生まれています
09:20
Mendel, who was supposed to be teaching high-school students,
メンデルは 高校の教師でしたが
09:24
actually, you know, discovered the laws of genetics --
趣味が高じて 遺伝の法則を
09:27
as a hobby, basically.
発見しました
09:30
So many, many useful things come out of this.
このシステムから 便利なものがたくさん生まれているのです
09:32
And News, which I just mentioned,
Google News は
09:36
was started by a researcher.
ある研究者が始めました
09:39
And he just -- he -- after 9/11, he got really interested in the news.
9.11テロ事件の後 ニュースに興味を抱いて
09:42
And he said, "Why don't I look at the news better?"
「ニュースを見やすくしよう」と考えて
09:45
And so he started clustering it by category,
まず カテゴリ分けしてみました
09:50
and then he started using it, and then his friends started using it.
自分で使ううちに 友人も使い始めました
09:53
And then, besides just looking cute on a baby's bottom,
赤ちゃんのおしりに書くとかわいいというのは余談ですが ―
09:56
we made it a Googlette,
それを Googlette に位置づけました
10:01
which is basically a small project at Google.
Google 社が進める小プロジェクトのことです
10:03
So it'd be like three people, or something like that,
Googlette は3人くらいで
10:06
and they would try to make a product.
サービスを立ち上げます
10:09
And we wouldn't really be sure if it's going to work or not.
うまくいく保証などありません
10:11
And in News' case, you know, they had a couple of people
Google News の事例では 二人ぐらいで進めているうちに
10:13
working on it for a while, and then more and more people
利用者がどんどん増えたので
10:17
started using it, and then we put it out on the Internet,
インターネットで公開したら
10:19
and more and more people started using it.
利用者がどんどん広がり始めました
10:21
And now it's a real, full-blown project with more people on it.
今では 本格プロジェクトになって関係者も増えました
10:23
And this is how we keep our innovation running.
こうやってイノベーションを起こし続けています
10:26
I think usually, as companies get bigger,
よく思うのですが 会社が大きくなるにつれて
10:29
they find it really hard to have small, innovative projects.
小さく革新的なプロジェクトは 生まれにくくなります
10:32
And we had this problem, too, for a while, and we said,
Google でもこの問題に直面しましたが
10:35
"Oh, we really need a new concept."
「新しい考えが必要だ」というわけで
10:38
You know, the Googlettes -- that's a small project that we're not quite sure if it's going to work or not,
Googlette を始めました 行く末も見えない小プロジェクトですが
10:40
but we hope it will, and if we do enough of them,
成功を願って たくさんやることで
10:44
some of them will really work and turn out, such as News.
Google News のように成功するプロジェクトも生まれます
10:47
But then we had a problem because then we had over 100 projects.
ところが プロジェクトが100を越えると弊害も出てきます
10:51
And I don't know about all of you,
皆さんがどうかは分かりませんが
10:55
but I have trouble keeping 100 things in my head at once.
100個も把握しておくなんて 私にはできません
10:57
And we found that if we just wrote all of them down
そこで プロジェクトを全てリストにして優先順位をつけました
11:00
and ordered them -- and these are kind of made up.
このリストはダミーですから
11:04
Don't really pay attention to them.
あんまり気にしないでください
11:07
For example, the "Buy Iceland" was from a media article.
メディア欄に「アイスランド買収」とありますけど
11:09
We would never do such a crazy thing, but --
そんなこと絶対にしません
11:12
in any case, we found if we just basically wrote them all down and ordered them,
リストにして優先順位をつけると
11:17
that most people would actually agree what the ordering should be.
たいていの人はその優先順位に納得してくれます
11:21
And this was kind of a surprise to me, but
新しい発見でしたが
11:25
we found that as long as you keep the 100 things in your head,
100個も把握しておくときは
11:27
which you did by writing them down,
リストにすれば
11:30
that you could do a pretty good job deciding what to do
何をして どこに力を注げばいいのか
11:32
and where to put your resources.
判断しやすくなります
11:34
And so that's basically what we've done
数年前に Googlette を始めて以来
11:37
since we instituted that a few years ago, and I think it has really allowed us to be innovative
Google は革新的であり続けることができて
11:39
and still stay reasonably well-organized.
会社がうまく機能し続けています
11:43
The other thing we discovered is that people like to work on things that are important,
人は重要なことに取り組むのが好きで
11:46
and so naturally,
当然のように
11:49
people sort of migrate to the things that are high priorities.
優先度の高い方に引かれる傾向があるということも分かりました
11:51
I just wanted to highlight a couple of things
今から 皆さんのまだ知らない
11:57
that are new, or you might not know about.
新しいサービスを紹介したいと思います
11:59
And the top thing, actually, is the Deskbar.
まずは Deskbar です
12:02
So this is a new -- how many of you use the Google Toolbar?
Google Toolbar を使っている方?
12:05
Raise your hands.
手を挙げてください
12:08
How many of you use the Deskbar?
Deskbar を使っている方?
12:10
All right, see? You guys should try it out.
分かりました ぜひ試してください
12:13
But if you go to our site and search
Google のサイトで探せば
12:15
for "Deskbar," you'll get this.
「Deskbar」があるはずです
12:17
And the idea is, instead of a toolbar, it's just present all the time
ツールバーと違って
12:19
on your screen on the bottom,
画面の下にずっと表示されているので
12:21
and you can do searches really easily.
検索が簡単になります
12:23
And it's sort of like a better version of the toolbar.
ツールバーの改良版です
12:26
Thank you, Sergey.
ありがとう セルゲイ
12:28
This is another example of a project that somebody at Google
これは先ほどとは別の社員が
12:34
was really passionate about, and they just, they got going,
熱心に取り組んでいるプロジェクトです
12:36
and it's really, really a great product, and really taking off.
本当に素晴らしくて 人気の高いサービスです
12:39
Google Answers is something we started, which is really cool,
Google Answers は かなり冴えたサービスで
12:42
which lets you -- for five to 100 dollars,
5ドルから100ドル払って
12:46
you can type a question in,
質問を入力すれば
12:49
and then there's a pool of researchers
皆さんに代わって
12:51
that go out and research it for you, and it's guaranteed and all that,
登録された信頼のおける研究者が調査して
12:53
and you can get actually very good answers to things
的確な解答をくれるので
12:57
without spending all that time yourself.
皆さんの時間を節約できるのです
12:59
Froogle lets you search shopping information,
Froogle では 買い物情報を検索できます
13:01
and Blogger lets you publish things.
Blogger では 意見を発信できます
13:04
But all of these -- well, these were all sort of innovative things that we did that --
これらは我々が成し遂げてきた さまざまな革新の成果です
13:06
you know, we try many, many different things
Google が数々の挑戦をしてきた成果
13:10
in our company.
なのです
13:13
We also like to innovate in our physical space,
革新は 職場でも奨励しています
13:14
and we noticed in meetings, you know, you have to wait a long time
会議でプロジェクターの電源を入れたり切ったりすると
13:16
for projectors to turn on and off,
待たされるし 耳障りなので
13:19
and they're noisy, so people shut them off.
みんなすぐに消してしまいます
13:22
And we didn't like that, so we actually,
これはまずいということで
13:24
in maybe a couple of weeks, we built these little enclosures
2週間後には ちょっとしたカバーを設置しました
13:26
that enclosed the projectors, and so we can leave them on all the time
プロジェクターを覆ってしまうので
13:31
and they're completely silent.
電源を入れたままでも すっかり静かになりました
13:33
And as a result, we were able to build some software
おかげで 会議管理ソフトを
13:36
that also lets us manage a meeting,
作り上げることができました
13:38
so when you walk into a meeting room now,
会議室に入ると
13:40
it lists all the meetings that are happening,
進行中の会議が全て表示されます
13:42
you can very easily take notes, and they just get emailed automatically
メモを取るのも簡単で
13:44
to all the people that were present in the meeting.
出席者全員に自動的にメール送信されます
13:46
And as we become more of a global company,
グローバル企業としての度合いを増す中で
13:49
we find these things really affect us --
このようなソフトを使えば
13:52
you know, can we work effectively with people who aren't in the room?
「不在者と効率良く仕事したい」という願いがかないます
13:54
And things like that. And simple things like this can really make a big difference.
些細に見える事から 大きな成果が生まれるのです
13:57
We also have a lot of engineers in those meetings,
こういった会議にはたくさんのエンジニアが参加するのですが
14:01
and they don't always do their laundry as much as they should.
洗濯が必要なのにやらない人もいますので
14:06
And so we found it was pretty helpful
ランドリールームを設置しました
14:13
to have laundry machines, for our younger employees especially, and ...
特に若いスタッフは重宝したようです
14:15
we also allow dogs and things like that,
犬なんかのペットも許可しています
14:22
and we've had, I think, a really fun culture at our company,
仕事を楽しみながら進められる企業風土を
14:25
which helps people work and enjoy what they're doing.
みんなで満喫しています
14:28
This is actually our "cult picture."
我が社の「カルト集団写真」です
14:31
I just wanted to show quickly.
ちょっとお見せするだけにします
14:33
We had this on our website for a while,
しばらくウェブで公開したのですが
14:38
but we found that after we put it on our website,
掲載して以降
14:40
we didn't get any job applications anymore.
就職希望者がいなくなってしまいました
14:43
But anyway, every year we've taken
それはともかく 毎年 全社員を
14:48
the whole company on a ski trip.
スキー旅行に連れて行っています
14:50
A lot of work happens in companies from people knowing each other, and informally.
個々の交流を深めることで さまざまなプロジェクトが生まれています
14:52
And I think we've done a good job encouraging that.
そのきっかけをうまく作れたと感じています
14:56
It makes it a really fun place to work.
おかげでとても楽しい職場になりました
15:00
Along with our logos, too, which I think really embody
何かを変えるという意味では 会社のロゴも
15:02
our culture when we change things.
企業風土を象徴しているといえます
15:05
In the early days, we were actually advised
最初の頃は
15:08
we should never change our logo because
ブランドを確立させるためにも ロゴは
15:09
we should establish our brand, you know,
変えてはいけないと言われました
15:13
because, you know, you'd never want to change your logo.
皆さんも変えたくないですよね
15:15
You want it to be consistent.
一貫性を保ちたいものです
15:17
And we said, "Well, that doesn't sound so much fun.
でも「それじゃあ面白くない」
15:19
Why don't we try changing it every day?"
「毎日変えちゃえ」となりました
15:21
One of the things that really excites me about what we're doing now
現在進行中のサービスで かなり期待しているのが
15:26
is we have this thing called AdSense,
AdSense です
15:29
and this is a little bit foreshadowing --
まだ全てを見せるわけにはいきません
15:31
this is from before Dean dropped out.
映っているのはディーン氏が落選する前のものです
15:35
But the idea is, like, on a newspaper, for example,
AdSense は例えばニュースサイトに
15:38
we show you relevant ads.
関連した広告を表示します
15:40
And this is hard to read, but this says "Battle for New Hampshire:
「ニューハンプシャー州予備選挙」
15:42
Howard Dean for President" -- articles on Howard Dean.
「ハワード・ディーンが大統領に」という記事です
15:44
And these ads are generated automatically --
広告は自動生成されます この場合は
15:48
like in this case, on the Washington Post --
ワシントン・ポスト紙の
15:51
from the content on the site.
記事内容から作り出します
15:52
And so we use our over 150,000 advertisers
15万を越す広告主の 何百万という広告の中から
15:54
and millions of advertisements, so we pick the one
記事に最適な広告を一つ
15:58
that's most relevant to what you're actually looking at,
選び出すのです
16:00
much as we do on search.
ウェブ検索の場合と同じです
16:02
So the idea is we can make advertising useful,
広告をうっとうしく感じさせず
16:04
not just annoying, right?
有益と思わせるアイデアです
16:07
And the nice thing about this,
AdSenseの利点は
16:09
we have a self-serve program,
セルフサービスであること
16:11
and many thousands of websites have signed up,
ウェブサイトが何千も登録されていること
16:13
and this let's them really make money. And I --
登録者が現に稼げることです
16:16
you know, there's a number of people I met --
たくさんの方が成果を上げています
16:18
I met this guy who runs a conservation site at a party,
パーティーで会ったある監視システムサイトの運営者は
16:20
and he said, "You know, I wasn't making any money.
言ってました「利益がなかったのに
16:23
I just put this thing on my site and I'm making 10,000 dollars a month.
サイトに AdSense を使って広告を載せたら 月収1万ドルだよ
16:25
And, you know, thank you.
ありがとう
16:29
I don't have to do my other job now."
ほかの仕事はせずにすむよ」
16:31
And I think this is really important for us, because it makes the Internet work better.
画期的です ネットを一層有効に活用できるからです
16:33
It makes content get better, it makes searching work better,
AdSense がコンテンツを充実させ 検索精度を高めます
16:36
when people can really make their livelihood
だから 優れたコンテンツを作れば
16:39
from producing great content.
生計を立てられるのです
16:41
So this session is supposed to be about the future,
このセッションのテーマは未来ですから
16:46
so I'd thought I'd talk at least briefly about it.
すこしは触れないといけませんね
16:49
And the idea behind this is to do the perfect job doing search,
Google の背景にあるのは完ぺきな検索です
16:52
you really have to be smart.
実現には かなり知恵が必要です
16:55
Because you can type, you know, any kind of thing into Google,
Google の検索ボックスには何でも入力できます
16:57
and you expect an answer back, right?
それでいて当然答えが返ってくると思っていますよね
17:00
But finding things is tricky, and so you really want intelligence.
でも何かを探し出すのは難しくて 知恵が必要になります
17:03
And in fact, the ultimate search engine would be smart.
究極の検索エンジンは賢くなくてはいけません
17:07
It would be artificial intelligence.
人工知能ぐらいかもしれません
17:10
And so that's something we work on,
今 取り組んでいるのは まさにそこで
17:12
and we even have some people who are excited enough
かなりの情熱と熱意を持って
17:14
and crazy enough to work on it now,
取り組んでいる仲間がいます
17:16
and that's really their goal.
目指すのは究極の検索エンジンです
17:18
So we always hope that Google will be smart,
優秀な Google を追求し続けているのに
17:20
but we're always surprised when other people think that it is.
すでに優秀だと言われると いつもびっくりします
17:22
And so I just wanted to give a funny example of this.
これについて少し面白い話をしたいと思います
17:25
This is a blog from Iraq,
これはイラクのブログです
17:28
and it's not really what
紹介したいのはブログではありません
17:30
I'm going to talk about, but I just wanted to show you an example.
あくまでも例です
17:32
Maybe, Sergey, you can highlight this.
セルゲイ ポインタを当ててくれる?
17:34
So we decided --
我々は ―
17:36
actually, the highlight's right there. Oh, thank you.
注目して欲しいのはそこの ― ありがとう
17:42
So, "related searches," right there. You can't see it that well,
この「関連検索」です 見にくいかもしれませんね
17:47
but we decided we should put in this feature
将来的には この「関連検索」を
17:52
into our AdSense ads, called "related searches."
AdSense を利用した広告に適用する予定です
17:54
And so we'd say, you know, "Did you mean 'search for'" -- what is this,
このブログにはイラクのことが書かれているので
17:57
in this case, "Saddam Hussein," because this blog is about Iraq --
「もしかして:サダム・フセイン」と表示されます
18:00
and you know, in addition to the ads,
広告に付けるのも素晴らしいのですが
18:03
and we thought this would be a great idea.
もう一つ素晴らしいアイデアがあります
18:05
And so there is this blog
ある若者の作ったブログがありました
18:08
of a young person who was kind of depressed, and he said,
少し落ち込んでいたようで こんなことを書いています
18:10
"You know, I'm sleeping a lot."
「僕はたくさん寝るんだ」
18:15
He was just kind of writing about his life.
日常のことを書いていただけです
18:17
And our algorithms -- not a person, of course,
すると Google のアルゴリズムが ― もちろん人ではなくて
18:19
but our algorithms, our computers --
アルゴリズム つまりコンピュータが
18:22
read his blog and decided that
ブログを読んで 選んだ関連ワードが
18:24
the related search was, "I am bored."
「退屈だ」でした
18:26
And he read this, and he thought a person had decided
この若者は「退屈な人間だと決めつけたやつがいる」
18:28
that he was boring,
と思ってしまいました
18:31
and it was very unfortunate,
すごく残念なことです
18:33
and he said, "You know, what are these, you know, bastards at Google doing?
そこで こう書いています「Google の馬鹿野郎が何してるんだ」
18:36
Why don't they like my blog?"
「何で僕のブログが嫌いなんだ?」
18:40
And so then we read his blog, which was getting -- you know,
Google がこれを読んで
18:42
sort of going from bad to worse,
状況はますます悪くなりました 選んだ関連ワードは
18:45
and we said the related search was, "Retards."
「まぬけ」です
18:48
And then, you know, he got even more mad,
この若者は ますます熱くなって
18:53
and he wrote -- like, started swearing and so on.
悪態をつき始めました
18:55
And then we produced "You suck."
すると関連ワードは「最低なやつ」
18:57
And finally, it ended with "Kiss my ass."
ついには「くそ野郎」になりました
19:00
And so basically, he thought he was dealing with something smart,
この若者は 人間を相手に
19:05
and of course, you know,
戦っているつもりでしたが
19:07
we just sort of wrote this program and we tried it out,
我々はプログラムを試しただけです
19:09
and it didn't quite work,
結局 うまくいかないので
19:11
and we don't have this feature anymore.
この機能はもう使いません
19:14
So with that, maybe I can switch back to the world.
そうすればもとの世界に戻せるでしょう
19:18
I wanted to end just by saying that
最後に
19:21
there's a couple things that really make me excited
Google に関わって本当に良かったと
19:23
to be involved with Google,
感じた事を二つお話ししたいと思います
19:25
and one of those is that we're able to make money
一つは かなりの収入源が広告だということです
19:28
largely through advertising, and one of the benefits that I didn't expect from that
予想外なのですが そのおかげで
19:32
was that we're able to serve everyone in the world
世界中にサービスを提供できるようになりました
19:35
without worrying about, you know, places that don't have as much money.
豊かではない地域にも問題なくサービスを提供できます
19:38
So we don't have to worry about our products being sold,
製薬業界のように
19:43
for example, for less money in places that are poor,
貧しい国で安く販売した製品が
19:46
and then they get re-imported into the U.S. --
アメリカに逆輸入されるような
19:49
for example, with the drug industry.
懸念はないのです
19:51
And I think we're really lucky to have that kind of business model
このようなビジネスモデルを展開できるのはラッキーです
19:53
because everyone in the world has access to our search,
世界中の誰もが Google を利用できるからです
19:56
and I think that's a tremendous, tremendous benefit.
その効果は計り知れません
19:59
The other thing I wanted to mention just briefly
もう一つは
20:02
is that we have a tremendous ability and responsibility
正しい情報を届ける力と責任が
20:05
to provide people the right information,
あるということです
20:11
and we view ourselves like a newspaper or a magazine --
Google は新聞や雑誌のように
20:14
that we should provide very objective information.
客観的な情報を届けなければなりません
20:16
And so in our search results, we never accept payment for our search results.
なので お金で検索順位を変えることは絶対にありません
20:19
We accept payment for advertising,
広告費だけ受け取ります
20:22
and we mark it as such.
そういった形で運営していますから
20:25
And that's unlike many of our competitors.
あまたの競合他社とは違います
20:27
And I think decisions we're able to make like that
こういった方針を下せるからこそ
20:29
have a tremendous impact on the world,
世界に大きな衝撃を与えられるし
20:32
and it makes me really proud to be involved with Google.
Google にいることを誇りに思うのです
20:34
So thank you.
ありがとうございました
20:36
Translated by Hiroaki Yamane
Reviewed by Satoshi Tatsuhara

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About the Speakers:

Sergey Brin - Google Co-founder
Sergey Brin is half of the team that founded Google. Now he's leading the development of special projects like Google Glass.

Why you should listen

Sergey Brin and Larry Page met in grad school at Stanford in the mid-'90s, and in 1996 started working on a search technology based around a new idea: that relevant results come from context. Their technology analyzed the number of times a given website was linked to by other sites — assuming that the more links, the more relevant the site — and ranked sites accordingly. Despite being a late entrant to the search game, it now rules the web.

Brin and Page's innovation-friendly office culture has spun out lucrative new products including AdSense/AdWords, Google News, Google Maps, Google Earth, and Gmail, as well as the Android mobile operating system. Now, led by Brin, Google is pursuing problems beyond the page, like the driverless car and the digital eyewear known as Google Glass .

More profile about the speaker
Sergey Brin | Speaker | TED.com
Larry Page - CEO of Google
Larry Page is the CEO and cofounder of Google, making him one of the ruling minds of the web.

Why you should listen

Larry Page and Sergey Brin met in grad school at Stanford in the mid-'90s, and in 1996 started working on a search technology based on a new idea: that relevant results come from context. Their technology analyzed the number of times a given website was linked to by other sites — assuming that the more links, the more relevant the site — and ranked sites accordingly. In 1998, they opened Google in a garage-office in Menlo Park. In 1999 their software left beta and started its steady rise to web domination.

Beyond the company's ubiquitous search, including AdSense/AdWords, Google Maps, Google Earth and the mighty Gmail. In 2011, Page stepped back into his original role of chief executive officer. He now leads Google with high aims and big thinking, and finds time to devote to his projects like Google X, the idea lab for the out-there experiments that keep Google pushing the limits.

More profile about the speaker
Larry Page | Speaker | TED.com