sponsored links
Skoll World Forum 2007

Larry Brilliant: The case for optimism

ラリー・ブリリアント: 楽観主義者の言い分

January 1, 2007

「私たちは地球温暖化について、50年も前から認識していながら対策は少ししか打ってこなかった」と主張しているのはGoogle.orgのディレクター、ラリー・ブリリアントです。このことを始め、世界には気がかりな傾向がいろいろあるにも関わらず、彼は楽観的です。それはなぜでしょう。 スコール・ワールド・フォーラム、オックスフォード、UK www.skollfoundation.org

Larry Brilliant - Epidemiologist, philanthropist
2006 TED Prize winner Dr. Larry Brilliant has spent his career solving the ills of today -- from overseeing the last smallpox cases to saving millions from blindness -- and building technologies of the future. Now, as President and CEO of the Skoll Global Threats Fund , he's redefining how we solve the world's biggest problems. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I'm going to try to give you a view of the world as I see it,
まず私は この世界が直面する危機
そしてチャンスについて
00:16
the problems and the opportunities that we face,
私がどう見ているか
ありのままに話そうと思います
00:22
and then ask the question if we should be optimistic or pessimistic.
そして 私たちは楽観的であるべきか
悲観的であるべきかを問い
00:26
And then I'll let you in on a secret, which is why I am an incurable optimist.
私がどうしようもない楽観主義者である理由を
特別に皆さんにお伝えします
00:30
Let me start off showing you an Al Gore movie that you may have seen before.
まず アル・ゴア風の映像をお見せします
ご覧になった方もいるでしょう
00:36
Now, you've all seen "Inconvenient Truth." This is a little more inconvenient.
『不都合な真実』は有名ですが
これはもう少し不都合です
00:42
(Video): Man: ... extremely dangerous questions.
(ビデオ):男性:…非常に危険な質問です
00:51
Because, with our present knowledge, we have no idea what would happen.
なぜなら 私たちの今の知識では
何が起こるか見当もつかないからです
00:53
Even now, man may be unwittingly changing the world's climate
この瞬間にも 人は意図せずに
文明の廃棄物によって
00:57
through the waste products of his civilization.
世界の気候を変えているかもしれない
01:01
Due to our release, through factories and automobiles every year,
工場や自動車によって 私たちは毎年
01:04
of more than six billion tons of carbon dioxide --
60億トンもの二酸化炭素を排出し--
01:07
which helps air absorb heat from the sun --
それは空気が太陽の熱を
吸収するのを補助し--
01:10
our atmosphere seems to be getting warmer.
私たちの大気は暖かくなってきているようです
01:13
This is bad?
これは悪い事なのか?
01:16
Well, it's been calculated a few degrees' rise in the earth's temperature would
まず 地球の気温が数度上がれば
極冠氷が溶けると
01:18
melt the polar ice caps.
試算されています
01:22
And if this happens, an inland sea would fill a good portion of the Mississippi Valley.
それにより ミシシッピ川沿いの地域の
大部分が内陸の海となるでしょう
01:32
Tourists in glass-bottomed boats would be viewing the drowned towers of Miami
グラスボートに乗った観光客は
水没したマイアミの高層ビルを
01:37
through 150 feet of tropical water.
150フィートの熱帯の海を通して
見ることでしょう
01:41
For, in weather, we're not only dealing with forces of a far greater variety
気候においては 多様な力が関わります
―原子物理学よりも多様です
01:45
than even the atomic physicist encounters, but with life itself.
それだけでなく
命そのものも関わるのです
01:50
Larry Brilliant: Should we feel good, or should we feel bad
ラリー・ブリリアント:
私たちは得意になるべきでしょうか?
それとも悔いるべきでしょうか?
01:54
that 50 years of foreknowledge accomplished so little?
50年も先を見据えながらも
成し遂げたことは少ないことに
01:58
Well, it depends, really, on what your goals are.
まぁ それはあなたの目的によります
02:04
And I think, as my goals, I always go back to Gandhi's talisman.
私は 目的について考える時
常にガンディの哲学に帰結します
02:07
When Mahatma Gandhi was asked,
マハトマ・ガンディは
02:14
"How do you know if the next act that you are about to do is the right one
「次にとる行動が 正しいか間違っているか
どうすると分かりますか」と尋ねられた時
02:16
or the wrong one?" he said, "Consider the face of the poorest,
「あなたがこれまでに出会った
02:22
most vulnerable human being that you ever chanced upon,
もっとも貧しく 最も弱い人の
顏を想像して
02:28
and ask yourself if the act that you contemplate will be of benefit to that person.
あなたの考えている行動が
その人の役にたつだろうかと考えます
02:34
And if it will be, it's the right thing to do, and if not, rethink it."
役に立つならば それは正しいこと
役に立たないなら 考え直しなさい」と答えました
02:40
For those of us in this room, it's not just the poorest and the most vulnerable individual,
この部屋にいる私たちにとって これは
最も貧しく 弱い人にとどまらず
02:46
it's the community, it's the culture, it's the world itself.
コミュニティー 文化 そして世界
に関する話です
02:51
And the trends for those who are at the periphery of our society,
そして 私たちの社会の末端に属する
人たちを取り巻く趨勢
02:56
who are the poorest and the most vulnerable,
最も貧しく 弱い人たちを取り巻く趨勢は
03:01
the trends give rise to a great case for pessimism.
悲観的な考えをよぎらせます
03:04
But there's also a wonderful case for optimism.
しかし 楽観的になれる
素晴らしいこともあります
03:10
Let's review them both. First of all, the megatrends.
両方とも見てみましょう
まずはメガトレンドです
03:13
There's two degrees, or three degrees of climate change baked into the system.
これから 2,3℃の温度上昇は
避けられません
03:19
It will cause rising seas. It will cause saline deposited into wells and into lands.
それにより海面は上昇し
塩分が井戸や 土地に堆積し
03:26
It will disproportionately harm the poorest and the most vulnerable,
最も貧しく 弱い人たちが
不公平にも最も被害を受けます
03:34
as will the increasing rise of population.
人口増加に苦しむのも同じ人々です
03:38
Even though we've dodged Paul Ehrlich's population bomb,
パウル・エールリヒの『人口爆弾』を回避したので
03:43
and we will not see 20 billion people in this decade, as he had forecast,
この10年に 彼が予想した200億人には到達しないでしょうが
03:46
we eat as if we were 20 billion.
我々は 200億人分を食べています
03:52
And we consume so much that again, a rise of 6.5 billion to 9.5 billion
私たちはあまりにも消費しすぎていて
孫の代に総人口が65億人から95億人に増えると
03:55
in our grandchildren's lifetime will disproportionately hurt
これもまた 最も貧しく 弱い人たちを
04:04
the poorest and the most vulnerable.
不公平に害するでしょう
04:08
That's why they migrate to cities.
このために 彼らは都市へと移住します
04:12
That's why in June of this year, we passed, as a species, 51 percent of us living in cities,
このために 今年の6月 私たちは種族として
51%以上の住む場所が 都市や―
04:16
and bustees, and slums, and shantytowns.
貧民街、スラム、バラック街になります
04:22
The rural areas are no longer producing as much food as they did.
田舎では以前と同量の食糧を
生産出来ていません
04:27
The green revolution never reached Africa.
緑の革命はアフリカに届きませんでした
04:31
And with desertification, sandstorms, the Gobi Desert, the Ogaden,
ゴビ砂漠やオガデンの様な所に
代表される 砂漠化による砂嵐により
04:34
we are finding increasing difficulty of a hectare
1ヘクタールの土地が生産するカロリーを
04:41
to produce as many calories as it did even 15 years ago.
15年前と同じ水準にするのにすら苦労をしています
04:45
So humans are turning more towards animal consumption.
人はますます肉食化しています
04:50
In Africa last year, Africans ate 600 million wild animals,
去年アフリカで アフリカ人は6億頭もの
野生動物を食べました
04:55
and consumed two billion kilograms of bush meat.
つまり20億キロの野生動物を食したのです
05:00
And every kilogram of bush meat contained hundreds of thousands of novel viruses
野生動物の肉は 1kg あたりに何十万種もの
新しいウイルスを含みます
05:05
that have never been charted, the genomic sequences of which we don't know.
分類表に記載されたこともなく
遺伝子配列も未知のウイルスです
05:11
Their fitness for creating pandemics we are unaware of,
彼らがパンデミックを
起こす可能性は未知数ですが
05:17
but we are ripe for zoonotic-borne, emerging communicable diseases.
私たちが新たな動物由来の感染症に
直面する環境下にいることは確実です
05:22
Increasingly, I would say explosive growth of technology.
技術の爆発的な成長も
私が特に強調したい点です
05:30
Most of us are the beneficiaries of that growth. But it has a dark side
ほとんどの人々が成長の恩恵を受けていますが
悪い面もあるのです
05:34
-- in bioweapons, and in technology that puts us on a collision course
例えば生物兵器の様な技術は
私たちを互いに衝突させ
05:41
to magnify any anger, hatred or feeling of marginalization.
怒り、憎しみ、分断化の感情を増長します
05:46
And in fact, with increasing globalization --
さらには グローバル化の加速により
05:54
for which there are big winners and even bigger losers
多くの勝者とさらに多くの敗者が生まれ
05:58
-- today the world is more diverse and unfair than perhaps it has ever been in history.
現在 世界は史上最も
多様で不公平だと考えられます
06:02
One percent of us own 40 percent of all the goods and services.
1%の人々が 全ての製品とサービスの
40%を保有しています
06:10
What will happen if the billion people today who live on less than one dollar a day
もし 1日1ドル以下で生活している10億人もの人々が
06:17
rise to three billion in the next 30 years?
次の30年間で30億人まで
増加したらどうなるでしょう?
06:24
The one percent will own even more than 40 percent of all the world's goods
1%の人々は世界の製品とサービスを
40%以上を保有するでしょう
06:29
and services. Not because they've grown richer,
それは彼らがより豊かになったのではなく
06:34
but because the rest of the world has grown increasingly poorer.
残りの世界がますます貧しくなるからです
06:38
Last week, Bill Clinton at the TED Awards said,
先週 ビル・クリントンはTED プライズを受けて
06:43
"This situation is unprecedented, unequal, unfair and unstable."
「今の状況は 前代未聞であり
不等で 不公平で 不安定です」と言いました
06:45
So there's lots of reason for pessimism.
なので悲観的になる理由は沢山あります
06:52
Darfur is, at its origin, a resource war.
ダルフールの紛争―
その根源は資源をめぐる戦いです
06:55
Last year, there were 85,000 riots in China,
昨年 中国では85,000件の暴動が起きました
07:02
230 a day, that required police or military intervention.
1日に230件―
警察か軍の介入が必要でした
07:07
Most of them were about resources.
ほとんどが資源に関するものです
07:12
We are facing an unprecedented number, scale of disasters.
私たちが直面する災害は
前代未聞の数と規模になっています
07:15
Some are weather-related, human-rights related, epidemics.
気候問題もあり 人権問題 そして疫病
07:20
And the newly emerging diseases may make H5N1 and bird flu
新しく出現しつつある疫病の前では
H5N1や鳥インフルエンザは
07:25
a quaint forerunner of things to come. It's a destabilized world.
ただの前兆になるかもしれません
そうなれば世界は不安定になります
07:31
And unlike destabilized world in the past, it will be broadcast to you on YouTube,
そして過去の不安定な世界と違い
ユーチューブで配信がされています
07:39
you will see it on digital television and on your cell phones.
あなたはデジタルテレビや
携帯電話で見ることが出来ます
07:44
What will that lead to?
これは何をもたらすのか?
07:48
For some, it will lead to anger, religious and sectarian violence and terrorism.
怒りや 宗教的、党派的な暴力
テロへと導かれる人―
07:50
For others, withdrawal, nihilism, materialism.
引き籠り、ニヒリズム、物質主義に
走る人もいるでしょう
07:57
For us, where does it take us, as social activists and entrepreneurs?
社会活動家や事業家である私たちは
どこに導かれるでしょう
08:06
As we look at these trends, do we become despondent, or will we become energized?
これらの傾向を見て 私たちは落胆するでしょうか?
それとも気力を得るでしょうか?
08:11
Let's look at one case, the case of Bangladesh.
一つのケースを見てみましょう
バングラデシュのケースです
08:20
First, even if carbon dioxide emissions stopped today,
まず 二酸化炭素の排出が
今日からなくなっても
08:25
global warming would continue.
地球温暖化は止まりません
08:30
And even with global warming -- if you can see these blue lines,
もし地球温暖化が--
この青い線を見てください
08:33
the dotted line shows that even if emissions of greenhouse gasses stopped today,
点線は もし温暖化ガスの排出が今日
止まったとしても 次の10年間は
08:37
the next decades will see rising sea levels.
海面が上昇し続けることを示しています
08:46
A minimum of 20 to 30 inches of increase in sea levels is the best case
最低でも50から75センチの
海面上昇が最も無難な予測値で
08:51
that we can hope for, and it could be 10 times that.
その10倍の上昇も考えられます
08:58
What will that do to Bangladesh? Let's take a look.
バングラデシュにどう影響するか見てみましょう
09:02
So here's Bangladesh.
ここにバングラデシュがあります
09:05
70 percent of Bangladesh is at less than five feet above sea level.
バングラデシュの70%は
海抜1.5メートル以下です
09:12
Let's go up and take a look at the Himalayas.
少し登ってヒマラヤを見ます
09:19
And we'll watch as global warming makes them melt. More water comes down,
そして地球温暖化により雪が溶け
さらに水が下に流れます
09:21
the deforested areas, here in the Tarai, will be unable to absorb the effluent,
森林破壊の進んだタライでは
流水は吸収しきれません
09:26
because trees are like straws that suck up the extra seasonal water.
なぜなら木は余分な季節性の水分を
吸い取るストローのようなものだからです
09:32
Now we're looking down south, through the Kali Gandaki.
今度はカリ・ガンダキを通り南に行きます
09:38
Many of you, I think, have probably trekked here.
沢山の方がここでトレッキングをしたと思います
09:41
And we're going to cruise down and take a look at Bangladesh
そして川を下ってバングラデシュを見てみます
09:44
and see what the impact will be of twin increases in water
北からの雪解け水と南の海の水が
共に増えたときに
09:49
coming from the north, and in the seas rising from the south.
どのような影響が生じるか見てみましょう
09:55
Looking at the five major rivers that feed Bangladesh.
バングラデシュに供給される
主な5つの川を見ています
10:01
And now let's look from the south, looking up, and let's see this in relief.
立体的な地形を南側から見てみましょう
10:05
A minimum of 20 to 40 inches of increase in seas,
最低50から100センチの海面上昇が
10:11
coupled with increasing flows from the Himalayas. And take a look at this.
ヒマラヤから流れる水の増加と組み合わさります
そしてこれを見てください
10:17
As many as 100 million refugees from Bangladesh could be expected to migrate
1億人もの難民がバングラデシュから
移住すると予想されています
10:26
into India and into China.
インド そして中国へと
10:35
This is the difficulty that one country faces.
ひとつの国で この規模の困難が生じます
10:39
But if you look at the globe, all around the earth, wherever there is low-lying area,
そして世界を見渡せば 世界中どこでも
海抜が低い場所や
10:44
populated areas near the water,
水に近い居住地では
10:52
you will find increase in sea level that will challenge our way of life.
私たちの生活に試練を与える
海面の上昇に直面するでしょう
10:55
Sub-Saharan Africa, and even our own San Francisco Bay Area.
サハラ以南のアフリカ そして私たちの
サンフランシスコのベイエリア
10:59
We're all in this together.
皆 同じ困難に直面します
11:06
This is not something that happens far away to people that we don't know.
どこか遠い地の 見知らぬ誰かに
起こる事ではありません
11:09
Global warming is something that happens to all of us, all at once.
地球温暖化は 皆に降りかかります
一遍にです
11:13
As are these newly emerging communicable diseases,
新たに出現しつつある伝染病もそうです
11:19
names that you hadn't heard 20 years ago: ebola, lhasa fever, monkey pox.
20年前はこんな病名は耳にしませんでした
エボラ、ラッサ熱、サル痘
11:23
With the erosion of the green belt separating animals from humans,
人間と動物を隔てていた
グリーンベルトの浸食により
11:28
we live in each other's viral environment.
お互いにウイルス環境を共有しました
11:33
Do you remember, 20 years ago, no one had ever heard of West Nile fever?
20年前は ウエストナイル熱など
聞いたこともなかったんですよ
11:36
And then we watched, as one case arrived on the East Coast of the United States
そして1つの症例がアメリカの東海岸に到着するや
11:40
and it marched every year, westwardly.
毎年 西に伝播しているのが見受けられます
11:44
Do you remember no one had heard of ebola
エボラも聞いたことがありませんでした
11:48
until we heard of hundreds of people dying in Central Africa from it?
中央アフリカで何百人も死ぬまでは
11:51
It's just the beginning, unfortunately.
残念ながらこれらは序の口です
11:55
There have been 30 novel emerging communicable diseases
過去30年間 動物から種を飛び越えて伝染する
11:57
that begin in animals that have jumped species in the last 30 years.
新しい伝染病が30も出現しています
12:04
It's more than enough reason for pessimism.
悲観的になるには十分すぎる理由です
12:11
But now let's look at the case for optimism. (Laughter)
さて 楽観的になれる事例をみましょうか (笑)
12:14
Enough of the bad news. Human beings have always risen to the challenge.
悪いニュースはもう十分です
人類はいつも試練に立ち向かっていました
12:19
You just need to look at the list of Nobel laureates to remind ourselves.
ノーベル受賞者達のリストを見れば
再認識するはずです
12:24
We've been here before, paralyzed by fear, paralyzed into inaction,
私たちは以前もこの状態に陥っていました
恐怖で麻痺し 無気力で消極的になっていました
12:30
when some -- probably one of you in this room -- jumped into the breach
何人かが―多分この部屋にいるどなたかが―
突破口を開き
12:36
and created an organization like Physicians for Social Responsibility,
核の脅威に立ち向かうべく
「社会的責任を果たすための医師団」
12:42
which fought against the nuclear threat,
のような組織を立ち上げました
12:47
Medicins Sans Frontieres, that renewed our commitment to disaster relief,
新しい災害救急活動に従事する
国境なき医師団
12:50
Mohamed ElBaradei, and the tremendous hope and optimism that he
モハメド・エルバラダイと
彼が私たちにもたらしてくれた
12:56
brought all of us, and our own Muhammad Yunus.
大いなる希望と楽観主義
ムハマド・ユヌスもです
13:00
We've seen the eradication of smallpox.
そして私たちは天然痘を撲滅しました
13:04
We may see the eradication of polio this year.
今年はポリオの撲滅に立ち会えるかもしれません
13:08
Last year, there were only 2,000 cases in the world.
去年は世界中で たった2,000の
症例しか報告されていません
13:11
We may see the eradication of guinea worm next year --
来年はギニー・ワームの撲滅に
立ち会えるかもしれません―
13:15
there are only 35,000 cases left in the world.
残る症例は35,000のみです
13:19
20 years ago, there were three and a half million.
20年前は350万もの症例がありました
13:21
And we've seen a new disease, not like the 30 novel emerging communicable diseases.
そして私たちは新しい病気
30の新たな伝染病とは別の病気も見ています
13:25
This disease is called sudden wealth syndrome. (Laughter)
その病気は「突然金持ち病」です
(笑)
13:32
It's an amazing phenomenon.
これはビックリするような現象です
13:38
All throughout the technology world, we're seeing young people bitten by this
技術の分野を見渡すと 若い人々が
13:41
disease of sudden wealth syndrome.
「突然金持ち病」にかかっています
13:45
But they're using their wealth in a way that their forefathers never did.
しかし彼らは 彼らの祖先とは
全く違う富の使い方をしています
13:49
They're not waiting until they die to create foundations.
彼らは死んだら基金を設立する
という姿勢ではなく
13:55
They're actively guiding their money, their resources, their hearts, their commitments,
積極的に彼らの資金、資源、情熱、責任感を
よりよい世界を作るために使用しています
13:59
to make the world a better place.
積極的に彼らの資金、資源、情熱、責任感を
よりよい世界を作るために使用しています
14:04
Certainly, nothing can give you more optimism than that.
楽観的になるのに
これ以上の理由はないでしょう
14:06
More reasons to be optimistic:
もっと楽観的になれる理由があります
14:09
in the '60s, and I am a creature of the '60s, there was a movement.
60年代に―私は60年代の男なんですが―
一つの運動がありました
14:12
We all felt that we were part of it, that a better world was right around the corner,
私たちは皆 その一部を担っていた自覚があり
よりよい世界はすぐそこだと
14:17
that we were watching the birth of a world free of hatred and violence and prejudice.
憎悪と暴力と偏見のない世界の誕生を
見ていると感じていました
14:21
Today, there's another kind of movement. It's a movement to save the earth.
今日では別の運動が起こっています
地球を救うための運動です
14:27
It's just beginning.
これは始まりにすぎません
14:32
Five weeks ago, a group of activists from the business community gathered together
5週間前 ビジネス界の活動家達が集まって
14:34
to stop a Texas utility from building nine coal-fired electrical plants
テキサス・ユーティリティーの9つの新たな
石炭火力発電所を建設計画を止めようとしました
14:41
that would have contributed to destroying the environment.
環境を大いに破壊する計画だったのです
14:47
Six months ago, a group of business activists gathered together to join with the
6か月前 ビジネス界の活動家達が
民主党のカリフォルニア州知事と
14:52
Republican governor in California to pass AB 32,
州法AB32 を通すための会合を開きました
14:58
the most far-reaching legislation in environmental history.
環境保護の歴史の中で最も踏み込んだ法律です
15:02
Al Gore made presentations in the House and the Senate as an expert witness.
アル・ゴアは上院と下院で専門評価委員として
プレゼンテーションを行いました
15:07
Can you imagine? (Laughter)
想像できますか?(笑)
15:16
We're seeing an entente cordiale between science and religion that five years ago
今は科学界と宗教界が「英仏協商」を結びました
5年前だったら―
15:19
I would not have believed, as the evangelical community
信じることが出来なかったでしょう
教会のコミュニティーが
15:25
has understood the desperate situation of global warming.
地球温暖化の危機的状況を
理解してきてくれたのです
15:29
And now 4,000 churches have joined the environmental movement.
今では4,000の教会が
環境保護運動に参加しています
15:35
It is something to be greatly optimistic about.
非常に楽観的になれる事実です
15:40
The European 20-20-20 plan is an amazing breakthrough,
ヨーロッパの20-20-20計画は
素晴らしいブレークスルーです
15:44
something that should make all of us feel that hope is on the horizon.
希望が地平線から昇ってきたと
皆に感じさせるものだと思います
15:50
And on April 14th, there will be Step Up Day, where there will be a thousand
そして4月14日にはステップ・アップ・デーが
あります その日は千人もが―
15:55
individual mobilized social activist movements in the United States on protest
動員される社会活動がアメリカで行われ
法案に対して抗議し―
16:00
against legislation -- pushing for legislation to stop global warming.
地球温暖化を止めるための法律を後押しします
16:07
And on July 7th, around the world, I learned only yesterday,
さらに7月7日には世界中で―
昨日知ったばっかりなのですが―
16:13
there will be global Live Earth concerts.
ライブ・アース・コンサートが行われます
16:17
And you can feel this optimistic move to save the earth in the air.
そして地球を救えるという楽観的な
雰囲気を感じ取ることが出来るのです
16:21
Now, that doesn't mean that people understand that global warming
なお これは地球温暖化が
最も弱く最も貧しい人々に―
16:27
hurts the poorest and the weakest the most.
危害を加えるということを 皆が
理解したという意味ではありません
16:31
That means that people are beginning the first step,
これは人々が最初の一歩を踏み出した―
16:35
which is acting out of their own self-interest.
皆が利他的な行動を始めたということなのです
16:37
But I am seeing in the major funders, in CARE, Rockefeller,
大きな投資機関が―
ケア、ロックフェラー
16:40
Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Hewlett, Mercy Corps, you guys, Google,
ロックフェラー・ブラザーズ・ファンド
ヒューレット・マーシー・コープス、皆様方グーグル
16:44
so many other organizations, a beginning of understanding that we need
そして他の多くの機関が私たちが必要と
しているものを理解し始めています
16:49
to work not just on primary prevention of global warming,
温暖化を防ぐための一次予防策だけでなく
16:54
but on the secondary prevention of the consequences of global warming
その結果として最も貧しく
最も弱い人たちに起こることを防ぐ
16:57
on the poorest and the most vulnerable.
二次予防策に取り組む必要性です
17:02
But for me, I have another reason to be an incurable optimist.
しかし 私にはどこまでも観主義者であれる
別の理由があります
17:07
And you've heard so many inspiring stories here, and I heard so many last night
皆さんは沢山の話を聞いて刺激を受けたでしょう
私もそうです
17:12
that I thought I would share a little bit of mine.
私も一つ皆さんと共有したいと思います
17:18
My background is not exactly conventional medical training.
私の経歴には正確に言うと
既存の医療教育は入っていません
17:21
And I lived in a Himalayan monastery, and I studied with a very wise teacher,
私はヒマラヤの僧院に住み込み
とても聡明な先生の元で勉強しました
17:25
who kicked me out of the monastery one day and told me that it was my destiny --
彼は私を僧院から追い出し言ったのです―
まるでヨーダみたいに
17:30
it felt like Yoda -- it is your destiny to go to work for WHO
あなたの天命はWHOで働き
天然痘を根絶するために
17:35
and to help eradicate smallpox,
尽くすことだ
17:41
at a time when there was no smallpox program.
これは天然痘の組織的対策が
まだない時代でした
17:43
It should make you optimistic that smallpox no longer exists
そして天然痘がもう存在しないことは
皆さんを楽観的にさせてくれるはずです
17:47
because it was the worst disease in history.
歴史的に 最悪の疫病だったのですから
17:51
In the last century -- that's the one that was seven years ago --
20世紀には―
それはつい7年前のことです
17:55
half a billion people died from smallpox:
5億人が天然痘で死亡しました
18:01
more than all the wars in history,
歴史上全ての戦争における死者よりも多いのです
18:03
more than any other infectious disease in the history of the world.
そして歴史上 他の全ての疫病による
死者よりも多いのです
18:06
In the Summer of Love, in 1967, two million people, children, died of smallpox.
サマー・オブ・ラブの年 1967年には
子供も含めて200万人が天然痘で亡くなりました
18:11
It's not ancient history.
これは太古の記録ではありません
18:18
When you read the biblical plague of boils, that was smallpox.
聖書には天然痘が「沸騰の疫病」として
記載されています
18:21
Pharaoh Ramses the Fifth, whose picture is here, died of smallpox.
ファラオ・ラムセス5世―
この絵の人物は天然痘で亡くなりました
18:26
To eradicate smallpox, we had to gather the largest United Nations army in history.
天然痘を駆逐するために 私たちは史上最大の
国際連合軍を召集しなければなりませんでした
18:33
We visited every house in India, searching for smallpox -- 120 million houses,
私たちは天然痘を探すためにインドの全ての
家庭を訪問しました―1億2千万もの家庭です
18:39
once every month, for nearly two years.
2年間もの間 毎月一回
18:45
In a cruel reversal, after we had almost conquered smallpox --
もう少しで駆逐出来るというところで残酷にも―
18:49
and this is what you must learn as a social entrepreneur, the realm of the final inch.
これは社会起業家として学ばなければならない
最後の詰めの領域なのです
18:52
When we had almost eradicated smallpox, it came back again,
天然痘を駆逐しかけた時に
それは復活しました
18:58
because the company town of Tatanagar drew laborers,
タタの町にある企業が労働者を呼び込み
19:02
who could come there and get employment.
職につられて彼らが移動し
19:07
And they caught smallpox in the one remaining place that had smallpox,
天然痘が残っていた唯一の場所で
天然痘にかかったからです
19:10
and they went home to die.
そして死ぬために故郷に帰り
19:14
And when they did, they took smallpox to 10 other countries
その時に彼らは天然痘を10もの他国に
持ち込んだのです
19:16
and reignited the epidemic.
そして流行が再発しました
19:20
And we had to start all over again.
私たちは全てをやり直さなければなりませんでした
19:22
But, in the end, we succeeded, and the last case of smallpox:
しかし 最後には 私たちは成功して
最後の天然痘患者は
19:26
this little girl, Rahima Banu -- Barisal, in Bangladesh --
この小さな女の子 ラヒナ・バヌが
バングラデシュのバリサルで
19:33
when she coughed or breathed, and the last virus of smallpox left her lungs
彼女が咳をしたか息を吐いた時
最後の天然痘ウイルスが彼女の肺を去り
19:40
and fell on the dirt and the sun killed that last virus,
土に落ちて 太陽が最後のウイルスを殺しました
19:47
thus ended a chain of transmission of history's greatest horror.
そして 史上最大の恐怖だった
伝染病の鎖は断ち切られました
19:53
How can that not make you optimistic?
これが皆さんを楽観的に
させないはずはありませんよね?
20:01
A disease which killed hundreds of thousands in India, and blinded half of
インドで何十万人もの人が亡くなり
盲目になった人の半数を―
20:07
all of those who were made blind in India, ended.
失明させていた伝染病が撲滅されたのです
20:13
And most importantly for us here in this room, a bond was created.
そしてこの部屋にいる皆さんにとって
最も重要なことは 絆が出来たことです
20:18
Doctors, health workers, from 30 different countries,
30の異なる国から来た
医者と医療従事者達の間に
20:25
of every race, every religion, every color, worked together,
全ての民族、宗教、人種が力を合わせ
20:28
fought alongside each other,
共に戦いました
20:33
fought against a common enemy, didn't fight against each other.
お互いに争うのではなく
共通の敵に立ち向かったのです
20:36
How can that not make you feel optimistic for the future?
これが皆さんの未来を
楽観的にせずにいられるでしょうか?
20:41
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
20:46
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:48
Translator:Makoto Ikeo
Reviewer:Claire Ghyselen

sponsored links

Larry Brilliant - Epidemiologist, philanthropist
2006 TED Prize winner Dr. Larry Brilliant has spent his career solving the ills of today -- from overseeing the last smallpox cases to saving millions from blindness -- and building technologies of the future. Now, as President and CEO of the Skoll Global Threats Fund , he's redefining how we solve the world's biggest problems.

Why you should listen

Larry Brilliant's career path, as unlikely as it is inspirational, has proven worthy of his surname. Trained as a doctor, he was living in a Himalayan monastery in the early 1970s when his guru told him he should help rid the world of smallpox. He joined the World Health Organization's eradication project, directed efforts to eliminate the disease in India and eventually presided over the last case of smallpox on the planet.

Not content with beating a single disease, he founded the nonprofit Seva Foundation , which has cured more than two million people of blindness in 15 countries (through innovative surgery, self-sufficient eye care systems, and low-cost manufacturing of intraocular lenses). Outside the medical field, he found time to cofound the legendary online community The Well, and run two public technology companies. Time and WIRED magazines call him a "technology visionary."

His 2006 TED Prize wish draws on both sides of his career: He challenged the TED community to help him build a global early-response system to detect new diseases or disasters as quickly as they emerge or occur. Shortly after he won the TED Prize, Google executives asked Brilliant to run their new philanthropic arm, Google.org . So, between consulting on the WHO's polio eradication project and designing a disease-surveillance network, he was able to harness Google's brains and billions in a mix of for-profit and nonprofit ventures tackling the global problems of disease, poverty and climate change. Today, Larry is President and CEO of the Skoll Global Threats Fund, where he heads a team whose mission is to confront global threats imperiling humanity: pandemics, climate change, water security, nuclear proliferation and Middle East conflict.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.