16:36
TEDxMarin

Paul Piff: Does money make you mean?

ポール・ピフ: お金が人を嫌なヤツにする?

Filmed:

勝敗の決まっているモノポリーによって驚くべきことが明らかになります。この愉快かつハッとさせるトークで社会心理学者のポール・ピフが紹介するのは、自分が裕福だと感じる人がとる(残念な)態度です。不平等の問題は複雑で困難な課題ですが、朗報もあります。(TEDxMarinにて収録)

- Social psychologist
Paul Piff studies how social hierarchy, inequality and emotion shape relations between individuals and groups. Full bio

I want you to, for a moment,
皆さん ちょっと
00:12
think about playing a game of Monopoly,
モノポリーというゲームについて
考えてください
00:14
except in this game, that combination
ただし 今回のゲームは
00:18
of skill, talent and luck
実人生と同様
技と才能と運が相まって
00:21
that help earn you success in games, as in life,
成功を勝ち取るという
通常のゲームとは
00:24
has been rendered irrelevant,
まったく別物です
00:26
because this game's been rigged,
仕掛けがしてあって
00:28
and you've got the upper hand.
必ず勝てるようになっています
00:30
You've got more money,
対戦相手より多くのお金をもらい
00:32
more opportunities to move around the board,
盤上を動き回るチャンスも多く
00:34
and more access to resources.
利用できる資源も多いのです
00:36
And as you think about that experience,
この経験について
00:39
I want you to ask yourself,
皆さんに考えていただきたいのですが
00:40
how might that experience of being
仕組まれたゲームで
00:43
a privileged player in a rigged game
有利に事を運ぶという経験は
00:44
change the way that you think about yourself
自分についての考え方や
相手に対する見方を
00:48
and regard that other player?
どう変えるのでしょうか
00:50
So we ran a study on the U.C. Berkeley campus
我々がUCバークレー校で研究を行い
00:54
to look at exactly that question.
調べたのは まさにその疑問です
00:57
We brought in more than 100 pairs
研究室に被験者を呼び
01:00
of strangers into the lab,
初めて会った人同士
100組以上のペアを作り
01:01
and with the flip of a coin
コインを投げて無作為に
01:04
randomly assigned one of the two
ペアの一人を金持ちに割り当て
01:06
to be a rich player in a rigged game.
ゲームをやってもらいました
01:08
They got two times as much money.
金持ち側は2倍のお金をもらいます
01:10
When they passed Go,
「GO」のマスを通ったら
01:13
they collected twice the salary,
サラリーは2倍もらえ
サイコロは―
01:14
and they got to roll both dice instead of one,
1個ではなく
2個とも振れますから
01:17
so they got to move around the board a lot more.
うんと早く進めるわけです
01:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:20
And over the course of 15 minutes,
15分間に渡って
01:23
we watched through hidden
cameras what happened.
隠しカメラで様子を観察しました
01:25
And what I want to do today, for the first time,
今日は初めて
皆さんに
01:29
is show you a little bit of what we saw.
我々が見たものの一部をお見せします
01:30
You're going to have to pardon the sound quality,
音質が良くないのですが
01:33
in some cases, because again,
these were hidden cameras.
なにしろ隠しカメラですので
お許しください
01:34
So we've provided subtitles.
字幕を付けておきました
01:37
Rich Player: How many 500s did you have?
金持ち:500は何枚あるんだっけ?
01:39
Poor Player: Just one.
貧乏:1枚だけ
01:41
Rich Player: Are you serious.
Poor Player: Yeah.
金持ち:マジで?
貧乏:うん
01:42
Rich Player: I have three. (Laughs)
金持ち:僕は3枚(笑)
01:43
I don't know why they gave me so much.
何故か たくさん くれたんだよね
01:45
Paul Piff: Okay, so it was quickly apparent to players
彼らはすぐに「何かある」と
01:47
that something was up.
気づいたようですね
01:49
One person clearly has a lot more money
一人だけが相手に比べ
どう見ても
01:50
than the other person, and yet,
多くのお金を持っているのです
01:52
as the game unfolded,
それでも ゲームが進むにつれ
01:54
we saw very notable differences
我々は二者の間に
01:56
and dramatic differences begin to emerge
非常に顕著で劇的な違いが
01:58
between the two players.
表れてくるのを目撃しました
02:01
The rich player
金持ちのプレイヤーは
02:03
started to move around the board louder,
盤上を進む時に大きな音を立て
02:05
literally smacking the board with their piece
コマを叩きつけるようにして
02:07
as he went around.
回るようになってきたのです
02:09
We were more likely to see signs of dominance
金持ちは支配的な仕草や
02:12
and nonverbal signs,
非言語のサインを見せ
02:15
displays of power
力を誇示したり
02:16
and celebration among the rich players.
喜びを表したりすることが
多くなりました
02:19
We had a bowl of pretzels
positioned off to the side.
脇にプレッツェルを置いておきました
02:23
It's on the bottom right corner there.
画面では右下に映っています
02:25
That allowed us to watch
participants' consummatory behavior.
被験者の完了行動を
観察するためです
02:27
So we're just tracking how
many pretzels participants eat.
被験者がプレッツェルをいくつ食べたか
調べました
02:31
Rich Player: Are those pretzels a trick?
金持ち:このプレッツェルも
仕掛けかな
02:35
Poor Player: I don't know.
貧乏:さあ
02:37
PP: Okay, so no surprises, people are onto us.
当然ですね
感づいています
02:39
They wonder what that bowl of pretzels
そこにプレッツェルがあること自体
不審に思っています
02:42
is doing there in the first place.
そこにプレッツェルがあること自体
不審に思っています
02:44
One even asks, like you just saw,
ご覧いただいたとおり
02:45
is that bowl of pretzels there as a trick?
プレッツェルは仕掛けかと
聞く人もいました
02:47
And yet, despite that, the power of the situation
怪しいと思いながらも
立場による力の影響は
02:50
seems to inevitably dominate,
どうしても出てしまうようで
02:53
and those rich players start to eat more pretzels.
金持ちの方がプレッツェルを
多く食べるのです
02:56
Rich Player: I love pretzels.
金持ち:プレッツェルはうまいなぁ
03:03
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:06
PP: And as the game went on,
ゲームが進むと
03:09
one of the really interesting and dramatic patterns
実に興味深く 劇的なパターンが
03:12
that we observed begin to emerge
現れてきました
03:14
was that the rich players actually
金持ちは相手に対し
03:17
started to become ruder toward the other person,
横柄な態度を取るようになりました
03:19
less and less sensitive to the plight
気の毒な対戦相手が
苦境に陥っても
03:22
of those poor, poor players,
だんだん気に留めなくなり
03:24
and more and more demonstrative
自らの物質的な成功を
03:26
of their material success,
どんどん表に出して
03:28
more likely to showcase how well they're doing.
見せびらかすようになってきました
03:30
Rich Player: I have money for everything.
金持ち:もう何でも買えちゃうよ
03:35
Poor Player: How much is that?
貧乏:いくら?
03:39
Rich Player: You owe me 24 dollars.
金持ち:君に24ドル貸してるよ
03:41
You're going to lose all your money soon.
もうすぐ すっからかんだね
03:45
I'll buy it. I have so much money.
買おう
お金はたっぷりある
03:48
I have so much money, it takes me forever.
ありすぎて使い切れないよ
03:50
Rich Player 2: I'm going to buy out this whole board.
金持ち2:全部丸ごと買い取るわ
03:52
Rich Player 3: You're going
to run out of money soon.
金持ち3:お金なくなりそうだね
03:54
I'm pretty much untouchable at this point.
俺は無敵だな
03:55
PP: Okay, and here's what I think
さて ここで私が
03:58
was really, really interesting,
大変興味深いと思うのは
04:01
is that at the end of the 15 minutes,
15分間のゲーム終了後に
04:02
we asked the players to talk about
their experience during the game.
プレイヤーたちにゲーム中の経験について
語ってもらったことです
04:06
And when the rich players talked about
金持ちのプレイヤーは
04:10
why they had inevitably won
必然的に勝った理由を述べる時―
04:12
in this rigged game of Monopoly --
そう仕組まれているわけですが
04:14
(Laughter) —
(笑)
04:16
they talked about what they'd done
彼らは様々な資産を購入したり
04:21
to buy those different properties
成功を収めるために
04:24
and earn their success in the game,
自分が何をしたか語りました
04:27
and they became far less attuned
いろいろあったはずの
状況の違いも
04:30
to all those different features of the situation,
まるで気にしなくなっていました
04:32
including that flip of a coin
最初にコインを投げて
04:35
that had randomly gotten them into
たまたま有利な立場になったことも
04:38
that privileged position in the first place.
全然 気にしなくなっていたのです
04:40
And that's a really, really incredible insight
これは人が優位性に対し
どう辻褄を合わせるか
04:43
into how the mind makes sense of advantage.
その本質を実に見事なまでに
突いています
04:46
Now this game of Monopoly can be used
さて このモノポリーの実験は
04:51
as a metaphor for understanding society
社会とその階層構造を理解するための
04:54
and its hierarchical structure, wherein some people
メタファーとして使えます
社会には
04:56
have a lot of wealth and a lot of status,
裕福で地位の高い人もいますし
05:00
and a lot of people don't.
そうでない人も大勢います
05:02
They have a lot less wealth and a lot less status
多くの人は裕福でなく
地位もなく
05:04
and a lot less access to valued resources.
貴重な資源へのツテも
持っていません
05:07
And what my colleagues and I for
the last seven years have been doing
私が仲間と共に
ここ7年行っているのは
05:10
is studying the effects of these kinds of hierarchies.
こうした階層の影響を
研究することです
05:13
What we've been finding across dozens of studies
いくつもの研究を重ね
05:17
and thousands of participants across this country
国内の何千という被験者の協力を得て
わかってきたのは
05:20
is that as a person's levels of wealth increase,
人間は富のレベルが上がると
05:24
their feelings of compassion and empathy go down,
慈悲や同情の気持ちが減り
05:28
and their feelings of entitlement, of deservingness,
権利意識や
05:34
and their ideology of self-interest increases.
自己利益についての観念が
強くなるということです
05:38
In surveys, we found that it's actually
アンケートによると実際
05:43
wealthier individuals who are more likely
裕福な人たちほど
05:45
to moralize greed being good,
貪欲であることを
倫理的に良いものと捉え
05:47
and that the pursuit of self-interest
私利私欲の追求には賛成で
05:50
is favorable and moral.
倫理にかなうと考える傾向がありました
05:52
Now what I want to do today is talk about
今日 私がお話ししたいのは
05:54
some of the implications
of this ideology self-interest,
この自己利益の観念が意味すること
05:56
talk about why we should
care about those implications,
なぜそれに注目する必要があるか
06:01
and end with what might be done.
そして最後に
どんな対策ができるか ご提案します
06:03
Some of the first studies that we ran in this area
初期の研究で調査したのは
06:07
looked at helping behavior,
人助けの行動でした
06:09
something social psychologists call
社会心理学では
06:10
pro-social behavior.
向社会的行動と呼ばれるものです
06:13
And we were really interested in who's more likely
興味の中心は
他人に助けの手を
06:15
to offer help to another person,
差し伸べる傾向が強いのは
06:17
someone who's rich or someone who's poor.
金持ちなのか貧乏人なのか
ということです
06:20
In one of the studies, we bring in rich and poor
ある研究では
金持ちと貧乏人を
06:23
members of the community into the lab
研究室に呼び
06:27
and give each of them the equivalent of 10 dollars.
全員に10ドル相当ずつ渡し
06:30
We told the participants
こう言いました
06:33
that they could keep these 10 dollars for themselves,
「この10ドルは
取っておいてもいいし
06:35
or they could share a portion of it,
もし望むなら一部を
06:37
if they wanted to, with a stranger
まったく知らない誰かに
06:39
who is totally anonymous.
あげてもいいですよ」
06:41
They'll never meet that stranger and
the stranger will never meet them.
お金を受け取る人と
会うことはありません
06:43
And we just monitor how much people give.
そして被験者が
いくら分け与えるか観察しました
06:46
Individuals who made 25,000 sometimes
年収が2万5千ドルの人や
06:49
under 15,000 dollars a year,
1万5千ドル以下の人が
06:51
gave 44 percent more of their money
見ず知らずの人に与えるお金は
06:54
to the stranger
年収が15万ドルや
06:56
than did individuals making 150,000
20万ドルの人より
06:57
or 200,000 dollars a year.
44%多いという結果が出ました
06:59
We've had people play games
賞品を獲得するためなら
07:02
to see who's more or less likely to cheat
ズルもしかねない人の特徴を調べるため
07:05
to increase their chances of winning a prize.
被験者にゲームをさせました
07:08
In one of the games, we actually rigged a computer
あるゲームでは
コンピュータに細工をして
07:10
so that die rolls over a certain score
特定のスコア以上が
出ないようにしておきました
07:13
were impossible.
特定のスコア以上が
出ないようにしておきました
07:16
You couldn't get above 12 in this game,
12以上は絶対に出ません
07:17
and yet, the richer you were,
ところが お金持ちほど
07:20
the more likely you were to cheat in this game
このゲームでズルをして
07:23
to earn credits toward a $50 cash prize,
50ドルの賞金を獲ろうとしたのです
07:25
sometimes by three to four times as much.
その頻度は3倍から4倍でした
07:29
We ran another study where we looked at whether
別の研究では
ビンに入ったお菓子を
07:32
people would be inclined to take candy
人々が取る傾向を調べました
07:35
from a jar of candy that we explicitly identified
お菓子は子ども用だと
07:38
as being reserved for children --
はっきり断ってありました
07:40
(Laughter) —
(笑)
07:43
participating -- I'm not kidding.
冗談じゃないですよ
07:46
I know it sounds like I'm making a joke.
冗談みたいに聞こえますけどね
07:48
We explicitly told participants
被験者に はっきり言ったんです
07:51
this jar of candy's for children participating
近くで発達研究をやっていて
07:53
in a developmental lab nearby.
このお菓子はその協力者である―
07:55
They're in studies. This is for them.
子どもたちのために用意してあると
07:57
And we just monitored how
much candy participants took.
そして被験者がお菓子をいくつ取るか
観察しました
07:59
Participants who felt rich
金持ちと自覚している人は
08:03
took two times as much candy
貧乏と自覚している人の
08:04
as participants who felt poor.
2倍多く お菓子を取りました
08:06
We've even studied cars,
車についても調べました
08:09
not just any cars,
ただの車じゃありません
08:12
but whether drivers of different kinds of cars
車種によって運転手が
法律違反をする傾向に
08:13
are more or less inclined to break the law.
違いがあるか調べました
08:16
In one of these studies, we looked at
ある研究では
08:20
whether drivers would stop for a pedestrian
横断歩道を渡る素振りを見せている
歩行者のために
08:22
that we had posed waiting to cross at a crosswalk.
運転手が止まるかどうか
検証しました
08:27
Now in California, as you all know,
カリフォルニアでは
08:29
because I'm sure we all do this,
当然のことですよね
08:31
it's the law to stop for a pedestrian
who's waiting to cross.
渡ろうとしている歩行者がいたら
止まるのがルールです
08:34
So here's an example of how we did it.
実験はこんな感じです
08:38
That's our confederate off to the left
左にいる人はサクラで
08:40
posing as a pedestrian.
歩行者を装っています
08:42
He approaches as the red truck successfully stops.
彼が前へ出ると
赤いトラックがちゃんと止まります
08:43
In typical California fashion, it's overtaken
カリフォルニアでは日常茶飯事ですが
08:48
by the bus who almost runs our pedestrian over.
バスが追い越し
歩行者をひきそうです
08:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:52
Now here's an example of a more expensive car,
高級車の場合です
08:54
a Prius, driving through,
プリウスは無視です
08:56
and a BMW doing the same.
BMWも 同じくです
08:57
So we did this for hundreds of vehicles
何百台もの車を
09:03
on several days,
数日間にわたって調査し
09:05
just tracking who stops and who doesn't.
止まる車と止まらない車を
記録しました
09:08
What we found was that as the expensiveness
これでわかったのは
09:12
of a car increased,
高級車の運転手ほど
09:14
the driver's tendencies to break the law
法律を破る傾向が強い
ということです
09:18
increased as well.
法律を破る傾向が強い
ということです
09:20
None of the cars, none of the cars
一番安い価格帯の車は
09:22
in our least expensive car category
一台たりとも
09:24
broke the law.
違反しませんでした
09:28
Close to 50 percent of the cars
最高価格帯の車では
09:29
in our most expensive vehicle category
50%近くが
09:32
broke the law.
法律違反をしました
09:34
We've run other studies finding that
別の実験では
09:37
wealthier individuals are more
likely to lie in negotiations,
裕福な人ほど交渉で嘘をついたり
職場における違反行動―
09:39
to endorse unethical behavior at work
たとえばレジから現金を盗んだり
09:42
like stealing cash from the cash register,
賄賂を受け取る
顧客をだますなどの違反を
09:44
taking bribes, lying to customers.
容認する傾向が表れました
09:47
Now I don't mean to suggest
裕福な人々だけが
09:52
that it's only wealthy people
こうした行動パターンを示すと
09:54
who show these patterns of behavior.
言っているのではありません
09:55
Not at all. In fact, I think that we all,
まったく違います
実際 私たちは皆
09:57
in our day-to-day, minute-by-minute lives,
日々の生活の中で 常に
10:00
struggle with these competing motivations
自分の利益を
他人の利益より優先させるか否か
10:03
of when, or if, to put our own interests
させるとすればいつか
10:06
above the interests of other people.
そういう対立する気持ちと闘っています
10:09
And that's understandable because
仕方がないのです
なぜなら
10:12
the American dream is an idea
アメリカンドリームというのは
10:14
in which we all have an equal opportunity
誰もが機会を平等に持ち
10:16
to succeed and prosper,
一生懸命 真面目に働けば
10:20
as long as we apply ourselves and work hard,
成功し繁栄するという思想です
10:22
and a piece of that means that sometimes,
それは時に
自分の利益を
10:24
you need to put your own interests
周りの人の利益や幸せより
10:27
above the interests and well-being
of other people around you.
優先させる必要がある
という意味でもあります
10:30
But what we're finding is that,
研究により わかってきたのは
10:33
the wealthier you are, the more likely you are
人は裕福になればなるほど
10:36
to pursue a vision of personal success,
個人的な成功や
10:38
of achievement and accomplishment,
業績についての理想を求め
10:41
to the detriment of others around you.
周囲の人の不利益を
顧みなくなるということです
10:43
Here I've plotted for you the mean household income
こちらは ここ20年間の
世帯収入の平均を
10:46
received by each fifth and top
five percent of the population
グラフ化したものです
人口を5分の1ずつに分け
10:49
over the last 20 years.
上位5%と比較しています
10:53
In 1993, the differences between the different
1993年の時点で
五分位数間の
10:55
quintiles of the population, in terms of income,
所得格差には
10:57
are fairly egregious.
かなりの開きがあります
11:00
It's not difficult to discern that there are differences.
差があるのは
誰の目にも明らかです
11:03
But over the last 20 years, that significant difference
しかしこの20年で
その著しい格差は
11:06
has become a grand canyon of sorts
上位とその他の間で
11:09
between those at the top and everyone else.
天と地ほどの差になりました
11:11
In fact, the top 20 percent of our population
実際 人口の上位20%が
11:14
own close to 90 percent of the
total wealth in this country.
我が国の富の90%近くを
保有しています
11:18
We're at unprecedented levels
これほどの経済格差は
11:21
of economic inequality.
人類史上 例がありません
11:23
What that means is that wealth is not only becoming
これは ある特定の層の人が
11:27
increasingly concentrated in the hands
of a select group of individuals,
ますます富をかき集めるように
なってきているというだけでなく
11:29
but the American dream is becoming
増加し続ける大多数の人々にとって
11:34
increasingly unattainable
アメリカンドリームを達成することが
11:36
for an increasing majority of us.
ますます難しくなっている
ということでもあります
11:38
And if it's the case, as we've been finding,
我々が明らかにしたとおり
11:41
that the wealthier you are,
人は裕福になればなるほど
11:44
the more entitled you feel to that wealth,
特権意識を募らせ
11:46
and the more likely you are
to prioritize your own interests
他人の利益よりも
自分の利益を
11:48
above the interests of other people,
優先させる傾向が強まり
11:51
and be willing to do things to serve that self-interest,
自己利益を追求しようとするのなら
11:53
well then there's no reason to think
このパターンは今後も
11:57
that those patterns will change.
変わっていくわけがありません
11:58
In fact, there's every reason to think
むしろ悪化の一途をたどると
考える方が自然です
12:00
that they'll only get worse,
むしろ悪化の一途をたどると
考える方が自然です
12:02
and that's what it would look like
if things just stayed the same,
このペースで今後20年の間に
12:04
at the same linear rate, over the next 20 years.
事態が変わらなければ
ご覧のようになっていきます
12:07
Now, inequality, economic inequality,
さて 不平等や経済格差は
12:11
is something we should all be concerned about,
皆で考えるべき問題です
12:14
and not just because of those at the bottom
社会的階層の底辺にいる
人たちのためだけでなく
12:16
of the social hierarchy,
社会的階層の底辺にいる
人たちのためだけでなく
12:19
but because individuals and groups
個人であろうと集団であろうと
12:20
with lots of economic inequality do worse,
経済格差が広がると
状況が悪くなりますから
12:22
not just the people at the bottom, everyone.
貧困層の人々だけでなく
全員に関わるのです
12:28
There's a lot of really compelling research
裏付けとなる研究が
たくさんあります
12:30
coming out from top labs all over the world
経済格差の拡大に伴い
12:33
showcasing the range of things
弱体化した様々な物事を
紹介する研究が
12:35
that are undermined
世界中の―
12:38
as economic inequality gets worse.
一流の研究所から
発表されています
12:40
Social mobility, things we really care about,
社会的流動性や
我々が大切にしているもの
12:43
physical health, social trust,
身体的健康
社会的信用などは皆
12:45
all go down as inequality goes up.
格差が広がると下落します
12:48
Similarly, negative things
同様に社会的集団や
12:51
in social collectives and societies,
社会そのものにおける
ネガティブな物事―
12:53
things like obesity, and violence,
たとえば肥満や暴力
12:55
imprisonment, and punishment,
投獄や刑罰などは
12:57
are exacerbated as economic inequality increases.
経済格差が広がると
悪化するのです
12:59
Again, these are outcomes not just experienced
先ほども言ったとおり
こうなると
13:03
by a few, but that resound
一部の人だけではなく
13:06
across all strata of society.
社会階層の どの層も
甚大な影響を受けます
13:08
Even people at the top experience these outcomes.
最富裕層の人たちにさえ
影響が及びます
13:10
So what do we do?
では どうしましょう?
13:13
This cascade of self-perpetuating,
この尽きることのない
13:17
pernicious, negative effects
致命的な悪影響の流れは
13:20
could seem like something that's spun out of control,
制御不能に見えるかもしれません
13:23
and there's nothing we can do about it,
もうお手上げ状態で
13:26
certainly nothing we as individuals could do.
我々個人には為すすべもないように
思えます
13:28
But in fact, we've been finding
しかし実は 私たちの研究所での
研究によると
13:31
in our own laboratory research
ほんのちょっとした心理的介入や
13:35
that small psychological interventions,
価値観のちょっとした変化
13:38
small changes to people's values,
ある方向への
ちょっとした刺激によって
13:43
small nudges in certain directions,
平等主義や共感のレベルを
修復できることが
13:46
can restore levels of egalitarianism and empathy.
わかってきています
13:49
For instance, reminding people
たとえば人々に
13:53
of the benefits of cooperation,
協力による恩恵や
共同体の利点を
13:55
or the advantages of community,
思い出させると
13:57
cause wealthier individuals to be just as egalitarian
裕福な人も貧しい人と同じくらいの
14:00
as poor people.
平等主義になります
14:04
In one study, we had people watch a brief video,
ある研究で
短いビデオを見てもらいました
14:07
just 46 seconds long, about childhood poverty
たった46秒間
子どもの貧困についてです
14:10
that served as a reminder of the needs of others
世の中には困っている人がいるのだと
14:14
in the world around them,
思い出させるのが狙いです
14:17
and after watching that,
ビデオを見た後
研究室に
14:19
we looked at how willing people were
悩みを抱えた人が現れます
14:21
to offer up their own time to a stranger
我々は人々が
見ず知らずの人のために
14:23
presented to them in the lab who was in distress.
どれくらい自分の時間を
使おうとするか検証しました
14:27
After watching this video, an hour later,
ビデオを見てから1時間後
14:30
rich people became just as generous
金持ちは赤の他人を救うために
14:34
of their own time to help out this other person,
時間を割くことにおいて
14:36
a stranger, as someone who's poor,
貧乏人と同じくらい寛容になりました
14:38
suggesting that these differences are not
このことが示すのは
差異というものは
14:41
innate or categorical,
先天的でも絶対的でもなく
14:43
but are so malleable
価値観のわずかな変化や
14:45
to slight changes in people's values,
慈悲や共感する力に
14:47
and little nudges of compassion
ちょっと目を向けさせるだけで
14:49
and bumps of empathy.
左右されるということです
14:51
And beyond the walls of our lab,
研究室内だけでなく
14:53
we're even beginning to see
signs of change in society.
社会にも変化の兆しが
現れ始めています
14:54
Bill Gates, one of our nation's wealthiest individuals,
ビル・ゲイツは我が国の
最富裕層の一人ですが
14:58
in his Harvard commencement speech,
ハーバードの卒業式の式辞で
15:02
talked about the problem facing society
社会が直面している不平等の問題を
15:03
of inequality as being the most daunting challenge,
最も手ごわい課題として語り
15:05
and talked about what must be done to combat it,
それと闘うためにすべきことを
語りました
15:09
saying, "Humanity's greatest advances
彼の言葉です
「人類の進歩のうちで最大のものは
15:11
are not in its discoveries,
発見にあるのではなく
15:15
but in how those discoveries are applied
不平等を緩和するために
15:17
to reduce inequity."
発見をどう利用するかにある」
15:20
And there's the Giving Pledge,
「Giving Pledge(寄付の誓い)」という
15:23
in which more than 100 of our nation's
取り組みがあります
そこでは―
15:25
wealthiest individuals
我が国の百人以上の大富豪たちが
15:27
are pledging half of their fortunes to charity.
財産の半分を寄付すると
誓いを立てています
15:29
And there's the emergence
利益分割の草の根運動が
15:33
of dozens of grassroots movements,
いくつも始まっています
名前を挙げるなら
15:35
like We are the One Percent,
「We are the One Percent」
15:39
the Resource Generation,
「Resource Generation」
15:41
or Wealth for Common Good,
「Wealth for Common Good」
15:43
in which the most privileged
こうした活動を通じ
15:45
members of the population,
特権階級の人たちや
15:47
members of the one percent and elsewhere,
上位1%に当たる人など
15:49
people who are wealthy,
裕福な人々が
15:52
are using their own economic resources,
自らの経済力を使って
15:54
adults and youth alike, that's
what's most striking to me,
大人も若者も ― ここに私は
最も感動したのですが
15:57
leveraging their own privilege,
自らの特権や
16:01
their own economic resources,
自らの経済力を
16:03
to combat inequality
格差是正のために生かそうと
16:05
by advocating for social policies,
社会政策や
社会的価値の変革を求め
16:08
changes in social values,
人々の行動を
16:11
and changes in people's behavior,
変える必要があると訴えています
16:13
that work against their own economic interests
この活動は彼ら自身の
経済的利益にはマイナスですが
16:15
but that may ultimately restore the American dream.
いずれアメリカンドリームを復活させる
可能性を秘めています
16:18
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:25
Translated by Emi Kamiya
Reviewed by Yuko Yoshida

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Paul Piff - Social psychologist
Paul Piff studies how social hierarchy, inequality and emotion shape relations between individuals and groups.

Why you should listen

Paul Piff is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior at the University of California, Irvine.​ In particular, he studies how wealth (having it or not having it) can affect interpersonal relationships.

His surprising studies include running rigged games of Monopoly, tracking how those who drive expensive cars behave versus those driving less expensive vehicles and even determining that rich people are literally more likely to take candy from children than the less well-off. The results often don't paint a pretty picture about the motivating forces of wealth. He writes, "specifically, I have been finding that increased wealth and status in society lead to increased self-focus and, in turn, decreased compassion, altruism, and ethical behavior."

More profile about the speaker
Paul Piff | Speaker | TED.com