12:13
TEDSalon Berlin 2014

Heather Barnett: What humans can learn from semi-intelligent slime

ヘザー・バーネット: 準知的粘菌が人類に教えてくれること

Filmed:

涼しく湿気った所に生息する真核性微生物であるモジホコリ。その生物学的デザインと自己組織的システムに触発され、アーティストであるヘザー・バーネットはモジホコリとの共同制作に取り組んでいます。この準知的粘菌から我々が学べることとは何か?このトークを聞いて確かめてください。

- Artist
Heather Barnett creates art with slime mold -- a material used in diverse areas of scientific research, including biological computing, robotics and structural design. Full bio

I'd like to introduce you to an organism:
皆さんにある生物を紹介したいと思います
00:12
a slime mold, Physarum polycephalum.
モジホコリという粘菌です
00:15
It's a mold with an identity
crisis, because it's not a mold,
自己認識が崩壊した糸状菌です
糸状菌ではないからです
00:19
so let's get that straight to start with.
まずはこの点から説明しましょう
00:22
It is one of 700 known slime molds
これはアメーバ界に属する
00:23
belonging to the kingdom of the amoeba.
700 もの既知の粘菌の一つです
00:26
It is a single-celled organism, a cell,
単細胞生物であり
00:28
that joins together with other cells
資源を最大化できるよう
00:31
to form a mass super-cell
他の細胞とくっつき
00:33
to maximize its resources.
巨大なスーパーセルになります
00:35
So within a slime mold you might find thousands
従って粘菌一株につき
00:37
or millions of nuclei,
数千ないし数百万の核を持ち
00:40
all sharing a cell wall,
その全てが細胞壁を共有し
00:42
all operating as one entity.
一つの個体として活動します
00:44
In its natural habitat,
自然の生態系では
00:47
you might find the slime mold foraging in woodlands,
森の中で腐敗した草木を
00:48
eating rotting vegetation,
食べている粘菌が見られるでしょう
00:51
but you might equally find it
また同様に
00:55
in research laboratories,
研究者の実験室
00:56
classrooms, and even artists' studios.
教室や芸術家のスタジオでも見られます
00:58
I first came across the slime
mold about five years ago.
私が初めて粘菌を知ったのは 5 年前です
01:02
A microbiologist friend of mine
微生物学者の友人が
01:05
gave me a petri dish with a little yellow blob in it
黄色い小塊が入ったペトリ皿を渡し
01:07
and told me to go home and play with it.
持ち帰って遊んでみろと言うのです
01:10
The only instructions I was given,
その時教えられたのは
01:13
that it likes it dark and damp
それが暗がりと湿気を好み
01:15
and its favorite food is porridge oats.
好物がポリッジオーツだということだけでした
01:17
I'm an artist who's worked for many years
私は長年生物学 そして科学的手法を
01:21
with biology, with scientific processes,
扱ってきたアーティストなので
01:23
so living material is not uncommon for me.
生きた素材には慣れっこでした
01:26
I've worked with plants, bacteria,
これまで植物 細菌 コウイカ
01:29
cuttlefish, fruit flies.
ショウジョウバエを扱ったことがあります
01:31
So I was keen to get my new collaborator home
ですので新たな協力者で何ができるか
01:32
to see what it could do.
楽しみに家に帰りました
01:35
So I took it home and I watched.
持ち帰り 観察しました
01:36
I fed it a varied diet.
いろいろな食べ物を与えました
01:40
I observed as it networked.
それがネットワークを作るのを見ました
01:42
It formed a connection between food sources.
食べ物と食べ物の間にコネクションを形成しました
01:44
I watched it leave a trail behind it,
それがどこを通ったのか
01:47
indicating where it had been.
痕跡を残しているのを見ました
01:49
And I noticed that when it was
fed up with one petri dish,
また 粘菌は今のペトリ皿が嫌になると
01:51
it would escape and find a better home.
ましな住み処を求めて脱出することを知りました
01:54
I captured my observations
観察経過を
01:57
through time-lapse photography.
微速度撮影で記録しました
01:59
Slime mold grows at about one centimeter an hour,
粘菌は毎時約 1cm 成長するため
02:01
so it's not really ideal for live viewing
リアルタイムでの観察には向いていません
02:03
unless there's some form of
really extreme meditation,
凄い瞑想か何かすれば別ですが
02:06
but through the time lapse,
とにかく 微速度撮影を通じて
02:09
I could observe some really interesting behaviors.
とても興味深い行動を観察できました
02:11
For instance, having fed on a nice pile of oats,
例えば美味しいオーツを 一山 平らげると
02:14
the slime mold goes off to explore new territories
粘菌は新たなテリトリーの探索に
02:18
in different directions simultaneously.
同時に別々の方向へ拡がります
02:22
When it meets itself,
そして自身と合流すると
02:25
it knows it's already there,
自分が既にそこにいることを知り
02:27
it recognizes it's there,
存在を認識し
02:29
and instead retreats back
来た道を戻るのではなく
02:31
and grows in other directions.
更に他の道へ拡がります
02:33
I was quite impressed by this feat,
この芸当にはかなり感激しました
02:36
at how what was essentially
just a bag of cellular slime
根本的にただの粘液細胞の塊が
02:39
could somehow map its territory,
どうやって自身のテリトリーを把握し
02:42
know itself, and move with seeming intention.
意思があるように動けるのでしょうか
02:45
I found countless scientific studies,
私はこの生物に関する
02:49
research papers, journal articles,
素晴らしい性質を取り上げた
02:53
all citing incredible work with this one organism,
数多くの研究 論文 記事を見つけました
02:55
and I'm going to share a few of those with you.
いくつか皆さんに紹介していきます
02:59
For example, a team in Hokkaido University in Japan
例えば日本の北海道大学のチームでは
03:01
filled a maze with slime mold.
迷路を粘菌でいっぱいにしました
03:04
It joined together and formed a mass cell.
粘菌は結合して一つの大きな細胞になりました
03:06
They introduced food at two points,
チームは2 ヶ所に食べ物を置きます
03:08
oats of course,
もちろんオーツです
03:10
and it formed a connection
すると粘菌はその 2 点の間に
03:11
between the food.
コネクションを作ります
03:13
It retracted from empty areas and dead ends.
何もない所や行き止まりからは退散します
03:15
There are four possible routes through this maze,
4 つの経路がある迷路ですが
03:17
yet time and time again,
何度繰り返しても
03:20
the slime mold established the shortest
粘菌は最も短く
03:22
and the most efficient route.
効率の良い経路を形成します
03:24
Quite clever.
なかなか賢いですね
03:27
The conclusion from their experiment
このチームは実験の結果から
03:28
was that the slime mold had
a primitive form of intelligence.
粘菌は原始的な知能を持っていると結論付けました
03:30
Another study exposed cold air at
regular intervals to the slime mold.
別の実験では 粘菌を一定間隔で冷気に曝しました
03:33
It didn't like it. It doesn't like it cold.
粘菌は冷気を嫌がります
03:36
It doesn't like it dry.
乾燥を嫌がります
03:39
They did this at repeat intervals,
一定間隔で冷気に曝すと
03:40
and each time, the slime mold
それに応じて粘菌は毎回
03:42
slowed down its growth in response.
成長を遅めました
03:44
However, at the next interval,
ところが その次の試行では
03:47
the researchers didn't put the cold air on,
実験者は冷気を与えませんでしたが
03:49
yet the slime mold slowed down in anticipation
粘菌の動きは冷気に備えて
03:52
of it happening.
ゆっくりになりました
03:55
It somehow knew that it was about the time
粘菌はどのようにしてか 嫌いな冷気が
03:56
for the cold air that it didn't like.
来る頃だと分かっていたのです
03:59
The conclusion from their experiment
この実験の結論は
04:01
was that the slime mold was able to learn.
粘菌は学習できるということでした
04:02
A third experiment:
3 つ目の実験です
04:06
the slime mold was invited
粘菌にオーツで埋め尽くされた場所を
04:07
to explore a territory covered in oats.
探索させました
04:09
It fans out in a branching pattern.
粘菌は枝状に拡がります
04:13
As it goes, each food node it finds,
拡がって食べ物を見つける度に
04:16
it forms a network, a connection to,
ネットワークを形成しながら
04:18
and keeps foraging.
拡がり続けます
04:21
After 26 hours, it established
26 時間後 粘菌は
04:23
quite a firm network
あちこちのオーツ間で
04:25
between the different oats.
かなりしっかりしたネットワークを形成しました
04:27
Now there's nothing remarkable in this
それだけなら何も驚くことはありませんが
04:29
until you learn that the center oat that it started from
実はスタート地点である中央のオーツは
04:31
represents the city of Tokyo,
東京の都市を表しており
04:33
and the surrounding oats are
suburban railway stations.
周りのオーツは近郊の駅を表していました
04:35
The slime mold had replicated
粘菌は東京の
04:39
the Tokyo transport network
交通網を再現したのです
04:42
— (Laughter) —
(笑)
04:44
a complex system developed over time
住宅建築 土木工学 都市計画によって
04:46
by community dwellings, civil
engineering, urban planning.
時を経て作り上げられたものを再現したのです
04:49
What had taken us well over 100 years
私たちが優に百年以上かけたものを
04:53
took the slime mold just over a day.
粘菌はほんの一日強で作りました
04:55
The conclusion from their experiment
この実験の結論は 粘菌は
04:58
was that the slime mold can form efficient networks
効率の良いネットワークを形成することができ
05:00
and solve the traveling salesman problem.
巡回セールスマン問題を解けるということです
05:02
It is a biological computer.
生体コンピュータなのです
05:05
As such, it has been mathematically modeled,
そうして 粘菌は数学モデル化され
05:07
algorithmically analyzed.
アルゴリズム解析されました
05:10
It's been sonified, replicated, simulated.
音波処理 複製 シミュレートされました
05:11
World over, teams of researchers
世界中の研究チームが
05:14
are decoding its biological principles
粘菌の演算ルールを理解しようと
05:17
to understand its computational rules
その機能をデコードし
05:20
and applying that learning
to the fields of electronics,
そこから得たものを電子工学 プログラミング
05:22
programming and robotics.
ロボット工学の分野で活かしています
05:24
So the question is,
問題はこうです
05:27
how does this thing work?
粘菌はどうやって機能しているのか?
05:29
It doesn't have a central nervous system.
粘菌は中枢神経系を持ちません
05:31
It doesn't have a brain,
脳もありません
05:33
yet it can perform behaviors
それなのに私たちが
05:35
that we associate with brain function.
脳で実現していることをやってのけます
05:36
It can learn, it can remember,
学習でき 記憶でき
05:38
it can solve problems, it can make decisions.
問題が解けて 判断ができる
05:40
So where does that intelligence lie?
この知性はどこに宿っているのでしょうか?
05:43
So this is a microscopy, a video I shot,
こちらは私が録画した
05:46
and it's about 100 times magnification,
100 倍拡大
05:48
sped up about 20 times,
20 倍速の顕微鏡画像です
05:51
and inside the slime mold,
粘菌の内部は
05:54
there is a rhythmic pulsing flow,
律動的な信号の流れがあり
05:56
a vein-like structure carrying
血管のような構造が
05:59
cellular material, nutrients and chemical information
細胞形成成分 栄養 化学情報を
06:01
through the cell,
細胞内で運んでいます
06:05
streaming first in one direction
and then back in another.
まずは一方向に それから逆方向にです
06:07
And it is this continuous, synchronous oscillation
そして細胞内の
06:10
within the cell that allows it to form
この連続的 同期発振こそが
06:14
quite a complex understanding of its environment,
巨大な中央制御装置抜きに
06:17
but without any large-scale control center.
環境の複雑な把握を可能としているのです
06:20
This is where its intelligence lies.
ここに粘菌の知性が宿っています
06:23
So it's not just academic researchers
この生物に興味を持っているのは
06:25
in universities that are interested in this organism.
大学の研究者だけではありません
06:29
A few years ago, I set up SliMoCo,
数年前 私は SliMoCo という
06:31
the Slime Mould Collective.
粘菌会を立ち上げました
06:34
It's an online, open, democratic network
粘菌学者やファンのための
06:37
for slime mold researchers and enthusiasts
オープンで民主的なオンラインネットワークで
06:40
to share knowledge and experimentation
所属や分野を越えて
06:42
across disciplinary divides
知識や実験法を
06:45
and across academic divides.
共有する場です
06:48
The Slime Mould Collective
membership is self-selecting.
会員権は自己選抜的です
06:51
People have found the collective
粘菌がオーツを見つけるように
06:55
as the slime mold finds the oats.
人々はこの会を見つけます
06:58
And it comprises of scientists
会員には科学者
07:01
and computer scientists and researchers
コンピュータ学者や研究者もいますが
07:03
but also artists like me,
私のようなアーティストや
07:04
architects, designers, writers, activists, you name it.
建築家 デザイナー 作家 活動家 何でもいます
07:07
It's a very interesting, eclectic membership.
とても面白い 良いとこ取りな会員です
07:12
Just a few examples:
少し例を挙げます
07:16
an artist who paints with fluorescent Physarum;
光るモジホコリカビで絵を描くアーティストや
07:17
a collaborative team
ワークショップで 3D プリントのテクノロジーを使って
07:20
who are combining biological and electronic design
生物学と電子工学のデザインを組み合わせる
07:22
with 3D printing technologies in a workshop;
コラボチームや
07:26
another artist who is using the slime mold
粘菌を使って
07:29
as a way of engaging a community
コミュニティの領域を
07:31
to map their area.
マッピングするアーティストもいます
07:33
Here, the slime mold is being used directly
粘菌は直接的には
07:36
as a biological tool, but metaphorically
生物学的な道具として用いられていますが
07:38
as a symbol for ways of talking
団結力 コミュニケーション 協力を
07:41
about social cohesion, communication
表現するシンボルとしても
07:43
and cooperation.
使われます
07:47
Other public engagement activities,
その他の公共活動として
07:49
I run lots of slime mold workshops,
粘菌と創造的に関わる
07:51
a creative way of engaging with the organism.
多くの粘菌ワークショップを開いています
07:53
So people are invited to come and learn
人々を招待して粘菌が
07:56
about what amazing things it can do,
どんなに凄いことをできるのかを学び
07:58
and they design their own petri dish experiment,
その特性を調べられるよう
08:00
an environment for the slime mold to navigate
粘菌に探索させるための
08:02
so they can test its properties.
皆さんそれぞれの実験場をデザインします
08:04
Everybody takes home a new pet
皆 新たなペットを持ち帰ります
08:06
and is invited to post their results
そして実験の結果は粘菌会に
08:09
on the Slime Mould Collective.
投稿してもらうよう奨めています
08:12
And the collective has enabled me
粘菌会によって私は
08:14
to form collaborations
様々な分野の面白い人々と
08:15
with a whole array of interesting people.
コラボできるようになりました
08:18
I've been working with filmmakers
これまでに映像作家と
08:20
on a feature-length slime mold documentary,
長編の粘菌ドキュメンタリーを作ってました
08:22
and I stress feature-length,
聞き間違いではありません 長編です
08:25
which is in the final stages of edit
これは今 編集の最終段階にあり
08:28
and will be hitting your cinema screens very soon.
近い内にスクリーンで上映されます
08:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:33
It's also enabled me to conduct what I think is
また 粘菌会のお陰で私が思うに世界初の
08:34
the world's first human slime mold experiment.
人間粘菌実験を実施できました
08:38
This is part of an exhibition in Rotterdam last year.
昨年のロッテルダムでの展示会の一部です
08:40
We invited people to become
slime mold for half an hour.
来場者に 30 分間 粘菌になってもらいました
08:43
So we essentially tied people together
基本的に皆さんを繋いで
08:48
so they were a giant cell,
一つの巨大な細胞に見立てて
08:51
and invited them to follow slime mold rules.
粘菌のルールで動いてもらいました
08:54
You have to communicate through oscillations,
参加者は振動で意志疎通しなくてはなりません
08:57
no speaking.
言葉は無しです
09:00
You have to operate as one entity, one mass cell,
一つの個体 一つの巨大な細胞として
09:01
no egos,
自我抜きに動きます
09:06
and the motivation for moving
動いて
09:08
and then exploring the environment
周囲を探索する目的は
09:10
is in search of food.
食べ物の発見です
09:12
So a chaotic shuffle ensued
as this bunch of strangers
そうして園内を「粘菌中」Tシャツを着て
09:14
tied together with yellow ropes
wearing "Being Slime Mold" t-shirts
黄色いロープで繋がれた
09:18
wandered through the museum park.
大勢の参加者がうろつきます
09:22
When they met trees, they had to reshape
木にぶつかったら言葉は使わずに
09:25
their connections and reform as a mass cell
繋がりを変えて
09:28
through not speaking.
再形成しなくてはなりません
09:31
This is a ludicrous experiment in many, many ways.
これはいろんな意味でおかしな実験です
09:35
This isn't hypothesis-driven.
仮説があったわけではありません
09:39
We're not trying to prove, demonstrate anything.
証明や実現しようとしていたこともありません
09:41
But what it did provide us was a way
ただこの実験を通して
09:43
of engaging a broad section of the public
知性 仲介 自律性によって
09:45
with ideas of intelligence, agency, autonomy,
広く公衆を参加させることや
09:47
and provide a playful platform
そこから判明したことを議論できる
09:52
for discussions about
遊び心溢れた場の
09:54
the things that ensued.
作り方が分かりました
09:58
One of the most exciting things
この実験の
10:00
about this experiment
最も興奮する所は
10:03
was the conversation that happened afterwards.
その後の会話にあります
10:06
An entirely spontaneous symposium
happened in the park.
完全に自発的なシンポジウムが開かれました
10:08
People talked about the human psychology,
個別の人格や自我を
10:12
of how difficult it was to let go
手放すのがどんなに難しいかという
10:14
of their individual personalities and egos.
人間の心理について話していました
10:15
Other people talked about bacterial communication.
細菌のコミュニケーションについての話もありました
10:19
Each person brought in their own
各人がそれぞれの
10:22
individual interpretation,
解釈を披露しました
10:24
and our conclusion from this experiment was that
そしてこの実験の私たちの結論は
10:27
the people of Rotterdam were highly cooperative,
ロッテルダムの方々はとても協力的だということです
10:28
especially when given beer.
特にビールが振る舞われればです
10:32
We didn't just give them oats.
オーツだけではありません
10:35
We gave them beer as well.
ビールも振る舞ったのです
10:37
But they weren't as efficient as the slime mold,
ただ皆さん 粘菌ほど燃費はよくありませんでした
10:39
and the slime mold, for me,
そして私にとって粘菌は
10:41
is a fascinating subject matter.
魅力的な対象です
10:43
It's biologically fascinating,
生物学的に魅力的ですし
10:45
it's computationally interesting,
計算処理的に魅力的です
10:47
but it's also a symbol,
また同時に粘菌は
10:49
a way of engaging with ideas of community,
コミュニティ 集合的行動 協力といったことを
10:51
collective behavior, cooperation.
扱うためのシンボルでもあります
10:54
A lot of my work draws on the scientific research,
私の作品の多くは科学研究を利用しており
10:58
so this pays homage to the maze experiment
これは形は違うものの
11:00
but in a different way.
迷路実験をオマージュしています
11:03
And the slime mold is also my working material.
また粘菌は私の仕事道具です
11:05
It's a coproducer of photographs, prints, animations,
写真 印刷物 アニメーション 参加型イベントの
11:07
participatory events.
共同制作者です
11:13
Whilst the slime mold doesn't choose
粘菌は 正確には私との
11:14
to work with me, exactly,
共同作業を選択はしていませんが
11:16
it is a collaboration of sorts.
ある意味でコラボです
11:18
I can predict certain behaviors
私は粘菌の仕組みを理解することで
11:21
by understanding how it operates,
特定の行動を予測できますが
11:23
but I can't control it.
制御はできません
11:25
The slime mold has the final say
創造の過程の中で粘菌が
11:27
in the creative process.
最終的な決定権を持っています
11:28
And after all, it has its own internal aesthetics.
結局 粘菌は自身の審美眼に従うのです
11:31
These branching patterns that we see
私たちが目にする枝状のパターンは
11:34
we see across all forms, scales of nature,
三角州から雷
11:36
from river deltas to lightning strikes,
血管から神経網と
11:38
from our own blood vessels to neural networks.
自然界のあらゆるスケールと形で見られます
11:41
There's clearly significant rules at play
この単純ながらも複雑な生命には
11:45
in this simple yet complex organism,
明らかに重要な法則が働いています
11:48
and no matter what our disciplinary
perspective or our mode of inquiry,
そしてどのような学問や問題であっても
11:50
there's a great deal that we can learn
この美しく 脳を持たない小塊を
11:54
from observing and engaging
探求し 利用することから学べることは
11:56
with this beautiful, brainless blob.
膨大にあります
11:57
I give you Physarum polycephalum.
モジホコリを称えましょう
12:00
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
12:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:05
Translated by Keiichi Kudo
Reviewed by Shuichi Sakai

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Heather Barnett - Artist
Heather Barnett creates art with slime mold -- a material used in diverse areas of scientific research, including biological computing, robotics and structural design.

Why you should listen
Heather Barnett creates fascinating biodesigns with the semi-intelligent slime mold. While it has no brain nor central nervous system, the single celled organism, Physarum polycephalum, shows a primitive form of memory, problem-solving skills and the apparent ability to make decisions. It is used as a model organism in diverse areas of scientific research, including biological computing, robotics and structural design. “It is also quite beautiful,” says Barnett, “and makes therefore for a great creative collaborator. Although ultimately I cannot control the final outcome, it is a rather independent organism.“
More profile about the speaker
Heather Barnett | Speaker | TED.com