19:31
TED2005

Howard Rheingold: The new power of collaboration

ハワード ラインゴールド: コラボレーション

Filmed:

ハワード ラインゴールドは、次世代の協同制作、一般参加型媒体や集団行動について、そしてWikipediaが、人間の天性である集団作業をいかにうまく引き伸ばすかを語ります。

- Digital community builder
Writer, artist and designer, theorist and community builder, Howard Rheingold is one of the driving minds behind our net-enabled, open, collaborative life. Full bio

I'm here to enlist you
私は ここで 協力を求めます
00:13
in helping reshape the story about how humans and other critters get things done.
人間や他の動物が 物事を運ぶ方法についての物語を 新しい形にするために
00:19
Here is the old story -- we've already heard a little bit about it:
これがよくある話です すでに少しは知っている話です
00:27
biology is war in which only the fiercest survive;
生物学とは 強い者が生き残る戦争である
00:32
businesses and nations succeed only by defeating,
企業や国家は 競争相手を打ち負かし 破壊し
00:39
destroying and dominating competition;
征服することでのみ成功する
00:47
politics is about your side winning at all costs.
政治とは どんな代償を払っても勝つことにある
00:53
But I think we can see the very beginnings of a new story beginning to emerge.
でも 新しい物語の兆しが見え始めたように思います
01:00
It's a narrative spread across a number of different disciplines,
それはいくつかの異なる分野に広がり
01:08
in which cooperation, collective action and complex interdependencies
そこでは協力 集団行動 そして 複雑な相互依存が
01:15
play a more important role.
より重要な役割を演じます
01:23
And the central, but not all-important, role of competition and survival of the fittest
そして 支配的ながら それだけが重要とは言えない競争や適者生存の役割は
01:26
shrinks just a little bit to make room.
少し縮んでスペースを作ります
01:35
I started thinking about the relationship between communication, media
「スマートモブズ」を書いたとき 私はコミュニケーションやメディア
01:39
and collective action when I wrote "Smart Mobs,"
それに集団行動の関係について考え始め
01:46
and I found that when I finished the book, I kept thinking about it.
本を書き終えたあとも 考え続けていました
01:51
In fact, if you look back, human communication media
実際 振り返ってみると 人類のコミュニケーション媒体と
01:56
and the ways in which we organize socially have been co-evolving for quite a long time.
我々が社会を形成する方法は 非常に長い間 共に進化してきました
02:02
Humans have lived for much, much longer
人類は 約1万年前に農業文明で定住したときよりも
02:09
than the approximately 10,000 years of settled agricultural civilization
はるかに昔から存在していました
02:13
in small family groups. Nomadic hunters bring down rabbits, gathering food.
小さな家族集団で 狩猟型遊牧民はウサギを狩り 食物を集めました
02:20
The form of wealth in those days was enough food to stay alive.
その頃の富の形は 生きるのに十分な食物でした
02:28
But at some point, they banded together to hunt bigger game.
しかし ある時点で 彼らはより大き獲物を狩るために団結しました
02:33
And we don't know exactly how they did this,
実際彼らが どうやってそうしたのかは 知りません
02:40
although they must have solved some collective action problems;
しかし彼らは 集団行動に伴う問題をいくつか 解決したにちがいありません
02:43
it only makes sense that you can't hunt mastodons
なぜなら 他の集団と争っている間は
02:48
while you're fighting with the other groups.
マストドンの狩猟が出来ないからです
02:52
And again, we have no way of knowing,
どうやってかはわかりませんが
02:55
but it's clear that a new form of wealth must have emerged.
新しい富のかたちが現れてきたのは明らかです
02:57
More protein than a hunter's family could eat before it rotted.
腐る前に 家族が食べきれないほどのタンパク質がとれ
03:02
So that raised a social question
このことが新しい社会をつくる
03:07
that I believe must have driven new social forms.
原動力となる社会問題を引き起こした
03:09
Did the people who ate that mastodon meat owe something
そのマストドンの肉を食べた人は 狩人と
03:12
to the hunters and their families?
その家族に何か負債があったのか?
03:17
And if so, how did they make arrangements?
そうなら 彼らはどうやって取引をしたのか?
03:19
Again, we can't know, but we can be pretty sure that some form of
我々はそれを知るすべはありませんが 何か象徴的な
03:23
symbolic communication must have been involved.
コミュニケーションがあったことは間違いないでしょう
03:26
Of course, with agriculture came the first big civilizations,
もちろん農業とともに 最初の大きな文明が築かれ
03:31
the first cities built of mud and brick, the first empires.
最初の都市が泥とレンガから造られ 最初の帝国が出来ました
03:36
And it was the administers of these empires
そして これらの帝国の管理者たちは
03:41
who began hiring people to keep track of the wheat and sheep and wine that was owed
借出された小麦や羊そしてワイン その上に義務づけられる税金の
03:45
and the taxes that was owed on them
記録をつける人を雇い
03:51
by making marks; marks on clay in that time.
課された税金は 粘土に印付けられました
03:53
Not too much longer after that, the alphabet was invented.
それから しばらくしてアルファベットが発明されました
03:57
And this powerful tool was really reserved, for thousands of years,
そして この強力なツールは 帝国の会計を
04:02
for the elite administrators (Laughter) who kept track of accounts for the empires.
記録したエリート管理者の間のみで 何千年もの間 使われていました
04:08
And then another communication technology enabled new media:
それから 他のコミュニケーションテクノロジーが新しい媒体の発明に貢献し
04:18
the printing press came along, and within decades,
印刷機が導入され 数十年で
04:23
millions of people became literate.
何百万もの人が読み書き出来るようになりました
04:28
And from literate populations,
そして読み書きが出来る人口から
04:30
new forms of collective action emerged in the spheres of knowledge,
新しい形の集団的行動が 知識や宗教 政治の分野で
04:34
religion and politics.
出現しました
04:38
We saw scientific revolutions, the Protestant Reformation,
以前は考えられなかった 科学革命 宗教改革
04:42
constitutional democracies possible where they had not been possible before.
立憲民主制が可能になりました
04:47
Not created by the printing press,
それは印刷機から作られたのではなく
04:53
but enabled by the collective action that emerges from literacy.
読み書きが出来ることから始まった集団的行動によって可能になりました
04:55
And again, new forms of wealth emerged.
そしてまた 新しい富のかたちが現れました
05:00
Now, commerce is ancient. Markets are as old as the crossroads.
商業は太古からあり 市場は十字路と同じくらい古いのですが
05:04
But capitalism, as we know it, is only a few hundred years old,
我々が知る資本主義はたったの数百年の歴史しかなく
05:09
enabled by cooperative arrangements and technologies,
合資会社、分担損害保険
05:13
such as the joint-stock ownership company,
複式簿記のように協同の
05:18
shared liability insurance, double-entry bookkeeping.
措置と技術によって可能となりました
05:21
Now of course, the enabling technologies are based on the Internet,
現在 もちろん 問題の解決を促進するテクノロジーはインターネットに基づきます
05:26
and in the many-to-many era, every desktop is now a printing press,
そして 多対多の時代 あらゆるデスクトップは現在印刷機であり
05:31
a broadcasting station, a community or a marketplace.
放送局 コミュニティ または市場です
05:38
Evolution is speeding up.
進化は速くなっています
05:44
More recently, that power is untethering and leaping off the desktops,
最近では その力はデスクトップから離れて暴走しています
05:47
and very, very quickly, we're going to see a significant proportion, if not the majority of
近い将来 過半数とはいかなくても かなりの割合の人々が
05:53
the human race, walking around holding, carrying or wearing supercomputers
今日のブロードバンドというようなものよりも もっと速いスピードでつながれた
05:59
linked at speeds greater
スーパーコンピューターを
06:07
than what we consider to be broadband today.
身につけて歩き回っているのを見ることでしょう
06:10
Now, when I started looking into collective action,
集団的行動を調査していくと 社会学者が
06:14
the considerable literature on it is based on what sociologists call "social dilemmas."
「社会的ジレンマ」と呼んでいるものに基づいた文献が沢山あります
06:17
And there are a couple of mythic narratives of social dilemmas.
社会的ジレンマには二、三の神話的物語があります
06:23
I'm going to talk briefly about two of them:
そのうち二つをご紹介しましょう
06:26
the prisoner's dilemma and the tragedy of the commons.
囚人のジレンマとコモンズの悲劇です
06:29
Now, when I talked about this with Kevin Kelly,
ケビン ケリーとこれについて話したとき
06:32
he assured me that everybody in this audience pretty much knows the details
ここにいる人は皆 囚人のジレンマの詳細は知っていると
06:34
of the prisoner's dilemma,
保証してくれたので
06:38
so I'm just going to go over that very, very quickly.
ここでは短く語ります
06:40
If you have more questions about it, ask Kevin Kelly later. (Laughter)
もし質問があれば 後でケビン ケリーに聞いてください (笑)
06:43
The prisoner's dilemma is actually a story that's overlaid
囚人のジレンマは昔、核戦争を想定して
06:50
on a mathematical matrix that came out of the game theory
ゲーム理論の数学的マトリクス上に
06:53
in the early years of thinking about nuclear war:
作られた物語です
06:57
two players who couldn't trust each other.
互いを信頼することができなかった2人のプレーヤー
07:01
Let me just say that every unsecured transaction
すべての 保証のない取引が
07:03
is a good example of a prisoner's dilemma.
囚人のジレンマの良い例だと言っておきましょう
07:06
Person with the goods, person with the money,
モノを持っている人も お金持ちも お互い信頼できないと
07:09
because they can't trust each other, are not going to exchange.
取引しません
07:12
Neither one wants to be the first one
どちらからも取引を始めないか
07:16
or they're going to get the sucker's payoff,
割に合わない報酬を受け取るかです
07:19
but both lose, of course, because they don't get what they want.
彼らは望むものを得ず 両方とも負けます
07:21
If they could only agree, if they could only turn a prisoner's dilemma into
彼らがもし 囚人のジレンマを 保証ゲームと呼ばれるような
07:25
a different payoff matrix called an assurance game, they could proceed.
他の報酬マトリクスに変える同意ができれば ゲームを進めることが出来ます
07:29
Twenty years ago, Robert Axelrod used the prisoner's dilemma
20年前 ロバート アクセルロッドは 生物学的問題の調査に
07:35
as a probe of the biological question:
囚人のジレンマを使いました:
07:39
if we are here because our ancestors were such fierce competitors,
先祖が勇敢な競争者だったおかげで我々がここにいるなら
07:44
how does cooperation exist at all?
いったいどうやって協力が存在するんだ?
07:49
He started a computer tournament for
彼は 囚人のジレンマ戦略を投稿させる
07:51
people to submit prisoner's dilemma strategies and discovered,
コンピューター競技を始め 驚いたことに
07:53
much to his surprise, that a very, very simple strategy won --
かなり単純な戦略が勝つことを発見しました
07:58
it won the first tournament, and even after everyone knew it won,
それは最初の競技で勝ち そして皆がその戦略が勝つとわかった後でも
08:02
it won the second tournament -- that's known as tit for tat.
第2の競技も勝ちました "しっぺ返し"の名で知られています
08:06
Another economic game that may not be as well known as the prisoner's dilemma
囚人のジレンマほど 知られていない もう一つの経済ゲームは
08:13
is the ultimatum game,
最後通牒ゲーム
08:19
and it's also a very interesting probe of
これは 人の経済的取引のやり方を
08:21
our assumptions about the way people make economic transactions.
想定するにおいても 非常に面白い実験です
08:23
Here's how the game is played: there are two players;
これがゲームのやり方です 2人のプレーヤーがいます
08:29
they've never played the game before,
これまでこのゲームをしたことはなく
08:32
they will not play the game again, they don't know each other,
また以後することもないでしょう 彼らは 互いを知りません
08:34
and they are, in fact, in separate rooms.
そして彼らは 別々の部屋にいます
08:37
First player is offered a hundred dollars
最初のプレーヤーは100ドルを提供され
08:40
and is asked to propose a split: 50/50, 90/10,
分け前を提案するよう言われます: 50/50 90/10
08:42
whatever that player wants to propose. The second player either accepts the split --
提案する割合にかかわらず 二番目のプレーヤーが分け前に同意すれば
08:48
both players are paid and the game is over --
両方のプレーヤーが分け前を受けとり ゲーム終了です
08:55
or rejects the split -- neither player is paid and the game is over.
取り分を拒絶すれば どちらのプレーヤーも支払われず ゲーム終了です
08:58
Now, the fundamental basis of neoclassical economics
さて 新古典主義の経済学の基本は
09:04
would tell you it's irrational to reject a dollar
知らない誰かが 部屋の向うで99ドルを得るからと言って
09:08
because someone you don't know in another room is going to get 99.
こちらで1ドルを拒絶することは不合理だと訴えます
09:12
Yet in thousands of trials with American and European and Japanese students,
でも欧米や日本の学生と何千もの実験をしたところ
09:17
a significant percentage would reject any offer that's not close to 50/50.
かなりの確立で 50/50に近くない提案は拒絶されます
09:23
And although they were screened and didn't know about the game
彼らは事前審査で このゲームを知らず
09:29
and had never played the game before,
このゲームをしたことさえなかったのに
09:34
proposers seemed to innately know this
平均的な提案が驚くほど50/50近くだったので
09:36
because the average proposal was surprisingly close to 50/50.
提案者は まるでこれを知っていたかのようでした
09:39
Now, the interesting part comes in more recently
この実験の面白いところは最近わかったのですが
09:45
when anthropologists began taking this game to other cultures
人類学者がこのゲームを他の文化でやってみて
09:47
and discovered, to their surprise,
驚きをもって発見したのは
09:51
that slash-and-burn agriculturalists in the Amazon
アマゾン川の焼畑式農民 中央アジアの遊牧放牧民
09:54
or nomadic pastoralists in Central Asia or a dozen different cultures --
またその他沢山の文化 -- 彼らはそれぞれ 何が公正かについて
09:58
each had radically different ideas of what is fair.
かなり違ったアイデアを持っていました
10:03
Which suggests that instead of there being an innate sense of fairness,
これは 我々の経済的取引の基本が 生来の
10:08
that somehow the basis of our economic
公正という感覚によるものでなく
10:14
transactions can be influenced by our social institutions,
社会的機関によって影響されることを示します
10:17
whether we know that or not.
我々がそれを知っているかどうかは関係なく
10:23
The other major narrative of social dilemmas is the tragedy of the commons.
その他の社会的ジレンマの主要物語は コモンズの悲劇です
10:25
Garrett Hardin used it to talk about overpopulation in the late 1960s.
ガレット ハーディンは1960年代後期にそれを使って人口過剰を語りました
10:30
He used the example of a common grazing area in which each person
彼は 共有放牧地を例に挙げました それぞれの人が
10:36
by simply maximizing their own flock
彼らの群れを最大化するために
10:42
led to overgrazing and the depletion of the resource.
過度に放牧することで 資源の枯渇を招いた
10:45
He had the rather gloomy conclusion that
彼は人間が 使うことを制限されない
10:48
humans will inevitably despoil any common pool resource
共有の資源を必然的に強奪するという
10:50
in which people cannot be restrained from using it.
気のめいるような結論に達しました
10:55
Now, Elinor Ostrom, a political scientist, in
さて 政治学者のエレノア オストロームは
11:01
1990 asked the interesting question that any good scientist should ask,
1990年代 優れた科学者なら誰もが提議する問題を問いました
11:04
which is: is it really true that humans will always despoil commons?
人間が共有地から常に強奪するというのは本当なのか?
11:09
So she went out and looked at what data she could find.
彼女はあらゆるデータを検証しました
11:14
She looked at thousands of cases of humans sharing watersheds,
人々が共有する川の流域 森林資源
11:18
forestry resources, fisheries, and discovered that yes, in case after case,
漁場と 何千もの症例を検証し どの症例においても
11:22
humans destroyed the commons that they depended on.
人間が彼らの依存する共有地を破壊したことを発見しました
11:29
But she also found many instances in which people escaped the prisoner's dilemma;
しかし 彼女は 囚人のジレンマから抜け出した例も沢山見つけました
11:33
in fact, the tragedy of the commons is a multiplayer prisoner's dilemma.
実際 コモンズの悲劇は 複数のプレイヤーによる囚人のジレンマです
11:40
And she said that people are only prisoners if they consider themselves to be.
そして 彼女はこう言いました「自分自身を囚人と思う人のみが囚人である」
11:46
They escape by creating institutions for collective action.
彼らは 集団的行動のための組織を作ることで逃れます
11:51
And she discovered, I think most interestingly,
そして 最も興味深いことを 彼女が発見しました
11:55
that among those institutions that worked,
これらの うまくいった組織には
11:59
there were a number of common design
いくつかの共通のデザイン原則がありました
12:02
principles, and those principles seem to be
そして これらの原則は 失敗した
12:04
missing from those institutions that don't work.
機関にはありませんでした
12:07
I'm moving very quickly over a number of
これらの規律について短くご紹介しましょう
12:11
disciplines. In biology, the notions of symbiosis,
生物学では 共生関係 集団選択
12:13
group selection, evolutionary psychology are contested, to be sure.
進化心理学の概念は 正しいと論争されています
12:16
But there is really no longer any major debate over the fact that
しかし 協力的な措置が 補助的役割から 中心的役割に
12:22
cooperative arrangements have moved from a peripheral role to a central role
生物学での 細胞レベルから 生態系レベルへと 移行したという
12:27
in biology, from the level of the cell to the level of the ecology.
事実についての大論争は 今ではほとんどされません
12:33
And again, our notions of individuals as economic beings
そしてまた 個人は自己の利益を追求するという
12:39
have been overturned.
概念は ひっくり返されました
12:44
Rational self-interest is not always the dominating factor.
合理的な自己の利益は 必ずしも優勢な要因でありません
12:46
In fact, people will act to punish cheaters, even at a cost to themselves.
実際 自ら代償を払っても 人々はペテン師を罰するために行動します
12:51
And most recently, neurophysiological measures
そして ごく最近 神経生理学的実験において
12:59
have shown that people who punish cheaters in economic games
経済ゲームでペテン師を罰する人の
13:01
show activity in the reward centers of their brain.
脳の報酬センターが活発になることが明らかになりました
13:07
Which led one scientist to declare that altruistic punishment
それは 一人の科学者に 利他的な懲罰は 社会の連帯感を
13:11
may be the glue that holds societies together.
保持する接着剤の役割をすると断言させました
13:18
Now, I've been talking about how new forms of communication and new media
さて私は 新しい形のコミュニケーションや媒体が
13:22
in the past have helped create new economic forms.
過去 いかに新しい経済の形成に役立ってきたか話しました
13:27
Commerce is ancient. Markets are very old. Capitalism is fairly recent;
商業は古代からあり 市場の歴史は古く 資本主義は新しい
13:31
socialism emerged as a reaction to that.
社会主義はその対立軸として表れました
13:36
And yet we see very little talk about how the next form may be emerging.
しかし 次はいったいどんな形が出てくるかについては あまり語られていません
13:40
Jim Surowiecki briefly mentioned Yochai Benkler's paper about open source,
ジェームズ スロウィッキーはヨハイ ベンクラーのオープンソースについての文書にふれ
13:46
pointing to a new form of production: peer-to-peer production.
新しい生産方式を指摘しました: ピアツーピア生産です
13:51
I simply want you to keep in mind that if in the past, new forms of cooperation
皆さんに心に留めていただきたいのは 過去に 新しい技術によって
13:55
enabled by new technologies create new forms of wealth,
新しい形の協力関係が可能になり 新しい形の富が作られました
14:01
we may be moving into yet another economic form
我々は 前とはかなり違った
14:05
that is significantly different from previous ones.
別の経済形式へと移動しているかもしれません
14:09
Very briefly, let's look at some businesses. IBM, as you know, HP, Sun --
手短にいいます 一部の企業をみてみましょう IBM はご存知ですね HP Sun --
14:13
some of the most fierce competitors in the IT world are open sourcing
ITの世界で 最も競争力の強い企業のいくつかはソフトウェアを
14:19
their software, are providing portfolios of patents for the commons.
オープンソースにして パテントポートフォリオを共有の場に提供しています
14:25
Eli Lilly -- in, again, the fiercely competitive pharmaceutical world --
イーライリリー -- 製薬会社の世界ではかなりの競争力を誇ります --
14:32
has created a market for solutions for pharmaceutical problems.
製薬問題を解消する市場をつくりました
14:37
Toyota, instead of treating its suppliers as a marketplace,
トヨタは サプライヤーを市場として扱う代わりに
14:43
treats them as a network and trains them to produce better,
ネットワークとして扱い 生産性向上にむけて訓練します
14:48
even though they are also training them to produce better for their competitors.
それが 競争相手の為に訓練することになっても
14:52
Now none of these companies are doing this out of altruism;
さて どの企業も 利他主義者から行っているのではありません
14:57
they're doing it because they're learning that
彼らは ある種の共有は 彼らの自己利益に適合することを
15:01
a certain kind of sharing is in their self-interest.
知っているから そうしているのです
15:03
Open source production has shown us that world-class software, like Linux and Mozilla,
オープンソース生産は Linux やMozilla などの世界に通用するソフトウェアが
15:09
can be created with neither the bureaucratic structure of the firm
我々が思っていたような官僚的な構造の会社や 市場の誘因なく
15:16
nor the incentives of the marketplace as we've known them.
作ることが出来ることを示しました
15:22
Google enriches itself by enriching thousands of bloggers through AdSense.
グーグルは AdSenseを通して 何千ものブロガーを豊かにすることで 自らを豊かにします
15:28
Amazon has opened its Application Programming Interface
アマゾンは APIを
15:34
to 60,000 developers, countless Amazon shops.
6万人の開発者 無数のアマゾン店に開放しました
15:38
They're enriching others, not out of altruism but as a way of enriching themselves.
利他主義者でなく 彼ら自身を豊かにする方法として 他人を豊かにしています
15:43
eBay solved the prisoner's dilemma and created a market
イーベイは囚人のジレンマを解決して 市場をつくりました
15:49
where none would have existed by creating a feedback mechanism
何もないところに 囚人のジレンマを保証ゲームに変える
15:54
that turns a prisoner's dilemma game into an assurance game.
フィードバックメカニズムを作製したのです
15:58
Instead of, "Neither of us can trust each other, so we have to make suboptimal moves,"
「お互いに信頼できないので、準最適な行動を起こす」ではなく
16:03
it's, "You prove to me that you are trustworthy and I will cooperate."
「あなたが信頼に値することを証明してください、そうすれば私は協力します」
16:08
Wikipedia has used thousands of volunteers to create a free encyclopedia
Wikipediaは たったの二年で、200の言語からなる150万の記事を無料で提供する
16:14
with a million and a half articles in 200 languages in just a couple of years.
百科事典を作成するために、何千人ものボランティアを利用しました
16:20
We've seen that ThinkCycle has enabled NGOs in developing countries
我々は ThinkCycle が発展途上国のNGOが抱える問題を掲示して
16:27
to put up problems to be solved by design students around the world,
世界中のデザイン学生が解決するのをみてきました
16:34
including something that's being used for tsunami relief right now:
そこには津波救済ですぐに使えるものが含まれています
16:40
it's a mechanism for rehydrating
コレラ犠牲者への水分補給メカニズムです
16:43
cholera victims that's so simple to use it,
とても簡単に使え
16:45
illiterates can be trained to use it.
文盲も教われば使えます
16:48
BitTorrent turns every downloader into an uploader,
BitTorrent は あらゆるダウンローダーをアップローダーに変換し
16:51
making the system more efficient the more it is used.
システムをより効率的にすることで 利用者を増やします
16:55
Millions of people have contributed their desktop computers
何百万人もの人がデスクトップを使用していないときに
17:00
when they're not using them to link together through the Internet
医学研究者のたんぱく質折畳問題解決を援助するために
17:03
into supercomputing collectives
インターネットを通じて
17:08
that help solve the protein folding problem for medical researchers --
PCを相互にリンクして スーパーコンピューターとして貢献しました
17:10
that's Folding@home at Stanford --
スタンフォードの Folding@homeです
17:14
to crack codes, to search for life in outer space.
コードを解読する 宇宙での生命を捜す
17:17
I don't think we know enough yet.
まだ十分な知識があるとは思いません
17:22
I don't think we've even begun to discover what the basic principles are,
基本的な原則が何であるかさえ見出せたとは思いません
17:24
but I think we can begin to think about them.
しかし それらを考え始めることはできると思います
17:28
And I don't have enough time to talk about all of them,
すべてをお話する時間はありません
17:31
but think about self-interest.
しかし 自己の利益について考えてください
17:34
This is all about self-interest that adds up to more.
結局のところは すべては自己の利益についてです
17:36
In El Salvador, both sides that withdrew from their civil war
エルサルバドルでは 内戦から撤退した両者は、
17:39
took moves that had been proven to mirror a prisoner's dilemma strategy.
囚人のジレンマ戦略を証明する動きをしました
17:44
In the U.S., in the Philippines, in Kenya, around the world,
米国 フィリピン ケニヤ 世界中で
17:48
citizens have self-organized political protests and
市民はモバイルやSMSを使って
17:54
get out the vote campaigns using mobile devices and SMS.
政治的抗議や投票推進運動を自発的に組織しました
17:57
Is an Apollo Project of cooperation possible?
協力的アポロ計画は可能でしょうか?
18:03
A transdisciplinary study of cooperation?
学際的な共同研究は?
18:06
I believe that the payoff would be very big.
成果は大きいと思います
18:10
I think we need to begin developing maps of this territory
我々は 学問分野に渡ってこの話が出来るよう この領域の
18:14
so that we can talk about it across disciplines.
地図を開発し始める必要があると思います
18:18
And I am not saying that understanding cooperation
私は 協力することの意義を理解することで
18:20
is going to cause us to be better people --
我々が優れた人間になるとは言いません
18:24
and sometimes people cooperate to do bad things --
人は折々悪いことをするためにも協力します
18:28
but I will remind you that a few hundred years ago,
でも数百年前 彼らの愛するものを
18:31
people saw their loved ones die from diseases they thought
病で亡くしたとき 人は原罪や外国人や悪霊のせいだと
18:34
were caused by sin or foreigners or evil spirits.
思っていたことを 思い出してください
18:38
Descartes said we need an entire new way of thinking.
デカルトは 我々にはまったく新しい考え方が必要だと言いました
18:43
When the scientific method provided that new way of thinking
科学的研究法が新しい考え方を提供し
18:47
and biology showed that microorganisms caused disease,
生物学が微生物が病気を引き起こすと証明したとき
18:50
suffering was alleviated.
苦しみは軽減されました
18:54
What forms of suffering could be alleviated,
我々がもうすこし協力について知ることで
18:57
what forms of wealth could be created
どんな形の苦しみが軽減され
19:00
if we knew a little bit more about cooperation?
どんな形の富が作られるでしょう?
19:02
I don't think that this transdisciplinary discourse
この学際的な談話が
19:05
is automatically going to happen;
自動的に起こるとは思えません
19:09
it's going to require effort.
それは 努力を要します
19:11
So I enlist you to help me get the cooperation project started.
そこで、私はあなた方に協力プロジェクトを始める手助けとなる協力を求めます
19:14
Thank you.
ありがとう
19:20
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:22
Translated by Kayo Mizutani
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Howard Rheingold - Digital community builder
Writer, artist and designer, theorist and community builder, Howard Rheingold is one of the driving minds behind our net-enabled, open, collaborative life.

Why you should listen

As Howard Rheingold himself puts it, "I fell into the computer realm from the typewriter dimension, then plugged my computer into my telephone and got sucked into the net." A writer and designer, he was among the first wave of creative thinkers who saw, in computers and then in the Internet, a way to form powerful new communities.

His 2002 book Smart Mobs, which presaged Web 2.0 in predicting collaborative ventures like Wikipedia, was the outgrowth of decades spent studying and living life online. An early and active member of the Well (he wrote about it in The Virtual Community), he went on to cofound HotWired and Electric Minds, two groundbreaking web communities, in the mid-1990s. Now active in Second Life, he teaches, writes and consults on social networking. His latest passion: teaching and workshopping participatory media literacy, to make sure we all know how to read and make the new media that we're all creating together.

More profile about the speaker
Howard Rheingold | Speaker | TED.com