sponsored links
TED2016

Al Gore: The case for optimism on climate change

アル・ゴア: 気候変動についての楽観論

February 17, 2016

なぜアル・ゴアは気候変動について楽観的なのでしょうか。この熱意あふれる講演で、ゴアは地球を破壊する恐れのある人為的な脅威とその問題と闘うための解決策について、力強い問いを投げかけます。(TEDのキュレーターであるクリス・アンダーソンとの質疑応答があります。)

Al Gore - Climate advocate
Nobel Laureate Al Gore focused the world’s attention on the global climate crisis. Now he’s showing us how we’re moving towards real solutions. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I was excited to be a part
of the "Dream" theme,
今回は「夢」がテーマだと聞いて
とても楽しみにしていましたが
00:12
and then I found out I'm leading off
the "Nightmare?" section of it.
私のセッションは
「悪夢?」だったんですね
00:16
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:20
And certainly there are things
about the climate crisis that qualify.
確かに気候危機についてなら
当てはまります
00:23
And I have some bad news,
いくつか悪い知らせがありますが
00:28
but I have a lot more good news.
もっとたくさんの
良い知らせがあります
00:30
I'm going to propose three questions
3つの質問を提起します
00:32
and the answer to the first one
最初の質問への答えは
00:36
necessarily involves a little bad news.
必然的に
少し悪い知らせが含まれます
00:38
But -- hang on, because the answers
to the second and third questions
でも 待ってください
第二、第三の質問への答えは
00:41
really are very positive.
本当にとても前向きなものです
00:46
So the first question is,
"Do we really have to change?"
最初の質問は「私たちは本当に
変わらなくてはならないのか?」です
00:48
And of course, the Apollo Mission,
among other things
もちろんアポロ計画や
その他のことで
00:53
changed the environmental movement,
環境保護運動は変わり
00:59
really launched the modern
environmental movement
本当に現代的な環境運動が
始まりました
01:01
18 months after this Earthrise picture
was first seen on earth,
この「地球の出」の写真を
人々が目にした18か月後に
01:04
the first Earth Day was organized.
最初のアースデイが
開催されました
01:08
And we learned a lot about ourselves
そして宇宙から地球を
振り返ることで
01:11
looking back at our planet from space.
私たちは自分自身について
多くを学びました
01:14
And one of the things that we learned
私たちが学んだことの一つは
01:17
confirmed what the scientists
have long told us.
長い間 科学者が
語ってきたことの確認です
01:18
One of the most essential facts
気候危機についての
01:21
about the climate crisis
has to do with the sky.
最も重要な事実の一つは
空に関連しています
01:23
As this picture illustrates,
この写真が示す通り
01:26
the sky is not the vast
and limitless expanse
空は広大で無限に
広がっているわけではありません
01:28
that appears when we look up
from the ground.
地上から見上げると
そう見えますが
01:31
It is a very thin shell of atmosphere
実際は とても薄い大気の殻が
01:33
surrounding the planet.
地球を取り囲んでいるだけです
01:37
That right now is the open sewer
for our industrial civilization
そこは 現在の社会構造では
01:40
as it's currently organized.
産業文明の下水溝
のようになっています
01:45
We are spewing 110 million tons
空に向けて 温室効果を生む
地球温暖化汚染が
01:47
of heat-trapping global warming pollution
into it every 24 hours,
24時間で1億1千万トン
吐き出されています
01:51
free of charge, go ahead.
無料です どうぞご自由にと
01:56
And there are many sources
of the greenhouse gases,
温室効果ガスの発生源は
沢山あります
01:58
I'm certainly not going
to go through them all.
もちろん すべてを
検討するつもりはありません
02:00
I'm going to focus on the main one,
主要なものに集中します
02:03
but agriculture is involved,
diet is involved, population is involved.
農業、食べ物
人口が関連しています
02:04
Management of forests, transportation,
森林管理、輸送
02:09
the oceans, the melting of the permafrost.
海洋、永久凍土の融解も
関連していますが
02:11
But I'm going to focus
on the heart of the problem,
ここでは問題の核心に焦点を
合わせようと思います
02:14
which is the fact that we still rely
on dirty, carbon-based fuels
それは私たちが未だに汚染源となる
炭素系燃料に依存してるということで
02:16
for 85 percent of all the energy
that our world burns every year.
毎年 世界で燃やされる
エネルギーの85%を占めています
02:21
And you can see from this image
that after World War II,
この図から分るように
第二次世界大戦後に
02:27
the emission rates
started really accelerating.
排出量の増加が加速しています
02:31
And the accumulated amount
of man-made, global warming pollution
人間による地球温暖化汚染は
02:34
that is up in the atmosphere now
大気圏に蓄積されており
02:37
traps as much extra heat energy
as would be released
それが今や24時間ごとに
広島型原爆40万発が
02:39
by 400,000 Hiroshima-class
atomic bombs exploding
1年365日休みなく爆発したのと
同じ量の余分な熱エネルギーを
02:43
every 24 hours, 365 days a year.
取り込み続けています
02:48
Fact-checked over and over again,
何度も事実確認をしましたが
02:52
conservative, it's the truth.
控えめにみても これは事実です
02:54
Now it's a big planet, but --
地球は大きな惑星ですが
02:56
(Explosion sound)
(爆発音)
02:58
that is a lot of energy,
これは大量のエネルギーで
03:00
particularly when you multiply it
400,000 times per day.
毎日その40万倍となれば
なおさらです
03:02
And all that extra heat energy
その余分な熱エネルギーが
03:08
is heating up the atmosphere,
the whole earth system.
大気や地球のシステム全体を
加熱するのです
03:10
Let's look at the atmosphere.
大気を見てみましょう
03:13
This is a depiction
このグラフは
03:15
of what we used to think of as
the normal distribution of temperatures.
かつて気温の正規分布と
されていたものです
03:16
The white represents
normal temperature days;
白い部分は
平年並みの気温の日です
03:22
1951-1980 are arbitrarily chosen.
1951年から1980年という期間は
任意に選びました
03:25
The blue are cooler than average days,
青は平均より涼しい日
03:28
the red are warmer than average days.
赤は平均より暖かい日です
03:30
But the entire curve has moved
to the right in the 1980s.
1980年代には分布曲線全体が
右に移動しています
03:32
And you'll see
in the lower right-hand corner
右下の角に
03:36
the appearance of statistically
significant numbers
統計的に有意な数の猛暑日が
03:38
of extremely hot days.
出現しています
03:41
In the 90s, the curve shifted further.
90年代に分布曲線は
更に移動しました
03:42
And in the last 10 years,
you see the extremely hot days
この10年では猛暑日が
03:44
are now more numerous
than the cooler than average days.
平均より涼しい日よりも
多くなっていることが分ります
03:48
In fact, they are 150 times more common
on the surface of the earth
実際に地球表面では
猛暑日が
03:52
than they were just 30 years ago.
ほんの30年前より
150倍多く発生しています
03:57
So we're having
record-breaking temperatures.
記録破りの気温です
04:01
Fourteen of the 15 of the hottest years
ever measured with instruments
計器測定されるようになって以来
最も暑かった年15のうちの14までが
04:04
have been in this young century.
この始まったばかりの世紀に
起きています
04:07
The hottest of all was last year.
すべての中で
最も暑かったのは去年です
04:09
Last month was the 371st month in a row
先月まで 20世紀の
平均よりも暑い月が
04:12
warmer than the 20th-century average.
371か月連続しています
04:15
And for the first time,
not only the warmest January,
そして先月は最も暑かった1月
というだけでなく
04:17
but for the first time, it was more
than two degrees Fahrenheit warmer
初めて平均を2°F (1.1℃) 以上
04:21
than the average.
上回りました
04:26
These higher temperatures
are having an effect on animals,
こうした高い気温は動物
植物、人、生態系に
04:28
plants, people, ecosystems.
影響を与えますが
04:32
But on a global basis, 93 percent
of all the extra heat energy
地球全体では
余分な熱エネルギーの93%が
04:35
is trapped in the oceans.
海洋に蓄えられています
04:40
And the scientists can measure
the heat buildup
現在では科学者が 深海、中間
04:41
much more precisely now
数百メートルの浅い部分と
04:44
at all depths: deep, mid-ocean,
すべての深さで 熱の集積量を
04:45
the first few hundred meters.
正確に測定できるように
なっています
04:47
And this, too, is accelerating.
そしてこれも
加速しています
04:49
It goes back more than a century.
一世紀以上前から
始まっていますが
04:52
And more than half of the increase
has been in the last 19 years.
上昇の半分以上は
最近19年間に起こりました
04:54
This has consequences.
これには結果が伴います
04:58
The first order of consequence:
直接の影響としては
海を起点とする嵐が
04:59
the ocean-based storms get stronger.
より強くなっていることです
05:01
Super Typhoon Haiyan
went over areas of the Pacific
超大型台風ハイエンが
05:03
five and a half degrees Fahrenheit
warmer than normal
これまで上陸した中で
最も破壊的な嵐として
05:05
before it slammed into Tacloban,
タクロバンを襲う前に通った
太平洋の海域は
05:09
as the most destructive storm
ever to make landfall.
通常よりも水温が
3℃高くなっていました
05:11
Pope Francis, who has made
such a difference to this whole issue,
教皇フランシスコは
この問題を重大視して
05:15
visited Tacloban right after that.
直後にタクロバンを
訪問しています
05:20
Superstorm Sandy went over
areas of the Atlantic
巨大暴風雨サンディが
ニューヨークやニュージャージーを
05:22
nine degrees warmer than normal
襲う前に通過した
大西洋海域の水温は
05:25
before slamming into
New York and New Jersey.
通常より5℃
高くなっていました
05:27
The second order of consequences
are affecting all of us right now.
温暖化の二次的な影響は今や
みんなに影響を及ぼしています
05:31
The warmer oceans are evaporating
much more water vapor into the skies.
暖かくなった海はより多くの
水蒸気を空中に放出しています
05:34
Average humidity worldwide
has gone up four percent.
世界の平均湿度は
4%以上 上昇しています
05:40
And it creates these atmospheric rivers.
それで この水蒸気の流れが
作り出されます
05:44
The Brazilian scientists
call them "flying rivers."
ブラジルの科学者たちはこれを
「空飛ぶ川」と呼んでいます
05:47
And they funnel all of that
extra water vapor over the land
荒天状態によって 大規模な
記録破りの豪雨が引き起こされ
05:50
where storm conditions trigger
these massive record-breaking downpours.
余分な水蒸気がすべて
大地の上に流し込まれています
05:55
This is from Montana.
写真はモンタナ州でのものです
06:00
Take a look at this storm last August.
こちらの 去年8月の嵐を
ご覧ください
06:03
As it moves over Tucson, Arizona.
アリゾナ州トゥーソンを
過ぎていくところです
06:05
It literally splashes off the city.
文字通り町が
水しぶきを上げています
06:07
These downpours are really unusual.
この豪雨は明らかに異常です
06:11
Last July in Houston, Texas,
去年7月に
テキサス州ヒューストンでは
06:14
it rained for two days,
162 billion gallons.
2日で6,130億リットルの
雨が降りました
06:18
That represents more than two days
of the full flow of Niagara Falls
ナイアガラの滝の最大流量の
2日分以上が
06:21
in the middle of the city,
町中に流れ込んだことになります
06:25
which was, of course, paralyzed.
もちろん都市機能は麻痺しました
06:26
These record downpours are creating
historic floods and mudslides.
こういった記録的豪雨は歴史的な
洪水や土砂崩れを引き起こしています
06:28
This one is from Chile last year.
これは去年のチリでのものです
06:32
And you'll see that warehouse going by.
倉庫が通り過ぎるのが見えます
06:36
There are oil tankers cars going by.
タンクローリーが通り過ぎています
06:40
This is from Spain last September,
これは去年9月の
スペインのものです
06:42
you could call this the running
of the cars and trucks, I guess.
「車やトラックの流れ」とは
このことですね
06:44
Every night on the TV news now
is like a nature hike
今や毎晩のテレビニュースは
06:49
through the Book of Revelation.
ヨハネの黙示録観察ツアーのようです
06:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:54
I mean, really.
いや本当に
06:56
The insurance industry
has certainly noticed,
保険業界は間違いなく
気付いていることですが
06:58
the losses have been mounting up.
損失が増大してきています
07:01
They're not under any illusions
about what's happening.
何が起こっているのかについて
彼らは思い違いはしていません
07:03
And the causality requires
a moment of discussion.
因果関係については
議論が必要です
07:07
We're used to thinking of linear cause
and linear effect --
かつて私たちは直接的な
原因と結果を考えていました
07:13
one cause, one effect.
原因一つに結果一つです
07:16
This is systemic causation.
でもこれはシステム的な原因です
07:17
As the great Kevin Trenberth says,
優れた気象学者ケビン・トレンバースが
言っています
07:20
"All storms are different now.
「今やすべての嵐は異なります
07:23
There's so much extra energy
in the atmosphere,
大気中には非常に多くの余分な
07:24
there's so much extra water vapor.
エネルギーと水蒸気があります
07:26
Every storm is different now."
今やすべての嵐は
異なるのです」
07:28
So, the same extra heat pulls
the soil moisture out of the ground
同じ余分な熱が
地面から土壌水分を奪い
07:31
and causes these deeper, longer,
more pervasive droughts
より深刻で長期的かつ
広範囲な干ばつを起こし
07:35
and many of them are underway right now.
その多くは現在も
続いています
07:40
It dries out the vegetation
草木を枯らし
07:42
and causes more fires
in the western part of North America.
北アメリカ西部で より多くの
火災を引き起こしています
07:43
There's certainly been evidence
of that, a lot of them.
確かな証拠がたくさんあります
07:47
More lightning,
雷も増えています
07:51
as the heat energy builds up,
a considerable amount
熱エネルギーがたまるにつれ
07:52
of additional lightning also.
かなりの数の雷が起きています
07:55
These climate-related disasters also have
geopolitical consequences
こうした気候関連の災害には
地政学的な影響もあり
07:58
and create instability.
不安定さの原因になっています
08:05
The climate-related historic drought
that started in Syria in 2006
シリアで気候に起因する歴史的な
干ばつが2006年に始まりました
08:07
destroyed 60 percent
of the farms in Syria,
シリアにある農場の
60%が壊滅し
08:12
killed 80 percent of the livestock,
家畜の80%が死に
08:15
and drove 1.5 million climate refugees
into the cities of Syria,
150万人の気候難民が
シリアの都市に押し寄せ
08:17
where they collided with another
1.5 million refugees
そこでイラク戦争から
逃れてきた150万人の難民と
08:22
from the Iraq War.
衝突しました
08:25
And along with other factors,
that opened the gates of Hell
他の要因と相まって
地獄の門が開かれました
08:27
that people are trying to close now.
人々は今 それを
閉じようと努力しています
08:32
The US Defense Department has long warned
米国国防総省は難民や
08:35
of consequences from the climate crisis,
食料と水の不足
08:37
including refugees,
food and water shortages
病気の世界的流行も含めた
気候危機の影響を
08:40
and pandemic disease.
長らく警告してきました
08:44
Right now we're seeing microbial diseases
from the tropics spread
現在 微生物疾患が熱帯地方から
高緯度地域に広がるのを
08:46
to the higher latitudes;
目の当たりにしています
08:51
the transportation revolution has had
a lot to do with this.
これは輸送革命によるところが
大きいのですが
08:52
But the changing conditions
change the latitudes in the areas
環境の変化によって
こうした微生物疾患が流行し得る
08:56
where these microbial diseases
can become endemic
緯度や地域が変化し
08:59
and change the range of the vectors,
like mosquitoes and ticks that carry them.
蚊やダニのような媒介生物の
種類も変化しています
09:03
The Zika epidemic now --
今 ジカ熱が流行していますが
09:08
we're better positioned in North America
北アメリカの状況はましです
09:11
because it's still a little too cool
and we have a better public health system.
まだ少し涼しすぎることに加え
優れた公衆衛生システムがあるからです
09:13
But when women in some regions
of South and Central America
しかし中南米の
一部地域にいる女性は
09:18
are advised not to get pregnant
for two years --
2年間 妊娠しないよう
助言されています
09:22
that's something new,
that ought to get our attention.
これは今までなかったことで
注目すべきことです
09:25
The Lancet, one of the two greatest
medical journals in the world,
世界の2大医学誌の
一つであるランセットが昨夏
09:29
last summer labeled this
a medical emergency now.
これを現在の医学的な
緊急事態に分類しました
09:32
And there are many factors because of it.
これには多くの要因があります
09:37
This is also connected
to the extinction crisis.
気候変動は絶滅の危機とも
関連があります
09:39
We're in danger of losing 50 percent
of all the living species on earth
今世紀の終わりまでに地球にいる
全生物種の50%を
09:42
by the end of this century.
失う危険があります
09:46
And already, land-based plants and animals
陸上の動植物種は
09:47
are now moving towards the poles
今や 両極に向かって
09:50
at an average rate of 15 feet per day.
1日平均5m 移動しています
09:52
Speaking of the North Pole,
北極に関していえば
09:56
last December 29, the same storm
that caused historic flooding
昨年12月29日に
歴史的な洪水を
09:57
in the American Midwest,
アメリカ中西部に
もたらした嵐が
10:03
raised temperatures at the North Pole
北極の気温を
10:04
50 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than normal,
通常より28℃上昇させて
10:06
causing the thawing of the North Pole
長くて暗い冬の極夜の最中に
10:09
in the middle of the long,
dark, winter, polar night.
北極の凍解を引き起こしました
10:12
And when the land-based ice
of the Arctic melts,
北極圏にある
陸上の氷が解けると
10:16
it raises sea level.
海面が上昇します
10:20
Paul Nicklen's beautiful photograph
from Svalbard illustrates this.
ポール・ニックレンの美しい
スバールバル諸島の写真に示されています
10:22
It's more dangerous coming off Greenland
グリーンランドや
特に南極の融解は
10:26
and particularly, Antarctica.
更に危険です
10:28
The 10 largest risk cities
for sea-level rise by population
海面上昇によるリスクが
人口面で最も大きな10都市は
10:30
are mostly in South and Southeast Asia.
ほとんどが
南・東南アジアにあります
10:35
When you measure it by assets at risk,
number one is Miami:
資産的なリスクの大きさから見ると
1位はマイアミで
10:37
three and a half trillion dollars at risk.
390兆円が
損失の危機にさらされています
10:41
Number three: New York and Newark.
3位はニューヨーク・
ニューアーク地区です
10:44
I was in Miami last fall
during the supermoon,
私は昨秋
スーパームーンのときの
10:46
one of the highest high-tide days.
最満潮日にマイアミにいました
10:49
And there were fish from the ocean
swimming in some of the streets
海から来た魚がマイアミビーチや
フォートローダーデール
10:52
of Miami Beach and Fort Lauderdale
デルレイビーチの通りを
10:55
and Del Rey.
泳いでいました
10:58
And this happens regularly
during the highest-tide tides now.
今やこれが 最満潮時に
定期的に起きています
10:59
Not with rain -- they call it
"sunny-day flooding."
雨とは関係ないので
「晴天の洪水」と呼ばれます
11:02
It comes up through the storm sewers.
排水管から
水が上がってくるのです
11:04
And the Mayor of Miami
speaks for many when he says
これを党派的な目で見ていられる
時代はとうに終わっていると
11:09
it is long past time this can be viewed
through a partisan lens.
マイアミ市長は
多くの人を代弁して語っています
11:13
This is a crisis
that's getting worse day by day.
危機は日々
さらに悪化しています
11:18
We have to move beyond partisanship.
私たちは党派を超えて
動く必要があります
11:21
And I want to take a moment
to honor these House Republicans --
この下院共和党議員たちに
敬意を表したいと思います
11:23
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:26
who had the courage last fall
昨秋 勇気を持って
11:27
to step out and take a political risk,
一歩踏み出し
政治的危険を冒しながら
11:30
by telling the truth
about the climate crisis.
気候危機に関しての
真実を語りました
11:35
So the cost of the climate
crisis is mounting up,
気候危機による損失が
増大しており
11:38
there are many of these aspects
I haven't even mentioned.
私が言及さえしなかったことが
たくさんあります
11:41
It's an enormous burden.
それが途方もなく
大きな負担となっています
11:44
I'll mention just one more,
もう一つだけ言及します
11:46
because the World Economic Forum
last month in Davos,
先月 ダボスでの
世界経済フォーラムで
11:48
after their annual survey
of 750 economists,
750人の経済学者への
年次調査の結果
11:53
said the climate crisis is now
the number one risk
今や気候危機は 世界経済にとって
一番の危険要因になっていると
11:56
to the global economy.
発表されました
11:59
So you get central bankers
英国中央銀行の
12:01
like Mark Carney, the head
of the UK Central Bank,
マーク・カーニー総裁のような
中央銀行関係者は
12:02
saying the vast majority
of the carbon reserves are unburnable.
炭素埋蔵量の大部分は
「燃やすことができない」と言っています
12:05
Subprime carbon.
「サブプライム・カーボン」です
12:09
I'm not going to remind you what happened
with subprime mortgages,
サブプライム住宅ローンに
何が起こったかは言いませんが
12:10
but it's the same thing.
これは同じことです
12:14
If you look at all of the carbon fuels
that were burned
産業革命が
始まって以来燃やされた
12:15
since the beginning
of the industrial revolution,
すべての化石燃料を見ると
12:18
this is the quantity burned
in the last 16 years.
濃い部分が この16年間に
燃やされた量です
12:21
Here are all the ones that are proven
and left on the books,
存在が確認されている
化石燃料の埋蔵量は
12:24
28 trillion dollars.
3,100兆円相当です
12:28
The International Energy Agency
says only this amount can be burned.
国際エネルギー機関によると
そのうちで燃やせるのは灰色の部分だけで
12:30
So the rest, 22 trillion dollars --
残りの2,400兆円分は
12:34
unburnable.
燃やせません
12:37
Risk to the global economy.
世界経済に対する危機です
12:39
That's why divestment movement
makes practical sense
だから投資撤収の動きは
ただの道徳的要請ではなく
12:41
and is not just a moral imperative.
実際的な意味があるのです
12:44
So the answer to the first question,
"Must we change?"
ですから「私たちは変わらなければならないのか?」
という最初の質問への答えは
12:47
is yes, we have to change.
「変わらなければならない」です
12:51
Second question, "Can we change?"
第二の質問は
「私たちは変われるだろうか?」
12:53
This is the exciting news!
朗報があります
12:54
The best projections
in the world 16 years ago
16年前の最善の予測では
12:57
were that by 2010, the world
would be able to install
2010年までに世界中で
導入できる風力発電量は
13:00
30 gigawatts of wind capacity.
30ギガワットということでした
13:04
We beat that mark
by 14 and a half times over.
実際の数値は
その14.5倍になっています
13:07
We see an exponential curve
for wind installations now.
風力発電量は
指数関数的に増加しています
13:12
We see the cost coming down dramatically.
コストが劇的に
下がっているのが分ります
13:15
Some countries -- take Germany,
an industrial powerhouse
強い産業を持つ国の
ドイツを例に取ると
13:19
with a climate not that different
from Vancouver's, by the way --
バンクーバーとそれ程
変わらない気候ですが
13:22
one day last December,
昨年12月のある日には
13:26
got 81 percent of all its energy
from renewable resources,
全エネルギーの81%が
再生可能資源由来でした
13:27
mainly solar and wind.
主に太陽光と風力です
13:31
A lot of countries are getting
more than half on an average basis.
平均で半分以上という国は
たくさんあります
13:32
More good news:
良い知らせは まだあります
13:36
energy storage,
from batteries particularly,
エネルギー貯蔵
特に電池によるものが
13:37
is now beginning to take off
大きく伸びていることです
13:40
because the cost has been
coming down very dramatically
断続性の問題に
対処するコストが
13:42
to solve the intermittency problem.
劇的に下がっています
13:45
With solar, the news is even
more exciting!
太陽光発電についての朗報は
さらに心躍る内容です
13:47
The best projections 14 years ago
were that we would install
14年前の最善の予測では
2010年までに導入量が
13:50
one gigawatt per year by 2010.
年1ギガワットになる
ということでした
13:53
When 2010 came around,
we beat that mark by 17 times over.
2010年になったら
その17倍になっていました
13:56
Last year, we beat it by 58 times over.
去年は58倍になりました
14:00
This year, we're on track
to beat it 68 times over.
今年は68倍になるでしょう
14:04
We're going to win this.
私たちは勝つのです
14:07
We are going to prevail.
私たちは勝者となるのです
14:08
The exponential curve on solar
is even steeper and more dramatic.
太陽光発電の指数曲線は
さらに急で より劇的です
14:10
When I came to this stage 10 years ago,
10年前 私がTEDの壇上に
上がったときは
14:14
this is where it was.
ここでした
14:16
We have seen a revolutionary breakthrough
こうした指数曲線が現れる中で
14:18
in the emergence
of these exponential curves.
私たちは画期的な技術革新を
目にしてきました
14:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:25
And the cost has come down
10 percent per year
この30年間 コストは
14:28
for 30 years.
年に10%下がっています
14:32
And it's continuing to come down.
そしてそれは
下降し続けています
14:33
Now, the business community
has certainly noticed this,
今やグリッドパリティとなる点を
越えようとしており
14:35
because it's crossing
the grid parity point.
経済界はそのことに
確かに気付いています
14:38
Cheaper solar penetration rates
are beginning to rise.
安い太陽光発電の普及率が
増加し始めています
14:41
Grid parity is understood
as that line, that threshold,
グリッドパリティとは
分岐点であり その先では
14:44
below which renewable electricity
is cheaper than electricity
再生可能発電の方が
化石燃料を燃やすよりも
14:48
from burning fossil fuels.
安価だと
理解されているものです
14:52
That threshold is a little bit
like the difference
その分岐点は
華氏32度と33度
14:54
between 32 degrees Fahrenheit
and 33 degrees Fahrenheit,
もしくは
摂氏0度と1度の違いに
14:57
or zero and one Celsius.
少し似ています
15:01
It's a difference of more than one degree,
それは1度の違い以上のもので
15:02
it's the difference between ice and water.
氷と水を分ける違いです
15:04
And it's the difference between markets
that are frozen up,
それは凍り付いた市場と
15:07
and liquid flows of capital
into new opportunities for investment.
新たな投資の機会に対する
資本の流れがある市場の違いです
15:11
This is the biggest
new business opportunity
これは世界史上最大の
15:16
in the history of the world,
新しいビジネスの機会です
15:19
and two-thirds of it
is in the private sector.
開発投資の3分の2は
民間が行っています
15:21
We are seeing an explosion
of new investment.
私たちは新たな投資の急増を
目の当たりにしています
15:24
Starting in 2010, investments globally
in renewable electricity generation
2010年からは全世界の
再生可能電力への投資が
15:27
surpassed fossils.
化石燃料を超えました
15:33
The gap has been growing ever since.
それ以来
差は開いてきています
15:35
The projections for the future
are even more dramatic,
将来への予測は
さらに劇的なものです
15:37
even though fossil energy
is now still subsidized
化石燃料が今もなお
再生可能エネルギーよりも
15:40
at a rate 40 times larger than renewables.
補助を40倍多く
受けているにもかかわらずです
15:44
And by the way, if you add
the projections for nuclear on here,
ここに原子力への
予測を加えると
15:47
particularly if you assume
that the work many are doing
特に より安全で許容できる
15:51
to try to break through to safer
and more acceptable,
より手頃な形の
原子力にするための努力が
15:54
more affordable forms of nuclear,
多くなされていることを
考えるなら
15:56
this could change even more dramatically.
変化はより一層
劇的なものになるでしょう
15:58
So is there any precedent
for such a rapid adoption
では そのような新技術の
急速な導入に
16:01
of a new technology?
先例はあるのでしょうか?
16:04
Well, there are many,
but let's look at cell phones.
たくさんありますが
携帯電話の例を見てみましょう
16:06
In 1980, AT&T, then Ma Bell,
1980年にAT&T
かつての「マ・ベル」が
16:08
commissioned McKinsey to do
a global market survey
当時現れた
新しい不格好な携帯電話の
16:12
of those clunky new mobile phones
that appeared then.
世界市場調査を
マッキンゼーに依頼しました
16:14
"How many can we sell
by the year 2000?" they asked.
「2000年までに何台売れるか?」
との問いに
16:18
McKinsey came back and said, "900,000."
マッキンゼーは
「90万台」と答えました
16:21
And sure enough,
when the year 2000 arrived,
2000年になったら
確かに90万台売れました
16:24
they did sell 900,000 --
in the first three days.
最初の3日間で
16:26
And for the balance of the year,
they sold 120 times more.
その年の売上台数は
120倍になりました
16:28
And now there are more cell connections
than there are people in the world.
今や携帯電話の契約数は
世界人口以上になっています
16:32
So, why were they not only wrong,
but way wrong?
なぜこんなにも大きく
予想が外れたのでしょうか?
16:37
I've asked that question myself, "Why?"
自分自身に問いかけました
「なぜ?」
16:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:44
And I think the answer is in three parts.
答えは3つあると思います
16:45
First, the cost came down much faster
than anybody expected,
第一にコストが誰も予想しないほど
早く下がったこと
16:47
even as the quality went up.
同時に品質が向上したこと
16:51
And low-income countries, places
that did not have a landline grid --
固定電話網のなかった
低所得国や地域で
16:53
they leap-frogged to the new technology.
一足飛びに 新技術に
飛びついたこと
16:58
The big expansion has been
in the developing counties.
大きな広がりは
発展途上国で起こっています
17:00
So what about the electricity grids
in the developing world?
では発展途上国の
電力供給網はどうでしょうか?
17:03
Well, not so hot.
さほど良くありません
17:07
And in many areas, they don't exist.
多くの地域では
存在すらしていません
17:09
There are more people
without any electricity at all in India
インドでは
まったく電気がない人が
17:11
than the entire population
of the United States of America.
アメリカの全人口よりも
たくさんいます
17:14
So now we're getting this:
現在はこうなってきています
17:17
solar panels on grass huts
藁ぶき屋根の上の
太陽電池パネルと
17:19
and new business models
that make it affordable.
それを入手可能にした
新しいビジネスモデルです
17:21
Muhammad Yunus financed
this one in Bangladesh with micro-credit.
ムハマド・ユヌスはバングラデシュで
これに対してマイクロクレジット融資を行いました
17:24
This is a village market.
これは村の市場です
17:28
Bangladesh is now the fastest-deploying
country in the world:
バングラデシュは今や
世界で最も早く展開している国で
17:30
two systems per minute
on average, night and day.
昼も夜も 平均1分間に2台
導入されています
17:33
And we have all we need:
必要なすべてがあります
17:36
enough energy from the Sun
comes to the Earth
太陽から地球に届く
エネルギーの1時間分で
17:37
every hour to supply the full world's
energy needs for an entire year.
世界の1年分のエネルギー需要を
まかなうことができます
17:39
It's actually a little bit
less than an hour.
実際には1時間より
少し短いくらいです
17:44
So the answer to the second question,
"Can we change?"
「私たちは変われるか?」
という第二の質問への答えは
17:47
is clearly "Yes."
もちろん「はい」です
17:50
And it's an ever-firmer "yes."
これ以上にないくらい
確固たる「はい」です
17:52
Last question, "Will we change?"
最後の質問です
「私たちは変わるだろうか?」
17:55
Paris really was a breakthrough,
パリ協定は大成功でした
17:57
some of the provisions are binding
いくつかの条項には
拘束力があり
17:59
and the regular reviews will matter a lot.
定期的な状況確認が
大変重要でしょう
18:01
But nations aren't waiting,
they're going ahead.
関係諸国は待つのではなく
前進しています
18:03
China has already announced
that starting next year,
すでに中国は来年から全国で
18:05
they're adopting a nationwide
cap and trade system.
キャップ・アンド・トレードの仕組みを
導入すると発表しました
18:08
They will likely link up
with the European Union.
彼らは欧州連合と
連携する見込みです
18:11
The United States
has already been changing.
アメリカはすでに
変わってきています
18:14
All of these coal plants were proposed
これらの石炭発電所は
18:17
in the next 10 years and canceled.
この10年間に建設予定で
キャンセルされたものです
18:19
All of these existing
coal plants were retired.
これらは廃止された
石炭発電所です
18:21
All of these coal plants have had
their retirement announced.
これらの石炭発電所は
廃止が発表されています
18:24
All of them -- canceled.
すべてキャンセルです
18:27
We are moving forward.
私たちは前進しています
18:30
Last year -- if you look at
all of the investment
去年の新しい発電に対する
18:31
in new electricity generation
in the United States,
アメリカでの
すべての投資を見ると
18:34
almost three-quarters
was from renewable energy,
ほぼ4分の3は
再生可能エネルギーに対するもので
18:37
mostly wind and solar.
大部分は風力と太陽光でした
18:39
We are solving this crisis.
私たちはこの危機を
解決しつつあるのです
18:42
The only question is:
how long will it take to get there?
唯一の疑問はどれくらい
掛かるのかということです
18:45
So, it matters that a lot
of people are organizing
この変化を強く求めるためには
18:50
to insist on this change.
大勢で団結することが重要です
18:55
Almost 400,000 people
marched in New York City
約40万人が気候変動に関する
国連特別総会の前に
18:57
before the UN special session on this.
ニューヨーク市を
デモ行進しました
19:01
Many thousands, tens of thousands,
何千何万の人が
19:03
marched in cities around the world.
世界中の都市で
デモ行進しました
19:05
And so, I am extremely optimistic.
だから私はとても楽観的です
19:08
As I said before,
we are going to win this.
前に言ったように
私たちは勝つのです
19:12
I'll finish with this story.
この話で締めくくりましょう
19:15
When I was 13 years old,
私が13才のとき
19:18
I heard that proposal by President Kennedy
10年以内に
人間を月に着陸させ
19:20
to land a person on the Moon
and bring him back safely
無事に帰還させるという
ケネディ大統領の
19:24
in 10 years.
計画を聞きました
19:26
And I heard adults
of that day and time say,
その時 大人たちは
「それは無謀で
19:27
"That's reckless, expensive,
may well fail."
費用も掛かるし
失敗するだろう」と言いました
19:30
But eight years and two months later,
しかし8年2か月後に
19:34
in the moment that Neil Armstrong
set foot on the Moon,
ニール・アームストロングが
月に第一歩を記したとき
19:36
there was great cheer that went up
in NASA's mission control in Houston.
ヒューストンにあるNASAの管制室で
大きな歓声が上がりました
19:39
Here's a little-known fact about that:
ほとんど知られていない
事実があります
19:44
the average age of the systems engineers,
その日 管制室にいた
システムエンジニアや
19:47
the controllers in the room
that day, was 26,
管制官の平均年齢は26才でした
19:49
which means, among other things,
ということは つまり
19:52
their age, when they heard
that challenge, was 18.
その挑戦のことを聞いたとき
彼らは18才だったということです
19:54
We now have a moral challenge
人々が直面してきた
良心への挑戦の伝統に
19:57
that is in the tradition of others
that we have faced.
今 私たちは直面しています
20:00
One of the greatest poets
of the last century in the US,
20世紀アメリカの
最も偉大な詩人の一人である
20:04
Wallace Stevens,
ウォレス・スティーヴンズの
20:07
wrote a line that has stayed with me:
詩の一節が
私の心に残っています
20:09
"After the final 'no,'
there comes a 'yes,'
「最終的な否定の後には
肯定がある
20:10
and on that 'yes',
the future world depends."
その肯定に
世界の未来が掛かっている」
20:13
When the abolitionists
started their movement,
奴隷解放運動が始まったとき
20:16
they met with no after no after no.
否定に次ぐ否定を受けたのちに
20:18
And then came a yes.
それは肯定されました
20:21
The Women's Suffrage
and Women's Rights Movement
女性参政権と女権拡張運動は
20:22
met endless no's, until finally,
there was a yes.
最終的に肯定されるまで
終わりなき否定に直面しました
20:24
The Civil Rights Movement,
the movement against apartheid,
公民権運動
アパルトヘイト反対運動
20:28
and more recently, the movement
for gay and lesbian rights
つい最近のアメリカや
その他の場所の
20:31
here in the United States and elsewhere.
同性愛者の権利に
対する運動もです
20:34
After the final "no" comes a "yes."
最終的な否定の後には
肯定があるのです
20:37
When any great moral challenge
is ultimately resolved
大いなる倫理的ジレンマが
究極的には
20:39
into a binary choice
between what is right and what is wrong,
正しことと間違っていることの
二者択一であるとき
20:44
the outcome is fore-ordained
because of who we are as human beings.
その結果はあらかじめ定まっていて
それは我々の人間性によるものです
20:48
Ninety-nine percent of us,
that is where we are now
99%の人々というところまで
私たちは来ています
20:52
and it is why we're going to win this.
だから私たちは勝つのです
20:56
We have everything we need.
必要なものはすべてあります
20:58
Some still doubt that we have
the will to act,
未だに人々の行動する意志を
疑う人もいますが
21:00
but I say the will to act is itself
a renewable resource.
私は行動する意思それ自体
再生可能な資源だと申し上げます
21:04
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
21:09
(Applause)
(拍手)
21:10
Chris Anderson: You've got this incredible
combination of skills.
クリス・アンダーソン:
信じられないほど多才な方です
21:47
You've got this scientist mind
that can understand
このような科学者の
考え方をお持ちで
21:50
the full range of issues,
あらゆる問題を理解して
21:53
and the ability to turn it
into the most vivid language.
それを最も生き生きとした言葉で
表現する才能がおありです
21:55
No one else can do that,
that's why you led this thing.
他の誰もできないから
これを主導されたんですね
21:59
It was amazing to see it 10 years ago,
it was amazing to see it now.
10年前も素晴らしいものでしたが
今日も素晴らしいお話でした
22:02
Al Gore: Well, you're nice
to say that, Chris.
アル・ゴア:
そう言っていただけて光栄です
22:05
But honestly, I have a lot
of really good friends
しかし正直に言うと 科学界に
22:07
in the scientific community
who are incredibly patient
とても良き友人がたくさんいて
非常に我慢強く
22:11
and who will sit there
and explain this stuff to me
腰を据えて
22:14
over and over and over again
何度も何度も説明して
22:17
until I can get it
into simple enough language
私が分りやすい言葉に変え
22:18
that I can understand it.
理解できるように
してくれたんです
22:22
And that's the key to trying
to communicate.
これが理解し合う鍵です
22:23
CA: So, your talk. First part: terrifying,
クリス・アンダーソン: あなたのお話ですが
前半は非常に恐ろしいもので
22:27
second part: incredibly hopeful.
後半はとても
希望に満ちたものでした
22:31
How do we know that all those graphs,
all that progress, is enough
グラフで表された進歩が
前半で示された問題の解決に十分だと
22:33
to solve what you showed
in the first part?
どうして分かるのでしょうか?
22:38
AG: I think that the crossing --
アル・ゴア: それは あの分岐点です —
22:41
you know, I've only been
in the business world for 15 years.
私は実業界に
15年間しかいませんが
22:45
But one of the things I've learned
is that apparently it matters
そこで学んだのは
新しい製品やサービスが
22:48
if a new product or service
is more expensive
既存のものよりも
高いか安いかが
22:51
than the incumbent, or cheaper than.
どうも重要らしい
ということです
22:54
Turns out, it makes a difference
if it's cheaper than.
結局 安いというのは大きい
と分かりました
22:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
22:59
And when it crosses that line,
一線を越えると
23:00
then a lot of things really change.
たくさんのことが
本当に変わるのです
23:03
We are regularly surprised
by these developments.
こうした変化には
いつも驚かされています
23:05
The late Rudi Dornbusch,
the great economist said,
偉大な経済学者の
ルディガー・ドーンブッシュが言っています
23:08
"Things take longer to happen
then you think they will,
「物事が起こるまでには
人々が思うよりも時間が掛かるが
23:10
and then they happen much faster
than you thought they could."
それが起これば 思った以上に
急速に進展する」
23:13
I really think that's where we are.
私たちはまさに
そうした所にいるのです
23:16
Some people are using the phrase
"The Solar Singularity" now,
「太陽光の特異点」
という言葉を使う人もいます
23:18
meaning when it gets
below the grid parity,
それはほとんどの場所で
助成金の支給なしに
23:22
unsubsidized in most places,
グリッドパリティ以下になったら
23:25
then it's the default choice.
既定の選択になる
という意味です
23:27
Now, in one of the presentations
yesterday, the jitney thing,
昨日の発表の一つに乗り合いタクシーに
関するものがありました
23:29
there is an effort to use
regulations to slow this down.
法的規制でこれを
減速させる動きがありますが
23:35
And I just don't think it's going to work.
私はそれは
上手くいかないと思います
23:40
There's a woman in Atlanta, Debbie Dooley,
アトランタ・ティーパーティー会長の
23:44
who's the Chairman
of the Atlanta Tea Party.
デビー・ドゥーリー
という女性がいます
23:46
They enlisted her
in this effort to put a tax
彼女は 太陽電池パネルに対し
税や規制を課す活動に
23:48
on solar panels and regulations.
協力を求められましたが
23:51
And she had just put
solar panels on her roof
最近 自宅に太陽電池パネルを
設置した彼女は
23:53
and she didn't understand the request.
頼まれていることが
分かりませんでした
23:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
23:57
And so she went and formed
an alliance with the Sierra Club
それで彼女は
シエラクラブと提携して
23:59
and they formed a new organization
called the Green Tea Party.
グリーンティー・パーティーと呼ばれる
新しい組織を作りました
24:02
(Laughter)
(笑)
24:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
24:07
And they defeated the proposal.
そして提案を退けたのです
24:08
So, finally, the answer
to your question is,
では 最後にあなたの
質問に対する答えです
24:10
this sounds a little corny
and maybe it's a cliché,
少しありきたりで 決まり文句に
聞こえるかもしれませんが
24:13
but 10 years ago -- and Christiana
referred to this --
クリスティアナも言っていましたが
10年前
24:16
there are people in this audience
who played an incredibly significant role
あの指数曲線を生み出す際に
とても重要な役割を果たした人々が
24:20
in generating those exponential curves.
この聴衆の中にいます
24:26
And it didn't work out economically
for some of them,
その中には経済的に
上手くいかない人もいましたが
24:28
but it kick-started
this global revolution.
この世界的な革命を
推し進めました
24:31
And what people in this audience do now
今 この聴衆の中にいる人たちは
同じことを
24:34
with the knowledge
that we are going to win this.
勝てると知りながら
やっていますが
24:38
But it matters a lot how fast we win it.
いかに早く勝利を
収められるかが重要です
24:40
CA: Al Gore, that was incredibly powerful.
クリス・アンダーソン:
とても力強いですね
24:45
If this turns out to be the year,
もし今年がそうした年になって
24:47
that the partisan thing changes,
党派問題が変化して
24:49
as you said, it's no longer
a partisan issue,
あなたがおっしゃったように
党派間の問題がなくなり
24:52
but you bring along people
from the other side together,
反対側にいる人々と共に
24:55
backed by science, backed by these kinds
of investment opportunities,
科学に裏打ちされ
こうした投資機会や
24:59
backed my reason that you win the day --
勝利するという裏付けに
支えられて進むというのは
25:02
boy, that's really exciting.
とても胸が高鳴ります
25:05
Thank you so much.
どうもありがとうございました
25:07
AG: Thank you so much
for bringing me back to TED.
アル・ゴア: またTEDに呼んでくれて
感謝しています
25:08
Thank you!
ありがとう
25:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
25:12
Translator:Hiroe Humphreys
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Al Gore - Climate advocate
Nobel Laureate Al Gore focused the world’s attention on the global climate crisis. Now he’s showing us how we’re moving towards real solutions.

Why you should listen

Former Vice President Al Gore is co-founder and chairman of Generation Investment Management. While he’s is a senior partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, and a member of Apple, Inc.’s board of directors, Gore spends the majority of his time as chair of The Climate Reality Project, a nonprofit devoted to solving the climate crisis.

He is the author of the bestsellers Earth in the Balance, An Inconvenient Truth, The Assault on Reason, Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis, and most recently, The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change. He is the subject of the Oscar-winning documentary An Inconvenient Truth and is the co-recipient, with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 for “informing the world of the dangers posed by climate change.”

Gore was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976, 1978, 1980 and 1982 and the U.S. Senate in 1984 and 1990. He was inaugurated as the 45th Vice President of the United States on January 20, 1993, and served eight years.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.