17:15
TEDGlobal 2009

David Deutsch: A new way to explain explanation

デイヴィッド・ドイチュ:説明を説明するための新しい方法

Filmed:

何万年もの間、私達の祖先はこの世界を神話を通して理解してきました。変化のスピードは非常に遅かったのです。科学的な理解の高まりは、この2,3世紀の間に世界を変えました。なぜでしょう?物理学者デイヴィッド・ドイチュは巧妙な答えを提案します。

- Quantum physicist
David Deutsch's 1997 book "The Fabric of Reality" laid the groundwork for an all-encompassing Theory of Everything, and galvanized interest in the idea of a quantum computer, which could solve problems of hitherto unimaginable complexity. Full bio

I'm sure that, throughout the hundred-thousand-odd years
私達の種が存在して
00:18
of our species' existence,
100万年以上を通して
00:23
and even before,
またもっと以前にも
00:26
our ancestors looked up at the night sky,
私達の祖先は、夜空を見上げては星とはなんであるかと
00:29
and wondered what stars are.
不思議に思ったであろうことは間違いありません。
00:31
Wondering, therefore,
それ故に
00:34
how to explain what they saw
目に見えない観点から見えるものを
00:36
in terms of things unseen.
どう説明すればいいのかを知りたいと思いました。
00:40
Okay, so, most people
ほとんどの人が
00:45
only wondered that occasionally, like today,
今日のように、時折そのようなことを疑問に思うだけでした --
00:49
in breaks from whatever
普段は何かと
00:52
normally preoccupied them.
考えなければならないことがあるそのあいまに。
00:54
But what normally preoccupied them
しかし、普段彼らの頭を一杯にしていることには
00:56
also involved yearning to know.
知りたいという欲求も含まれていたのです。
01:00
They wished they knew
彼らは知りたかったのです --
01:03
how to prevent their food supply
どうやって時折起こる
01:06
from sometimes failing,
食料の不足を防げばいいのか
01:08
and how they could rest when they were tired
疲れたときに休めるようにするにはどうすればいいのか
01:10
without risking starvation,
飢える危険を冒すことなく
01:13
be warmer, cooler, safer,
より暖かく、より涼しく、より安全に暮らすには、そして
01:17
in less pain.
痛みを軽減するにはどうすればいいのか。
01:21
I bet those prehistoric cave artists
有史以前の洞くつアーティストは
01:23
would have loved to know
より上手に絵を描く方法を
01:26
how to draw better.
知りたかったに違いありません。
01:28
In every aspect of their lives,
彼らは生活のあらゆる面で
01:30
they wished for progress, just as we do.
進歩しようとしました、今日の私達のように。
01:35
But they failed, almost completely, to make any.
しかし、どれにおいてもほとんど完全に失敗しました。
01:40
They didn't know how to.
やり方を知らなかったのです。
01:46
Discoveries like fire
火の発見などは
01:49
happened so rarely, that from an individual's point of view,
ごく稀にしか起こらないので、個人の視点からみると
01:53
the world never improved.
それで世界が進歩したということはありませんでした。
01:57
Nothing new was learned.
新しいことを何も学習できなかったのです。
02:00
The first clue to the origin of starlight
星の光がなんなのかを知る最初のきっかけが現れたのは
02:04
happened as recently as 1899: radioactivity.
1899年とごく最近です。放射能のことですね。
02:07
Within 40 years,
それから40年で
02:14
physicists discovered the whole explanation,
全体的な説明を発見した物理学者は
02:16
expressed, as usual, in elegant symbols.
いつものように美しい記号でそれを表しました。
02:20
But never mind the symbols.
しかし記号に関しては気にしないでください。
02:25
Think how many discoveries
どれだけ多くの発見があったのか
02:27
they represent.
見ていきましょう。
02:31
Nuclei and nuclear reactions, of course.
原子核、核反応はもちろん、
02:33
But isotopes, particles of electricity,
同位体、電気の粒子、
02:36
antimatter,
反物質、
02:43
neutrinos,
ニュートリノ、
02:47
the conversion of mass to energy -- that's E=mc^2 --
質量とエネルギーの等価性 -- つまり E=mc^2 --
02:49
gamma rays,
ガンマ線
02:53
transmutation.
核変換などです。
02:55
That ancient dream that had always eluded the alchemists
錬金術師が果たせなかった古代の夢は
02:59
was achieved through these same theories
果たされました --
03:04
that explained starlight
星の光や
03:06
and other ancient mysteries,
その他古代の謎や
03:08
and new, unexpected phenomena.
新しく、予想外の現象を説明するこういった論理を通じて。
03:11
That all that, discovered in 40 years,
この40年の間に発見されたこれらのことは --
03:14
had not been in the previous hundred thousand,
過去100万年の間果たされなかった --
03:18
was not for lack of thinking
それは星やその他、至急対処が必要な問題について
03:21
about stars, and all those other urgent problems they had.
考えなかったからではありません。
03:25
They even arrived at answers,
彼らも答えを導きだしましたが、
03:29
such as myths,
それは彼らの人生を
03:32
that dominated their lives,
支配していた神話であり、
03:34
yet bore almost no resemblance
真実とはほとんど何の類似点も
03:36
to the truth.
ありませんでした。
03:40
The tragedy of that protracted stagnation
長い間停滞したままである悲惨な状況が
03:42
isn't sufficiently recognized, I think.
十分に認識すらされていなかったと思います。
03:47
These were people with brains of
結局これらのすべてを発見したのは
03:49
essentially the same design
昔の人と全く同じ構造の
03:51
that eventually did discover all those things.
脳を持った人々でした。
03:54
But that ability to make progress
しかしその進歩を遂げる能力も
03:59
remained almost unused,
ずっと使われないままでした --
04:03
until the event that
人類の状況に
04:06
revolutionized the human condition
革命がもたらされ
04:09
and changed the universe.
それが世界を変えるまで。
04:11
Or so we should hope.
私達は期待するべきです。
04:13
Because that event was the
なぜならその出来事とは
04:15
Scientific Revolution,
科学革命であり、
04:17
ever since which our knowledge
それは物質界に関する
04:19
of the physical world,
知識をもたらし、
04:21
and of how to adapt it to our wishes,
際限なく増え続ける私達の要望に
04:23
has been growing relentlessly.
応えようとするからです。
04:27
Now, what had changed?
それでは、何が変わったのでしょうか?
04:29
What were people now doing for the first time
そのとき彼らは最初に何をしたのでしょうか?
04:32
that made that difference
停滞から抜け出し、
04:34
between stagnation
急速で際限のない
04:36
and rapid, open-ended discovery?
発見に移行するために。
04:38
How to make that difference
変化を生みだす方法とは、
04:42
is surely the most important universal truth
知ることのできる最も重要で、普遍的な真実であることは
04:44
that it is possible to know.
確かです。
04:48
Worryingly, there is no consensus about what it is.
困ったことに、それが何であるのか確かな通念はありません。
04:50
So, I'll tell you.
だから私がお話しましょう。
04:55
But I'll have to backtrack a little first.
しかしその前に少し話を戻さなければいけません。
04:57
Before the Scientific Revolution,
この科学革命以前は、
05:01
they believed that everything important, knowable,
人々は、重要な分かりうることは全て
05:04
was already known,
既に分かっているものであり、
05:07
enshrined in ancient writings, institutions,
そういったものは古代の書物や組織
05:09
and in some genuinely useful rules of thumb --
また本当に役立った経験則の中に秘められているのだと信じていました。
05:12
which were, however, entrenched as dogmas,
それらはしかし、教理として頑なに守られていました --
05:15
along with many falsehoods.
多くの嘘と共に。
05:19
So they believed that knowledge came from authorities
だから人々は、実際はほとんど何も知らない権威者から得る知識を
05:21
that actually knew very little.
信じてしまっていたのです。
05:25
And therefore progress
ですから進歩を遂げるには、
05:28
depended on learning how to reject
いかに拒絶するかにかかっていました --
05:31
the authority of learned men,
博識あるとされる権威者や
05:34
priests, traditions and rulers.
聖職者や伝統、統治者たちを。
05:37
Which is why the Scientific Revolution
それが科学革命には
05:41
had to have a wider context.
より幅広い背景が必要であった理由です。
05:44
The Enlightenment, a revolution in how
つまり啓蒙思想です。権威者に頼らず
05:46
people sought knowledge,
知識を得る方法を
05:50
trying not to rely on authority.
追求した革命です。
05:53
"Take no one's word for it."
「誰の言葉も信じるな」と。
05:56
But that can't be what made the difference.
しかしそれが変化をもたらしたわけではないのです。
05:58
Authorities had been rejected before, many times.
それまでにも権威あるものたちは、何度も退けられていました。
06:02
And that rarely, if ever,
そして、それにより科学革命のようなことが
06:04
caused anything like the Scientific Revolution.
起こったことはほとんどありません。
06:06
At the time, what they thought
当時優れた科学とは
06:10
distinguished science
目に見えないものに関する
06:12
was a radical idea about things unseen,
急進的なアイデアであると考えられていました。
06:14
known as empiricism.
経験主義として知られているように。
06:18
All knowledge derives from the senses.
全ての知識は感覚に由来するというものです。
06:21
Well, we've seen that that can't be true.
私たちはそれが真実でないとすでに知っていますが。
06:26
It did help by promoting
経験主義は観測と実験を
06:29
observation and experiment.
奨励したので確かに役には立ちました。
06:33
But, from the outset, it was obvious
しかし、何かが恐ろしく違っていることは
06:35
that there was something horribly wrong with it.
最初から明らかでした。
06:37
Knowledge comes from the senses.
知識は感覚から得るものであるなら、
06:40
In what language? Certainly not the language of mathematics,
どの言語で説明されるのでしょう?数学という言語でないことは確かです。
06:42
in which, Galileo rightly said,
ガリレオが「自然という本は数学という言語で書かれている」と
06:45
the book of nature is written.
正しく言い表したように。
06:48
Look at the world. You don't see equations
世界を見てください。山腹に、
06:51
carved on to the mountainsides.
方程式が施されているわけではありませんね。
06:54
If you did, it would be because people
もしそうであるなら、人間が、
06:57
had carved them.
それを刻んだからです。
06:59
By the way, why don't we do that?
ところで、なぜそうしないのでしょう?
07:01
What's wrong with us?
私達はどうかしているのでしょうか?
07:04
(Laughter)
(観客の笑い声)
07:06
Empiricism is inadequate
経験主義とは不十分なものです。
07:07
because, well,
なぜなら、
07:09
scientific theories explain the seen in terms of the unseen.
科学理論とは目に見えない観点から見えるものを説明するものだからです。
07:11
And the unseen, you have to admit,
その目に見えないものを、私達は、
07:16
doesn't come to us through the senses.
感覚を通して知るわけではないということを、認めなければなりません。
07:18
We don't see those nuclear reactions in stars.
星の中に核反応は見えません。
07:20
We don't see the origin of species.
種の起原も見えるものではありません。
07:24
We don't see the curvature of space-time,
時空間の歪みや、
07:27
and other universes.
他の宇宙だって見えはしません。
07:31
But we know about those things.
しかし私達は、それらを知っています。
07:33
How?
どうやって知っているのでしょう?
07:36
Well, the classic empiricist answer is induction.
典型的な経験主義者の答えは帰納法です。
07:38
The unseen resembles the seen.
見えないものは見えるものに似ていると彼らは言います。
07:43
But it doesn't.
しかし似てはいないのです。
07:47
You know what the clinching evidence was
決定的な証拠として
07:49
that space-time is curved?
時空間の歪みがありますね。
07:51
It was a photograph, not of space-time,
それは写真でしたが、時空間の写真ではありません。
07:54
but of an eclipse, with a dot there rather than there.
日食の写真です。点がここではなくここにある、というような。
07:57
And the evidence for evolution?
進化の証拠とはなんでしょう?
08:01
Some rocks and some finches.
岩やフィンチですね。
08:03
And parallel universes? Again: dots there,
平行宇宙はどうでしょう?これもまた、スクリーン上で
08:06
rather than there, on a screen.
点がここではなくここにある、といった話になります。
08:09
What we see, in all these cases,
これら全てのケースにおいて
08:11
bears no resemblance to the reality
目に見えるものは、私たちが証拠であると考えるものとは
08:14
that we conclude is responsible --
なんら類似点はありません。
08:18
only a long chain of theoretical reasoning
ただそれらを繋ぐ理論的な推理と
08:20
and interpretation connects them.
解釈があるだけです。
08:24
"Ah!" say creationists.
「ああ!」と創造論者は言います。
08:26
"So you admit it's all interpretation.
「では全てが解釈次第であると認めるのですね。
08:29
No one has ever seen evolution.
誰も進化を目にしたことがない。
08:31
We see rocks.
私達には岩が見えます。
08:34
You have your interpretation. We have ours.
あなたにはあなたの、私達には私達の解釈がある。
08:36
Yours comes from guesswork,
あなたの解釈は推測からくるものです。
08:39
ours from the Bible."
私達の解釈は聖書から来ているのです。」と彼らは言います。
08:41
But what creationist and empiricists both ignore
しかし創造論者も経験主義者も共に無視していることは
08:43
is that, in that sense,
そう言った意味で
08:49
no one has ever seen a bible either,
今まで誰も聖書を見た者はいない、ということです。
08:51
that the eye only detects light, which we don't perceive.
目が光を感知するのであって、私たちに光は見えません。
08:54
Brains only detect nerve impulses.
脳が神経衝撃を受けただけのことです。
08:58
And they don't perceive even those as what they really are,
そして彼らはそういったことでさえ、ありのままに見ることができないのです、
09:01
namely electrical crackles.
つまり電気信号さえも。
09:04
So we perceive nothing as what it really is.
そうなると私達は何もありのままに見えることができなくなります。
09:06
Our connection to reality
私達の現実とのつながりは、
09:11
is never just perception.
決して知覚だけではありません。
09:14
It's always, as Karl Popper put it,
カールポッパーが言ったように、それはいつも、
09:16
theory-laden.
理論負荷的なのです。
09:20
Scientific knowledge isn't derived from anything.
科学的な知識とは、何かから派生するものではありません。
09:23
It's like all knowledge. It's conjectural, guesswork,
それは全て知識のようなものです。憶測であり、推測であり、
09:26
tested by observation,
観察によって検証はされますが、
09:31
not derived from it.
観察から派生するものではありません。
09:33
So, were testable conjectures
そして検証できる憶測は、
09:37
the great innovation that opened the intellectual prison gates?
知力を解放する大革命であったでしょうか?
09:40
No. Contrary to what's usually said,
いいえ。通常言われていることとは反して、
09:44
testability is common,
検証可能であることは共通しています --
09:47
in myths and all sorts of other irrational modes of thinking.
神話やその他不合理な考え方においても。
09:49
Any crank claiming the sun will go out next Tuesday
次の火曜日に太陽は消えるだろうというような奇抜な考えでさえ
09:53
has got a testable prediction.
検証可能な予測なのです。
09:57
Consider the ancient Greek myth
季節について説明している古代ギリシャの神話について
10:00
explaining seasons.
考えてみましょう。
10:03
Hades, God of the Underworld,
黄泉の国の神であるハーデスは
10:06
kidnaps Persephone, the Goddess of Spring,
春の女神であるペルセフォネを誘拐し
10:08
and negotiates a forced marriage contract,
定期的に帰れることを条件に
10:11
requiring her to return regularly, and lets her go.
強制的に結婚を決めました。
10:14
And each year,
そして毎年
10:18
she is magically compelled to return.
彼女は魔法によって帰ることを強いられます。
10:20
And her mother, Demeter,
そして彼女の母、
10:23
Goddess of the Earth,
大地の女神デメテルは
10:25
is sad, and makes it cold and barren.
悲しみ、大地を寒く不毛の地にします。
10:27
That myth is testable.
この神話は検証可能です。
10:32
If winter is caused by Demeter's sadness,
もし冬がデメテルの悲しみによってもたらされるのであれば、
10:35
then it must happen everywhere on Earth simultaneously.
それは地球上の至る所で同時に起きなければなりません。
10:39
So if the ancient Greeks had only known that Australia
もし古代ギリシャ人が、デメテルが最も悲しいときに、
10:43
is at its warmest when Demeter is at her saddest,
オーストラリアは最も暖かいということを知ってさえいれば、
10:46
they'd have known that their theory is false.
彼らの理論が間違いであることに気づけたでしょう。
10:50
So what was wrong with that myth,
ではこの神話や全ての科学以前の考えの
10:53
and with all pre-scientific thinking,
何が間違いなのでしょうか?
10:56
and what, then, made that momentous difference?
また何がその重大な違いを作り出したのでしょうか?
10:59
I think there is one thing you have to care about.
ここで考えなければいけないことが一つあると思います。
11:04
And that implies
そしてそれは
11:08
testability, the scientific method,
検証の可能性や、科学的研究法、
11:10
the Enlightenment, and everything.
啓蒙思想など全てを含みます。
11:13
And here is the crucial thing.
ここに極めて重要なことがあるのです。
11:15
There is such a thing as a defect in a story.
物語の欠陥のようなものです。
11:17
I don't just mean a logical defect. I mean a bad explanation.
ただの論理的な欠陥ではありません。粗悪な説明、ということなんです。
11:20
What does that mean? Well, explanation
これはどういうことでしょうか?説明とは、
11:25
is an assertion about what's there, unseen,
そこにあるけれど目に見えないものが
11:28
that accounts for what's seen.
目に見えていることの原因であると主張することです。
11:31
Because the explanatory role
なぜならこのペルセフォネの結婚が果たす
11:34
of Persephone's marriage contract
説明的な役割は
11:37
could be played equally well
無数にあるその場しのぎの話によって
11:39
by infinitely many other
何の支障もなく
11:41
ad hoc entities.
同様に果たされてしまうからです。
11:43
Why a marriage contract and not any other reason
どうして規則的に毎年起こる現象の原因は結婚であって
11:45
for regular annual action?
他のどんな理由でもないのでしょうか?
11:48
Here is one. Persephone wasn't released.
こういうこともあるでしょう。ペルセフォネは解放されなかった。
11:52
She escaped, and returns every spring
彼女は逃げた、春の力によって、
11:55
to take revenge on Hades,
ハーデスに復讐するために
11:59
with her Spring powers.
毎年春には戻ってくるのです。
12:01
She cools his domain with Spring air,
彼女は春の風によりハーデスの領域を冷やし、
12:03
venting heat up to the surface, creating summer.
地上に熱気を放出し、夏を作り出すのです。
12:08
That accounts for the same phenomena as the original myth.
この説も最初の神話のように同じ現象を説明できます。
12:12
It's equally testable.
同様に検証可能なのです。
12:16
Yet what it asserts about reality
ですが現実に対して断言できることは
12:19
is, in many ways, the opposite.
様々な点において正反対です。
12:22
And that is possible because
それは可能です。なぜなら、
12:24
the details of the original myth
元の神話にまつわる詳細は
12:26
are unrelated to seasons,
季節とは関係がないからです。
12:29
except via the myth itself.
その神話の枠組みの中で語られた場合を除いて。
12:31
This easy variability
この容易な変わりやすさが
12:35
is the sign of a bad explanation,
粗悪な説明のサインです。
12:38
because, without a functional reason to prefer
なぜなら機能的な理由なしに、
12:42
one of countless variants,
無限にある選択肢から一つだけを選び、
12:46
advocating one of them, in preference to the others,
他をさしおいてそれだけを擁護するというのは、
12:51
is irrational.
非合理的だからです。
12:53
So, for the essence of what
よって、進歩を可能にするために
12:55
makes the difference to enable progress,
重要になる本質的なこととして、
12:57
seek good explanations,
簡単には変えることのできない
13:00
the ones that can't be easily varied,
正当な説明を求めるべきなのです --
13:02
while still explaining the phenomena.
何かの現象を説明するような時であっても。
13:05
Now, our current explanation of seasons
さて、季節に関するわたしたちの現在の説明は
13:10
is that the Earth's axis is tilted like that,
地球の軸がこのように傾いているというものです。
13:13
so each hemisphere tilts toward the sun for half the year,
それぞれの半球が半年は太陽の方へ傾き、
13:17
and away for the other half.
残りの半年は太陽から離れます。
13:20
Better put that up.
これを載せた方がいいですかね。
13:23
(Laughter)
(観客の笑い声)
13:25
That's a good explanation: hard to vary,
これは正当な説明です。変えることが難しいのです。
13:26
because every detail plays a functional role.
全ての詳細が機能的な役割を果たしているからです。
13:31
For instance, we know, independently of seasons,
例えば私達が知っているように、それぞれの季節において、
13:34
that surfaces tilted away
放射熱から離れた方に傾いた表面は
13:37
from radiant heat are heated less,
あまり暖められません。
13:39
and that a spinning sphere, in space,
宇宙空間で回転する惑星は、
13:42
points in a constant direction.
常に一定の方向を向いています。
13:45
And the tilt also explains
その傾きは、
13:48
the sun's angle of elevation at different times of year,
一年の中の違う時々の太陽の仰角についても説明しているし、
13:51
and predicts that the seasons
それぞれの季節が二つの半球で、
13:55
will be out of phase in the two hemispheres.
異なっていることも予測しています。
13:57
If they'd been observed in phase,
もし異なっていないと観察されたならば、
14:00
the theory would have been refuted.
その理論は論破されていたでしょう。
14:02
But now, the fact that it's also a good explanation,
しかし現在、これが容易には変えられない、
14:04
hard to vary, makes the crucial difference.
正当な説明であるという事実によって、重大な差が生じるのです。
14:09
If the ancient Greeks had found out
もし古代ギリシャ人が
14:14
about seasons in Australia,
オーストラリアの季節について知っていたなら、
14:16
they could have easily varied their myth
彼らはそれを予測するために容易に
14:19
to predict that.
神話を作り替えていたかもしれません。
14:21
For instance, when Demeter is upset,
例えば、デメテルが動揺したとき、
14:23
she banishes heat from her vicinity,
彼女は周辺から熱を払いのけ、
14:25
into the other hemisphere, where it makes summer.
反対側へ送り込み、夏を作り出す、というように。
14:28
So, being proved wrong by observation,
観察によって間違っていることが証明されたので、
14:31
and changing their theory accordingly,
それに応じて理論を作り替えたが、
14:34
still wouldn't have got the ancient Greeks
それでもなお、古代ギリシャ人が、
14:36
one jot closer to understanding seasons,
季節を理解するには遠く至らないのです。
14:39
because their explanation was bad: easy to vary.
なぜなら彼らの説明は粗悪だからです。簡単に変えることができます。
14:42
And it's only when an explanation is good
そして検証可能かどうかが重要になってくるのは
14:45
that it even matters whether it's testable.
説明が精巧であるときのみです。
14:48
If the axis-tilt theory had been refuted,
もしこの軸傾き理論が論破されていたなら、
14:50
its defenders would have had nowhere to go.
この理論の擁護者はどうすることもできなかったでしょう。
14:53
No easily implemented change
理論をちょっと変えたくらいでは
14:55
could make that tilt
その傾きが原因となり両半球で
14:58
cause the same seasons in both hemispheres.
季節が同じになると説明することはまず無理です。
15:00
The search for hard-to-vary explanations
変えることの難しい説明を求めることは、
15:05
is the origin of all progress.
全ての進歩においての根源となります。
15:08
It's the basic regulating principle
これは啓蒙思想の
15:11
of the Enlightenment.
基本的な原理規則です。
15:14
So, in science, two false approaches blight progress.
科学において、二つの間違ったアプローチが進歩の妨げとなります。
15:16
One is well known: untestable theories.
一つは、よく知られていますが、検証不可能な理論です。
15:20
But the more important one is explanationless theories.
しかしもっと重要なのは、説明の伴わない論理です。
15:23
Whenever you're told that some existing statistical trend will continue,
何らかの統計的な傾向が続く見込みがあるが、
15:27
but you aren't given a hard-to-vary account
その傾向の原因であるものについて
15:31
of what causes that trend,
変えることの難しい説明が伴わない場合、
15:34
you're being told a wizard did it.
魔法使いの仕業だと言われているのと同じです。
15:37
When you are told that carrots have human rights
ニンジンの遺伝子の半分は私達と同じであるという理由で、
15:39
because they share half our genes --
ニンジンにも人権があると言うが、
15:42
but not how gene percentages confer rights -- wizard.
遺伝子の割合がどれくらいだったら人権を与えるのか説明がない場合 -- 魔法使いの話です。
15:44
When someone announces that the nature-nurture debate
誰かが政治的な意見の何割かが、
15:50
has been settled because there is evidence
遺伝的に受け継がれるという証拠があるので、
15:54
that a given percentage of our
先天性ー後天性論争は、
15:56
political opinions are genetically inherited,
解決したと発表しても、
15:58
but they don't explain how genes cause opinions,
しかし、遺伝子がどのように意見を生み出すのか説明がない場合、
16:02
they've settled nothing. They are saying that our
何も解決していません。つまり、彼らは
16:06
opinions are caused by wizards,
魔法使いから影響を受けていると言っているのです。
16:08
and presumably so are their own.
おそらく彼ら自身の意見もそうなのでしょう。
16:10
That the truth consists of
現実についての
16:13
hard to vary assertions about reality
変えることの難しい説から成り立つ事実は
16:16
is the most important fact
物理的世界において
16:20
about the physical world.
最も重要なものです。
16:23
It's a fact that is, itself, unseen,
これはそれ自体が目に見えない、
16:25
yet impossible to vary. Thank you.
しかも変えることも不可能な事実なのです。ありがとうございました。
16:28
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:32
Translated by Mika Riedel

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

David Deutsch - Quantum physicist
David Deutsch's 1997 book "The Fabric of Reality" laid the groundwork for an all-encompassing Theory of Everything, and galvanized interest in the idea of a quantum computer, which could solve problems of hitherto unimaginable complexity.

Why you should listen

David Deutsch will force you to reconsider your place in the world. This legendary Oxford physicist is the leading proponent of the multiverse (or "many worlds") interpretation of quantum theory -- the idea that our universe is constantly spawning countless numbers of parallel worlds.

In his own words: "Everything in our universe -- including you and me, every atom and every galaxy -- has counterparts in these other universes." If that doesn't alter your consciousness, then the other implications he's derived from his study of subatomic physics -- including the possibility of time travel -- just might.

In The Fabric of Reality, Deutsch tied together quantum mechanics, evolution, a rationalist approach to knowledge, and a theory of computation based on the work of Alan Turing. "Our best theories are not only truer than common sense, they make more sense than common sense,"Deutsch wrote, and he continues to explore the most mind-bending aspects of particle physics.

In 2008, he became a member of the Royal Society of London.
 

More profile about the speaker
David Deutsch | Speaker | TED.com