English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

EG 2007

Brewster Kahle: A free digital library

ブルースター・ケール:無料の電子図書館を作る

Filmed
Views 449,007

ブルースター・ケールは壮大な電子図書館を作っています:発刊された全ての本や上映された全ての映画やインターネットのアーカイブなど。それは全部無料で公開されます・・・他者に先を越されない限り。

- Digital librarian
Brewster Kahle is an inventor, philanthropist and digital librarian. His Internet Archive offers 85 billion pieces of deep Web geology -- a fascinating look at the formation of the Internet over the years, and a challenge to those who would keep knowledge buried. Full bio

We really need to put the best we have to offer within reach of our children.
私たちは最上のものを子供たちの手の届くところに提供しなければなりません
00:15
If we don't do that, we're going to get the generation we deserve.
でないと次の世代につけが来るでしょう
00:19
They're going to learn from whatever it is they have around them.
子供たちはなんであれ 周りにあるものすべてから学ぶでしょう
00:24
And we, as now the elite, parents, librarians, professionals, whatever it is,
私たちは エリートであれ 両親であれ 司書であれ 専門家であれ 誰もが
00:27
a bunch of our activities are, in fact, in trying to get the best we have to offer
できるだけ大きな範囲で 周りの子どもたちに
00:35
within reach of those around us, or as broadly as we can.
知識や能力を伝えることに挑戦しています
00:39
I'm going to start and end this talk with a couple things that are carved in stone.
この話を石に刻まれた言葉で始めて 終わらせようと思います
00:43
One is what's on the Boston Public Library.
一つはボストン市立図書館にあります
00:46
Carved above their door is, "Free to All."
そのドアに刻まれているのは「すべての人に 自由に」
00:50
It's kind of an inspiring statement,
気持ちを鼓舞するような言葉ですね
00:53
and I'll go back at the end of this.
これについては後で話します
00:55
I'm a librarian, and what I'm trying to do is bring all of the works of knowledge
私は司書であり 私がしようとしているのは
00:57
to as many people as want to read it.
できるだけ多くの知識を多くの読みたい人に与えることです
01:02
And the idea of using technology is perfect for us.
最新の技術を使うことは この目的にうってつけです
01:06
I think we have the opportunity to one-up the Greeks.
古代ギリシャ人に先んじるいい機会だと思います
01:08
It's not easy to one-up the Greeks. But with the industriousness of the Egyptians,
ギリシャ人を負かすのは容易ではありません ギリシャ人はエジプト人の勤勉さを利用して
01:12
they were able to build the Library of Alexandria --
アレクサンドリア図書館を建てることができました
01:17
the idea of a copy of every book of all the peoples of the world.
世界中のあらゆる本を集めるという理想のもとに
01:19
The problem was you actually had to go to Alexandria to go to it.
問題は実際にアレクサンドリアまで行かなければならなかったということです
01:23
On the other hand, if you did, then great things happened.
行けば行ったで素晴らしい発見があります
01:26
I think we can one-up the Greeks and achieve something.
私たちはギリシャ人に先んじて 何かやり遂げることができると思うのです
01:29
And I'm going to try to argue only one point today:
今日私が一つ主張したいのは
01:32
that universal access to all knowledge is within our grasp.
全ての知識に誰もがアクセスすることは可能だということ
01:35
So if I'm successful, then you'll actually come away thinking,
もしこのスピーチが成功したら 皆さんは
01:40
yeah, we could actually achieve the great vision of everything ever published,
今までに発刊されたものや 配布されたもの全てに
01:43
everything that was ever meant for distribution,
世界中の誰もがアクセス出来るという
01:50
available to anybody in the world that's ever wanted to have access to it.
素晴らしいビジョンは実際 達成可能だと思うに至るでしょう
01:52
Yes, there's issues about how money should be distributed,
もちろん お金をどう分配すべきかを始め
01:56
and that's still being refigured out.
解決しなければならない問題もあります
02:00
But I'd say there's plenty of money, and there's plenty of demand,
でも私はお金も十分あり 需要も十分にあり
02:02
so we can actually achieve that.
私たちはやり遂げることができると思います
02:04
But I'm going to go over the technological, social
このビジョンを達成するために 技術的 社会的にそして全体的に
02:07
and sort of where are we as a whole, trying to get to that particular vision.
どの段階にいるのかまとめようと思います
02:10
And the way I'm going to try to do this is do it like the Amazon.com website,
それでは アマゾンのウェブサイトにならって
02:14
the books, music, video and just go step -- media type by media type,
本や音楽やビデオのジャンルに分けて
02:19
just go and say, all right, how're we doing on this?
今の現状を述べます
02:24
So if we start with books, you know, sort of where are we?
本から始めましょう 今の状況は?
02:27
Well, first you have to, as an engineer, scope the problem. How big is it?
まず始めに 技術者として 問題を測りましょう どのくらいの大きさか?
02:31
If you wanted to put all of the published works online
もし誰もがアクセス出来るよう 発刊された作品全てを
02:35
so that anybody could have it available, well, how big a problem is it?
インターネットにのせたら どれくらいの大きさなのか?
02:38
Well, we don't really know, but the largest print library in the world
私たちにはわかりませんが 世界で一番大きい図書館は
02:42
is the Library of Congress. It's 26 million volumes, 26 million volumes.
アメリカ議会図書館で 2600万冊もの蔵書があります
02:46
It is, by far and away, the largest print library in the world.
それは世界中の他の図書館よりはるかに大きいです
02:50
And a book, if you had a book, is about a megabyte,
本一冊は約1MB
02:53
so -- you know, if you had it in Microsoft Word.
マイクロソフト ワードの場合では
02:57
So a megabyte, 26 million megabytes is 26 terabytes --
2600万MBは26テラバイト
03:01
it goes mega-, giga-, tera-. 26 terabytes.
メモリーは メガ、ギガ、テラ と大きくなりますから
03:05
26 terabytes fits in a computer system that's about this big,
26テラバイトはこのぐらいのコンピューターに入ります
03:08
on spinning Linux drives, and it costs about 60,000 dollars.
リナクスを使えば 6万ドルくらいです
03:11
So for the cost of a house -- or around here, a garage --
家を買うぐらいの値段です まぁ この辺では ガレージでしょうか
03:16
you can put, you can have spinning all of the words in the Library of Congress.
これで 議会図書館のすべての本を保存することができます
03:20
That's pretty neat.
すごいでしょう
03:25
Then the question is, what do you get?
問題はこれで何が得られるかということです
03:27
You know, is it worth trying to get there?
試す価値があるのか?
03:29
Do you actually want it online?
デジタル化する必要があるのか?
03:31
Some of the first things that people do is they make book readers
実際に始めにしたことの一つは
03:33
that allow you to search inside the books, and that's kind of fun.
読者に本の中身を検索できるようにしたことで それは結構楽しいものです
03:36
And you can download these things, and look around them in new and different ways.
それらをダウンロードすると 本を 新しく違った読み方ができます
03:39
And you can get at them remotely, if you happen to have a laptop.
ノートPCがあれば インターネットから離れている時でも本が読めます
03:42
There's starting to be some of these sort of page turn-y interfaces
まるで本のように
03:48
that look a whole lot like books in certain ways,
ページをめくることのできるインターフェースもでてきて
03:52
and you can search them, make little tabs, and it's kind of cute --
本の中身を検索したり しおりを付けたり
03:55
still very book-like -- on your laptop.
いろんな面白いことができます 本に見えても ノートPC上ですから
03:57
But I don't know, reading things on a laptop --
まぁ ノートPCで作品を読むことはちょっと…
04:00
whenever I pull up my laptop, it always feels like work.
ノートPCを使うのは仕事の気分がするので
04:03
I think that's one of the reasons why the Kindle is so great.
だからキンドル(電子ブックリーダー)はすごいと思います
04:05
I don't have to feel like I'm at work to read a Kindle.
キンドルを読んでも 仕事をしていると感じないですみます
04:08
It's starting to be a little bit more specified.
もっと読むことに限定されていますから
04:11
But I have to say that there's older technologies that I tend to like.
でも 私自身は古いテクノロジーの方が好きなんです
04:14
I like the physical book.
本物の本の方がね
04:21
And I think we can go and use our technology to go and digitize things,
だから私は作品をデジタル化して
04:24
put them on the Net, and then download,
インターネットにのせて それから
04:29
print them and bind them, and end up with books again.
好きな本をダウンロードして 印刷し 製本して また本にするのです
04:31
And we sort of said, well, how hard is this?
それはどのぐらい難しいのでしょうか?
04:33
And it turns out to not be very hard.
結局 そんなに難しくありませんでした
04:35
We actually went off to make a bookmobile.
私たちは移動本屋を作りました
04:37
And a bookmobile -- the size of a van with a satellite dish,
移動本屋はバンの大きさで、衛星受信用アンテナやプリンターや
04:39
a printer, binder and cutter, and kids make their own books.
製本機やカッターが付いていて 子供たちは自分たちの本を作ることができます
04:41
It costs about three dollars to download, print and bind a normal, old book.
3ドルで ダウンロードして プリントして 1冊の普通の本を製本することができます
04:43
And they actually come out kind of nice looking.
実際 かなり見栄えよくできます
04:49
You can actually get really good-looking books
材料費が1ページにつき 1ペニーぐらいで
04:51
for on the order of one penny per page, sort of the parts cost for doing this.
本当に素敵な本を作ることができるのです
04:54
So the idea of -- this technology actually may end up
この技術の発想は実際
04:58
putting books back in people's hands again.
人々の手にもう一度本が戻るということかもしれません
05:01
There are some other bookmobiles running around.
何台かの移動本屋が既に活動しています
05:03
This is Eric Eldred making books at Walden Pond -- Thoreau's works.
彼はエリック エルドレッドで ウォルデン池で ソローの作品を本にしています
05:05
This is just before he got kicked out by the Parks Services,
これは公園の本屋ともめて
05:09
for competing with the bookstore there.
公園の管理人に追い出される前の写真です
05:12
In India, they've got another couple bookmobiles running around.
インドでは いくつかの移動本屋が活動しています
05:15
And this is the opening day at the Library of Alexandria,
これはエジプトの新しいアレキサンドリア図書館での
05:18
the new Library of Alexandria, in Egypt.
オープニングデー
05:21
It was quite popularly attended.
とても人気がありました
05:25
And kids starting to make their own books,
自分たちの本を作っている子供たち
05:27
and a happy kid with the first book that he's ever owned.
生まれて初めて持つ本に喜んでいる子供
05:30
So the idea of being able to use this technology
この技術を使って 手に実際持てる紙の本を作るという
05:33
to end up with paper where I can handle sort of sounds a little retro,
アイディアはすこしレトロに響くかもしれませんが
05:35
but I think it still has its place.
まだ役に立つと思います
05:38
And being from the Silicon Valley, sort of utopian
私たちはいわば世界のユートピアのような
05:41
sort of world,
シリコンバレーの出身ですが
05:45
we thought, if we can make this technology work in rural Uganda,
この技術をウガンダの田舎のようなところで使えれば
05:47
we might have something.
すごいことだと思います
05:50
So we actually got some funding from the World Bank to try it out.
それを試すのに 私たちは世界銀行から資金を得ることができました
05:52
And we found in about 30 days we could go and take a couple folks from Silicon Valley,
そして30日以内にシリコンバレー出身の2人をウガンダに送り
05:56
fly them to Uganda, buy a car, set up the first Internet connection
車を買い ウガンダの国立図書館で初めてインターネットを接続し
06:00
at the National Library of Uganda, figure out what they wanted,
ウガンダ人の欲しい本を探し出し
06:06
and get a program going making books in rural Uganda.
ウガンダの田舎で本を作る計画を実行したのです
06:09
And it actually -- so technologically, it works.
技術的にそれはうまくいきました
06:12
What we found out of this is we didn't have the right books.
これでわかったのは ふさわしい本がまだデジタル化されていないということです
06:15
So the books were in the library. We could get it to people, if they're digitized,
本は図書館にはあります デジタル化されていれば
06:19
but we didn't know how to quite get them digitized.
人々に届けられますが どうやってデジタル化すればいいかわからなかったのです
06:22
Everybody thought the answer is, send things to India and China.
みんなが考えたのは それらをインドや中国に送るということです
06:25
And so we've tried that, and I'll go over that in a moment.
私達はそれを試してみました 後でそれについて述べます
06:30
There are some newer technologies for delivering
本を製本するエキサイティングな新しい技術も
06:32
that have happened that are actually quite exciting as well.
最近でてきました
06:35
One is a print-on-demand machine that looks like a Rube Goldberg machine.
その一つはルーブ ゴールドバーグ マシンに似ているオーダーメイド本を印刷する機械です
06:38
We have one of these things now. It's completely cool.
私たちは一台それを持っています 本当にかっこいいんです
06:41
It's all conveyor belt, and it makes a book.
機械はベルト コンベヤーになっていて 本を作れます
06:43
And it's called the "Espresso Book Machine,"
「エスプレッソ ブック マシン」といって
06:48
and in about 10 minutes, you can press a button and make a book.
ただボタンを押すだけで 10分以内で本ができます
06:50
Something else I'm quite excited about in this particular domain,
欲しいときに本が作れるキオスクは置いておいて
06:54
beyond these sort of kiosk-y things where you can get books on demand,
私がこの分野で他に面白いと思っているのは
07:00
is some of these new little screens that are coming out.
最近出てきた新しい小さいスクリーンです
07:04
And one of my favorites in this is the $100 laptop.
私のお気に入りは 100ドルのノートPCです
07:08
And I don't mean to steal any thunder here,
お株を奪うつもりではないんですが
07:12
but we've gone and used one of these things to be an e-book reader.
私たちはそのうちの一台を電子ブックリーダーに変えたんです
07:18
So here's one of the beta units and you can --
これは試作品なんですが...
07:23
it actually turns out to be a really good-looking e-book reader.
なかなか素敵な電子ブックリーダーになりました
07:29
And we have a quick hack that we did to try to put one of our books on it,
私たちの簡単な方法で本をPCに取り込んでみると
07:37
and it turns out that 200 dots per inch
スクリーンに1インチに200ドットで
07:41
means that you can put scanned books on them that look really good.
200ドットというのは
07:44
At 200 dots per inch, it's kind of the equivalent of a 300 dot print laser printer.
レーザープリンターの300ドットに相当します
07:47
We're in good enough shape.
読むのに十分です
07:51
You actually can go and read scanned books quite easily.
実際デジタル化した本を容易に読むことができます
07:53
So the idea of electronic books is starting to come about.
電子ブックの夢は叶いそうです
07:56
But how do you go about doing all this scanning?
でもどうやって本をデジタル化したらいいでしょう?
08:00
So we thought, okay, well, let's try out this send books to India thing.
そこで私達が考えたのは そうだ インドに本を送ろう ということでした
08:02
And there was a project with, funded by the National Science Foundation --
このプロジェクトはアメリカ国立科学財団から資金を得て
08:05
sent a bunch of scanners, and the American libraries were supposed to send books.
沢山のスキャナーをインドに送り アメリカの図書館は本を送るはずでしたが
08:10
Well, they didn't. They didn't want to send their books.
送ってもらえませんでした 彼らは本を送りたくなかったんです
08:14
So we bought 100,000 books and sent them to India.
だから 私たちは本を10万冊買ってインドに送りました
08:17
And then we learned why you don't want to send books to India.
そして インドに本を送りたがらなかった訳がわかりました
08:19
The lesson we learned out of this is, scan your own books.
この経験から分かったことは 自分たちで本をデジタル化すべきだということです
08:22
If you really care about books, you're going to scan them better,
本が大好きな人はきれいにスキャンします
08:26
especially if they're valuable books.
特に貴重な本は
08:30
If they're new books and you can just, you know, butcher them,
新しい本なら 上質なスキャンを容易にするために 本をばらしてしまっても
08:32
because you could just buy another one,
また買い直せますので
08:34
that's not such a big deal in terms of doing high-quality scanning.
問題ありません
08:36
But do things that you love.
自分が好きな本をスキャンすればいいんです
08:40
But the Indians have been scanning a lot of their own books --
インド人は自分たちの本をたくさんスキャンしています
08:43
about 300,000 now -- doing very well.
今は約30万冊ぐらいです うまくいっています
08:46
The Chinese did over a million, and the Egyptians are about 30,000.
中国人は百万冊以上 エジプト人は約3万冊ぐらいです
08:48
But we sent -- thought, OK, if we're going to need to do this, let's do it in-library.
じゃ どうせやるなら 図書館の中でやろうと考えました
08:53
How do we go and do this, and how do we get it down
何をどうすべきか?
08:59
so that it's a cost point that we could afford?
どうやって手頃な値段に費用を下げたらいいのか?
09:01
And we sort of picked the price point of 10 cents a page.
そして 1ページ10セントの値段を設定しました
09:03
If it's basically the cost of xeroxing to basically digitize, OCR, package it up,
本をデジタル化し 光学式文字読み取りをして 組み合わせて
09:06
make it so that you could download, print and bind it -- the whole shebang --
お客さんがダウンロードやプリントや製本することができるようにして
09:12
we would have achieved something.
全部がコンビニのコピー機と同じ値段でできれば それは大したことだと思いました
09:15
So we started out trying to figure out. How do we get to 10 cents?
それで どうやって10セントにするかを考え始めたんです
09:17
And we tried these robot things, and they worked pretty well --
そこでロボットを試してみました 自動的にページをめくるロボットは
09:19
sort of these auto-page-turning things.
まぁまぁの出来でした
09:22
If we can have Mars Rovers, you'd think you could turn pages.
マーズローバーが火星で活動するぐらいだから ページをめくるのも簡単だと思ったんですが
09:24
But it actually turns out to be pretty hard to turn pages, and the volume isn't there.
ページをめくることは意外に難しいんです ロボットも足りません
09:28
So anyway -- so we ended up making our own book scanner,
とにかく 自分たちのブックスキャナーを作ることになりました
09:32
and with two digital, high-grade, professional digital cameras,
二つの高級なプロ デジカメと
09:38
controlled museum lighting, so even if it's a black and white book,
博物館の照明を使って
09:42
you can go and get the proper intonation.
白黒の本さえもきれいに撮れるような
09:45
So you basically do a beautiful, respectful job.
とにかく きれいで丁寧な仕事をしました
09:49
This is not a fax, this is -- the idea is to do a beautiful job
これはファックスじゃないんです つまり これらの蔵書を
09:52
as you're going through these libraries.
きれいに撮ることが大事なんです
09:56
And we've been able to achieve 10 cents a page if we run things in volume.
大量にすれば 1ページ10セントで実際にできました
09:59
This is what it looks like at the University of Toronto.
これはトロント大学での様子です
10:03
And actually, it turns out to, you know, pay a living wage.
実際にこれで 生計が立てられます
10:06
People seem to love it.
この仕事が大好きな人もいます
10:09
Yes, it's a little boring, but some people kind of get into the Zen of it.
そう ちょっと退屈ですが 禅モードに入る人もいます
10:11
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:15
And especially if it's kind of interesting books that you care about,
特に自分の言語で書かれた 自分の好きな面白い本だと
10:18
in languages that you can read.
楽しいですよね
10:20
We actually have been able to do a pretty good job of this, at getting 10 cents a page.
私たちは実際に1ページ10セントで素晴らしい本を作ることができました
10:22
So 10 cents a page, 300 pages in your average book, 30 dollars a book.
1ページ10セントで 平均の本は約300ページで 本1冊は30ドル
10:28
The Library of Congress, if you did the whole darn thing --
アメリカ議会の図書館は全体で2,600万冊だから
10:32
26 million books -- is about 750 million dollars, right?
7億5,000万ドルがかかりますね?
10:36
But a million books, I think, actually would be a pretty good start,
でも100万冊を目標とすると。。。それぐらいがちょうどいいスタートだと思うんですが
10:40
and that would cost 30 million dollars. That's not that big a bill.
それは3,000万ドルかかります それはそんなに高くはありません
10:44
And what we've been able to do is get into libraries.
そして私達は図書館の許可を得ることができました
10:47
We've now got eight of these scanning centers in three countries,
3カ国8カ所にスキャン センターがあり
10:50
and libraries are up for having their books scanned.
図書館は本をスキャンさせてくれます
10:54
The Getty here is moving their books to the UCLA,
このゲッティ図書館は本をUCLAに移動しています
10:57
which is where we have one these scanning centers,
そこには私たちのスキャン センターの一つがあり
11:00
and scanning their out-of-copyright books, which is fabulous.
版権期限が過ぎた本をスキャンさせてくれます 素晴らしいことです
11:03
So we're starting to get the institutional responsibility.
公共施設の恩恵にも預かれるようになってきました
11:07
The thing we're missing is the 10 cents.
あと 足りないのは10セントです
11:10
If we can get the 10 cents, all the rest of it flows.
その10セントがあれば ほかはうまく行きます
11:13
We've scanned about 200,000 books.
私たちは今まで約20万冊をスキャンしました
11:16
Now we're scanning about 15,000 books a month,
現在は1ヶ月間1万5千冊ぐらいをスキャンしていて
11:19
and it's starting to gear up another factor of two from there.
これからは その2倍の量がスキャンできるようになります
11:22
So all in all, that's going very well.
それは 全体的にうまくいっています
11:26
And we're starting to move out of the just out-of-copyright
そして私たちの焦点は版権期限が過ぎただけの本から
11:29
into the out-of-print world.
絶版の本へと移っています
11:32
So I think of -- we're kind of going from the out-of-copyright, library stuff,
私たちは版権期限が過ぎた本の世界から
11:34
and Amazon.com is coming from the in-print world.
アマゾンは出版中の本の世界から
11:38
And I think we'll meet in the middle some place,
お互いに近づき 真ん中のどこかで出会い
11:43
and have the classic thing that you have,
今ある伝統的な出版システムと図書館のシステムが
11:45
which is a publishing system and a library system working in parallel.
同時に機能する形ができると思います
11:47
And so we're starting up a program to do out-of-print works, but loaning them.
私たちは絶版の作品を手掛けることにしたのですが それを貸すことにしました
11:51
Exactly what loaning means, I'm not quite sure.
デジタル化された本を貸すというのは 正確には私もわかりません
11:57
But anyway, loaning out-of-print works from the Boston Public Library,
でもとにかく このプログラムに参加しているボストン公立図書館や
11:59
the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute and a few other libraries
ウッズホール海洋学機構やほかのいくつかの図書館の
12:04
that are starting to participate in this program,
絶版された作品を貸して
12:08
to try out this model of where does a library stop
どこまでが図書館で
12:10
and where does the bookstore take over.
どこからが本屋の領域かを見つけるためのモデルにしています
12:13
So all in all, it's possible to do this in large scale.
概して 大規模にすることは可能です
12:16
We're also going back over microfilm and getting that online.
私たちはまたマイクロフィルムも探しだしてオンラインに載せています
12:20
So, we can do 10 cents a page, we're going 15,000 books a month
それで 私たちは1ページ10セントで 月に1万5千冊の本をスキャンし
12:25
and we've got about 250,000 books online,
現在新しく加わったプロジェクトを入れて
12:28
counting all the other projects that are starting to add in.
25万冊の本をオンラインに載せています
12:31
So what I wanted to argue is, books are within our grasp.
私が主張したいのは すべての本は私たちの手に届くということです
12:33
The idea of taking on the whole ball of wax is not that big a deal.
すべての本にアクセスすることに挑戦するのは そんなに大変なことではありません
12:37
Yes, it costs tens of millions, low hundreds of millions,
ええ 何千万ドル もしかしたら数億ドルかかるかもしれません
12:43
but one time shot and we've got basically the history of printed literature online.
でも一度スキャンすれば 要するに 私たちはオンライン上で文献の歴史のすべてを得ることができるのです
12:47
And then, there's business model issues
そこで どのように効果的に
12:54
about how to try to effectively market it and get it to people.
人々に届けるかというビジネスモデルの問題があります
12:56
But it is within our grasp, technologically and law-wise,
でも 少なくとも 絶版と版権期限が過ぎた本については
13:00
at least for the out of print and out of copyright,
技術的に 法律的に すべての文献をオンライン上に載せることは
13:04
we suggest, to be able to get the whole darn thing online.
私たちの手中にあると私たちは確信しています
13:07
Now let's go for audio, and I'm going to go through these.
次は オーディオについて話そうと思います
13:12
So how much is there?
オーディオはどのぐらいあるでしょう?
13:15
Well, as best we can tell, there are about two to three million disks
私たちが知っている限り 2~3百万ディスクが出版されています
13:17
having been published -- so 78s, long-playing records and CDs --
78回転のディスクやレコードやCDを含めて
13:20
or at least that's the largest archives of published materials
少なくとも私たちが見つけた 出版されている一番大きなアーカイブは
13:25
we've been able to sort of point at.
そのぐらいの大きさです
13:28
It costs about 10 dollars a piece to go and take a disk
大量にすれば ディスク1枚をインターネットに載せるのは
13:30
and put it online, if you're doing things in volume.
約10ドルかかります
13:34
But we've found that the rights issues are really quite thorny.
でも版権の問題はとても困難だとわかりました
13:38
This is a fairly heavily litigated area,
これは法廷で激しく争われている分野ですが
13:41
so we've found that there are niches in the music world
音楽界では 伝統的な商業向けの出版制度に満足していない
13:43
that aren't served terribly well by the classic commercial publishing system.
サブカルチャーもある ということがわかりました
13:46
And we've been starting to make these available by going
インターネットで居場所を提供することにより
13:49
and offering shelf space on the Net.
私たちはそれぞれのサブカルチャーを公開しています
13:53
In the United States, it doesn't cost you to give something away. Right?
アメリカでは 寄付することは費用がかからないですよね?
13:55
If you give something to a charity or to the public,
チャリティや 地域に寄付する場合は
13:59
you get a pat on the back and a tax donation --
みんなに褒められて 税控除を受けられます
14:06
except on the Net, where you can go broke.
でもインターネット世界では破産しかねません
14:08
If you put up a video of your garage band, and it starts getting heavily accessed,
自分のバンドのビデオをインターネットに載せて そして視聴者がたくさんアクセスして
14:10
you can lose your guitars or your house.
サイトの維持に大変お金がかかり ギターも家も失う怖れがあるんです
14:15
This doesn't make any sense.
道理にかないませんね
14:17
So we've offered unlimited storage, unlimited bandwidth, forever, for free,
だから私たちは図書館に入る価値のある全ての音楽に
14:19
to anybody that has something to share that belongs in a library.
無限の保存 無限の容量を いつまでも誰にでも無料で提供しています
14:24
And we've been getting a lot of takers. One is the rock 'n' rollers.
使用者がたくさんいます 特にロックンロールの音楽家
14:27
The rock 'n' rollers had a tradition of sharing,
ロックンロール界では お金を儲ける目的でなければ
14:31
as long as nobody made any money. You could --
音楽を無料で配布する伝統があります
14:33
concert recordings, it's not the commercial recordings,
それはコンサートの録音で 販売用の録音ではありません
14:35
but concert recordings, started by the Grateful Dead.
グレートフール デッドというバンドが始めた習慣です
14:37
And we get about two or three bands a day signing up.
一日に 2 - 3のバンドの登録があります
14:40
They give permission, and we get about 40 or 50 concerts a day.
バンドが許可を与え 一日40 - 50くらいのコンサートの録音が集まります
14:43
We have about 40,000 concerts, everything the Grateful Dead ever did,
グレートフール デッドの全ての作品を始め 約4万のコンサートが
14:48
up on the Net, so that people can see it and listen to this material.
私たちのサイトに載っていて だれでも視聴できます
14:51
So audio is possible to put up, but the rights issues are really pretty thorny.
オーディオはインターネットに載せられますが 版権の問題は困難です
14:57
We've got a lot of collections now --
たくさんの作品を集めました
15:01
a couple hundred thousand items -- and it's growing over time.
数十万件 もっと増える予定です
15:03
Moving images: if you think of theatrical releases,
では ビデオは?映画館で上映された映画といえば
15:07
there are not that many of them.
そんなに多くはありません
15:09
As best we can tell, there are about 150,000 to 200,000 movies ever
知っている限り 大規模映画館配給のために作られた映画は
15:11
that are really meant for a large-scale theatrical distribution. It's just not that many.
わずか15-20万です そんなに多くありません
15:15
But half of those were Indian.
そしてその半分はインド映画です
15:20
But anyway, it's doable,
とにかく ビデオはできそうです
15:22
but we've only found about a thousand of these things that --
でも版権期限が過ぎたのはわずか
15:24
to be out of copyright.
1,000しかありません
15:27
So we've digitized those and made those available.
その1,000をデジタル化して 公開しました
15:29
But we've found that there's lots of other types of movies
でも日の目を見ないたくさんのビデオのジャンルが
15:31
that haven't really seen the light of day -- archival films.
あることを私たちは発見しました
15:33
We've found, also, a lot of political films, a lot of amateur films,
記録用フィルム また政治の記録 アマチュア フィルムなどで
15:36
all sorts of things that are basically needing a home, a permanent home.
これらは永久に保存される場所が必要なんです
15:41
So we've been starting to make these available and it's grown to be very popular.
そういうフィルムを公開し始め 大人気になりました
15:46
We're not quite a YouTube.
ユーチューブみたいでなく
15:50
We tended towards longer-term things
私達は 長期保存フィルムや
15:52
and also things that people can reuse and make into new movies,
人々がそれらを再使用して新しい映画を作ることのできるフィルムに集中していて
15:54
which has just been great fun.
それはすごく楽しいことです
15:58
Television comes quite a bit larger.
一方 テレビ番組の量は大変大きいです
16:01
We started recording 20 channels of television 24 hours a day.
私たちは24時間 20チャンネルを録音し始めました
16:03
It's sort of the biggest TiVo box you've ever seen.
まるで世界一大きなレコーダーみたいです
16:06
It's about a petabyte, so far, of worldwide television --
1ぺドバイトぐらいの大容量の世界中のテレビニュース
16:10
Russian, Chinese, Japanese, Iraqi, Al Jazeera, BBC, CNN, ABC, CBS, NBC --
ロシア 中国 日本 イラク アルジャジーラ BBC CNN ABC CBS NBC
16:13
24 hours a day.
一日24時間
16:18
We only put one week up,
費用の理由で 一週間のビデオのみが公開されています
16:20
which is mostly for cost reasons, which is the 9/11,
それは2001年9月11日からの一週間です
16:22
sort of from 9/11/2001. For one week, what did the world see?
この一週間で 世界は何を見たんでしょう?
16:27
CNN was saying that Palestinians were dancing in the streets.
CNNはパレスチナ人は道路で踊っていると報道しました
16:31
Were they? Let's look at the Palestinian television and find out.
本当でしょうか?パレスチナのテレビを見てみましょう
16:35
How can we have critical thinking without being able to quote
過去の出来事を引用して 比べることなしに
16:38
and being able to compare what happened in the past?
批評的な考え方がどうやってできるでしょう?
16:42
And television is dreadfully unrecorded and unquotable,
テレビは全くといっていいほど録音されておらず 引用できません
16:45
except by Jon Stewart, who does a fabulous job.
素晴らしい仕事をするジョン スチュワート(トーク番組の司会者)を除いてですが
16:49
So anyway, television is, I would suggest, within our grasp.
とにかくテレビのオンライン保存も可能です
16:53
So 15 dollars per video hour, and also about 100 dollars to 150 dollars per celluloid hour,
ビデオは1時間15ドルぐらい セルロイド フィルムは1時間100 - 150ドルぐらいかかります
16:57
we're able to go and get materials online very inexpensively
私達はこういう素材をとても安く
17:02
and have them up on the Net.
インターネット上に載せられます
17:06
And we've got, now, a lot of these materials.
そして今 こういう素材をずいぶん手に入れました
17:08
So we've got about 100,000 pieces up there.
そして約10万の作品を載せることができました
17:10
So books, music, video, software. There's only 50,000 titles of it.
つまり 本 音楽 ビデオ 5万しかないソフトはできそうです
17:13
Mostly the issues there are legal issues and breaking copy protections.
大きな問題は版権問題とコピープロテクトを外すことです
17:18
But we've worked through some of those,
そういう問題をたくさん乗り越えましたが
17:24
but we've still got real problems in Washington.
ワシントンではまだ大きな問題があります
17:26
Well, we're best known as the World Wide Web.
私たちはワールド ワイド ウェブでもっとも知られています
17:28
We've been archiving the World Wide Web since 1996.
1996年からワールド ワイド ウェブを記録しています
17:31
We take a snapshot of every website and all of the pages on it, every two months.
私たちは2ヵ月ごとに 全てのウェブサイトのコピーをとります
17:33
And actually, it's really been pioneered by Alexa Internet,
実際は そのコピーをインターネット アーカイブに寄付してくれる
17:39
which donates this collection to the Internet Archive.
アレクサ インターネットが先駆者です
17:43
And it's been growing along for the last 11 years, and it's a fantastic resource.
この11年で大きくなってきて 素晴らしい資料となっています
17:47
And we've made a Wayback Machine
私たちはまた「ウェイ バック マシン」を作りました
17:53
that you can then go and see old websites kind of the way they were.
それを使うと当時のままの古いウェブサイトを見ることができます
17:55
If you go and search on something -- this is Google.com,
検索してみましょう
17:59
the different versions of it that we have,
こちらはグーグルのいくつかのバージョンです
18:03
this is what it looks like when it was an alpha release,
これはアルファ版(試作品)で
18:05
and this is what it looked like at Stanford.
スタンフォードではこう見えました
18:07
So anyway, you've got basically an idea of where things came from.
とにかく ウェブサイトの経歴が分かります
18:09
Mostly, people want to see their old stuff out of this.
ほとんどの人は自分の古いウェブサイトを見たがっています
18:13
If there's one thing that we want to learn from the Library of Alexandria version one,
全焼してしまったことでよく知られる
18:16
which is probably best known for burning,
アレクサンドリア図書館から学んだ教訓は
18:20
is, don't just have one copy.
一つのコピーだけでは足りないということです
18:24
So we've started to -- we've made another copy of all of this
私たちは二つ目のコピーを作って
18:26
and we actually put it back in the Library of Alexandria.
アレクサンドリア図書館に保管しています
18:32
So this is a picture of the Internet Archive at the Library of Alexandria.
こちらはアレクサンドリア図書館のインターネット アーカイブの写真です
18:35
And we now have also another copy building up in Amsterdam.
アムステルダムにももう一つのコピーを製作中です
18:38
So, we should put it in the San Andreas Fault Line in San Francisco,
それと 三つのコピーはサンフランシスコのサンアンドレアス断層と
18:42
flood zone in Amsterdam and in the Middle East. Right, so anyway ...
アムステルダムの洪水ゾーンと中東にでも置きましょうか
18:46
so we're hedging our bets here.
まぁ とにかく 危険回避をしています
18:51
If we go and put it in a couple more places, I think we'll be in good shape.
あと数カ所にコピーを置いたら それで十分でしょう
18:54
There's a political and social question out of this.
このプログラムには政治的 社会的な問題があります
18:59
Is all of this, as we go digital, is it going to be public or private?
デジタル化が進むにつれて それらは公的 それとも私的なものになるのか?
19:01
There's some large companies that have seen this vision,
このビジョンを見た大手会社も
19:05
that are doing large-scale digitization,
大規模なデジタル化をしていますが
19:07
but they're locking up the public domain.
彼らは公共財産を独占しています
19:09
The question is, is that the world that we really want to live in?
問題は これが私たちの本当に望む世界なのかということです
19:11
What's the role of the public versus the private as things go forward?
公共施設や私的施設の役割はどうなるのか?
19:14
How do we go and have a world where we both have libraries
私たちが恩恵を受けてきた時のように
19:18
and publishing in the future, just as we basically benefited as we were growing up?
図書館と出版社の両方が共存する世界をどうやって作ればいいのか?
19:22
So universal access to all knowledge --
全ての知識にだれでもがアクセスできることは
19:27
I think it can be one of the greatest achievements of humankind,
人類の偉業の一つになるかもしれません
19:30
like the man on the moon, or the Gutenberg Bible, or the Library of Alexandria.
月に行くことやグテンバーグのバイブルやアレクサンドリア図書館のように
19:33
It could be something that we're remembered for,
何千年もの間人々が
19:37
for millennia, for having achieved.
覚えている業績になるかもしれません
19:39
And as I said before, I'll end with something
先ほど言ったように この話を
19:42
that's carved above the door of the Carnegie Library.
カーネギー図書館の扉に刻まれた言葉で締めくくります
19:44
Carnegie -- one of the great capitalists of this country --
カーネギーはアメリカの偉大な資本主義者の一人で
19:47
carved above his legacy, "Free to the People."
自分の遺産の上にこれを刻みました 「全ての人に自由に」
19:49
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
19:53

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Brewster Kahle - Digital librarian
Brewster Kahle is an inventor, philanthropist and digital librarian. His Internet Archive offers 85 billion pieces of deep Web geology -- a fascinating look at the formation of the Internet over the years, and a challenge to those who would keep knowledge buried.

Why you should listen

Brewster Kahle's stated goal is "Universal access to all knowledge," and his catalog of inventions and institutions created for this purpose read like a Web's Greatest Hits list. In 1982 he helped start Thinking Machines, a supercomputer company specializing in text searching, and would go on to invent the Internet's first publishing and distributed search system, WAIS, whose customers included the New York Times and the United States Senate.

But most notably, perhaps, Kahle is founder and director of the Internet Archive, a free service which steadfastly archives World Wide Web documents, even as they are plowed over by breakneck trends in commerce, culture and politics. (On his Wayback Machine, you can view pages as they appeared in web antiquity -- say, Yahoo! in 1996.) As a member of the Board of Directors of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, he works to keep such information free and reachable.

Kahle is a key supporter of the Open Content Alliance and has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife operate a nonprofit organization, the Kahle/Austin Foundation, which funds the Internet Archive.

More profile about the speaker
Brewster Kahle | Speaker | TED.com