18:04
TEDxToronto 2010

Neil Pasricha: The 3 A's of awesome

ニール・パスリチャ:「Awsome(最高)」の3つの要素

Filmed:

無料のおかわりから清潔なシーツまで、人生のささやかな喜びをかみ締めるニール・パスリチャのブログ「1000 Awsome Things(1000の最高なこと)」。TEDxTrontoにおける誠実な講演で、パスリチャは本当に最高な人生を送るための3つの秘訣を紹介する。

- Director, The Institute for Global Happiness
Neil Pasricha is the New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and serves as the Director of the Institute for Global Happiness after a decade running leadership development inside Walmart. He is one the world's leading authorities on happiness and positivity. Full bio

So the Awesome story:
では「Awesome (最高)」な物語を
00:15
It begins about 40 years ago,
この話は約40年前
00:17
when my mom and my dad came to Canada.
僕の父と母がカナダに来た時に始まります
00:19
My mom left Nairobi, Kenya.
母はケニアのナイロビを去り
00:22
My dad left a small village outside of Amritsar, India.
父はインドのアムリトサル郊外の小さな村を去り
00:24
And they got here in the late 1960s.
60年代後半にカナダにやって来ました そして
00:27
They settled in a shady suburb about an hour east of Toronto,
トロントから東に約1時間の貧相な郊外住宅地に腰をすえ
00:30
and they settled into a new life.
新たな人生を始めました
00:33
They saw their first dentist,
生まれて初めて歯医者に行き
00:35
they ate their first hamburger,
初めてハンバーガーを食べ
00:37
and they had their first kids.
初めて子供をもうけました
00:39
My sister and I
姉と僕は
00:41
grew up here,
ここで育ち
00:43
and we had quiet, happy childhoods.
平穏で幸せな子供時代を送りました
00:45
We had close family,
仲のいい家族
00:48
good friends, a quiet street.
良い友達 静かな近所に恵まれ
00:50
We grew up taking for granted
両親が子供の頃には
00:52
a lot of the things that my parents couldn't take for granted
当たり前でなかった多くのことを
00:54
when they grew up --
当たり前と思って育ってきました
00:56
things like power always on
家の中では
00:58
in our houses,
電気がいつも使えるとか
01:00
things like schools across the street
通りの向かいに学校があるとか
01:02
and hospitals down the road
道の先に病院があって 裏庭では
01:04
and popsicles in the backyard.
アイスキャンディーが食べられることです
01:06
We grew up, and we grew older.
僕らは成長し大人になりました
01:08
I went to high school.
高校に行って
01:10
I graduated.
卒業し
01:12
I moved out of the house, I got a job,
一人暮らしを始め 就職し
01:14
I found a girl, I settled down --
彼女を見つけて落ち着きました
01:16
and I realize it sounds like a bad sitcom or a Cat Stevens' song --
下手なシットコムかキャット・スティーヴンスの歌のようだとは分かってます
01:19
(Laughter)
(笑い)
01:22
but life was pretty good.
でも順風満帆の人生でした
01:24
Life was pretty good.
人生バラ色だったのです
01:26
2006 was a great year.
2006年は素晴らしい年でした
01:28
Under clear blue skies in July in the wine region of Ontario,
オンタリオのワイン生産地域で
01:31
I got married,
7月の真っ青な空の下
01:34
surrounded by 150 family and friends.
150人の家族と友達に囲まれて結婚式を挙げました
01:36
2007 was a great year.
2007年も素晴らしい年でした
01:40
I graduated from school,
学校を卒業し
01:43
and I went on a road trip with two of my closest friends.
2人の親友と車で旅行しました
01:45
Here's a picture of me and my friend, Chris,
これは僕と僕の友達のクリスの写真です
01:48
on the coast of the Pacific Ocean.
太平洋海岸で撮りました
01:51
We actually saw seals out of our car window,
車の窓からアザラシが見えたので
01:53
and we pulled over to take a quick picture of them
車を停めて素早く写真を撮ったのですが
01:55
and then blocked them with our giant heads.
僕らの頭がデカ過ぎました
01:57
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:00
So you can't actually see them,
そういうわけで実際に写ってないですが
02:02
but it was breathtaking,
アザラシはすごかったです
02:04
believe me.
本当です
02:06
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:08
2008 and 2009 were a little tougher.
2008年と2009年は少し厳しい年でした
02:10
I know that they were tougher for a lot of people,
僕だけでなく沢山の人達にとっても
02:13
not just me.
大変な年だったと思います
02:15
First of all, the news was so heavy.
まずニュースで気が滅入りました
02:17
It's still heavy now, and it was heavy before that,
今でも暗いニュースがあり 以前もそうでしたが
02:19
but when you flipped open a newspaper, when you turned on the TV,
新聞を広げたりテレビをつけると
02:22
it was about ice caps melting,
氷帽が溶けていることや
02:25
wars going on around the world,
世界あちこちで戦争していることや
02:27
earthquakes, hurricanes
地震やハリケーン
02:29
and an economy that was wobbling on the brink of collapse,
そして経済が傾いて破壊寸前なニュースで
02:32
and then eventually did collapse,
実際に経済は結局破壊し
02:35
and so many of us losing our homes,
多くの人が家を失ったり
02:38
or our jobs,
職を失ったり
02:40
or our retirements,
老後の貯蓄や
02:42
or our livelihoods.
生活の糧を失いました
02:44
2008, 2009 were heavy years for me for another reason, too.
2008年と2009年は僕にとって別の理由でも辛い年でした
02:46
I was going through a lot of personal problems at the time.
当時プライベートな問題を多く抱えていました
02:49
My marriage wasn't going well,
夫婦の仲がうまくいっておらず
02:53
and we just were growing further and further apart.
どんどん関係が冷めてきていました
02:56
One day my wife came home from work
ある日妻が仕事から帰ってきて
03:00
and summoned the courage, through a lot of tears,
涙を流しながら思い切って
03:02
to have a very honest conversation.
正直な気持ちを打ち明けてくれました
03:05
And she said, "I don't love you anymore,"
「貴方のことをもう愛してないの」と
03:08
and it was one of the most painful things I'd ever heard
人生でこんな悲しいことを聞くのはほとんどなく
03:11
and certainly the most heartbreaking thing I'd ever heard,
実際それまでの人生で一番心に刺さる言葉でした
03:15
until only a month later,
でも1ヶ月もしないうちに
03:18
when I heard something even more heartbreaking.
もっと悲痛なことを知らされました
03:20
My friend Chris, who I just showed you a picture of,
さっき写真で見せた僕の友達のクリスは
03:23
had been battling mental illness for some time.
精神的な病気にかなりの間苦しんでいました
03:25
And for those of you
皆さんの中でも
03:27
whose lives have been touched by mental illness,
身近に精神病の人がいた人は
03:29
you know how challenging it can be.
どれほど大変か分かると思います
03:31
I spoke to him on the phone at 10:30 p.m.
僕は日曜日の夜10時半に
03:34
on a Sunday night.
クリスと電話で話しました
03:36
We talked about the TV show we watched that evening.
その晩に観たテレビ番組の話でした
03:38
And Monday morning, I found out that he disappeared.
そして月曜日の朝 クリスがいなくなったと知りました
03:41
Very sadly, he took his own life.
やり切れないことに クリスは自殺したのです
03:44
And it was a really heavy time.
このように本当に辛い時期でした
03:48
And as these dark clouds were circling me,
そして僕の周りに暗雲が垂れ込む中
03:51
and I was finding it really, really difficult
明るいことを考えるのが
03:53
to think of anything good,
この上なくとても難しく思えました
03:56
I said to myself that I really needed a way
どうにかして前向きに物事を考える方法を
03:58
to focus on the positive somehow.
見つけなくては駄目だと自分に言い聞かせました
04:01
So I came home from work one night,
そこである晩仕事から帰ってきて
04:04
and I logged onto the computer,
コンピューターを立ち上げて
04:06
and I started up a tiny website
小さなウェブサイトを作りました
04:08
called 1000awesomethings.com.
1000awesomethings.comというサイトです
04:10
I was trying to remind myself
普段話したりはしないけれど
04:14
of the simple, universal, little pleasures that we all love,
誰もがうれしく思う シンプルで普遍的な
04:16
but we just don't talk about enough --
小さなことに目を向けようとしたのです
04:18
things like waiters and waitresses
頼まなくても無料でおかわりを出してくれる
04:20
who bring you free refills without asking,
ウエイターやウエイトレスとか
04:22
being the first table to get called up
結婚式のビュッフェ式ディナーで
04:24
to the dinner buffet at a wedding,
一番に呼ばれるテーブルだったとか
04:26
wearing warm underwear from just out of the dryer,
乾燥機から暖かい下着を出して着けるとか
04:28
or when cashiers open up a new check-out lane at the grocery store
スーパーで新しいレジが開いて
04:30
and you get to be first in line --
もともと列の最後尾にいたのに
04:32
even if you were last at the other line, swoop right in there.
さっと入って一番乗りになれたとか
04:34
(Laughter)
(笑い)
04:37
And slowly over time,
そしてだんだん時と共に
04:40
I started putting myself in a better mood.
気持ちが晴れていきました
04:42
I mean, 50,000 blogs
毎日5万のブログが
04:45
are started a day,
立ち上げられています
04:48
and so my blog was just one of those 50,000.
つまり僕のブログは5万の中の1つでしかなかったのです
04:51
And nobody read it except for my mom.
読んでくれているのは僕の母だけでした
04:54
Although I should say that my traffic did skyrocket
と言ってもアクセス量は
04:57
and go up by 100 percent
母が父に転送した時点で
04:59
when she forwarded it to my dad.
ぐんと上がって倍になったのですが
05:01
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:03
And then I got excited
それから10あまりのヒットがあり
05:05
when it started getting tens of hits,
僕は大喜びでした
05:07
and then I started getting excited when it started getting dozens
そしてそれが何十になり
05:09
and then hundreds and then thousands
何百になり 何千になり
05:12
and then millions.
何百万になり有頂天になりました
05:15
It started getting bigger and bigger and bigger.
どんどん大きくなっていったのです
05:17
And then I got a phone call,
そしてある日電話があり
05:19
and the voice at the other end of the line said,
電話の向こうの人が
05:21
"You've just won the Best Blog In the World award."
「世界最優秀ブログ賞に選ばれました」と言ったのです
05:23
I was like, that sounds totally fake.
これは何かの詐欺だと思いました
05:27
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:32
Which African country do you want me to wire all my money to?
アフリカのどの国に送金しろって?
05:37
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:40
But it turns out, I jumped on a plane,
でも結果的には 飛行機に乗って
05:43
and I ended up walking a red carpet
サラ・シルバーマンやジミー・ファロン
05:45
between Sarah Silverman and Jimmy Fallon and Martha Stewart.
マーサ・スチュワートとレッドカーペットを歩くことになりました
05:47
And I went onstage to accept a Webby award for Best Blog.
そしてステージでべストブログ部門でウェビー賞を受け取りました
05:50
And the surprise
その驚きと感動が
05:53
and just the amazement of that
薄れたのは
05:55
was only overshadowed by my return to Toronto,
トロントに戻って
05:57
when, in my inbox,
メールを見た時でした
06:00
10 literary agents were waiting for me
ブログを本にしたいと言う申し出が
06:02
to talk about putting this into a book.
10人の出著作権エージェントからあったのです
06:04
Flash-forward to the next year
そして翌年になり
06:07
and "The Book of Awesome" has now been
「The Book of Awesome」はこれで連続20週間
06:09
number one on the bestseller list for 20 straight weeks.
No.1ベストセラーとなっています
06:11
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:13
But look, I said I wanted to do three things with you today.
でも今日は3つのことをしたいと思って来ました
06:21
I said I wanted to tell you the Awesome story,
「Awsome」な話をして
06:23
I wanted to share with you the three As of Awesome,
「Awsome」の3つの要素を共有して
06:25
and I wanted to leave you with a closing thought.
最後に思考の糧を提示したいと思います
06:27
So let's talk about those three As.
では3つの要素について話しましょう
06:29
Over the last few years,
ここ数年の間 僕にはゆっくり
06:31
I haven't had that much time to really think.
物事を考える時間がありませんでした
06:33
But lately I have had the opportunity to take a step back
でも最近落ち着いて
06:35
and ask myself: "What is it over the last few years
「ここ数年の間で ウェブサイトや僕自身を
06:38
that helped me grow my website,
成長させてくれたものはなんだろう?」
06:41
but also grow myself?"
と考える機会がありました
06:43
And I've summarized those things, for me personally,
そして個人的にこれを
06:45
as three As.
3つの要素としてまとめました
06:47
They are Attitude, Awareness
「物事に対する姿勢 」「気付く心」
06:49
and Authenticity.
そして「自分に忠実であること」です
06:52
I'd love to just talk about each one briefly.
1つずつ簡単に話したいと思います
06:54
So Attitude:
まず「物事に対する姿勢」
06:58
Look, we're all going to get lumps,
人は誰も困難の壁に直面したり
07:00
and we're all going to get bumps.
逆境に遭遇したりするものです
07:02
None of us can predict the future, but we do know one thing about it
誰も未来を予測できませんが 1つ分かっているのは
07:04
and that's that it ain't gonna go according to plan.
計画通りに物事は進まないことです
07:07
We will all have high highs
絶好調の時もあれば
07:10
and big days and proud moments
卒業証書を受け取る笑顔や
07:12
of smiles on graduation stages,
結婚式での父娘のダンスや
07:14
father-daughter dances at weddings
分娩室で元気に泣く赤ちゃんなどの
07:16
and healthy babies screeching in the delivery room,
記念すべき日や晴れ姿もあります
07:18
but between those high highs,
でもそんな幸せなことの合間に
07:21
we may also have some lumps and some bumps too.
いくつか壁や障害があるかもしれません
07:23
It's sad, and it's not pleasant to talk about,
話すにはつらく悲しいことですが
07:26
but your husband might leave you,
夫が去るかもしれないし
07:29
your girlfriend could cheat,
彼女が浮気するかもしれない
07:32
your headaches might be more serious than you thought,
頭痛はただの頭痛ではないかもしれないし
07:34
or your dog could get hit by a car on the street.
愛犬が通りで車にはねられるかもしれない
07:37
It's not a happy thought,
考えたくないけれど
07:41
but your kids could get mixed up in gangs
子供が不良にそそのかされたり
07:43
or bad scenes.
事件に巻き込まれることもあり得る
07:46
Your mom could get cancer,
お母さんがガンになる可能性もあるし
07:48
your dad could get mean.
お父さんが陰険になる可能性もある
07:50
And there are times in life
そして人生ときには
07:52
when you will be tossed in the well, too,
深みにはまることもあり
07:54
with twists in your stomach and with holes in your heart,
心に穴が開いて断腸の思いをすることも
07:56
and when that bad news washes over you,
でも悪いニュースに突然見舞われたり
07:58
and when that pain sponges and soaks in,
痛みがいっぱいに広がったとき
08:00
I just really hope you feel
常に2つの選択支があるのだと
08:03
like you've always got two choices.
皆さんが思えることを願います
08:05
One, you can swirl and twirl
1つは振り回されたまま
08:07
and gloom and doom forever,
どうしようもないと悲観することで
08:09
or two, you can grieve
もう1つは嘆いた後
08:11
and then face the future
冷静に戻った目を
08:13
with newly sober eyes.
未来に向けることです
08:15
Having a great attitude is about choosing option number two,
前向きな姿勢とは後者を選ぶことです
08:17
and choosing, no matter how difficult it is,
どんなに困難でも
08:20
no matter what pain hits you,
どんなに苦しくても
08:22
choosing to move forward and move on
気持ちを切り替え前進し 未来へと
08:24
and take baby steps into the future.
少しずつ足を踏み出す選択をすることです
08:26
The second "A" is Awareness.
2つ目の要素は「気付く心」です
08:31
I love hanging out with three year-olds.
僕は3歳児と遊ぶのが大好きです
08:35
I love the way that they see the world,
子供から見た世界は素晴らしいです
08:38
because they're seeing the world for the first time.
彼らにとっては初めて見る世界だからです
08:40
I love the way that they can stare at a bug crossing the sidewalk.
歩道を横切る虫をじっと飽きずに見つめる様子
08:42
I love the way that they'll stare slack-jawed
グローブを手に 目を丸くした子供が
08:45
at their first baseball game
口を開けて初めての野球試合を凝視し
08:47
with wide eyes and a mitt on their hand,
球を打つバットの音やピーナッツの歯ごたえ
08:49
soaking in the crack of the bat and the crunch of the peanuts
ホットドックの匂いなどを存分楽しむ様子は
08:51
and the smell of the hotdogs.
本当に微笑ましく
08:53
I love the way that they'll spend hours picking dandelions in the backyard
裏庭で何時間もかけてたんぽぽを摘んで
08:55
and putting them into a nice centerpiece
素敵な感謝祭の食卓の飾りを
08:58
for Thanksgiving dinner.
作る様子にも魅せられます
09:00
I love the way that they see the world,
世界の受け止め方がとてもいい
09:02
because they're seeing the world
これは子供は世界を初めて
09:04
for the first time.
見ているからです
09:06
Having a sense of awareness
感受性を持つのは
09:09
is just about embracing your inner three year-old.
3歳児の自分を受け入れることです
09:11
Because you all used to be three years old.
誰もが一度は3歳児であったわけです
09:14
That three-year-old boy is still part of you.
その3歳の男の子や女の子の心は
09:16
That three-year-old girl is still part of you.
まだ皆さんの中にあります
09:18
They're in there.
探せばあるはずです
09:20
And being aware is just about remembering
物事に気付くには 自分にも見るものすべてが
09:22
that you saw everything you've seen
目新しかったことがあったのだと
09:25
for the first time once, too.
ただ思い出せばいいのです
09:27
So there was a time when it was your first time ever
仕事から帰宅する道のりで初めて
09:29
hitting a string of green lights on the way home from work.
青信号ばかりだった日があったはずです
09:32
There was the first time you walked by the open door of a bakery
初めてパン屋さんの横を通って
09:34
and smelt the bakery air,
その焼きたてパンの匂いを嗅いだ日や
09:37
or the first time you pulled a 20-dollar bill out of your old jacket pocket
古い上着のポケットから20ドル札が出てきて
09:39
and said, "Found money."
「お金見つけた」と言った瞬間があったはずです
09:42
The last "A" is Authenticity.
最後の要素は「自分に忠実であること」です
09:46
And for this one, I want to tell you a quick story.
これについては短い話をさせてください
09:49
Let's go all the way back to 1932
1932年まで一気に遡ります
09:53
when, on a peanut farm in Georgia,
ジョージア州のあるピーナッツ農場に
09:55
a little baby boy named Roosevelt Grier was born.
ルーズベルト・グリアという名前の男の子が生まれました
09:58
Roosevelt Grier, or Rosey Grier, as people used to call him,
彼はロージー・グリアとも呼ばれていて
10:02
grew up and grew into
成長してからは
10:05
a 300-pound, six-foot-five linebacker in the NFL.
300ポンドで6フィート5の NFLラインバッカーになりました
10:07
He's number 76 in the picture.
写真の背番号76がグリアです
10:11
Here he is pictured with the "fearsome foursome."
このメンバーは「恐怖の4人組」と呼ばれた
10:14
These were four guys on the L.A. Rams in the 1960s
1960年代のL.A. ラムズの選手達で
10:17
you did not want to go up against.
対戦したくないと恐れられていました
10:19
They were tough football players doing what they love,
屈強のフットボール選手である彼らは好きで
10:21
which was crushing skulls
フィールドで頭をぶつけ合ったり
10:24
and separating shoulders on the football field.
肩関節の捻挫をしていたわけです
10:26
But Rosey Grier also had
でもロージー・グリアには
10:28
another passion.
もう1つの趣味がありました
10:30
In his deeply authentic self,
偽りのない心の奥底で
10:32
he also loved needlepoint. (Laughter)
彼は刺繍も好きだったのです
10:35
He loved knitting.
編み物も好きでした
10:39
He said that it calmed him down, it relaxed him,
心が落ち着いてリラックスできる
10:41
it took away his fear of flying and helped him meet chicks.
飛行機が怖いのも忘れられて 女の子とも知り合える
10:43
That's what he said.
彼はそう言っていました
10:46
I mean, he loved it so much that, after he retired from the NFL,
好きが高じてNFLから引退したあとに
10:49
he started joining clubs.
刺繍クラブに行くようになったほどです
10:51
And he even put out a book
それだけでなく本まで出版しました
10:53
called "Rosey Grier's Needlepoint for Men."
「ロージー・グリアの男性向け刺繍」
10:55
(Laughter)
(笑い)
10:57
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:59
It's a great cover.
この表紙がすごいんです
11:02
If you notice, he's actually needlepointing his own face.
よく見ると自分の顔の刺繍をしてるんです
11:04
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:07
And so what I love about this story
この話で僕がいいなと思うのは
11:09
is that Rosey Grier
ロージー・グリアが
11:12
is just such an authentic person,
本当に偽りのない人だということです
11:14
and that's what authenticity is all about.
自分に忠実であるというのはこのことです
11:16
It's just about being you and being cool with that.
堂々とあるがままの自分でいることです
11:18
And I think when you're authentic,
自分に忠実になると
11:21
you end up following your heart,
心に従うこととなり
11:23
and you put yourself in places
自分が好きで楽しめる
11:25
and situations and in conversations
場所や状況や会話などを
11:27
that you love and that you enjoy.
見つけることになるのだと思います
11:29
You meet people that you like talking to.
会話するのが楽しい相手を見つけ
11:31
You go places you've dreamt about.
行きたいと思っていた場所に行くのです
11:33
And you end you end up following your heart
そして自分の気持ちに従うことで
11:35
and feeling very fulfilled.
充実感を味わうことになるのです
11:37
So those are the three A's.
これらが3つの要素です
11:40
For the closing thought, I want to take you all the way back
最後に一番最初の
11:43
to my parents coming to Canada.
僕の両親がカナダに来た話に戻ります
11:45
I don't know what it would feel like
20代の中ごろに未知の国に来るのが
11:48
coming to a new country when you're in your mid-20s.
どんなことなのかは僕には分かりません
11:50
I don't know, because I never did it,
自分で経験したことがないからです
11:53
but I would imagine that it would take a great attitude.
でも意欲的な姿勢が必要だっただろうと思います
11:55
I would imagine that you'd have to be pretty aware of your surroundings
自分の周りのことに敏感に反応し
11:58
and appreciating the small wonders
新しい世界で目にし始める
12:01
that you're starting to see in your new world.
小さな発見を楽しまなくてはならなかったでしょう
12:03
And I think you'd have to be really authentic,
そして直面する物事を乗り越える為
12:06
you'd have to be really true to yourself
本当に偽りのない
12:08
in order to get through what you're being exposed to.
ありのままの自分でいる必要があったと思います
12:10
I'd like to pause my TEDTalk
ここで僕のTEDトークを
12:14
for about 10 seconds right now,
10秒ほど中断させてください
12:16
because you don't get many opportunities in life to do something like this,
人生こんなことができる機会は滅多にない上
12:18
and my parents are sitting in the front row.
僕の両親は前列に座っているので
12:20
So I wanted to ask them to, if they don't mind, stand up.
よければ立ってもらいたいと思います
12:22
And I just wanted to say thank you to you guys.
2人にありがとうを言いたかったんです
12:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:26
When I was growing up, my dad used to love telling the story
僕が子供の頃 父はカナダに来たばかりの頃の
12:45
of his first day in Canada.
話をするのが好きでした
12:48
And it's a great story, because what happened was
面白い話で 何が起こったかと言うと
12:50
he got off the plane at the Toronto airport,
トロント空港に到着した父を
12:53
and he was welcomed by a non-profit group,
非営利団体が迎えてくれたのです
12:56
which I'm sure someone in this room runs.
たぶんこの会場の誰かの団体だと思いますが
12:58
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:00
And this non-profit group had a big welcoming lunch
この団体はカナダに来た新しい移民者のため
13:02
for all the new immigrants to Canada.
盛大な歓迎ランチを準備していました
13:05
And my dad says he got off the plane and he went to this lunch
そして父によると 飛行機を降りてこのランチに行くと
13:08
and there was this huge spread.
ものすごい量の料理が並んでいて
13:11
There was bread, there was those little, mini dill pickles,
パンがあり 小さなディルピクルスがあり
13:13
there was olives, those little white onions.
オリーブやパールオニオンがありました
13:16
There was rolled up turkey cold cuts,
サンドイッチ用のターキーや
13:18
rolled up ham cold cuts, rolled up roast beef cold cuts
ハムやローストビーフがきれいに巻かれて
13:20
and little cubes of cheese.
小さなチーズのキューブと並んでいました
13:22
There was tuna salad sandwiches and egg salad sandwiches
ツナサラダのサンドイッチ 卵サラダのサンドイッチ
13:24
and salmon salad sandwiches.
サーモンサラダのサンドイッチもありました
13:27
There was lasagna, there was casseroles,
ラザニアがあり いくつかの蒸し焼きがあり
13:29
there was brownies, there was butter tarts,
ブラウニーやバタータルトもあり
13:31
and there was pies, lots and lots of pies.
たくさんの種類のパイがありました
13:34
And when my dad tells the story, he says,
そして父がこの話をするとき言うのは
13:37
"The craziest thing was, I'd never seen any of that before, except bread.
「なんせパン以外は見たことないものばかりで」
13:39
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:43
I didn't know what was meat, what was vegetarian.
「どれが肉入りでどれが肉無しか分からず
13:45
I was eating olives with pie.
オリーブにパイという組み合わせで食べたんだよ」
13:47
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:49
I just couldn't believe how many things you can get here."
「ここではこんな沢山の物があるのかと信じられなかったよ」
13:52
(Laughter)
(笑い)
13:55
When I was five years old,
僕が5歳の頃 父はよく
13:57
my dad used to take me grocery shopping,
食料品の買出しに僕を連れて行きました
13:59
and he would stare in wonder
そして驚きの目で
14:01
at the little stickers that are on the fruits and vegetables.
果物や野菜についているシールを眺め
14:03
He would say, "Look, can you believe they have a mango here from Mexico?
「ほら メキシコから来たマンゴがあるなんて信じられるか?」
14:06
They've got an apple here from South Africa.
「南アフリカ産のリンゴがあるぞ」
14:09
Can you believe they've got a date from Morocco?"
「モロッコのナツメヤシがあるなんてスゴイな」などと言い
14:12
He's like, "Do you know where Morocco even is?"
「そもそもモロッコがどこか知ってるか?」と言うので
14:15
And I'd say, "I'm five. I don't even know where I am.
「僕5歳で自分がどこにいるかも分かんない
14:18
Is this A&P?"
このスーパーはA&P?」と言うと
14:21
And he'd say, "I don't know where Morocco is either, but let's find out."
「お父さんも知らないけど調べてみよう」と言うのでした
14:24
And so we'd buy the date, and we'd go home.
そしてナツメヤシを買って家に帰り
14:27
And we'd actually take an atlas off the shelf,
実際に本棚から地図帳を出して
14:29
and we'd flip through until we found this mysterious country.
この謎の国を見つけるまでページをめくるのでした
14:31
And when we did, my dad would say,
見つけると父は
14:34
"Can you believe someone climbed a tree over there,
「誰かがここで木に登って収穫したものが
14:36
picked this thing off it, put it in a truck,
トラックに積まれて
14:38
drove it all the way to the docks
港までわざわざ運ばれ そのあと
14:40
and then sailed it all the way
はるばる大西洋を船で運ばれて
14:43
across the Atlantic Ocean
それから別のトラックに積まれ
14:45
and then put it in another truck
うちの家のすぐ近くの小さなスーパーまで
14:47
and drove that all the way to a tiny grocery store just outside our house,
遠路やってきたなんて信じられるか?
14:49
so they could sell it to us for 25 cents?"
それを25セントで売るためにだぞ」と言い
14:52
And I'd say, "I don't believe that."
僕が「信じられないよ」と言うと
14:55
And he's like, "I don't believe it either.
「お父さんも信じられんな
14:57
Things are amazing. There's just so many things to be happy about."
驚きだな ありがたいことで一杯だ」と言うのでした
14:59
When I stop to think about it, he's absolutely right.
よく考えてみると 父は全く正しいのです
15:02
There are so many things to be happy about.
幸せに思えることはいくらでもあります
15:04
We are the only species
私たちが知る限り 人間は
15:06
on the only life-giving rock
宇宙で生命体を育める唯一の星の
15:09
in the entire universe that we've ever seen,
このような沢山の事を
15:12
capable of experiencing
感じることが出来る
15:15
so many of these things.
唯一の生き物です
15:17
I mean, we're the only ones with architecture and agriculture.
建築物や農業があるのは人間だけです
15:19
We're the only ones with jewelry and democracy.
宝飾品や民主主義があるのも私たちだけです
15:22
We've got airplanes, highway lanes,
私たちには飛行機や高速道路や
15:25
interior design and horoscope signs.
インテリアデザインや星占いがあり
15:28
We've got fashion magazines, house party scenes.
ファッション雑誌やホームパーティをする場所があります
15:30
You can watch a horror movie with monsters.
怪物の出てくるホラー映画を観たり
15:33
You can go to a concert and hear guitars jamming.
コンサートに行ってギターの即興演奏を聴くこともできます
15:35
We've got books, buffets and radio waves,
本もあってビュッフェや電波や
15:38
wedding brides and rollercoaster rides.
花嫁さんやローラーコースターもある
15:40
You can sleep in clean sheets.
清潔なシーツの間で寝られて
15:42
You can go to the movies and get good seats.
映画に行っていい席を取ることもできる
15:44
You can smell bakery air, walk around with rain hair,
パン屋さんの匂いを嗅いだり 雨に濡れた髪のままでいたり
15:46
pop bubble wrap or take an illegal nap.
気泡シートをプチプチ潰したり禁じられた昼寝をすることもできる
15:49
We've got all that,
そういう色々なことがあるのに
15:52
but we've only got 100 years to enjoy it.
私たちには100年しか楽しむ時間がない
15:54
And that's the sad part.
これが悲しい点です
15:58
The cashiers at your grocery store,
あなたの行きつけのスーパーのレジ係
16:02
the foreman at your plant,
あなたの工場の主任
16:05
the guy tailgating you home on the highway,
高速道路であなたの後ろにぴったりつけてくる奴
16:08
the telemarketer calling you during dinner,
夕食時に電話してくるセールスマン
16:11
every teacher you've ever had,
今までお世話になった先生
16:14
everyone that's ever woken up beside you,
夜明けを一緒に迎えた相手
16:16
every politician in every country,
各国の政治家全員
16:19
every actor in every movie,
映画に出演した俳優のすべて
16:21
every single person in your family, everyone you love,
家族一人残らず あなたが愛する人全員
16:23
everyone in this room and you
あなたを含めたこの会場の皆さん
16:26
will be dead in a hundred years.
100年後には皆死んでいるのです
16:29
Life is so great that we only get such a short time
人生は素晴らしすぎて このような人生を甘美なものとする
16:32
to experience and enjoy
一つ一つのささやかな瞬間を体験して
16:35
all those tiny little moments that make it so sweet.
楽しむ時間がほんの少ししかありません
16:37
And that moment is right now,
その瞬間は今現在で
16:39
and those moments are counting down,
どんどん失われています
16:41
and those moments are always, always, always fleeting.
その瞬間はいつも常にあっという間に過ぎ去るのです
16:44
You will never be as young as you are right now.
今現在よりも若くなることは決してありません
16:49
And that's why I believe that if you live your life
だから人生を大いに前向きな
16:54
with a great attitude,
姿勢で生きて
16:57
choosing to move forward and move on
ダメージを受けても気持ちを切り替え
16:59
whenever life deals you a blow,
前に進む選択をしてください
17:01
living with a sense of awareness of the world around you,
自分の周りの世界に意識を向け
17:03
embracing your inner three year-old
3歳児の心を大切にしながら
17:06
and seeing the tiny joys that make life so sweet
人生を素晴らしくする小さな喜びを見つけてください
17:08
and being authentic to yourself,
そして自分に忠実でいることに
17:11
being you and being cool with that,
恐れないで心のままに
17:13
letting your heart lead you and putting yourself in experiences that satisfy you,
自分が満たされる経験をしてください
17:15
then I think you'll live a life
そうすれば皆さんは豊かで
17:18
that is rich and is satisfying,
充実感のある人生を送れると思います
17:20
and I think you'll live a life that is truly awesome.
本当に「Awsome」な人生を送れるはずです
17:22
Thank you.
ありがとう
17:24
Translated by Sawa Horibe
Reviewed by Nahomi Takada

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Neil Pasricha - Director, The Institute for Global Happiness
Neil Pasricha is the New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and serves as the Director of the Institute for Global Happiness after a decade running leadership development inside Walmart. He is one the world's leading authorities on happiness and positivity.

Why you should listen

In 2008, Neil Pasricha's world fell apart after a sudden divorce and death of a close friend. He channeled his energies into his blog 1000 Awesome Things, which counted down one small pleasure -- like snow days, bakery air or finding money in your coat pocket -- every single day for 1000 straight days. While writing his blog, Neil was working as Director of Leadership Development inside Walmart, the world's largest company. He continued working there when his books The Book of Awesome, The Book of (Even More) Awesome and Awesome is Everywhere were published and started climbing bestseller lists and shipping millions of copies.

Years later, he fell in love again and got married. On the airplane home from his honeymoon, his wife told him she was pregnant, and Neil began writing again. The result was a 300-page letter written to his unborn son sharing the nine secrets to finding true happiness. That letter has evolved into The Happiness Equation.

More profile about the speaker
Neil Pasricha | Speaker | TED.com