sponsored links
TEDWomen 2010

Kate Orff: Reviving New York's rivers -- with oysters!

ケイト・オルフ:ニューヨークの川を牡蠣で蘇らせる!

December 8, 2010

建築家ケイト・オルフは牡蠣が都市変化の要因になると見ている。牡蠣は都市の河川へ沈められると、汚染物質を吸収し、とてつもなく汚かった水をきれいにしてくれる--だからオルフは"oyster-tecture"の改革をさらに進めているのだ。オルフは自然と人間、双方に有益な両者を結び付ける都市の地形に対する自分の考えを発信する。

Kate Orff - Landscape architect
Kate Orff asks us to rethink “landscape”—to use urban greenspaces and blue spaces in fresh ways to mediate between humankind and nature. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I am passionate about the American landscape
私は、アメリカの景観と地形が
00:16
and how the physical form of the land,
大好きです。
00:19
from the great Central Valley of California
カリフォルニアのセントラルバリーから
00:21
to the bedrock of Manhattan,
マンハッタンの岩盤まで
00:23
has really shaped our history and our character.
それらは私達の歴史と特徴を形作っています。
00:25
But one thing is clear.
しかし、明らかなことに
00:28
In the last 100 years alone,
ここ100年間だけで
00:30
our country -- and this is a sprawl map of America --
―画面はスプロール現象の地図です―
00:32
our country has systematically
私達の国の地形は、計画的に
00:35
flattened and homogenized the landscape
平らに均一化されています。
00:38
to the point where we've forgotten
私達は、まるで
00:40
our relationship with the plants and animals
共存する動植物や
00:42
that live alongside us
足下の土壌との関係性を
00:44
and the dirt beneath our feet.
忘れてしまったかのようです。
00:46
And so, how I see my work contributing
この関係性を再形成し
00:48
is sort of trying to literally re-imagine these connections
物理的に再構築することが
00:50
and physically rebuild them.
私の仕事です。
00:53
This graph represents what we're dealing with now
この表は、建造環境について
00:55
in the built environment.
示しています。
00:58
And it's really a conflux
様々な情報をからめたものです。
01:00
of urban population rising,
都市部の人口増加や
01:02
biodiversity plummeting
生物の多様性の急激な減少
01:04
and also, of course, sea levels rising
もちろん、海面上昇や
01:06
and climate changing.
気候変動についてです。
01:09
So when I also think about design,
私はデザインを考えるとき、
01:11
I think about
もっと生産的になるように
01:13
trying to rework and re-engage
この表の線を、
01:15
the lines on this graph
再活用し、関係性を再構築するよう
01:17
in a more productive way.
試みています。
01:20
And you can see from the arrow here
表に見える矢印は
01:22
indicating "you are here,"
私達の居る現在です。
01:24
I'm trying to sort of blend and meld
私は、都市計画と生態学という
01:26
these two very divergent fields
2つの異なる分野を
01:28
of urbanism and ecology,
興味深く新しい方法で
01:30
and sort of bring them together in an exciting new way.
融合させようとしています。
01:32
So the era of big infrastructure is over.
巨大なインフラの時代は、終わりです。
01:36
I mean, these sort of top-down,
トップダウンで作られる
01:40
mono-functional, capital-intensive solutions
単機能の、巨額のインフラは
01:42
are really not going to cut it.
本当に効果的ではなくなります。
01:44
We need new tools and new approaches.
新しいツールやアプローチが必要です。
01:46
Similarly, the idea of architecture
同様に、この分野に於いて
01:49
as this sort of object in the field,
状況を踏まえていない
01:51
devoid of context,
建築の概念は
01:53
is really not the --
まったく—
01:55
excuse me, it's fairly blatant --
失礼。露骨ですね—
01:57
is really not the approach
必要とされるアプローチには
01:59
that we need to take.
全く見合わないものです。
02:02
So we need new stories,
ですから、新しいシナリオが必要です。
02:04
new heroes and new tools.
新しい役者や小道具も。
02:06
So now I want to introduce you to my new hero
さて、気候変動の物語での
02:09
in the global climate change war,
新しい主人公をご紹介します。
02:12
and that is the eastern oyster.
牡蠣です。
02:14
So, albeit a very small creature
この生物は、小さくて
02:16
and very modest,
地味ですが
02:18
this creature is incredible,
素晴らしいです。
02:20
because it can agglomerate
なぜなら、牡蠣は
02:22
into these mega-reef structures.
岩礁に付着して育ちますし、
02:24
It can grow; you can grow it;
養殖も可能です。
02:26
and -- did I mention? -- it's quite tasty.
その上—申し上げたかしら?美味しいんです。
02:28
So the oyster was the basis
つまり、牡蠣は私のマニフェストともいえる
02:31
for a manifesto-like urban design project
都市デザインプロジェクトの土台なのです。
02:33
that I did about the New York Harbor
私がニューヨークハーバーで行ったプロジェクトは
02:36
called "oyster-tecture."
「oyster-tecture」といいますが
02:38
And the core idea of oyster-tecture is to harness the biological power
その核となる考えは湾に住む
02:40
of mussels, eelgrass and oysters --
イシガイやアマモ、牡蠣の
02:43
species that live in the harbor --
生物としての力を利用するということ
02:46
and, at the same time,
それと同時に
02:48
harness the power of people
現状を打開しようとしている
02:50
who live in the community
地域に住んでいる
02:52
towards making change now.
人々の力を利用することです。
02:54
Here's a map of my city, New York City,
これはニューヨーク市の地図です。
02:57
showing inundation in red.
赤い部分が氾濫の危険のあるエリア、そして
03:00
And what's circled is the site that I'm going to talk about,
丸で囲ってあるところは私がこれから話す
03:02
the Gowanus Canal and Governors Island.
ゴワナス運河とガバナーズアイランドです。
03:04
If you look here at this map,
この地図を見てください。
03:07
showing everything in blue
青い部分はすべて
03:09
is out in the water,
水中であり
03:11
and everything in yellow is upland.
黄色い部分はすべて陸地です。
03:13
But you can see, even just intuit, from this map,
すると直感的にこの湾は
03:15
that the harbor has dredged and flattened,
掘りとられ平らにされていること
03:18
and went from a rich, three-dimensional mosaic to flat muck
ここ数年で立体から平面のつまらないものへと
03:21
in really a matter of years.
変ってしまったことがわかります。
03:24
Another set of views of actually the Gowanus Canal itself.
これは実際のゴワナス運河の別の角度からの写真です。
03:27
Now the Gowanus is particularly smelly -- I will admit it.
現在、ゴワナス運河はとても臭いです―それは私も認めます。
03:30
There are problems of sewage overflow
問題となっているのは下水の氾濫と
03:33
and contamination,
汚染です。
03:35
but I would also argue that almost every city
しかし重要なことは、ほとんどすべての都市が
03:37
has this exact condition,
そして私達全員が
03:40
and it's a condition that we're all facing.
全く同じ状況に直面していることです。
03:42
And here's a map of that condition,
これが現在の状況です。
03:44
showing the contaminants in yellow and green,
黄色と緑の部分が汚染されているエリアで
03:46
exacerbated by this new flow of
高潮や海面上昇といった新たな原因により
03:49
storm-surge and sea-level rise.
汚染は進んでいます。
03:51
So we really had a lot to deal with.
対処すべき問題は本当にたくさんあるのです。
03:53
When we started this project,
私達がこのプロジェクトを始めた時の
03:55
one of the core ideas was to look back in history
考えの中心は歴史を見直し
03:57
and try to understand what was there.
そこに何があったのかを知るということでした。
04:00
And you can see from this map,
そしてこの地図を見てわかるように
04:02
there's this incredible geographical signature
湾の外に連なっていた
04:04
of a series of islands
これらの島々は
04:06
that were out in the harbor
素晴らしい地形をしていて
04:08
and a matrix of salt marshes and beaches
塩沼や浜といった土台が
04:10
that served as natural wave attenuation
自然の波を減衰させ
04:13
for the upland settlement.
陸地での居住に役立っているのです。
04:15
We also learned at this time
私達は同時に
04:17
that you could eat an oyster about the size of a dinner plate
ディナープレートほどの大きさの牡蠣をまさにゴワナス運河で
04:19
in the Gowanus Canal itself.
食べることができるのだと知りました。
04:22
So our concept is really this back-to-the-future concept,
つまり私達のコンセプトは過去を未来に活かすというもので
04:25
harnessing the intelligence of that land settlement pattern.
その土地の生活の知恵を利用しようというものなのです。
04:28
And the idea has two core stages.
そしてこの考えには二つの核となる段階があります。
04:31
One is to develop a new artificial ecology,
まず、新しい人工的な生態系、つまり
04:33
a reef out in the harbor,
湾の中に礁をつくりだします。
04:36
that would then protect new settlement patterns
これにより内地とゴワナス運河の両方の
04:38
inland and the Gowanus.
新しい生活様式が保たれます。
04:40
Because if you have cleaner water and slower water,
きれいな、そして緩やかに流れる水があれば
04:42
you can imagine a new way of living with that water.
その水を利用して新たな生活様式を築けるということです。
04:44
So the project really addresses these three core issues
このプロジェクトはこれら三つの重大な問題に取り組んでいるのです。
04:47
in a new and exciting way, I think.
それも、私が思うに、斬新で刺激的な方法で。
04:50
Here we are, back to our hero, the oyster.
さて、私達のヒーロー、牡蠣に話を戻しましょう。
04:53
And again, it's this incredibly exciting animal.
もう一度言うと、牡蠣は信じられないほど素晴らしい生き物です。
04:56
It accepts algae and detritus in one end,
牡蠣は一方から藻や有機堆積物を取り込み
04:59
and through this beautiful, glamorous
美しく、また艶やかな
05:01
set of stomach organs,
胃でろ過して
05:03
out the other end comes cleaner water.
他方からきれいな水を排出します。
05:05
And one oyster can filter up to 50 gallons of water a day.
さらに一匹の牡蠣は一日50ガロンもの水をろ過するのです。
05:08
Oyster reefs also covered
牡蠣礁はニューヨークハーバーの
05:11
about a quarter of our harbor
およそ¼を占め
05:13
and were capable of filtering water in the harbor in a matter of days.
湾内の水を数日でろ過することができました。
05:15
They were key in our culture and our economy.
牡蠣は私達の文化、経済において重要な存在でした。
05:18
Basically, New York was built
もともと、ニューヨークは
05:22
on the backs of oystermen,
牡蠣養殖に支えられ
05:24
and our streets were literally built over oyster shells.
道路は文字通り牡蠣の貝殻の上に作られました。
05:26
This image
この写真は
05:29
is an image of an oyster cart,
かつての牡蠣の露店の様子の写真ですが
05:31
which is now as ubiquitous as the hotdog cart is today.
今日のホットドッグの露店と同じようにどこでも見ることができました。
05:33
So again, we got the short end of the deal there.
なのに残ったのはホットドッグってわけです。
05:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:38
Finally, oysters can attenuate
さらに、牡蠣はお互いに
05:40
and agglomerate onto each other
引っ付き、塊になることで
05:42
and form these amazing natural reef structures.
素晴らしい天然の礁構造を形成するのです。
05:44
They really become nature's wave attenuators.
実際牡蠣は天然の防波堤となり、
05:47
And they become the bedrock
さらに湾のあらゆる生態系の
05:50
of any harbor ecosystem.
基盤にもなるのです。
05:52
Many, many species depend on them.
本当に多くの生き物が牡蠣に依存しています。
05:54
So we were inspired by the oyster,
このことが私達を惹きつけたのですが
05:56
but I was also inspired by the life cycle of the oyster.
私は牡蠣のライフサイクルにも魅力を感じました。
05:58
It can move from a fertilized egg
牡蠣は受精卵から
06:01
to a spat, which is when they're floating through the water,
卵になり、水中を浮遊します。
06:04
and when they're ready to attach onto another oyster,
そして数週間の内に自分以外の、
06:07
to an adult male oyster or female oyster,
雌雄に関らず大人の牡蠣に
06:10
in a number of weeks.
付着するのです。
06:12
We reinterpreted this life cycle
私達はこのライフサイクルを
06:15
on the scale of our sight
人間のスケールに解釈しなおし
06:17
and took the Gowanus
ゴワナス運河を巨大な
06:19
as a giant oyster nursery
牡蠣の生育場としました。
06:21
where oysters would be grown up in the Gowanus,
つまり、ゴワナス運河で牡蠣は成長し
06:23
then paraded down in their spat stage
卵の段階を経て
06:25
and seeded out on the Bayridge Reef.
ベイリッジ礁で発生するのです。
06:27
And so the core idea here
ここでの中心となる考えは
06:30
was to hit the reset button
一度リセットボタンを押して
06:32
and regenerate an ecology over time
時間をかけて、自己再生する
06:34
that was regenerative and cleaning
清潔な、そして生産的な生態系を
06:36
and productive.
もう一度作ることでした。
06:38
How does the reef work? Well, it's very, very simple.
そのメカニズムですか?それはとても単純です。
06:40
A core concept here
ここでの大事な考えは
06:43
is that climate change
気候変動というのは
06:45
isn't something that --
なんというか・・・
06:47
the answers won't land down from the Moon.
月から答えが降ってくるという問題ではなく
06:49
And with a $20 billion price tag,
200億ドルの値札がついた
06:52
we should simply start and get to work with what we have now
私達の直面している、すぐに取りかかるべき
06:54
and what's in front of us.
問題なのです。
06:56
So this image is simply showing --
さて、この写真にあるのは
06:58
it's a field of marine piles
一面に打たれた海洋杭で
07:00
interconnected with this woven fuzzy rope.
繊維状のファジーロープにつながれています。
07:02
What is fuzzy rope, you ask?
「ファジーロープって何?」ですって?
07:05
It's just that; it's this very inexpensive thing,
そうですね・・・ とても安いもので
07:08
available practically at your hardware store, and it's very cheap.
近くの工具店へ行けばすぐに買えるものです。
07:11
So we imagine that we would actually
だから私達がひそかに想像しているのは
07:14
potentially even host a bake sale
実はバザーを主催するだけで
07:16
to start our new project.
必要な資金が集まっちゃうわけです。
07:18
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:20
So in the studio, rather than drawing,
スタジオでは製図よりも
07:22
we began to learn how to knit.
編み物を習いました。
07:24
The concept was to really knit this rope together
このロープを互いに編んで
07:26
and develop this new soft infrastructure
牡蠣が育つように
07:29
for the oysters to grow on.
やわらかい基盤を作ったのです。
07:31
You can see in the diagram how it grows over time
図のように、時間がたつにつれて
07:33
from an infrastructural space
基盤だった場所が
07:36
into a new public urban space.
新しい都会へと成長していったのです。
07:38
And that grows over time dynamically
気候変動とともに、時がたつにつれ
07:41
with the threat of climate change.
劇的に成長していきます。
07:44
It also creates this incredibly interesting, I think,
また、私はとても面白いと思うのですが、
07:46
new amphibious public space,
新たな水陸両用のスペースができます。
07:49
where you can imagine working,
ここで働いたり
07:52
you can imagine recreating in a new way.
新しい遊びをしたりするのを想像してみてください。
07:54
In the end, what we realized we were making
結局、私達が作っていたのは
07:57
was a new blue-green watery park
水であふれた次の世紀のための
07:59
for the next watery century --
新たな青と緑の公園だったのです。
08:02
an amphibious park, if you will.
いうなれば、水陸両用公園ですね。
08:04
So get your Tevas on.
さあ、Teva®をはいてみましょう。
08:06
So you can imagine scuba diving here.
ここでスキューバダイビングをしているのを想像してみてください。
08:08
This is an image of high school students,
これは高校生の写真です。
08:10
scuba divers that we worked with on our team.
彼らは私達のチームで働いていました。
08:12
So you can imagine a sort of new manner of living
水との新たな関係が築かれた
08:14
with a new relationship with the water,
新しい生活スタイルや
08:17
and also a hybridizing of recreational and science programs
レクリエーションとサイエンスの融合した観察プログラムを
08:19
in terms of monitoring.
想像してみてください。
08:22
Another new vocabulary word for the brave new world:
来たる素晴らしい世界のために、新しい言葉を紹介します。
08:24
this is the word "flupsy" --
それはflupsyです。
08:27
it's short for "floating upwelling system."
これは「浮遊湧昇システム」の略で
08:29
And this glorious, readily available device
壮大で、すぐにでも利用できる
08:32
is basically a floating raft
基本的には牡蠣の生育場の真上で
08:35
with an oyster nursery below.
浮かんでいるいかだです。
08:37
So the water is churned through this raft.
このいかだによって水が循環するのです。
08:39
You can see the eight chambers on the side
横についている8つの小部屋が
08:42
host little baby oysters and essentially force-feed them.
牡蠣の幼生を取り込んで餌を与えます。
08:44
So rather than having 10 oysters,
10匹どころではないですよ。
08:47
you have 10,000 oysters.
10,000匹もの牡蠣を育てていくのです。
08:50
And then those spat are then seeded.
それから卵が生まれていきます。
08:52
Here's the Gowanus future
これがゴワナス運河の未来予想図です。
08:54
with the oyster rafts on the shorelines --
海岸線に牡蠣のいかだが設置されています。
08:56
the flupsification of the Gowanus.
まさに「ゴワナス運河のflupsy化」です。
08:58
New word.
これは造語ですが。
09:01
And also showing oyster gardening for the community
これは運河の縁にそって作られた
09:03
along its edges.
牡蠣の庭園です。
09:06
And finally, how much fun it would be
そして最後に、これはとても楽しそうですね、
09:08
to watch the flupsy parade
flupsyのパレードです。
09:10
and cheer on the oyster spats
礁へ旅立つ牡蠣の卵を
09:12
as they go down to the reef.
祝福しているのです。
09:14
I get asked two questions about this project.
私はこのプロジェクトについて二つの質問を受けました。
09:16
One is: why isn't it happening now?
一つは、なぜこれは現在行われていないのか
09:19
And the second one is: when can we eat the oysters?
もう一つは、私達はいつその牡蠣を食べることができるのか、です。
09:21
And the answer is: not yet, they're working.
答えは、まだ食べられません、彼らは仕事中です。
09:24
But we imagine, with our calculations,
しかし私達の計算によれば
09:27
that by 2050,
2050年までには
09:29
you might be able to sink your teeth into a Gowanus oyster.
ゴワナス運河産の牡蠣を食べることができるかも知れません。
09:31
To conclude, this is just one cross-section
最後に、これはとある都市の
09:34
of one piece of city,
ある一角の試みです。
09:36
but my dream is, my hope is,
しかし私の夢は、私の望みは
09:38
that when you all go back to your own cities
あなた方が自分の街へ帰った時に
09:40
that we can start to work together and collaborate
私達と協力して仕事を始め
09:42
on remaking and reforming
新しい都市の地形を
09:45
a new urban landscape
再構築、再編成し
09:47
towards a more sustainable, a more livable
より持続的な、より住みやすい
09:49
and a more delicious future.
より美味しい未来を作ることです。
09:52
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
09:54
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:56
Translator:Mizuhiro Suzuki
Reviewer:SHIGERU MASUKAWA

sponsored links

Kate Orff - Landscape architect
Kate Orff asks us to rethink “landscape”—to use urban greenspaces and blue spaces in fresh ways to mediate between humankind and nature.

Why you should listen

Kate Orff is a landscape architect who thinks deeply about sustainable development, biodiversity and community-based change—and suggests some surprising and wonderful ways to make change through landscape. She’s a professor at Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, where she’s a director of the Urban Landscape Lab. She’s the co-editor of the new bookGateway: Visions for an Urban National Park, about the Gateway National Recreation Area, a vast and underused tract of land spreading across the coastline of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and New Jersey.

She is principal of SCAPE, a landscape architecture and urban design office with projects ranging from a 1,000-square-foot pocket park in Brooklyn to a 100-acre environmental center in Greenville, SC, to a 1000-acre landfill regeneration project in Dublin, Ireland. 

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.