TEDxEast

Sarah Kay: How many lives can you live?

Filmed:

Spoken-word poet Sarah Kay was stunned to find she couldn’t be a princess, ballerina and astronaut all in one lifetime. In this talk, she delivers two powerful poems that show us how we can live other lives. (Filmed at TEDxEast.)

- Poet
A performing poet since she was 14 years old, Sarah Kay is the founder of Project VOICE, an organization that uses spoken word poetry as a literacy and empowerment tool. Full bio

(Singing) I see the moon.
The moon sees me.
私はお月様を見ている
お月様は私を見ている
00:12
The moon sees somebody that I don't see.
お月様は私の見てない
誰かを見ている
00:18
God bless the moon, and God bless me.
神様はお月様を祝福する
神様は私を祝福する
00:24
And God bless the somebody
that I don't see.
神様は私の見てない
誰かを祝福する
00:31
If I get to heaven, before you do,
私が先に
天国に行ったなら
00:37
I'll make a hole and pull you through.
あなたを引っ張り込む
穴をあけるから
00:43
And I'll write your name on every star,
星の1つひとつに
あなたの名前を書くわ
00:49
and that way the world
そしたら世界は
00:55
won't seem so far.
そんなに遠く感じなくなる
00:59
The astronaut will not be at work today.
宇宙飛行士は
今日は仕事に行かないだろう
01:02
He has called in sick.
病欠すると電話していたから
01:06
He has turned off his cell phone,
his laptop, his pager, his alarm clock.
携帯もパソコンも
ポケベルも目覚ましも切って
01:08
There is a fat yellow cat
asleep on his couch,
彼のソファでは
黄色い太った猫が眠っている
01:13
raindrops against the window
雨粒が窓を流れ
01:16
and not even the hint
of coffee in the kitchen air.
キッチンには
コーヒーの気配すらしない
01:18
Everybody is in a tizzy.
みんな取り乱している
01:22
The engineers on the 15th floor have
stopped working on their particle machine.
15階のエンジニアは
粒子加速器を使うのをやめ
01:23
The anti-gravity room is leaking,
反重力室が漏っている
01:27
and even the freckled kid with glasses,
ゴミを出すことだけが仕事の
01:29
whose only job is to take
out the trash, is nervous,
そばかす眼鏡の男の子でさえ
不安になって
01:31
fumbles the bag, spills
a banana peel and a paper cup.
ゴミ袋を取り落とし
バナナの皮と紙コップがこぼれ出たけど
01:34
Nobody notices.
誰も気付かない
01:36
They are too busy recalculating
what this all mean for lost time.
これが失われた時間に どう関係するのか
計算し直すのでみんな忙しい
01:38
How many galaxies
are we losing per second?
毎秒いくつの銀河が
失われているのか
01:41
How long before next rocket
can be launched?
次のロケットを打ち上げるのに
どれだけ時間がかかるのか
01:43
Somewhere an electron
flies off its energy cloud.
どこかで電子が
エネルギー雲を飛び出し
01:45
A black hole has erupted.
ブラックホールが爆発し
01:48
A mother finishes setting
the table for dinner.
お母さんが
晩ご飯のしたくを終え
01:50
A Law & Order marathon is starting.
『ロー&オーダー』の
マラソンが始まる
01:53
The astronaut is asleep.
宇宙飛行士は眠っている
01:55
He has forgotten to turn off his watch,
切り忘れた腕時計が
01:57
which ticks, like a metal
pulse against his wrist.
鉄の鼓動のように
手首で時を刻んでいる
01:59
He does not hear it.
彼には聞こえていない
02:02
He dreams of coral reefs and plankton.
珊瑚礁とプランクトンの
夢を見ているのだ
02:03
His fingers find
the pillowcase's sailing masts.
彼の指が枕カバーの
マストを見つけ
02:06
He turns on his side,
opens his eyes at once.
寝返りを打って
一度に目を開く
02:09
He thinks that scuba divers must have
the most wonderful job in the world.
スキューバダイバーが
世界で一番素敵な仕事に違いないと思う
02:13
So much water to glide through!
滑り込める水が
あんなにもあるんだから
02:17
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:22
Thank you.
どうも
02:28
When I was little, I could
not understand the concept
小さい頃 私は1つの人生しか
生きられないということが
02:29
that you could only live one life.
理解できませんでした
02:34
I don't mean this metaphorically.
比喩としてじゃなく
02:37
I mean, I literally thought
that I was going to get to do
文字通り私は
思っていたんです
02:38
everything there was to do
為されるべきこと
すべてをやり
02:42
and be everything there was to be.
あるべき存在
すべてになるのだと
02:44
It was only a matter of time.
ただ時間の問題であって
02:46
And there was no limitation
based on age or gender
年齢や性別や
人種や時代さえ
02:48
or race or even appropriate time period.
制限にはならないと
思っていたんです
02:51
I was sure that I was going
to actually experience
それがどんなものか 実際に経験する
ことになるものとばかり思っていました
02:54
what it felt like to be a leader
of the civil rights movement
市民権運動の指導者とか
02:58
or a ten-year old boy living
on a farm during the dust bowl
ダスト・ボウル時代の
農家の10歳の男の子とか
03:02
or an emperor of the Tang
dynasty in China.
唐の皇帝とか
03:05
My mom says that when people asked me
母から聞いた話だと
03:09
what I wanted to be when I grew up,
my typical response was:
将来何になりたいかと
聞かれると
03:11
princess-ballerina-astronaut.
私は「お姫様バレリーナ宇宙飛行士」
と答えていたそうです
03:15
And what she doesn't understand
is that I wasn't trying to invent
母が分かっていなかったのは
03:17
some combined super profession.
私は何か新しい すごい職種を
作り出そうとしていたのではなく
03:20
I was listing things I thought
I was gonna get to be:
自分がなるであろうと思っていたものを
列挙していたということです
03:22
a princess and a ballerina
and an astronaut.
お姫様と バレリーナと 宇宙飛行士です
03:25
and I'm pretty sure the list
probably went on from there.
このリストは たぶん
もっと長かったのを
03:28
I usually just got cut off.
そこで切っていただけです
03:31
It was never a question
of if I was gonna get to do something
なれるかどうかに疑問はなく
03:33
so much of a question of when.
それがいつかだけが問題だったのです
03:36
And I was sure that if I was going
to do everything,
もしあらゆることを
するのであれば
03:39
that it probably meant I had
to move pretty quickly,
素早く立ち回らなければ
ならないはずで
03:41
because there was a lot
of stuff I needed to do.
しなければならないことは
山ほどあります
03:44
So my life was constantly
in a state of rushing.
だから私の人生は
常に駆け足でした
03:46
I was always scared
that I was falling behind.
いつも遅れはしないかと
怖れていました
03:48
And since I grew up
in New York City, as far as I could tell,
ニューヨークに
育った人間には
03:50
rushing was pretty normal.
駆け足なのは
ごく普通のことだと思いますが
03:54
But, as I grew up, I had
this sinking realization,
でも成長するにつれ
03:56
that I wasn't gonna get to live
any more than one life.
ただ1つの人生しか生きられないと
理解するようになりました
04:00
I only knew what it felt like
to be a teenage girl
私にわかるのは
04:05
in New York City,
ニューヨークの10代の女の子が
どんなかってことだけで
04:08
not a teenage boy in New Zealand,
ニュージーランドの
10代の少年でもなければ
04:09
not a prom queen in Kansas.
カンザスのミス学園祭でも
ありません
04:11
I only got to see through my lens.
私は自分のレンズを通してだけ
見ることができるのです
04:14
And it was around this time
that I became obsessed with stories,
その時から ストーリーに
惹かれるようになりました
04:16
because it was through stories
that I was able to see
他の人のレンズで
見られるのは
04:20
through someone else's lens,
however briefly or imperfectly.
ストーリーを通してだからです
それがどんなに短く不完全であったとしても
04:23
And I started craving hearing
other people's experiences
私は他の人の体験談を聞きたいと
強く思うようになりました
04:27
because I was so jealous
that there were entire lives
私の生きることのない
人生を うらやましく思い
04:30
that I was never gonna get to live,
自分の見逃した
すべてについて
04:34
and I wanted to hear
about everything that I was missing.
聞きたいと思ったのです
04:35
And by transitive property,
そして視点を変えたとき
気が付きました
04:38
I realized that some people
were never gonna get to experience
ニューヨークの10代の
女の子がどんなものか
04:39
what it felt like to be a teenage girl
in New York city.
けっして体験することのない人々
がいるということに
04:43
Which meant that they weren't gonna know
それはつまり
04:45
what the subway ride
after your first kiss feels like,
ファーストキスの後 地下鉄に
乗っているのがどんな感じかも
04:47
or how quiet it gets when its snows.
雪になった時 どれほど静かなものかも
知らないということです
04:51
And I wanted them to know,
I wanted to tell them.
教えてあげたい
という思いに
04:53
And this became the focus of my obsession.
取り付かれました
04:56
I busied myself telling stories
and sharing stories and collecting them.
そしてストーリーを語り 共有し
集めることに忙しくしていました
04:58
And it's not until recently
でも詩は急いで
できるものではないと
05:02
that I realized that
I can't always rush poetry.
最近になって気が付きました
05:04
In April for National Poetry Month,
there's this challenge
4月に全米詩月間があって
05:09
that many poets in the poetry
community participate in,
詩のコミュニティに属す多くの人が
その課題に挑戦しました
05:12
and its called the 30/30 Challenge.
「30/30チャレンジ」です
05:15
The idea is you write a new poem
どういうものかというと
05:18
every single day
for the entire month of April.
4月の間中 毎日
新しい詩を書くんです
05:21
And last year, I tried it
for the first time
去年初めて参加して
05:24
and was thrilled by the efficiency
at which I was able to produce poetry.
詩をすごく早く作れることに
興奮しました
05:26
But at the end of the month, I looked
back at these 30 poems I had written
でもその月の終わりに 自分の書いた
30篇の詩を振り返った時
05:31
and discovered that they were
all trying to tell the same story,
それが語ろうとしているのがみんな
同じストーリーだということに気付きました
05:35
it had just taken me 30 tries to figure
out the way that it wanted to be told.
そのストーリーが語られるのを望む形を
見つけようと 30回やり直していただけです
05:39
And I realized that this is probably true
of other stories on an even larger scale.
このことは もっと大きなスケールで
他のストーリーでも同じだと気付きました
05:44
I have stories that I have
tried to tell for years,
何年も語ろうと試み続けてきた
ストーリーがあって
05:48
rewriting and rewriting and constantly
searching for the right words.
何度も何度も書き直しては 絶えず
正しい言葉を見つけようとしているのです
05:50
There's a French poet and essayist
by the name of Paul Valéry
フランスの詩人でエッセイストの
ポール・ヴァレリーは
05:54
who said a poem is never
finished, it is only abandoned.
「詩というのは完成することがなく
ただ放棄される」と言いました
05:58
And this terrifies me
これは怖く感じます
06:01
because it implies that I could keep
re-editing and rewriting forever
好きなだけ推敲し書き直し
続けることができ
06:03
and its up to me to decide
when a poem is finished
詩をいつ完成し
歩み去るかを決めるのは
06:06
and when I can walk away from it.
ただ自分にかかっている
ということだからです
06:10
And this goes directly against
my very obsessive nature
これは正しい答え 完璧な言葉
適切な形を
06:12
to try to find the right answer
and the perfect words and the right form.
見つけようとする 私の偏執的な性質に
真っ向から反することです
06:15
And I use poetry in my life,
私は詩を
06:19
as a way to help me navigate
and work through things.
自分の人生を舵取りし
導いていく助けとして使っています
06:21
But just because I end the poem,
doesn't mean that I've solved
でも詩を書き終えるというのは
06:24
what it was I was puzzling through.
自分の取り組んでいた問題が
解決したことを意味しません
06:27
I like to revisit old poetry
昔書いた詩に立ち戻るのが
私は好きで
06:29
because it shows me exactly
where I was at that moment
その時自分がどんなだったか
はっきり見せてくれます
06:31
and what it was I was trying to navigate
その時自分が
どう切り抜けようとし
06:35
and the words that I chose to help me.
どんな言葉を
助けとして選んだのか
06:37
Now, I have a story
私が長年
06:40
that I've been stumbling
over for years and years
引きずり続けてきた
ストーリーがあります
06:41
and I'm not sure if I've found
the prefect form,
果たして完璧な形を
見つけられたのか
06:44
or whether this is just one attempt
それともこれは
単なる1つの試みで
06:47
and I will try to rewrite it later
in search of a better way to tell it.
もっと良い語り方を求め
書き直すことになるのか分かりません
06:49
But I do know that later, when I look back
でも 後で振り返った時に
06:52
I will be able to know that
this is where I was at this moment
自分がこの瞬間どこにいて
06:56
and this is what I was trying to navigate,
どう切り抜けようとしていたのか
きっと分かるはずです
07:00
with these words, here,
in this room, with you.
そう この場所で
皆さんと一緒にです
07:02
So --
じゃあ
07:07
Smile.
笑って
07:10
It didn't always work this way.
いつもこんな風に
いくわけじゃなかった
07:17
There's a time you had
to get your hands dirty.
手を汚さなければ
いけないときもあった
07:19
When you were in the dark,
for most of it, fumbling was a given.
暗がりの中にいたら
たいていは 手探りが前提で
07:22
If you needed more
contrast, more saturation,
もっとコントラストが
もっと彩度が
07:26
darker darks and brighter brights,
もっと暗い暗さ
もっと明るい明るさが必要なら
07:29
they called it extended development.
長時間現像と言っているけれど
それはつまり
07:31
It meant you spent longer inhaling
chemicals, longer up to your wrist.
長い間 化学薬品を吸い込み
腕まくりするということだ
07:34
It wasn't always easy.
いつも簡単とは限らない
07:37
Grandpa Stewart was a Navy photographer.
スチュアートおじいちゃんは
海軍のカメラマンだった
07:39
Young, red-faced
with his sleeves rolled up,
若く 赤ら顔で
腕まくりをして
07:42
fists of fingers like fat rolls of coins,
手の指は太い
コインの束のよう
07:45
he looked like Popeye
the sailor man come to life.
『ポパイ』を
実写版にしたみたいな
07:48
Crooked smile, tuft of chest hair,
しかめたような笑顔と
ふさふさの胸毛をして
07:51
he showed up to World War II,
with a smirk and a hobby.
にやにやしながら
第二次世界大戦に趣味でやってきた
07:53
When they asked him if he knew
much about photography,
写真について詳しいか
聞かれたとき
07:56
he lied, learned to read
Europe like a map,
嘘をついて ヨーロッパを
地図みたいに読む方法を学んだ
07:59
upside down, from the height
of a fighter plane,
逆さになって
戦闘機の高みから
08:02
camera snapping, eyelids flapping
カメラが音を立て
目をしばたたかせる
08:06
the darkest darks and brightest brights.
闇の中の闇
光の中の光
08:08
He learned war like he could
read his way home.
帰り道を読めるよう
戦争を学んだのだ
08:10
When other men returned,
they would put their weapons out to rest,
他の人たちは戦争が終わると
武器を置いたのに
08:14
but he brought the lenses
and the cameras home with him.
祖父はレンズとカメラを
持ち帰って
08:17
Opened a shop, turned it
into a family affair.
店を開いて家業にした
08:20
My father was born into this
world of black and white.
父はこの 白黒の世界に生まれた
08:23
His basketball hands learned
the tiny clicks and slides
バスケ向けの手で
細かな操作を学んだ
08:26
of lens into frame, film into camera,
レンズをフレームに
フィルムをカメラに
08:29
chemical into plastic bin.
薬品をプラスチック容器に
08:32
His father knew the equipment
but not the art.
父のお父さんは 道具は分かっていても
アートは分かっていなかった
08:33
He knew the darks but not the brights.
闇は分かっていても
光は分かっていなかった
08:37
My father learned the magic,
spent his time following light.
父は魔法を学んで
光を追いかけるのに時を費やした
08:38
Once he traveled across the country
to follow a forest fire,
ある時 国を横断して
08:42
hunted it with his camera for a week.
カメラ片手に 1週間
山火事を追いかけたことがあった
08:46
"Follow the light," he said.
「光を追うんだ」と彼は言った
08:49
"Follow the light."
「光を追うんだ」と
08:51
There are parts of me
I only recognize from photographs.
私には 写真からだけ
分かる部分がある
08:52
The loft on Wooster Street
with the creaky hallways,
ウースター通りにある
廊下が軋む建物のロフト
08:55
the twelve-foot ceilings,
white walls and cold floors.
4メートルの天井に
白い壁と冷たい床
08:58
This was my mother's home,
before she was mother.
それが母の家だった
母が母になる前の
09:01
Before she was wife, she was artist.
妻になる前
母は芸術家だった
09:04
And the only two rooms in the house,
家の中で たった
2つの部屋だけが
09:07
with walls that reached
all the way up to the ceiling,
天井までちゃんと届く壁と
09:08
and doors that opened and closed,
開閉する扉があって
09:11
were the bathroom and the darkroom.
それがお風呂場と暗室だった
09:13
The darkroom she built herself,
暗室は母が自分で作った
09:15
with custom-made stainless steel sinks,
an 8x10 bed enlarger
特製のステンレスの流しと
09:17
that moved up and down
by a giant hand crank,
大きなクランクで上下する
8x10判の引き伸ばし機
09:22
a bank of color-balanced lights,
色を調整した照明と
09:24
a white glass wall for viewing prints,
写真を見るための
白いガラス板
09:26
a drying rack that moved
in and out from the wall.
壁から出し入れできる
乾燥用の棚
09:28
My mother built herself a darkroom.
母が自分で据え付けて
09:30
Made it her home.
自分の居場所にした
09:32
Fell in love with a man
with basketball hands,
バスケ向きの手をした
09:34
with the way he looked at light.
光の見方を知る男と
恋に落ちて
09:36
They got married. Had a baby.
2人は結婚し
子どもができ
09:39
Moved to a house near a park.
公園の近くの家に越した
09:41
But they kept the loft on Wooster Street
でもウースター通りのロフトは
09:43
for birthday parties and treasure hunts.
お誕生会や宝探しのために
取って置いた
09:45
The baby tipped the grayscale,
赤ん坊は
グレースケールを変え
09:48
filled her parents' photo albums
with red balloons and yellow icing.
両親の写真アルバムを
赤い風船や 黄色いアイシングで充たした
09:50
The baby grew into a girl
without freckles,
その赤ちゃんは
そばかすのない
09:54
with a crooked smile,
しかめたような笑顔の
女の子へと成長した
09:56
who didn’t understand why her friends
did not have darkrooms in their houses,
その子は友達の家に暗室がないのを
不思議に思っていた
09:58
who never saw her parents kiss,
両親がキスするのを
見たことがなく
10:02
who never saw them hold hands.
両親が手を繋ぐのを
見たことがなかった
10:04
But one day, another baby showed up.
ある時 別の赤ちゃんが現れ
10:06
This one with perfect straight
hair and bubble gum cheeks.
その男の子は完璧にまっすぐな髪と
風船ガムのほっぺをしていて
10:08
They named him sweet potato.
スイートポテトと
名付けられた
10:11
When he laughed, he laughed so loudly
笑う時に
大きな声で笑うので
10:13
he scared the pigeons on the fire escape
非常階段の
ハトを驚かせた
10:15
And the four of them lived
in that house near the park.
4人はあの公園の近くの
家に暮らしていた
10:17
The girl with no freckles,
the sweet potato boy,
そばかすのない女の子と
スイートポテトの男の子
10:20
the basketball father and darkroom mother
バスケットボールのお父さんと
暗室のお母さんが
10:23
and they lit their candles
and said their prayers,
ろうそくを灯して
お祈りをし
10:25
and the corners of the photographs curled.
写真の隅が丸まった
10:27
One day, some towers fell.
ある時 塔が倒れて
10:30
And the house near the park
became a house under ash, so they escaped
公園の近くの家は 灰の下の家になり
みんなで逃げ出した
10:33
in backpacks, on bicycles to darkrooms
リュックで背負われ
自転車で 暗室へと
10:37
But the loft of Wooster Street
was built for an artist,
でもウースター通りのロフトは
芸術家向けで
10:40
not a family of pigeons,
お人好しの家族向きではなく
10:43
and walls that do not reach the ceiling
do not hold in the yelling
壁は天井に届かず
泣き声を閉じ込められず
10:45
and the man with basketball hands
put his weapons out to rest.
バスケ向けの手の男は
武器を置いた
10:49
He could not fight this war,
and no maps pointed home.
彼はこの戦いを戦うことができず
地図は家を指してはいなかった
10:53
His hands no longer fit his camera,
彼の手はもはや
カメラに合わなくなり
10:57
no longer fit his wife's,
妻の手に合わなくなり
10:59
no longer fit his body.
体に合わなくなった
11:01
The sweet potato boy mashed
his fists into his mouth
スイートポテトの男の子は
握り拳を口に押し込んで
11:03
until he had nothing more to say.
もう何も言えないようにしたので
11:05
So, the girl without freckles
went treasure hunting on her own.
そばかすのない女の子は
1人で宝探しに行った
11:07
And on Wooster Street, in a building
with the creaky hallways
ウースター通りの
廊下が軋む建物の
11:11
and the loft with the 12-foot ceilings
4メートルの天井の
ロフトにある
11:14
and the darkroom with too many sinks
流しの多すぎる暗室の
11:16
under the color-balanced lights,
she found a note,
色を調整した照明の下で
女の子はメモを見つけた
11:18
tacked to the wall with a thumb-tack,
left over from a time before towers,
画鋲で壁に留められた
塔が倒れる以前の
11:21
from the time before babies.
赤ん坊が生まれる以前の
11:25
And the note said: "A guy sure loves
the girl who works in the darkroom."
そのメモには 「男は間違いなく
暗室で働く女を愛している」と書かれていた
11:28
It was a year before my father
picked up a camera again.
それは父が再びカメラを
手にとる1年前だった
11:34
His first time out, he followed
the Christmas lights,
初めて取った休みに
クリスマスの光を追い
11:38
dotting their way through
New York City's trees,
ニューヨークのツリーを
点々と繋ぐ小さな光が
11:40
tiny dots of light, blinking out at him
from out of the darkest darks.
闇の中の闇から
彼に瞬いていた
11:43
A year later he traveled
across the country to follow a forest fire
1年後 彼は国を横断し
山火事を追った
11:47
stayed for a week hunting
it with his camera,
1週間に渡り
カメラを手にして
11:51
it was ravaging the West Coast
火事は西海岸に
被害をもたらし
11:54
eating 18-wheeler trucks in its stride.
18輪トラックを
飲み込んだ
11:56
On the other side of the country,
国の反対側で
11:58
I went to class and wrote a poem
in the margins of my notebook.
私は教室でノートの隅に
詩を書いていた
12:00
We have both learned the art of capture.
私たちは どちらも
捉える術を学んでいたのだ
12:03
Maybe we are learning
the art of embracing.
あるいは私たちは 抱きしめる術を
学んでいたのかもしれない
12:05
Maybe we are learning
the art of letting go.
あるいは私たちは 忘れる術を
学んでいたのかもしれない
12:08
(Applause)
(拍手)
12:13
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Mari Arimitsu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Sarah Kay - Poet
A performing poet since she was 14 years old, Sarah Kay is the founder of Project VOICE, an organization that uses spoken word poetry as a literacy and empowerment tool.

Why you should listen

Plenty of 14-year-old girls write poetry. But few hide under the bar of the famous Bowery Poetry Club in Manhattan’s East Village absorbing the talents of New York’s most exciting poets. Not only did Sarah Kay do that -- she also had the guts to take its stage and hold her own against performers at least a decade her senior. Her talent for weaving words into poignant, funny, and powerful performances paid off.

Sarah holds a Masters degree in the art of teaching from Brown University and an honorary doctorate in humane letters from Grinnell College. Her first book, B, was ranked the number one poetry book on Amazon.com. Her second book, No Matter the Wreckage, is available from Write Bloody Publishing.

Sarah also founded Project VOICE, an organization that uses spoken word poetry as a literacy and empowerment tool. Project VOICE runs performances and workshops to encourage people to engage in creative self-expression in schools and communities around the world.

More profile about the speaker
Sarah Kay | Speaker | TED.com