sponsored links
TEDxDublin

Aris Venetikidis: Making sense of maps

アリス・ヴェネティキディス: 分かりやすい地図のデザイン

September 2, 2012

グラフィックデザイナーのアリス・ヴェネティキディス氏は、経験によって人の記憶の中に作られる認知地図の可能性に注目しました。これは精密に描かれた市街地図とは異なり、むしろ回路図や配線図とよく似た、場所どうしの関係の抽象的な図なのです。 どうすればこの認知地図から学んだことを、実際の地図のデザインに生かせるのか?読みづらくて有名なダブリンのバス路線図を例に、分かりやすい地図のデザインについて話します 。 (TEDxダブリンにて収録)

Aris Venetikidis - Mapmaker
Aris Venetikidis imagines how maps work with our minds. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
What I do is I organize information. I'm a graphic designer.
グラフィックデザイナーの仕事は
情報処理です
00:15
Professionally, I try to make sense
意味が通じない事でも
00:18
often of things that don't make much sense themselves.
納得できるようにするのが
私の仕事です
00:21
So my father might not understand what it is
父は私が
どういう仕事をしているのか
00:25
that I do for a living.
あまりよく分かっていません
00:27
His part of my ancestry has been farmers.
父は農家の家系に生まれました
00:29
He's part of this ethnic minority called the Pontic Greeks.
ポントス人という少数民族の出身で
00:31
They lived in Asia Minor, and fled to Greece
この民族は100年程前に
大虐殺から逃れて
00:34
after a genocide about a hundred years ago,
小アジアからギリシャに
移り住みました
00:38
and ever since that, migration has somewhat been
それ以来 私達一族は
00:41
a theme in my family.
移民となったのです
00:44
My father moved to Germany, studied there, and married,
父はドイツに渡り
勉強して結婚しました
00:45
and as a result, I now have this half-German brain
その結果私の半分は
00:50
with all the analytical thinking
ドイツ的な分析的思考をします
00:54
and that slight dorky demeanor that comes with that.
私がちょっとのろまなのは
そのせいでしょう
00:56
And of course it meant that I was a foreigner in both countries,
どちらの国でも
私は外国人でしたが
01:00
and that of course made it pretty easy for me
そのことは苦ではありません
01:03
to migrate as well, in good family tradition, if you like.
移住も我が家の良き伝統です
01:05
But of course, most journeys that we undertake
さて 旅行というのは大抵
01:10
from day to day are within a city, and especially
その日その日を
一つの都市で過ごします
01:13
if you know the city, getting from A to B
知っている都市に行くと
01:16
may seem pretty obvious, right?
AからB地点へどう行くかなんて
一目瞭然ですよね?
01:19
But the question is, why is it obvious?
ではなぜすぐに分かるのか?
01:23
How do we know where we're going?
自分がどこに行くかなんて
分からないでしょう?
01:26
So I washed up on a Dublin ferry port
私はダブリンの港に
01:29
about 12 years ago, a professional foreigner, if you like,
約12年前にたどり着きました
01:31
and I'm sure you've all had this experience before, yeah?
これからお話しする経験は
誰にでもあると思います
01:35
You arrive in a new city, and your brain is trying
新しい街にたどり着くと
01:38
to make sense of this new place.
初めての土地を
理解しようとしますね?
01:42
Once you find your base, your home,
生活の基礎が整うと
01:44
you start to built this cognitive map of your environment.
周辺地域の
認知地図を作り始めます
01:47
It's essentially this virtual map that only exists
頭の中にだけ存在する
”仮想地図”です
01:52
in your brain. All animal species do it,
それぞれの動物が
01:55
even though we all use slightly different tools.
それぞれの方法で
記憶の地図を作ります
01:58
Us humans, of course, we don't move around
人間は 自分のテリトリーに
02:01
marking our territory by scent, like dogs.
犬のように
マーキングしませんし
02:04
We don't run around emitting ultrasonic squeaks, like bats.
コウモリのように
超音波で鳴くこともありません
02:07
We just don't do that,
人間はそんなことをしません
02:12
although a night in the Temple Bar district can get pretty wild. (Laughter)
夜のテンプルバー地区では
雄叫びが聞こえますけどね(笑)
02:14
No, we do two important things to make a place our own.
場所を理解するのに
重要なことは2つ
02:19
First, we move along linear routes.
1つは道にそって移動すること
02:23
Typically we find a main street, and this main street
メインストリートがあると
記憶の地図では
02:26
becomes a linear strip map in our minds.
直線道路となります
02:29
But our mind keeps it pretty simple, yeah?
でも地図は簡単にしておきたいと
思いますよね?
02:32
Every street is generally perceived as a straight line,
それぞれの道を
まっすぐだと考えて
02:34
and we kind of ignore the little twists and turns that the streets make.
多少道が曲がっていても
気にしません
02:38
When we do, however, make a turn into a side street,
角を曲がると
02:42
our mind tends to adjust that turn to a 90-degree angle.
直角に曲がったと思い込みます
02:44
This of course makes for some funny moments
こう思い込んで
02:49
when you're in some old city layout that follows some sort of
古代都市のような
同心円状の都市に行くと
02:52
circular city logic, yeah?
おかしなことになりますよね?
02:56
Maybe you've had that experience as well, right?
恐らく体験したことがあるでしょう?
02:59
Let's say you're on some spot on a side street that projects
例えばあなたが
03:01
from a main cathedral square, and you want to get to
大聖堂に続く道の
ある地点から
03:05
another point on a side street just like that.
他の地点に行きたいとします
03:08
The cognitive map in your mind may tell you, "Aris,
頭の中では「アリス
03:12
go back to the main cathedral square, take
大聖堂広場にもどって直角に曲がれ
03:17
a 90-degree turn, and walk down that other side street."
そして他の通りに入るんだ」と言います
03:20
But somehow you feel adventurous that day,
しかしなぜかその日は冒険したい気分になります
03:23
and you suddenly discover that the two spots
そしてたった1つしかないはずの建物を
03:25
were actually only a single building apart.
2つの地点で見つけてしまいます
03:30
Now, I don't know about you, but I always feel like I find
こんな時私は
ワームホールか
03:33
this wormhole or this inter-dimensional portal.
次元間の入口に
遭遇した気分になります(笑)
03:35
So we move along linear routes
人は移動する時
03:40
and our mind straightens streets and perceives turns
まっすぐに進んで
直角に角を曲がる
03:43
as 90-degree angles.
と感じるのです
03:48
The second thing that we do to make a place our own
2つ目に重要なことは
03:49
is we attach meaning and emotions to the things
人は移動中に目にしたものを
03:52
that we see along those lines.
自分の経験と関連付ける
ということです
03:57
If you go to the Irish countryside, and you ask an old lady
田舎に行って
老婦人に道を尋ねると
03:59
for directions, brace yourself for some elaborate
いくつかの目印の建物
それぞれにまつわる
04:04
Irish storytelling about all the landmarks. Yeah?
昔話をされるでしょう
04:08
She'll tell you the pub where her sister used to work,
"" 妹が昔働いていたパブ”とか
04:12
and go past the church where I got married, that kind of thing.
”私が結婚式を挙げた教会""の前を通る
と言って教えてくれます
04:15
So we fill our cognitive maps with these markers of meaning.
人は認知地図に
意味でマークをしていきます
04:18
What's more, we abstract,
人はこれを抽象化して
04:22
repeat patterns, and recognize them.
パターンを繰り返し 認識します
04:25
We recognize them by the experiences,
経験を通して認識して
04:28
and we abstract them into symbols.
これを抽象化します
04:31
And of course, we are all capable
人は このシンボルを
理解する能力に
04:34
of understanding these symbols. (Laughter)
実に長けています
(笑)
04:37
What's more, we're all capable of understanding
さらに重要なことに人は
04:40
the cognitive maps, and you are all capable
認知地図を読むことにも
04:43
of creating these cognitive maps yourselves.
作ることにも優れています
04:47
So next time, when you want to tell your friend how to get to your place,
自宅までの道順を友人に教える時
04:51
you grab a beermat, grab a napkin,
コースターかナプキンをとって
04:54
and you just observe yourself create this awesome piece
あなたは
コミュニケーションデザインの
04:57
of communication design. It's got straight lines.
最高傑作を作ろうとします
05:01
It's got 90 degree corners.
直線と直角
05:05
You might add little symbols along the way.
それにいくつかの目印を
書き加えます
05:07
And when you look at what you've just drawn,
出来上がったものは
05:09
you realize it does not resemble a street map.
市街地図とは全く違うことに
気付くでしょう
05:13
If you were to put an actual street map
二つを比べると
あなたが描いたものは
05:18
on top of what you've just drawn, you'd realize your streets
実際の市街地図とは
05:21
and the distances, they'd be way off.
地理的にかなり
違いがありますよね
05:24
No, what you've just drawn
あなたが描いたのは
05:28
is more like a diagram or a schematic.
むしろ模式図に似ています
05:30
It's a visual construct of lines, dots, letters,
脳の言葉でデザインされた
05:34
designed in the language of our brains.
線と点と文字の視覚的構図です
05:38
So it's no big surprise that the big information design icon
今では世界中の路線図の
基礎となっている
05:41
of the last century, the pinnacle of showing everybody
ロンドン地下鉄路線図を
20世紀に考案したのが
05:46
how to get from A to B, the London Underground map,
地図や都市計画の
専門家でなくても
05:51
was not designed by a cartographer or a city planner.
驚くことではありません
05:54
It was designed by an engineering draftsman.
デザインしたのは
建築製図家でした
05:59
In the 1930s, Harry Beck applied the principles of
1930年代 ハリー・ベックは
06:03
schematic diagram design, and changed
図式的配置ダイアグラムを
路線図に採用し
06:07
the way public transport maps are designed forever.
路線図のデザインを改革しました
06:12
Now the very key to the success of this map
地図を描くために重要なポイントは
06:16
is in the omission of less important information
重要でない情報を削除することと
06:19
and in the extreme simplification.
徹底的に簡略化することです
06:24
So straightened streets, corners of 90 and 45 degrees,
直線と直角または45度の角
06:26
but also the extreme geographic distortion in that map.
そして地理的な正確性に
縛られないことです
06:31
If you were to look at the actual locations of these stations,
実際の駅の位置とくらべると
06:36
you'd see they're very different. Yeah?
かなり違いがありますよね?
06:41
But this is all for the clarity of the public tube map.
この違いこそが地下鉄路線図を
分かりやすくしています
06:43
Yeah? If you, say, wanted to get from Regent's Park Station
リージェント公園駅から
グレート・ポートランド・ストリート駅に行くなら
06:48
to Great Portland Street, the tube map would tell you,
路線図ではベーカー街へ行って
06:51
take the tube, go to Baker Street, change over, take another tube.
別の地下鉄に
乗り換えることになっています
06:54
Of course, what you don't know is that the two stations
ところがこの2駅は
06:59
are only about a hundred meters apart.
100メートルしか離れていないのです
07:02
Now we've reached the subject of public transport,
では公共交通機関の話題です
07:06
and public transport here in Dublin
ダブリンの公共交通機関と言えば
07:09
is a somewhat touchy subject. (Laughter)
ちょっと微妙な話になりますね
(笑)
07:11
For everybody who does not know the public transport here in Dublin,
ダブリンの公共交通機関を
知らない皆さん
07:15
essentially we have this system of local buses
ダブリンには昔から
バスが走っています
07:19
that grew with the city. For every outskirt that was added,
郊外にお住まいの皆さん
07:22
there was another bus route added running
郊外からは
07:26
from the outskirt all the way to the city center,
ダブリン市内までを走る
バスがありました
07:28
and as these local buses approach the city center,
バスが市中心部に近づくと
07:32
they all run side by side, and converge in pretty much
それぞれのバスが
07:37
one main street.
メインストリートで合流します
07:40
So when I stepped off the boat 12 years ago,
12年前
私が移住してきて間もない頃
07:42
I tried to make sense of that,
私はこの路線図を
覚えようとしました
07:46
because exploring a city on foot only gets you so far.
歩いて街を散策しても
たかが知れています
07:49
But when you explore a foreign and new public transport system,
外国で電車やバスに乗ると
07:55
you will build a cognitive map in your mind
認知地図が
07:59
in pretty much the same way.
頭の中で作られます
08:03
Typically, you choose yourself a rapid transport route,
普通 高速路線を使うと
08:06
and in your mind this route is perceived as a straight line,
路線はまっすぐで
08:11
and like a pearl necklace, all the stations and stops
全ての駅は
真珠のネックレスの様に
08:15
are nicely and neatly aligned along the line,
きちんと並んでいると感じます
08:18
and only then you start to discover some local bus routes
市街地との
隔たりを埋める道や
08:22
that would fill in the gaps and that allow you for those
近道を発見するのは
08:27
wormhole, inter-dimensional portal shortcuts.
ローカルバスに乗った時だけです
08:31
So I tried to make sense, and when I arrived,
私がダブリンに着いた時
08:36
I was looking for some information leaflets that would
このシステムを
噛み砕いて理解するために
08:40
help me crack this system and understand it,
観光情報リーフレットを
探していました
08:43
and I found those brochures. (Laughter)
するとこんなリーフレットを
見つけました(笑)
08:46
They were not geographically distorted.
この地図は地理的には
正確に描かれています
08:52
They were having a lot of omission of information,
情報は省略されていて
08:55
but unfortunately the wrong information, say, in the city center.
市中心部の情報が間違っています
09:00
There were never actually any lines that showed the routes.
路線図を示す線が
全く描かれていなくて
09:04
There are actually not even any stations with names.
駅名すらありません
09:08
Now the maps of Dublin transport, have gotten better,
最近のダブリンの路線図は
良くなりました
09:14
and after I finished the project, they got a good bit better,
プロジェクトを終えてから
さらに改善されましたが
09:18
but still no station names, still no routes.
駅名と乗り換えルートは
未だに載っていません
09:25
So, being naive, and being half-German, I decided,
素朴かつドイツの血をひくものとして
自分に問いかけました
09:28
"Aris, why don't you build your own map?"
「アリス 自分で地図を作ったらどうだい?」
09:34
So that's what I did. I researched how each
そこで私は
09:37
and every bus route moved through the city,
それぞれのバスの路線を
調査して
09:40
nice and logical, every bus route a separate line,
分かりやすく色分けしました
09:43
and I plotted it into my own map of Dublin,
そして作成した地図が
こちらです
09:47
and in the city center,
ダブリンの市中心部は
09:50
I got a nice spaghetti plate. (Laughter)
皿に盛られた
スパゲッティの様です(笑)
09:53
Now this is a bit of a mess, so I decided, of course,
かなりゴチャゴチャしているので
09:57
you're going to apply the rules of schematic design,
回路図設計のルールを応用して
10:03
cleaning up the corridors, widening the streets
密集している個所を整理し
10:07
where there were loads of buses, and making the streets
バスの通りが多い道を広げます
10:09
at straight, 90-degree corners, 45-degree corners, or fractions of that,
直線と直角または45度の角で
10:13
and filled it in with the bus routes. And I built this city center
5年前に作成した
市中心部の路線図が
10:17
bus map of the system, how it was five years ago.
こちらです
10:22
I'll zoom in again so that you get the full impact of
拡大してみると
キー通りとウエストモーランド通りの―
10:26
the quays and Westmoreland Street. (Laughter)
すごさがわかります(笑)
10:29
Now I can proudly say — (Applause) —
自信を持って言えます(拍手)
10:33
I can proudly say, as a public transport map,
確信があります この路線図は
10:42
this diagram is an utter failure — (Laughter) —
大失敗です
(笑)
10:46
except probably in one aspect:
しかしある一面においては
成功と言えます
10:52
I now had a great visual representation
この図で
市の中心が混雑している状況を
10:54
of just how clogged up and overrun the city center really was.
視覚的に表現できました
10:57
Now call me old-fashioned, right, but I think
時代遅れと呼ばれても構いません
11:01
a public transport route map should have lines,
でも路線図には”線”が不可欠です
11:04
because that's what they are. Yeah?
”線”があってこそ路線図ですよね?
11:07
They're little pieces of string that wrap their way
路線図は市中心部から郊外までの道を
11:09
through the city center, or through the city.
いくつもの線でつなげているのです
11:13
If you will, the Greek guy inside of me feels, if I don't
ギリシャ人的なとらえ方をすれば
11:16
get a line, it's like entering the Labyrinth of the Minotaur
路線図に線を使わないのは
アリアドネ姫がくれた糸玉を持たずに
11:19
without having Ariadne giving you the string to find your way.
ミノタウロスの迷宮に入るみたいだ
ということです
11:24
So the outcome of my academic research,
私の研究で
11:27
loads of questionnaires, case studies,
たくさんのアンケートと事例研究
11:31
and looking at a lot of maps, was that a lot of the problems
そして地図を見た結果
多くの問題点が
11:35
and shortcomings of the public transport system here in Dublin
ダブリンの交通機関に
あることがわかりました
11:40
was the lack of a coherent public transport map --
問題点の一つは
路線図が読みづらいこと
11:43
a simplified, coherent public transport map --
つまり簡略化されていない
ということです
11:46
because I think this is the crucial step to understanding
なぜなら路線図は
11:48
a public transport network on a physical level,
交通網を物理的に
理解するためだけではなく
11:51
but it's also the crucial step to make
視覚的に
マッピングするためにも
11:55
a public transport network mappable on a visual level.
極めて重要だからです
11:57
So I teamed up with a gentleman called James Leahy,
そこで私は 土木技師であり
12:01
a civil engineer and a recent Master's graduate of
ダブリン工科大学では
環境維持開発で修士号を取った―
12:05
the Sustainable Development Program at DIT,
ジェイムズ・リーヒ氏と協力し
12:08
and together we drafted this simplified model network
私がずっと思い描いていた
12:12
which I could then go ahead and visualize.
簡略化された路線図を
作成しました
12:16
So here's what we did.
こちらです
12:19
We distributed these rapid transport corridors
高速輸送の路線を
12:21
throughout the city center, and extended them into the outskirts.
市中心部から郊外へと
分布させました
12:26
Rapid, because we wanted them to be served
なぜ高速かというと
12:31
by rapid transport vehicles, yeah?
高速車両を使いたかったのです
12:33
They would get exclusive road use, where possible,
可能な限り
道路を独占的に走り
12:37
and it would be high-quantity, high-quality transport.
本数を多く 質を高くしたいからです
12:40
James wanted to use bus rapid transport for that,
ジェイムズはこれに
路面電車ではなく
12:43
rather than light rail. For me, it was important
バスを使いたかったのです
12:46
that the vehicles that would run on those rapid transport corridors
私にとって重要なのは
高速車両が
12:49
would be visibly distinguishable from local buses on the street.
道路を走るローカルバスと
容易に区別できることです
12:53
Now we could take out all the local buses
高速輸送と並行して走るローカルバスを
12:59
that ran alongside those rapid transport means.
路線図から取り除いてみます
13:03
Any gaps that appeared in the outskirts were filled again.
郊外でバスが来ないところには
バスを戻します
13:06
So, in other words, if there was a street in an outskirt
言い換えると
かつてバスが行き来していた道が
13:09
where there had been a bus, we put a bus back in,
郊外にあったら
バスを戻しますが
13:12
only now these buses wouldn't run all the way to the city center
今度は市の中心までは
行かせません
13:15
but connect to the nearest rapid transport mode,
でも一番近くにある高速路線
つまり
13:20
one of these thick lines over there.
この中の太線のどれかと
接続させます
13:23
So the rest was merely a couple of months of work,
あとは数か月の作業と
13:25
and a couple of fights with my girlfriend of our place
地図で足の踏み場もない
我が家のことで
13:29
constantly being clogged up with maps,
彼女とちょっとケンカするだけです
13:32
and the outcome, one of the outcomes, was this map
そしてその結果の一つが
13:35
of the Greater Dublin Area. I'll zoom in a little bit.
ダブリン都市圏地図です
少し拡大すると
13:38
This map only shows the rapid transport connections,
この地図には高速路線との連絡だけが
描かれていて
13:43
no local bus, very much in the Metro map style
ローカルバスの路線は示してありません
13:46
that was so successful in London, and that since
ロンドンの地下鉄路線図に良く似ています
13:50
has been exported to so many other major cities,
これは世界中の主要都市に
広まったので
13:54
and therefore is the language that we should use
公共交通路線図にはこのスタイルが
13:57
for public transport maps.
適しています
13:59
What's also important is, with a simplified network like this,
この様に
ネットワークを簡略化することは重要です
14:02
it now would become possible for me
私はもう
14:08
to tackle the ultimate challenge,
この究極の課題に取り組んで
14:10
and make a public transport map for the city center,
市中心部の路線図を
作成できるようになりました
14:14
one where it wouldn't just show rapid transport connections
高速路線との接続だけではなくて
14:17
but also all the local bus routes, streets and the likes,
ローカルバスの路線や道なんかも
14:20
and this is what a map like this could like.
この地図では確認できます
14:24
I'll zoom in a little bit.
拡大しましょう
14:26
In this map, I'm including each transport mode,
この地図では 高速路線、バス
14:29
so rapid transport, bus, DART, tram and the likes.
DART、路面電車
全ての路線が確認できます
14:36
Each individual route is represented by a separate line.
路線は個々に
独立した線で描かれていて
14:41
The map shows each and every station,
それぞれの停留所名も
14:47
each and every station name,
記されています
14:52
and I'm also displaying side streets,
私はこれに
小さな通りも書き加えました
14:55
in fact, most of the side streets even with their name,
ほとんどの小道にも
名前を入れました
15:00
and for good measure, also a couple of landmarks,
おまけとして
15:04
some of them signified by little symbols,
小さな記号と
15:08
others by these isometric three-dimensional
3Dのパノラマ図で
15:11
bird's-eye-view drawings.
目印の建物を添えました
15:14
The map is relatively small in overall size,
この地図は
比較的小さいので
15:16
so something that you could still hold as a fold-out map,
携帯用の折り畳み地図として
便利です
15:19
or display in a reasonably-sized display box on a bus shelter.
またはバス待合所に
掲示するのに丁度いいでしょう
15:22
I think it tries to be the best balance
私がこだわったのは
15:26
between actual representation
実際の見た目と単純化の
最高のバランス
15:30
and simplification, the language of way-finding in our brain.
いわば「脳の道路探索言語」です
15:33
So straightened lines, cleaned-up corners,
だから直線と直角または45度の角
15:39
and, of course, that very, very important
そして路線図に最も重要なのは
15:42
geographic distortion that makes public transport maps possible.
地理的な正確性に
縛られないことです
15:44
If you, for example, have a look at the two main
たとえばあなたが
15:49
corridors that run through the city,
街を通る
2つの主要路線を見たら
15:51
the yellow and orange one over here, this is how
この地図でいう
黄色とオレンジの線ですが
15:54
they look in an actual, accurate street map,
精密な地図では
このように見えます
15:56
and this is how they would look in my distorted,
そしてこちらが私の作成した
15:59
simplified public transport map.
地理的な正確性を無視して
単純化した路線図です
16:03
So for a successful public transport map,
公共交通路線図を作成する時の
ポイントは
16:06
we should not stick to accurate representation,
精密さに縛られるよりも
16:09
but design them in the way our brains work.
明確に分かりやすく
デザインすることです
16:11
The reactions I got were tremendous. It was really good to see.
この路線図は大反響を呼びました
とてもうれしかった
16:14
And of course, for my own self, I was very happy to see
そして何と言っても
16:17
that my folks in Germany and Greece finally have an idea
ドイツやギリシャにいる家族に
やっと私の仕事を分かってもらえて
16:21
what I do for a living. (Laughter) Thank you. (Applause)
とてもうれしかったです(笑)
ありがとう(拍手)
16:24
Translator:Yuko Masubuchi
Reviewer:Masaki Yanagishita

sponsored links

Aris Venetikidis - Mapmaker
Aris Venetikidis imagines how maps work with our minds.

Why you should listen

Aris Venetikidis is a graphic designer with a passion for map design and public transport network visualisation. His project “Designing an integrated map for a visionary public transport network in Dublin” earned him the IDI Graduate Masters Award and IDI Graduate Grand Prix in 2010, as well as press coverage in major Irish and Greek newspapers. Aris studied at the National College of Art and Design ind Dublin and has been working as a designer in agencies or as an independent designer and photographer since.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.