sponsored links
TEDGlobal 2014

Glenn Greenwald: Why privacy matters

グレン・グリーンウォルド: なぜプライバシーは重要なのか

October 2, 2014

グレン・グリーンウォルドは、エドワード・スノーデンの機密ファイルを最初に目にし記事にした記者の1人でした。そのファイルから明らかになったのは、アメリカ政府が一般市民を大規模に監視している事実です。グリーンウォルドは強い口調で、たとえ「隠さなければならないことなどない」場合でもプライバシーは気にかける必要がある理由を説いています。

Glenn Greenwald - Journalist
Glenn Greenwald is the journalist who has done the most to expose and explain the Edward Snowden files. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
There is an entire genre of YouTube videos
YouTubeには
ある種の体験を扱った —
00:12
devoted to an experience which
一群のビデオがあります
00:15
I am certain that everyone in this room has had.
ここにいる皆さんにも
同じような体験があるはずです
00:17
It entails an individual who,
そこに映っているのは
00:20
thinking they're alone,
他に人はいないと思って
00:22
engages in some expressive behavior —
何らかの表現行為を
している人物です
00:23
wild singing, gyrating dancing,
絶唱していたり
踊り狂っていたり
00:27
some mild sexual activity —
ちょっとした性的行動を
していたり・・・
00:29
only to discover that, in fact, they are not alone,
ところが実際は自分一人ではなく
00:32
that there is a person watching and lurking,
ひそかに見ている人間が
いるのに気付き
00:34
the discovery of which causes them
恐怖に打たれて
00:37
to immediately cease what they were doing
それまでしていたことを
00:39
in horror.
はたと止める —
というものです
00:41
The sense of shame and humiliation
恥や屈辱を感じていることが
00:43
in their face is palpable.
表情に はっきり見て取れます
00:45
It's the sense of,
こんな感情です
00:47
"This is something I'm willing to do
「誰か見ていると知っていたら
00:49
only if no one else is watching."
絶対こんなことは
しなかったのに・・・」
00:51
This is the crux of the work
これが16か月に渡り
私が特に集中して
00:54
on which I have been singularly focused
取り組んできた活動の核心 —
00:57
for the last 16 months,
「なぜプライバシーが
00:59
the question of why privacy matters,
重要なのか」という問題です
01:01
a question that has arisen
この問題が持ち上がった背景には
01:03
in the context of a global debate,
エドワード・スノーデンの
暴露に端を発する —
01:05
enabled by the revelations of Edward Snowden
世界的な議論があります
01:08
that the United States and its partners,
アメリカとその同盟国は
01:10
unbeknownst to the entire world,
世界中の誰も知らないうちに
01:13
has converted the Internet,
以前は
01:15
once heralded as an unprecedented tool
自由化と民主化の
かつてないツールとして
01:17
of liberation and democratization,
歓迎されていたインターネットを
01:20
into an unprecedented zone
かつてない程の
01:23
of mass, indiscriminate surveillance.
無差別大量監視の場に
変えてきました
01:25
There is a very common sentiment
この議論では こんな意見が
01:29
that arises in this debate,
よく聞かれます
01:31
even among people who are uncomfortable
大量監視を快く思わない人々の
01:32
with mass surveillance, which says
間にさえ
広がっている意見です
01:34
that there is no real harm
「この大規模な
01:36
that comes from this large-scale invasion
権利侵害から実害は生じない
01:38
because only people who are engaged in bad acts
なぜなら
悪事を働いている人間だけが
01:41
have a reason to want to hide
人目を避けたり
01:44
and to care about their privacy.
プライバシーを気にする
動機があるからだ」
01:46
This worldview is implicitly grounded
この世界観が暗に根拠とする
考え方があります
01:49
in the proposition that there are
two kinds of people in the world,
「世界には2種類の人間 ―
01:52
good people and bad people.
善人と悪人がいる」
01:54
Bad people are those who plot terrorist attacks
悪人はテロ攻撃を画策し
暴力的な犯罪に
01:56
or who engage in violent criminality
関与しているからこそ
01:59
and therefore have reasons to
want to hide what they're doing,
自分の行為を隠し
プライバシーにこだわる —
02:00
have reasons to care about their privacy.
動機があるというのです
02:04
But by contrast, good people
一方で善人とは
02:06
are people who go to work,
仕事に行き
家に帰っては
02:08
come home, raise their children, watch television.
子育てをし
テレビを見るような人々です
02:10
They use the Internet not to plot bombing attacks
インターネットを
爆破テロの計画ではなく
02:13
but to read the news or exchange recipes
ニュースを読んだり
レシピを教え合ったり
02:16
or to plan their kids' Little League games,
リトルリーグの
試合を組むのに使い
02:18
and those people are doing nothing wrong
悪事に手を染めることなどないので
02:21
and therefore have nothing to hide
隠す事もなければ
02:23
and no reason to fear
政府による監視を
02:25
the government monitoring them.
恐れる理由もないというのです
02:27
The people who are actually saying that
でもこんなことを言う人々は
02:30
are engaged in a very extreme act
極度の自己軽視に
02:32
of self-deprecation.
陥っているのです
02:34
What they're really saying is,
実際には
こう言っているのも同然です
02:36
"I have agreed to make myself
「私は自分が
無害で 敵意のない
02:38
such a harmless and unthreatening
誰の関心も引かない人間に
なることに同意したので
02:40
and uninteresting person that I actually don't fear
自分が何をしているか
政府に知られたところで
02:43
having the government know what it is that I'm doing."
恐れることは何もない」
02:46
This mindset has found what I think
こういう考え方が
02:49
is its purest expression
最も純粋な形で
表れていると思うのが
02:51
in a 2009 interview with
GoogleのCEOを長く務めた
02:53
the longtime CEO of Google, Eric Schmidt, who,
エリック・シュミットの
2009年のインタビューです
02:55
when asked about all the different ways his company
世界中の何億もの人々に
02:58
is causing invasions of privacy
Googleがもたらしている
03:01
for hundreds of millions of people around the world,
様々なプライバシー問題について
質問されて
03:03
said this: He said,
彼はこう答えました
03:06
"If you're doing something that you don't want
「もし他人に知られたくない事を
03:08
other people to know,
やっているんだとしたら
03:09
maybe you shouldn't be doing it in the first place."
そもそも そんなことは
しない方が良いと思いますよ」
03:11
Now, there's all kinds of things to say about
この考え方に対しては
03:15
that mentality,
言うべきことが
山ほどあります
03:17
the first of which is that the people who say that,
まずプライバシーは
それほど重要ではないと
03:20
who say that privacy isn't really important,
主張している人も
03:23
they don't actually believe it,
実際には
そう考えてはいません
03:25
and the way you know that
they don't actually believe it
その証拠に
03:28
is that while they say with their
words that privacy doesn't matter,
プライバシーは重要でないと
言っておきながら
03:30
with their actions, they take all kinds of steps
実際には自分自身の
プライバシーを守るために
03:33
to safeguard their privacy.
あらゆる対策を
講じているのです
03:36
They put passwords on their email
メールとソーシャルメディアの
03:39
and their social media accounts,
アカウントにはパスワードをかけ
03:40
they put locks on their bedroom
自分の部屋やトイレの扉には
03:42
and bathroom doors,
カギをつけ
03:44
all steps designed to prevent other people
プライベートな領域だと
考えるものや
03:45
from entering what they consider their private realm
他人に知られたくないことに
03:48
and knowing what it is that they
don't want other people to know.
他人が触れることができないように
あらゆる手を打っています
03:51
The very same Eric Schmidt, the CEO of Google,
エリック・シュミット自身
03:55
ordered his employees at Google
オンラインマガジンCNETに
03:58
to cease speaking with the online
自分のプライベートな情報を
04:00
Internet magazine CNET
記事にされた時
04:02
after CNET published an article
Google社員に対し
04:05
full of personal, private information
CNETとの接触を禁じる
04:07
about Eric Schmidt,
指示を出しています
04:09
which it obtained exclusively
through Google searches
しかも その情報は
Google検索と
04:11
and using other Google products. (Laughter)
その他のGoogle製品だけを使って
入手したものでした(笑)
04:14
This same division can be seen
同様の矛盾は
04:18
with the CEO of Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg,
FacebookのCEO
マーク・ザッカーバーグにも見られます
04:20
who in an infamous interview in 2010
彼は評判の悪い2010年の
インタビューの中で
04:22
pronounced that privacy is no longer
プライバシーはもはや
04:26
a "social norm."
「社会的規範」ではないと
公言しています
04:28
Last year, Mark Zuckerberg and his new wife
ところが昨年
ザッカーバーグは新婚の妻と
04:31
purchased not only their own house
パロアルトに
04:34
but also all four adjacent houses in Palo Alto
自宅用の家に加えて
隣接する4軒を購入しました
04:36
for a total of 30 million dollars
総額3千万ドルです
04:40
in order to ensure that they enjoyed a zone of privacy
自分達の私生活を
04:41
that prevented other people from monitoring
他人に見られないよう
04:45
what they do in their personal lives.
私的空間を
確保するためです
04:47
Over the last 16 months, as I've
debated this issue around the world,
この16か月 私は世界中で
この問題を議論してきましたが
04:51
every single time somebody has said to me,
毎回こんな発言をする人がいます
04:53
"I don't really worry about invasions of privacy
「私には隠すことなどないから
04:56
because I don't have anything to hide."
プライバシーの侵害など
心配していない」
04:57
I always say the same thing to them.
その度に私は
同じことを言っています
04:59
I get out a pen, I write down my email address.
ペンを出しメールアドレスを
書いて言うのです
05:01
I say, "Here's my email address.
「これが私のアドレスです
05:03
What I want you to do when you get home
あなたが家に帰ったら
05:05
is email me the passwords
メールアカウントのパスワードを
05:06
to all of your email accounts,
全部 私に送ってください
05:08
not just the nice, respectable work one in your name,
あなた名義の
きちんとした仕事用のだけでなく
05:10
but all of them,
全部です
05:12
because I want to be able to just troll through
あなたがオンラインで
05:14
what it is you're doing online,
やっていることを探って
05:16
read what I want to read and
publish whatever I find interesting.
好きなだけ読み
面白いものは公表したいんです
05:18
After all, if you're not a bad person,
何しろあなたが悪人じゃなく
05:20
if you're doing nothing wrong,
悪いことなどしていないなら
05:22
you should have nothing to hide."
隠すべき事など
ないはずですよね」
05:24
Not a single person has taken me up on that offer.
これに応じた人は
今まで一人もいません
05:27
I check and — (Applause)
私は — (拍手)
05:30
I check that email account religiously all the time.
私はいつもそのメールアカウントを
チェックしていますが
05:34
It's a very desolate place.
誰も送ってきません
05:38
And there's a reason for that,
それには理由があります
05:41
which is that we as human beings,
私達は人間として
05:43
even those of us who in words
たとえ言葉では
05:45
disclaim the importance of our own privacy,
プライバシーの重要性を
否定する人でさえ
05:47
instinctively understand
心の底ではプライバシーが
05:49
the profound importance of it.
重要だとわかっているからです
05:51
It is true that as human beings, we're social animals,
確かに我々人間は
社会的な動物です
05:53
which means we have a need for other people
自分の行動や
発言や考えを
05:56
to know what we're doing and saying and thinking,
人に知って
欲しいという欲求があり
05:58
which is why we voluntarily publish
information about ourselves online.
だからこそ自発的にネットで
自分の情報を公開もするのです
06:01
But equally essential to what it means
しかし 自由で満ち足りた
人間であるために
06:05
to be a free and fulfilled human being
同様に不可欠なのは
06:08
is to have a place that we can go
他人の批判の目から
06:11
and be free of the judgmental eyes of other people.
逃れられる場所がある
ということです
06:13
There's a reason why we seek that out,
そういう場所を求めるのには
06:17
and our reason is that all of us —
理由があり
それは私達の誰にでも —
06:19
not just terrorists and criminals, all of us —
テロリストや犯罪者だけでなく
私達の誰にでも —
06:22
have things to hide.
隠したいことがあるからです
06:25
There are all sorts of things that we do and think
私達の行動や思考の中には
06:27
that we're willing to tell our physician
医者や弁護士や
06:30
or our lawyer or our psychologist or our spouse
精神分析医や伴侶や
親友には言えるけれど
06:33
or our best friend that we would be mortified
もし世間に知れたら
恥ずかしくてたまらない —
06:36
for the rest of the world to learn.
そんなことは
いくらでもあります
06:39
We make judgments every single day
私達は日々 —
06:41
about the kinds of things that we say and think and do
他の人に知られてもよい
06:43
that we're willing to have other people know,
発言や考えや行動と
06:45
and the kinds of things that we say and think and do
誰にも知られたくない
06:47
that we don't want anyone else to know about.
発言や考えや行動について
判断しています
06:49
People can very easily in words claim
「プライバシーなど気にしない」と
06:51
that they don't value their privacy,
言葉では簡単に言えても
06:55
but their actions negate the authenticity of that belief.
行動を見ると 本当は
そうではないことがわかります
06:57
Now, there's a reason why privacy is so craved
プライバシーが これほど例外なく
本能的に求められるのには
07:02
universally and instinctively.
理由があります
07:06
It isn't just a reflexive movement
それは呼吸とか水を飲むような
07:07
like breathing air or drinking water.
単なる反射運動ではないのです
07:09
The reason is that when we're in a state
その理由とは
07:12
where we can be monitored,
where we can be watched,
監視され 人に見られている
かもしれない状況下では
07:14
our behavior changes dramatically.
私達の行動は
劇的に変化してしまうからです
07:17
The range of behavioral options that we consider
誰かに見られている感じがすると
07:20
when we think we're being watched
私達がとりうる行動は
07:23
severely reduce.
著しく制限されてしまいます
07:25
This is just a fact of human nature
これは人間の本質に関わる事実で
07:27
that has been recognized in social science
社会科学 文学 宗教など
あらゆる分野で
07:29
and in literature and in religion
受け入れられていると
07:31
and in virtually every field of discipline.
言ってもいいでしょう
07:33
There are dozens of psychological studies
数十の心理学上の研究でも
証明されています
07:35
that prove that when somebody knows
監視されるかも知れないと
07:38
that they might be watched,
わかっている場合 —
07:41
the behavior they engage in
人間は大幅に
07:42
is vastly more conformist and compliant.
迎合的で従順な行動を
取りがちなのです
07:44
Human shame is a very powerful motivator,
羞恥心は
人が避けたいものであり
07:47
as is the desire to avoid it,
非常に強い動機として働きます
07:51
and that's the reason why people,
だからこそ人間は
07:54
when they're in a state of
being watched, make decisions
誰かに見られている時は
07:55
not that are the byproduct of their own agency
主体的な意志よりも
07:57
but that are about the expectations
他人からの期待や
08:01
that others have of them
社会通念上の要求に
08:03
or the mandates of societal orthodoxy.
従った決定をするのです
08:04
This realization was exploited most powerfully
この認識を最も上手く
実用的に利用したのが
08:09
for pragmatic ends by the 18th-
century philosopher Jeremy Bentham,
18世紀の哲学者
ジェレミー・ベンサムです
08:11
who set out to resolve an important problem
彼は産業化時代が招いた
大きな問題を
08:16
ushered in by the industrial age,
解決しようとしました
08:18
where, for the first time, institutions had become
この時代になると
施設の大規模化と
08:20
so large and centralized
中央集権化が進んだために
08:22
that they were no longer able to monitor
個々の人間の監視や
08:24
and therefore control each one
of their individual members,
管理ができなくなりました
08:26
and the solution that he devised
そこでベンサムが
08:29
was an architectural design
考案した解決策は
08:31
originally intended to be implemented in prisons
刑務所を想定した
建築デザイン —
08:33
that he called the panopticon,
「パノプティコン」です
08:36
the primary attribute of which was the construction
その最大の特徴は
施設の中心に
08:38
of an enormous tower in the center of the institution
巨大なタワーを
建てる点にありました
08:40
where whoever controlled the institution
施設の管理者は
そのタワーから
08:43
could at any moment watch any of the inmates,
どの収容者だろうと
いつでも監視できます
08:46
although they couldn't watch all of them at all times.
ただ常に全員を
監視することは不可能です
08:48
And crucial to this design
このデザインの核心は
08:52
was that the inmates could not actually
収容された人間からは
08:54
see into the panopticon, into the tower,
このタワーの中が
見えないことです
08:55
and so they never knew
だから監視の有無や
08:58
if they were being watched or even when.
いつ監視されているかは
絶対にわかりません
09:00
And what made him so excited about this discovery
そのことに気づいた
ベンサムは興奮しました
09:02
was that that would mean that the prisoners
監視の有無がわからないなら
09:06
would have to assume that they were being watched
収容された人間は
常に監視されていると
09:08
at any given moment,
仮定せざるを得なくなり
09:11
which would be the ultimate enforcer
それが服従と従順を強いる —
09:12
for obedience and compliance.
究極の方法になるからです
09:14
The 20th-century French philosopher Michel Foucault
20世紀フランスの哲学者
ミシェル・フーコーは
09:18
realized that that model could be used
このモデルが刑務所だけでなく
09:21
not just for prisons but for every institution
人の行動を管理しようとする
あらゆる施設に
09:23
that seeks to control human behavior:
適用できることに気づきました
09:26
schools, hospitals, factories, workplaces.
すなわち学校や病院
工場や職場です
09:28
And what he said was that this mindset,
フーコーによれば
ベンサムが発見した
09:31
this framework discovered by Bentham,
この考え方 この枠組みこそ
09:33
was the key means of societal control
現代の西欧社会における
09:35
for modern, Western societies,
社会統制の重要な手段なのです
09:39
which no longer need
西欧社会ではもはや
あからさまな —
09:41
the overt weapons of tyranny —
恐怖政治の武器は
必要ありません
09:42
punishing or imprisoning or killing dissidents,
反体制派の処罰や
投獄や殺害も不要なら
09:44
or legally compelling loyalty to a particular party —
法的に忠誠を強要する
必要もありません
09:47
because mass surveillance creates
大量監視は
人の心の中に
09:50
a prison in the mind
刑務所を作り出すからです
09:52
that is a much more subtle
これは社会規範や
09:55
though much more effective means
社会通念への
09:57
of fostering compliance with social norms
服従を促す手段としては
09:59
or with social orthodoxy,
力で屈服させるやり方よりも
10:02
much more effective
ずっと目立ちにくい上に
10:03
than brute force could ever be.
はるかに効果的なのです
10:05
The most iconic work of literature about surveillance
監視とプライバシーに関する
最も有名な文学作品は
10:08
and privacy is the George Orwell novel "1984,"
ジョージ・オーウェルの
『1984年』でしょう
10:11
which we all learn in school, and
therefore it's almost become a cliche.
みんな学校で習うので
陳腐にすら感じられます
10:14
In fact, whenever you bring it up
in a debate about surveillance,
実際 監視の議論で
この小説を取り上げても
10:18
people instantaneously dismiss it
現状には当てはまらないと
10:20
as inapplicable, and what they say is,
簡単に片付けられてしまいます
10:22
"Oh, well in '1984,' there were
monitors in people's homes,
「『1984年』では
各家庭に監視装置があって
10:24
they were being watched at every given moment,
どんな時でも
監視されていたけれど
10:28
and that has nothing to do with
the surveillance state that we face."
それは私達が直面する
監視国家とは全然違う」
10:30
That is an actual fundamental misapprehension
でもそれはオーウェルが
『1984年』で発した警告を
10:34
of the warnings that Orwell issued in "1984."
根本的に誤解しています
10:37
The warning that he was issuing
彼が警告したのは
10:39
was about a surveillance state
全員が常時監視されるような
10:41
not that monitored everybody at all times,
監視国家ではありません
10:43
but where people were aware that they could
いつ監視されてるかわからないと
10:45
be monitored at any given moment.
人々が感じている国家です
10:47
Here is how Orwell's narrator, Winston Smith,
語り手である
ウィンストン・スミスが
10:49
described the surveillance system
自分達の目前にある監視システムが
10:52
that they faced:
どんなものか説明しています
10:54
"There was, of course, no way of knowing
「どの時点で監視されているかは
10:55
whether you were being watched
at any given moment."
知りようがなかった」
10:57
He went on to say,
彼はさらに続けます
11:00
"At any rate, they could plug in your wire
「いずれにせよ彼らは好きな時に
11:01
whenever they wanted to.
監視装置に接続できた
11:03
You had to live, did live,
発する音はすべて盗聴され
11:05
from habit that became instinct,
暗闇の中でない限り
11:07
in the assumption that every sound you made
すべての動きが
観察されているという前提で
11:09
was overheard and except in darkness
生きるしかなかったし
11:12
every movement scrutinized."
実際そう生きていた
習慣は本能になっていた」
11:14
The Abrahamic religions similarly posit
ユダヤ教 キリスト教
イスラム教はどれも
11:17
that there's an invisible, all-knowing authority
目に見えない
全知全能の神を前提としています
11:20
who, because of its omniscience,
神は全知全能なので
11:23
always watches whatever you're doing,
人間のあらゆる行いを
常に見ていて
11:25
which means you never have a private moment,
人間には私的な時間など
一瞬たりともなく
11:27
the ultimate enforcer
それが神の言葉への —
11:30
for obedience to its dictates.
服従を強制する
究極の手段となるのです
11:31
What all of these seemingly disparate works
共通点が無いように見える
これらすべてが認め
11:34
recognize, the conclusion that they all reach,
共通してたどり着いている
結論があります
11:38
is that a society in which people
人々がいつでも
11:40
can be monitored at all times
監視されうる社会とは
11:43
is a society that breeds conformity
画一化と服従と隷属を
11:45
and obedience and submission,
生み出す社会なのです
11:48
which is why every tyrant,
だから圧政者はみんな
11:50
the most overt to the most subtle,
誰から見ても明らかな者であれ
11:52
craves that system.
影に隠れた者であれ
そんなシステムを欲します
11:54
Conversely, even more importantly,
逆に これはさらに重要なことですが
11:56
it is a realm of privacy,
プライバシーの領域 すなわち
11:59
the ability to go somewhere where we can think
他人が投げかける
批判の目から逃れて
12:01
and reason and interact and speak
何かを思い 考え 交流し
12:04
without the judgmental eyes
of others being cast upon us,
話すことができる場所へ
行ける時に 初めて
12:07
in which creativity and exploration
創造や探究や反論は
12:11
and dissent exclusively reside,
可能になるのです
12:14
and that is the reason why,
だからこそ
12:17
when we allow a society to exist
私達が常時監視社会の
12:19
in which we're subject to constant monitoring,
存在を許すとしたら
12:22
we allow the essence of human freedom
人間的な自由の本質が
大きく損なわれるのを
12:24
to be severely crippled.
認めることになります
12:27
The last point I want to observe about this mindset,
最後に述べたいことがあります
「悪事を働く人間だけに
12:30
the idea that only people who
are doing something wrong
隠すべきことがあって
12:33
have things to hide and therefore
reasons to care about privacy,
プライバシーを気にする動機がある」
という見方についてです
12:35
is that it entrenches two very destructive messages,
この見方を通して
2種類の極めて危険なメッセージ —
12:39
two destructive lessons,
2つの危険な考えが
すり込まれます
12:43
the first of which is that
危険な考えの1つは
12:45
the only people who care about privacy,
プライバシーに関心を持ち
12:47
the only people who will seek out privacy,
プライバシーを
求める人間が
12:49
are by definition bad people.
必然的に「悪人」と
見なされてしまうということです
12:51
This is a conclusion that we should have
こんな結論は
12:55
all kinds of reasons for avoiding,
何としてでも避けるべきです
12:57
the most important of which is that when you say,
大きな理由の1つは
12:59
"somebody who is doing bad things,"
一般に「悪事を働く人間」と言う場合
13:02
you probably mean things
like plotting a terrorist attack
テロ攻撃の計画や
暴力犯罪に関わるような人を
13:05
or engaging in violent criminality,
指しますが
13:07
a much narrower conception
これは権力を
行使する側の人々の言う
13:09
of what people who wield power mean
「悪事」よりもずっと
13:12
when they say, "doing bad things."
意味が狭いのです
13:14
For them, "doing bad things" typically means
権力者にとっての「悪事」は
13:17
doing something that poses meaningful challenges
権力行使の妨げになる行為を
13:19
to the exercise of our own power.
指すのが普通なのです
13:22
The other really destructive
この見方から生じる
13:25
and, I think, even more insidious lesson
もう1つの危険な考えは
13:27
that comes from accepting this mindset
はるかに狡猾なものです
13:29
is there's an implicit bargain
この見方を受け入れた人々は
13:32
that people who accept this mindset have accepted,
知らないうちに
ある取引をしたことになります
13:34
and that bargain is this:
こんな取引です
13:38
If you're willing to render yourself
「もしあなたが
13:39
sufficiently harmless,
政治権力を行使する側に対して
13:41
sufficiently unthreatening
危害や脅威を及ぼさないことを
13:43
to those who wield political power,
同意する場合に限って
13:45
then and only then can you be free
監視されるという危険から
13:47
of the dangers of surveillance.
逃れることができる
13:50
It's only those who are dissidents,
心配しなければならないのは
13:52
who challenge power,
反体制派や
13:55
who have something to worry about.
権力に反抗する人間だけである」
13:56
There are all kinds of reasons why we
should want to avoid that lesson as well.
こんな考えは何としても
避けなければならないはずです
13:58
You may be a person who, right now,
今は反対や抵抗をしようとは
14:02
doesn't want to engage in that behavior,
思わないかも知れません
14:04
but at some point in the future you might.
でも そうしたくなる時が
来るかも知れないのです
14:06
Even if you're somebody who decides
たとえ そんな行為に関わらないと
14:08
that you never want to,
自分では決意している場合でも
14:10
the fact that there are other people
権力に進んで反抗し
14:12
who are willing to and able to resist
抗議する人々が
いるということ —
14:13
and be adversarial to those in power —
反体制派や
ジャーナリストや
14:16
dissidents and journalists
活動家といった
様々な人間が
14:18
and activists and a whole range of others —
存在するという事実は
14:19
is something that brings us all collective good
社会全体に
善をもたらしますし
14:21
that we should want to preserve.
みんなそれは
維持したいと思うはずです
14:24
Equally critical is that the measure
同様に重要な点があります
14:27
of how free a society is
社会の自由度は
14:29
is not how it treats its good,
善良で従順で服従する市民を
14:31
obedient, compliant citizens,
その社会が
どう扱うかではなく
14:33
but how it treats its dissidents
反体制派や
14:36
and those who resist orthodoxy.
権力に抵抗する人々を
どう扱うかで決まるのです
14:38
But the most important reason
しかし何より重要な理由は
14:41
is that a system of mass surveillance
大量監視システムが
14:42
suppresses our own freedom in all sorts of ways.
私達の自由を
あらゆる面で抑圧することです
14:45
It renders off-limits
大量監視は
14:47
all kinds of behavioral choices
あらゆる行動上の選択肢を
14:49
without our even knowing that it's happened.
私達が気づかぬうちに
禁止してしまうのです
14:51
The renowned socialist activist Rosa Luxemburg
著名な社会主義活動家である —
14:55
once said, "He who does not move
ローザ・ルクセンブルクの言葉です
14:57
does not notice his chains."
「動かぬ者は鎖に繋がれていることに
気付かない」
15:00
We can try and render the chains
大量監視の足かせは
15:03
of mass surveillance invisible or undetectable,
見えないようにも
気づかれないようにもできます
15:05
but the constraints that it imposes on us
でも だからといって
15:08
do not become any less potent.
私達への束縛が
弱まる訳ではないのです
15:10
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
15:13
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:15
Thank you.
ありがとう
15:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:17
Thank you.
ありがとう
15:22
(Applause)
(拍手)
15:25
Bruno Giussani: Glenn, thank you.
(ブルーノ・ジュッサーニ)
ありがとう グレン
15:31
The case is rather convincing, I have to say,
あなたの主張には
説得力がありますね
15:33
but I want to bring you back
ここで過去16か月間のことや
15:35
to the last 16 months and to Edward Snowden
エドワード・スノーデンについて
振り返りながら
15:37
for a few questions, if you don't mind.
いくつか質問させてください
15:40
The first one is personal to you.
1つ目はあなた自身についてです
15:42
We have all read about the arrest of your partner,
パートナーのデビッド・ミランダが
ロンドンで拘束されたことや
15:45
David Miranda in London, and other difficulties,
その他 様々な困難について
記事で読んでいますが
15:48
but I assume that
個人として関与し
15:51
in terms of personal engagement and risk,
リスクを冒すという点で
世界最大の国家と
15:53
that the pressure on you is not that easy
対峙するプレッシャーは
15:57
to take on the biggest sovereign
organizations in the world.
大変なものだろうと思います
15:58
Tell us a little bit about that.
この点について
少し話していただけますか
16:01
Glenn Greenwald: You know, I think
one of the things that happens
(グレン・グリーンウォルド)
今 起きていることの1つは
16:04
is that people's courage in this regard
この件を通して
人々の間に勇気が
16:06
gets contagious,
広まっているということです
16:07
and so although I and the other
journalists with whom I was working
私や一緒に活動している
ジャーナリスト達は
16:09
were certainly aware of the risk —
確かに危険を感じています
16:13
the United States continues to be
the most powerful country in the world
アメリカは
世界で最も強大な国家ですし
16:14
and doesn't appreciate it when you
何千もの国家機密を
16:17
disclose thousands of their secrets
勝手にネットで公開されたら
16:19
on the Internet at will —
快く思うわけがないでしょう
16:21
seeing somebody who is a 29-year-old
でもスノーデンのような
普通の環境で育った29才の
16:23
ordinary person who grew up in
普通の人間が
16:27
a very ordinary environment
一生刑務所に入る危険や
16:29
exercise the degree of principled
courage that Edward Snowden risked,
命の危険さえあるのを承知で
16:31
knowing that he was going to go
to prison for the rest of his life
信念に従い勇気を持って
行動するのを
16:35
or that his life would unravel,
目の当たりにして
16:37
inspired me and inspired other journalists
私や他のジャーナリスト達
さらには
16:39
and inspired, I think, people around the world,
世界中の人々が刺激を受けました
16:41
including future whistleblowers,
その中には将来の告発者もいて
16:43
to realize that they can engage
in that kind of behavior as well.
同じように行動できると
気づいたはずです
16:44
BG: I'm curious about your
relationship with Ed Snowden,
(ジュッサーニ)
あなたとスノーデンの関係に
16:48
because you have spoken with him a lot,
関心があります
あなたと彼は たくさん語り合い
16:50
and you certainly continue doing so,
これからも
そうしていくでしょうが
16:53
but in your book, you never call him Edward,
著書の中で彼を
親しみを持って名前で呼ぶのではなく
16:55
nor Ed, you say "Snowden." How come?
「スノーデン」と名字で
呼んでいるのはなぜですか?
16:58
GG: You know, I'm sure that's something
(グリーンウォルド)それはきっと
17:01
for a team of psychologists to examine.
(Laughter)
心理学者が調べるべきでしょう
(笑)
17:03
I don't really know. The reason I think that,
自分でもわかりません
ただ思い当たることはあります
17:06
one of the important objectives that he actually had,
それは彼にとって
最も重要な目標であり
17:10
one of his, I think, most important tactics,
最も重要な戦略としていたことに
関わります
17:13
was that he knew that one of the ways
暴露の本質から
17:16
to distract attention from the
substance of the revelations
目をそらす方法が
いくつかありますが
17:18
would be to try and personalize the focus on him,
彼自身に焦点を当てる
というはそのひとつです
17:21
and for that reason, he stayed out of the media.
だから彼はメディアと
距離を置いたのです
17:23
He tried not to ever have his personal life
彼は自分の私生活が
報道の対象に
17:25
subject to examination,
ならないようにしてきました
17:28
and so I think calling him Snowden
だから私は 彼を
「スノーデン」と呼ぶことで
17:30
is a way of just identifying him
as this important historical actor
あくまで歴史上の重要な
立役者として扱い
17:32
rather than trying to personalize him in a way
個人として扱うことで
暴露の本質から
17:36
that might distract attention from the substance.
焦点がずれるのを
避けたのです
17:38
Moderator: So his revelations, your analysis,
(ジュッサーニ)
彼の暴露やあなたの分析 そして
17:41
the work of other journalists,
ジャーナリスト達の
記事によって
17:42
have really developed the debate,
議論はかなり盛り上がっています
17:44
and many governments, for example, have reacted,
例えばブラジルを含む
多くの政府が
17:47
including in Brazil, with projects and programs
インターネットのあり方などを
17:49
to reshape a little bit the design of the Internet, etc.
少し作り変える事業や計画に
関心を示しています
17:52
There are a lot of things going on in that sense.
その意味では様々な事が
起きていると言えます
17:54
But I'm wondering, for you personally,
ただ あなた自身にとって
17:57
what is the endgame?
終局はどんなものに
なるのでしょう?
17:59
At what point will you think,
どの時点で
18:01
well, actually, we've succeeded
in moving the dial?
「時計の針は進んだ」と
判断するのですか?
18:03
GG: Well, I mean, the endgame for me as a journalist
(グリーンウォルド)
ジャーナリストという立場では
18:06
is very simple, which is to make sure
ゲームの終わりはとても単純です
18:08
that every single document that's newsworthy
伝える価値がある全ての文書 —
18:11
and that ought to be disclosed
公開すべき全ての文書が
18:13
ends up being disclosed,
確実に公開されるようにし
18:14
and that secrets that should never
have been kept in the first place
隠されるべきでない機密が
18:16
end up uncovered.
全て公になることです
18:18
To me, that's the essence of journalism
私には それが報道の本質ですし
18:19
and that's what I'm committed to doing.
専念してきたことですから
18:21
As somebody who finds mass surveillance odious
大量監視を嫌悪する人間として
18:23
for all the reasons I just talked about and a lot more,
先ほど話した理由を含む
たくさんの理由から
18:25
I mean, I look at this as work that will never end
この活動は終わらないと
私は考えています
18:27
until governments around the world
それは世界中の政府が
18:30
are no longer able to subject entire populations
全国民を傍受や監視の対象に
できないようにするまでは
18:32
to monitoring and surveillance
終わりません
18:35
unless they convince some court or some entity
そのようなことは
対象となった人物が
18:36
that the person they've targeted
実際に悪事を働いていることを
18:39
has actually done something wrong.
裁判所なり何なりに
証明できる場合に限るべきです
18:40
To me, that's the way that
privacy can be rejuvenated.
これがプライバシーを生き返らせる
唯一の方法だと思います
18:43
BG: So Snowden is very,
as we've seen at TED,
(ジュッサーニ)以前TEDで見た通り
18:46
is very articulate in presenting and portraying himself
スノーデンは自分自身について
18:49
as a defender of democratic values
民主主義の価値観と原理を
守る立場だと
18:51
and democratic principles.
明確に述べています
18:54
But then, many people really
find it difficult to believe
その反面 彼の動機が
それだけとは
18:55
that those are his only motivations.
思わない人もたくさんいます
18:58
They find it difficult to believe
お金は絡んでいないとか
19:01
that there was no money involved,
中国やロシアには
19:02
that he didn't sell some of those secrets,
機密情報は少しも
売っていないとは
19:04
even to China and to Russia,
信じられないというのです
19:06
which are clearly not the best friends
現在 両国とも
アメリカの親友とは
19:08
of the United States right now.
言い難いですから
19:10
And I'm sure many people in the room
ここにいる方の中にも
19:12
are wondering the same question.
同じ疑問を
抱いている人が多いはずです
19:14
Do you consider it possible there is
スノーデンには
私達がまだ見ていない
19:16
that part of Snowden we've not seen yet?
側面を持っている
可能性はあると思いますか?
19:18
GG: No, I consider that absurd and idiotic.
(グリーンウォルド)いいえ
それは馬鹿げていると思います
19:21
(Laughter) If you wanted to,
(笑)仮にあなたが —
19:24
and I know you're just playing devil's advocate,
いや あえて批判的な事を
仰っているのはわかりますが
19:26
but if you wanted to sell
仮にあなたが他の国に機密を
19:29
secrets to another country,
売るとしましょう
19:32
which he could have done and become
スノーデンなら
やれただろうし
19:34
extremely rich doing so,
大金持ちにもなれたでしょう
19:36
the last thing you would
do is take those secrets
でも その機密を
ジャーナリストに渡して
19:37
and give them to journalists and
ask journalists to publish them,
公開させるなんて
絶対にしなかったはずです
19:39
because it makes those secrets worthless.
機密に価値が無くなるからです
19:42
People who want to enrich themselves
金儲けをしようとする人間なら
19:44
do it secretly by selling
secrets to the government,
密かに政府に売ります
19:46
but I think there's one important point worth making,
ひとつ重要な点を
指摘しておきましょう
19:48
which is, that accusation comes from
そういった非難の出所は
19:50
people in the U.S. government,
アメリカ政府関係者や
19:52
from people in the media who are loyalists
様々な政府を支持する —
19:54
to these various governments,
メディア関係者なのです
19:56
and I think a lot of times when people make accusations like that about other people —
そして他人に対して
この手の非難をする人間 —
19:57
"Oh, he can't really be doing this
「奴は主義主張があって
20:00
for principled reasons,
こんなことをしたんじゃない —
20:02
he must have some corrupt, nefarious reason" —
何かよこしまな
理由があるはずだ」
20:04
they're saying a lot more about themselves
そんな事を言う人間は
非難する相手ではなく
20:06
than they are the target of their accusations,
自分自身のことを
言っているのです
20:08
because — (Applause) —
なぜなら —
(拍手)
20:10
those people, the ones who make that accusation,
そういう批判をする人間の
20:14
they themselves never act
行動には
20:17
for any reason other than corrupt reasons,
不純な動機しかありません
20:19
so they assume
だからこそ彼らは
他の誰もが
20:21
that everybody else is plagued by the same disease
自分達と同じように
「卑劣」という名の病に
20:22
of soullessness as they are,
蝕まれていると思い込むのです
20:25
and so that's the assumption.
でもそれは憶測に過ぎません
20:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:29
BG: Glenn, thank you very much.
GG: Thank you very much.
(ジュッサーニ)ありがとう グレン
(グリーンウォルド)どうもありがとう
20:30
BG: Glenn Greenwald.
(ジュッサーニ)
グレン・グリーンウォルドでした
20:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:35
Translator:Kazunori Akashi
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Glenn Greenwald - Journalist
Glenn Greenwald is the journalist who has done the most to expose and explain the Edward Snowden files.

Why you should listen

As one of the first journalists privy to NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s archives, Glenn Greenwald has a unique window into the inner workings of the NSA and Britain's GCHQ. A vocal advocate for civil liberties in the face of growing post-9/11 authoritarianism, Greenwald was a natural outlet for Snowden, who’d admired his combative writing style in Salon and elsewhere.

Since his original Guardian exposés of Snowden’s revelations, Pulitzer winner Greenwald continues to stoke public debate on surveillance and privacy both in the media, on The Intercept, and with his new book No Place to Hide -- and suggests that the there are more shocking revelations to come.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.