sponsored links
TED2016

Stephen Wilkes: The passing of time, caught in a single photo

スティーヴン・ウィルクス: 移りゆく時間を、一枚の写真の中に

February 19, 2016

写真家スティーヴン・ウィルクスは、昼から夜への移り変わる様子が写り込む、目を見張るような素晴らしい風景写真を制作し、二次元の静止画写真の中に表せる時間と空間を探求しています。パリのトゥルネル橋、ヨセミテ国立公園のエル・キャピタン、そしてセレンゲティ国立公園中心に位置する、命を潤す水場などの、世界的に知られる絶景を、ウィルクスの作品と制作過程を通して巡るトークです。

Stephen Wilkes - Narrative photographer
By blending up to 100 still photographs into a seamless composite that captures the transition from day to night, Stephen Wilkes reveals the stories hidden in familiar locations. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
物語を伝える写真を撮るという
00:13
I'm driven by pure passion
その純粋な情熱に
私は突き動かされています
00:15
to create photographs that tell stories.
一般的に写真とは
ほんの刹那に捉えた—
00:18
Photography can be described
as the recording of a single moment
ある1つの瞬間を記録したものです
00:23
frozen within a fraction of time.
どの瞬間も どの写真も
時間の流れの中の
00:26
Each moment or photograph
represents a tangible piece
目に見える確かな記憶の断片を
表しています
00:30
of our memories as time passes.
でも もし1枚の写真に
1つの瞬間以上の時間を捉えられたら?
00:33
But what if you could capture more
than one moment in a photograph?
もし 写真を使って
時間という概念を崩し
00:37
What if a photograph
could actually collapse time,
昼夜両方の最高の瞬間を
途切れなく ただ1枚の絵の中に
00:41
compressing the best moments
of the day and the night
詰め込むことができたら
どうでしょうか?
00:43
seamlessly into one single image?
私が作ったコンセプト
「Day to Night(昼から夜へ)」
00:47
I've created a concept
called "Day to Night"
これが 人々の世界の見方を変えると
信じています
00:50
and I believe it's going to change
00:51
the way you look at the world.
私にとってそうでしたから
00:53
I know it has for me.
私の作業は
人々の記憶の中に散在する—
00:55
My process begins by photographing
iconic locations,
象徴的な場所を撮影することから
始まります
00:59
places that are part of what I call
our collective memory.
見晴らしの良い地点を1つ定め
そこから片時も動かずに撮影します
01:03
I photograph from a fixed vantage point,
and I never move.
時間の経過とともに 人間と光が
移ろう瞬間の連続を捉えます
01:06
I capture the fleeting moments
of humanity and light as time passes.
撮影には
15時間から30時間をかけ
01:11
Photographing for anywhere
from 15 to 30 hours
1500枚以上の写真を撮影して
01:14
and shooting over 1,500 images,
その中から 昼と夜それぞれで
最高の瞬間を選びます
01:17
I then choose the best moments
of the day and night.
時間を指標として
01:21
Using time as a guide,
昼から夜へと流れる時間を
滑らかにつなぎ合わせて1枚の写真にします
01:22
I seamlessly blend those best moments
into one single photograph,
時間と共に流れる
私たちの意識を描き出すのです
01:27
visualizing our conscious
journey with time.
パリのトゥルネル橋からの景色を
01:31
I can take you to Paris
ご覧ください
01:33
for a view from the Tournelle Bridge.
こちらは 明け方
セーヌ川に沿って
01:36
And I can show you the
early morning rowers
ボートを漕ぐ人たちです
01:38
along the River Seine.
そして同時に
01:40
And simultaneously,
ライトアップされた
夜のノートルダムが見えます
01:42
I can show you Notre Dame aglow at night.
そして朝と夜の中間には
光の都のロマンスが写ります
01:45
And in between, I can show you
the romance of the City of Light.
地上15メートルからの撮影が
私の主なスタイルですが
01:51
I am essentially a street photographer
from 50 feet in the air,
皆さんがご覧になった
すべての写真が
01:55
and every single thing you see
in this photograph
それぞれ同じ日に撮影されています
01:57
actually happened on this day.
「Day to Night」は
グローバルなブロジェクトで
02:02
Day to Night is a global project,
私の作品は
常に歴史に関連しています
02:04
and my work has always been about history.
私はヴェニスのような場所を訪れ
特定のイベントの際に
02:07
I'm fascinated by the concept
of going to a place like Venice
自分の目で見るということに
強い興味を惹かれるので
02:11
and actually seeing it during
a specific event.
歴史ある「レガッタ」を
見にいくことに決めました
02:13
And I decided I wanted to see
the historical Regata,
1498年から続いているイベントです
02:17
an event that's actually been
taking place since 1498.
船と乗客は
当時と一切変わらぬ姿です
02:21
The boats and the costumes
look exactly as they did then.
ぜひ皆さんに
ご理解いただきたいのですが
02:26
And an important element that I really
want you guys to understand is:
単に隔たった2つの瞬間を撮るのではなく
02:30
this is not a timelapse,
02:31
this is me photographing
throughout the day and the night.
一日中 そして一晩中ずっと
撮影を続けます
特別な瞬間を切り取り
貪欲に集めています
02:37
I am a relentless collector
of magical moments.
そんな瞬間を1つたりとも逃したくないという
切迫感が私を突き動かしています
02:40
And the thing that drives me
is the fear of just missing one of them.
「Day to Night」というコンセプト
そのものは1996年に生まれました
02:48
The entire concept came about in 1996.
雑誌『LIFE』に
バズ・ラーマンの映画
02:52
LIFE Magazine commissioned me
to create a panoramic photograph
『ロミオ+ジュリエット』の
キャストとクルーのパノラマ写真を依頼され
02:56
of the cast and crew of Baz Luhrmann's
film Romeo + Juliet.
セットに着いたとき
真四角だと気付きました
03:02
I got to the set and realized:
it's a square.
つまり パノラマ写真を作るには
250枚の写真を撮影して
03:05
So the only way I could actually create
a panoramic was to shoot a collage
つなぎ合わせるという
方法しかありません
03:10
of 250 single images.
ディカプリオとクレア・デーンズが
抱き合っている様子を撮り
03:13
So I had DiCaprio and Claire Danes
embracing.
カメラを右へと寄せていくと
03:16
And as I pan my camera to the right,
鏡の存在に気が付きました
03:19
I noticed there was a mirror on the wall
その鏡にしっかり2人が見えました
03:22
and I saw they were
actually reflecting in it.
なので この瞬間と絵のために
03:24
And for that one moment, that one image
キスしてもらえるようにと
お願いしました
03:26
I asked them, "Would you guys just kiss
キスしてもらえるようにと
お願いしました
03:28
for this one picture?"
そして私は
ニューヨークのスタジオへ戻り
03:29
And then I came back
to my studio in New York,
250枚の写真を
1つ1つ手で つなぎ合わせ
03:32
and I hand-glued these 250 images together
全体を見て思いました
「これはすごいぞ!
03:36
and stood back and went,
"Wow, this is so cool!
写真の中に時間の流れを描き出せている」
03:39
I'm changing time in a photograph."
そしてこのコンセプトを
その後13年の間
03:42
And that concept actually
stayed with me for 13 years
テクノロジーが私の夢に追いつくまで
温めていました
03:46
until technology finally
has caught up to my dreams.
これはサンタモニカ・ピアで撮った
「Day to Night」です
03:51
This is an image I created
of the Santa Monica Pier, Day to Night.
これからお見せする短い映像で
03:54
And I'm going to show you a little video
撮影中の私に同行すると
どんな感じになるのか
03:56
that gives you an idea of what
it's like being with me
ご覧いただきたいと思います
03:59
when I do these pictures.
まず始めにご説明すると
こういった景色を撮るには
04:01
To start with, you have to understand
that to get views like this,
ほとんどの時間を高い所で過ごします
通常は高所作業車や
04:04
most of my time is spent up high,
and I'm usually in a cherry picker
クレーンの中です
04:08
or a crane.
この日もいつも通り
12〜18時間 休みなく
04:09
So this is a typical day,
12-18 hours, non-stop
全日 撮影を続けました
04:12
capturing the entire day unfold.
幸いなことに
人間観察が大好きなのです
04:16
One of the things that's great
is I love to people-watch.
自信を持って言えることは
04:19
And trust me when I tell you,
もし家からの眺めだったら
最高だということです
04:20
this is the greatest seat
in the house to have.
でもこれが 私がこういった
作品を撮る方法なのです
04:24
But this is really how I go about
creating these photographs.
さて いったん撮る景色と
撮影場所を決めたら
04:27
So once I decide on my view
and the location,
朝の始まりと夜の終わりを
決めなくてはなりません
04:31
I have to decide where day begins
and night ends.
「時間ベクトル」と呼んでいます
04:34
And that's what I call the time vector.
アインシュタインは
時間を布地になぞらえたと言います
04:37
Einstein described time as a fabric.
トランポリンの表面を
思い浮かべてください
04:41
Think of the surface of a trampoline:
重力の影響により
歪んだり伸びたりします
04:43
it warps and stretches with gravity.
私もまた時間を
布地のように考えています
04:46
I see time as a fabric as well,
ただ私の場合は その生地を
平らな1枚の写真へと圧縮するわけです
04:49
except I take that fabric and flatten it,
compress it into single plane.
この仕事のユニークな側面は
04:54
One of the unique aspects
of this work is also,
私の写真からお分かりの通り
04:57
if you look at all my pictures,
時間ベクトルが変化することです
04:58
the time vector changes:
時に左から右へ
05:00
sometimes I'll go left to right,
また時には前から後ろ、上から下へ
場合によっては斜め移動です
05:01
sometimes front to back,
up or down, even diagonally.
時間と空間を連続させる表現を
05:07
I am exploring the space-time continuum
二次元の静止写真の中で
模索しているのです
05:09
within a two-dimensional still photograph.
写真を合成しているときは
05:12
Now when I do these pictures,
まさに心の中で並行して
パズルをしているような感覚に陥ります
05:14
it's literally like a real-time puzzle
going on in my mind.
時間を軸に写真を組み立てますが
05:18
I build a photograph based on time,
これを「原板」と呼んでいます
05:21
and this is what I call the master plate.
この過程が完了するのに
数カ月を要します
05:23
This can take us several
months to complete.
この仕事の面白い部分は
05:26
The fun thing about this work is
05:29
I have absolutely zero control
when I get up there
どんな日に撮影しても
撮影場所に登った時点で
自分の思い通りにできる要素が
何一つないことです
05:32
on any given day and capture photographs.
つまり写真の中に
誰が映り込むかとか
05:35
So I never know who's
going to be in the picture,
日の出や日没の光景がどうなるかなど
全てが未知数なのです
05:37
if it's going to be a great
sunrise or sunset -- no control.
では工程の最後の段階です
05:40
It's at the end of the process,
一日中本当に調子が良くて
全てが変わりなければ
05:42
if I've had a really great day
and everything remained the same,
写真の中に誰を残し
誰を消すか
05:45
that I then decide who's in and who's out,
時間のみを基準にして決めます
05:47
and it's all based on time.
1ヶ月かけて選別した最高の瞬間を
05:49
I'll take those best moments that I pick
over a month of editing
1枚の原板に継ぎ目なく
切り貼りしていきます
05:53
and they get seamlessly blended
into the master plate.
自分の目で見た通りに
05:57
I'm compressing the day and night
昼と夜とを統合し
06:00
as I saw it,
全く相容れない2つの世界の間に
類まれな1つの調和を作り上げるのです
06:01
creating a unique harmony between
these two very discordant worlds.
私の作品はいつも
絵画に強く影響を受けてきました
06:07
Painting has always been a really
important influence in all my work
例えばハドソン・リバー派の
アルバート・ビアスタットは
06:10
and I've always been a huge fan
of Albert Bierstadt,
素晴らしい画家です
06:13
the great Hudson River School painter.
彼の作品に触発され 最近
国立公園シリーズを撮りました
06:15
He inspired a recent series
that I did on the National Parks.
これは彼の描いたヨセミテ国立公園です
06:18
This is Bierstadt's Yosemite Valley.
そしてこれが
私が制作したヨセミテの写真です
06:22
So this is the photograph
I created of Yosemite.
『ナショナルジオグラフィック』
2016年1月号の
06:25
This is actually the cover story
of the 2016 January issue
巻頭特集を飾りました
06:29
of National Geographic.
この写真を撮るのに
30時間以上かけました
06:31
I photographed for over
30 hours in this picture.
私はそれこそ崖に張り付いた状態で
06:34
I was literally on the side of a cliff,
星々と月が移りゆく中で
エル・キャプテンの一枚岩を
06:36
capturing the stars
and the moonlight as it transitions,
月の光が照らす様子を
撮り続けました
06:40
the moonlight lighting El Capitan.
そして風景の隅々にまでわたる
時間の変移を捉えました
06:42
And I also captured this transition
of time throughout the landscape.
もちろん 見どころは
人々が見せるとびきりの瞬間が
06:47
The best part is obviously seeing
the magical moments of humanity
時間の流れに合わせ—
06:51
as time changed --
昼から夜へ変容する様子です
06:54
from day into night.
実のところを言えば
06:57
And on a personal note,
ビアスタットの絵のコピーが
ポケットに入っていました
06:59
I actually had a photocopy
of Bierstadt's painting in my pocket.
そして渓谷に太陽が登り始めたとき
07:03
And when that sun started
to rise in the valley,
興奮で実際に体が震えてきました
07:05
I started to literally shake
with excitement
手元の絵を見て こう思ったんです
07:08
because I looked at the painting and I go,
「すごいぞ これこそビアスタットが
100年前に描いた光加減そのものだ」
07:10
"Oh my god, I'm getting Bierstadt's
exact same lighting
07:13
100 years earlier."
「Day to Night」とは
つまるところ
07:17
Day to Night is about all the things,
写真という媒体において
07:20
it's like a compilation of all
the things I love
私が大切に思うもの全ての結晶です
07:22
about the medium of photography.
それは風景であり
07:24
It's about landscape,
同時にストリート写真であり
07:26
it's about street photography,
色彩であり 建築でもあり
07:28
it's about color, it's about architecture,
遠近やスケール感や
特に歴史に関することです
07:30
perspective, scale --
and, especially, history.
この写真は
これまで撮ってきた中でも
07:34
This is one of the most historical moments
最も歴史的な1枚です
07:36
I've been able to photograph,
2013年 バラク・オバマ大統領
就任式典の写真です
07:37
the 2013 Presidential Inauguration
of Barack Obama.
よく見ていただければわかるのですが
07:41
And if you look closely in this picture,
大型スクリーンそれぞれに
07:43
you can actually see time changing
時の経過が 映し出されています
07:45
in those large television sets.
ミシェル夫人と
子供たちが待っている様子
07:47
You can see Michelle
waiting with the children,
次に大統領のあいさつ
07:50
the president now greets the crowd,
そして宣誓
07:52
he takes his oath,
最後はスピーチの様子です
07:53
and now he's speaking to the people.
こうした写真の撮影には
本当に多くの課題が付き物です
07:56
There's so many challenging aspects
when I create photographs like this.
特にこの写真に関しては
08:00
For this particular photograph,
地上15メートルの高所作業台から
撮影していて
08:02
I was in a 50-foot scissor lift
up in the air
足場が不安定でした
08:06
and it was not very stable.
私と助手が
重心を変えるたびに
08:07
So every time my assistant and I
shifted our weight,
水平線が傾きました
08:11
our horizon line shifted.
ご覧になっている写真には
08:12
So for every picture you see,
約1800枚の写真を使いましたが
08:14
and there were about
1,800 in this picture,
毎回のシャッターを切るごとに
両足をいちいち
08:16
we both had to tape our feet into position
固定しなければなりませんでした
08:19
every time I clicked the shutter.
(拍手)
08:21
(Applause)
この仕事から素晴らしい学びを
本当にたくさん得てきました
08:26
I've learned so many extraordinary
things doing this work.
その中でも最も重要であると
私が思うのは
08:30
I think the two most important
are patience
忍耐と観察力です
08:34
and the power of observation.
例えばニューヨークのような都市を
俯瞰撮影するとき
08:36
When you photograph a city
like New York from above,
日常生活に登場するような
08:40
I discovered that those people in cars
例えば車の中の人々は
08:42
that I sort of live with everyday,
もはや「車の中の人々」ではありません
08:44
they don't look like people
in cars anymore.
まるで魚の大群のように
08:46
They feel like a giant school of fish,
群れとして同じような動きをします
08:49
it was a form of emergent behavior.
人々はよくニューヨークの
活気について語りますが
08:51
And when people describe
the energy of New York,
私はこの写真がその一端を
的確に捉えていると思っています
08:54
I think this photograph begins
to really capture that.
私の作品をよく見ていただくと
08:58
When you look closer in my work,
そこには物語があります
08:59
you can see there's stories going on.
タイムズスクエアは
1つの渓谷に見えてきて
09:02
You realize that Times Square is a canyon,
光と影が
浮き上がります
09:05
it's shadow and it's sunlight.
だから私はこの写真で
時間を格子状に並べる事にしました
09:07
So I decided, in this photograph,
I would checkerboard time.
影のあるところは
どこであれ夜なのであり
09:10
So wherever the shadows are, it's night
そして太陽のあるところは
常に昼なのです
09:13
and wherever the sun is,
it's actually day.
時間とは とてつもないもので
09:16
Time is this extraordinary thing
人智を超えた存在です
09:18
that we never can really
wrap our heads around.
09:21
But in a very unique and special way,
しかし 私が制作している写真は
独特かつ特殊な方法で 時間の姿を
捉え始めていると思っています
09:23
I believe these photographs
begin to put a face on time.
新たな形而上の視覚的現実を
具現化しているのです
09:28
They embody a new
metaphysical visual reality.
15時間 ある場所を
ひたすら眺めていると
09:34
When you spend 15 hours
looking at a place,
カメラを持ってきて写真を撮り
その場を去るより
09:38
you're going to see things
a little differently
少し違った角度で
09:40
than if you or I walked up
with our camera,
物事が見え始めるようになります
09:43
took a picture, and then walked away.
これはその代表例です
09:44
This was a perfect example.
「サクレ・クール・セルフィー」
と呼んでいます
09:46
I call it "Sacré-Coeur Selfie."
15時間以上
観察していましたが
09:49
I watched over 15 hours
サクレ・クール寺院自体には
誰も目もくれません
09:51
all these people
not even look at Sacré-Coeur.
写真の背景として寺院を使う方に
興味があったのです
09:53
They were more interested
in using it as a backdrop.
歩いて行って 写真を撮り
09:56
They would walk up, take a picture,
そして去ります
09:59
and then walk away.
私たちが考える「経験」と
進化しつつある経験そのものとの
10:01
And I found this to be an absolutely
extraordinary example,
甚大な隔たりを表した例として
10:07
a powerful disconnect between
what we think the human experience is
これ以上のものを
私は知りません
10:11
versus what the human experience
is evolving into.
シェアするという行為が
気がつけば 経験そのものよりも
10:15
The act of sharing has suddenly
become more important
重視されるようになっていたのです
10:20
than the experience itself.
(拍手)
10:23
(Applause)
最後に
私の最新作ですが
10:26
And finally, my most recent image,
特別な思い入れのある作品です
10:29
which has such a special meaning
for me personally:
タンザニア
セレンゲティ国立公園の
10:32
this is the Serengeti National
Park in Tanzania.
セロネラ中心部で
撮影しました
10:36
And this is photographed
in the middle of the Seronera,
ここは保護区ではありません
10:39
this is not a reserve.
動物たちの大移動が
起こる時期を狙いました
10:41
I went specifically during
the peak migration
動物の多様性を最大幅で
捉えるのが目的でした
10:44
to hopefully capture
the most diverse range of animals.
不幸にも
私たちが訪れたとき
10:48
Unfortunately, when we got there,
移動のピークにもかかわらず
日照りが続いていました
10:49
there was a drought going on
during the peak migration,
5週間の干ばつです
10:52
a five-week drought.
よって どの動物も水を探していました
10:53
So all the animals
were drawn to the water.
私がこの水源を見つけたとき
10:56
I found this one watering hole,
その場で起こっていることが
全てそのまま続けば
10:58
and felt if everything remained
the same way it was behaving,
何か特別な光景を撮る
またとない機会だと感じました
11:02
I had a real opportunity
to capture something unique.
3日間かけ
その水場を調べましたが
11:06
We spent three days studying it,
実際に何を目にすることになるか
11:07
and nothing could have prepared me
この時点では知る由もありませんでした
11:09
for what I witnessed during our shoot day.
私は26時間
写真を撮り続けました
11:12
I photographed for 26 hours
地上6メートルに設置された
狩猟用の隠れ場所からです
11:15
in a sealed crocodile blind,
18 feet in the air.
そして 想像もつかない景色を
目の当たりにしました
11:19
What I witnessed was unimaginable.
聖書の1ページのようでした
11:21
Frankly, it was Biblical.
11:23
We saw, for 26 hours,
26時間の間
生存を賭けて争う動物同士が
水という1つのを資源を共有していたのです
11:25
all these competitive species
share a single resource called water.
同じ資源を巡り
人類は向こう50年にわたって
11:30
The same resource that humanity
is supposed to have wars over
戦争を続けると言われています
11:34
during the next 50 years.
動物たちは互いに
敵意を示すことさえありませんでした
11:37
The animals never even
grunted at each other.
人間には分からない何かを
理解しているように思えます
11:41
They seem to understand something
that we humans don't.
それはつまり
水という貴重な資源を誰もが
11:45
That this precious resource called water
共有しなくてはならないということです
11:48
is something we all have to share.
この写真が出来上がったとき
11:51
When I created this picture,
「Day to Night」とは まさに
物事の新しい見方であり
11:55
I realized that Day to Night
is really a new way of seeing,
時間を集約し
11:59
compressing time,
写真の秘める時空間の連続を
探求するものだと気付きました
12:02
exploring the space-time continuum
within a photograph.
テクノロジーは
写真と共に発展します
12:06
As technology evolves
along with photography,
時間と記憶の深い意味合いを
写し出すだけではなく
12:11
photographs will not only communicate
a deeper meaning of time and memory,
かつて知られなかった
新しい物語を紡ぎ出し
12:15
but they will compose a new narrative
of untold stories,
時を超えて私たちの世界を覗く窓を
創り出しているのです
12:22
creating a timeless window into our world.
ありがとうございました
12:27
Thank you.
(拍手)
12:28
(Applause)
Translator:Rikuto Koyanagi
Reviewer:Riaki Poništ

sponsored links

Stephen Wilkes - Narrative photographer
By blending up to 100 still photographs into a seamless composite that captures the transition from day to night, Stephen Wilkes reveals the stories hidden in familiar locations.

Why you should listen

Since opening his studio in New York City in 1983, photographer Stephen Wilkes has built an unprecedented body of work and a reputation as one of America's most iconic photographers, widely recognized for his fine art, editorial and commercial work.

His photographs are included in the collections of the George Eastman Museum, James A. Michener Art Museum, Houston Museum of Fine Arts, Dow Jones Collection, Griffin Museum of Photography, Jewish Museum of NY, Library of Congress, Snite Museum of Art, The Historic New Orleans Collection, Museum of the City of New York, 9/11 Memorial Museum and numerous private collections. His editorial work has appeared in, and on the covers of, leading publications such as the New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, TIME, Fortune, National Geographic, Sports Illustrated and many others.

In 1998, a one-day assignment to the south side of Ellis Island led to a 5-year photographic study of the island's long abandoned medical wards where immigrants were detained before they could enter America. Through his photographs and video, Wilkes helped secure $6 million toward the restoration of the south side of the island.

Day to Night, Wilkes' most defining project, began in 2009. These epic cityscapes and landscapes, portrayed from a fixed camera angle for up to 30 hours capture fleeting moments of humanity as light passes in front of his lens over the course of full day. Blending these images into a single photograph takes months to complete. Day to Night has been featured on CBS Sunday Morning as well as dozens of other prominent media outlets and, with a grant from the National Geographic Society, was recently extended to include America's National Parks in celebration of their centennial anniversary. The series will be published by TASCHEN as a monograph in 2017.

Wilkes, who lives and maintains his studio in Westport, CT, is represented by Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York; Peter Fetterman Gallery, Los Angeles; Monroe Gallery of Photography, Santa Fe; and ARTITLEDContemporary, The Netherlands.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.