sponsored links
TEDxYouth@Sydney

Emily Parsons-Lord: Art made of the air we breathe

エミリー・パーソンズ=ロード: 呼吸する空気で作るアート

May 24, 2016

エミリー・パーソンズ=ロードは石炭紀の澄んだ新鮮な空気から、大量絶滅が起きた時の炭酸水のような空気や、我々が作り出している未来の重く有害な空気まで、地球史のおける異なる時期の空気を再現しています。空気をアートに変えることで、身の回りの目に見えない世界を知ることに私たちを誘います。この想像力に富んだ奇抜なトークで、地球の過去や未来を呼吸をしましょう。

Emily Parsons-Lord - Artist
Emily Parsons-Lord makes cross-disciplinary contemporary art that is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
If I asked you to picture the air,
皆さんに空気を描いてと言ったら
00:13
what do you imagine?
何を思い浮かべますか?
00:17
Most people think about either empty space
大抵の人が思い浮かべるのが
空っぽの空間や
00:20
or clear blue sky
澄み切った青空
00:24
or sometimes trees dancing in the wind.
時として風に踊る木々など
00:26
And then I remember my high school
chemistry teacher with really long socks
私はとても長いソックスを履いた
高校の化学の先生が
00:29
at the blackboard,
黒板に
00:33
drawing diagrams of bubbles
connected to other bubbles,
バブルとバブルがつながった図を描き
それらが―
00:34
and describing how they vibrate
and collide in a kind of frantic soup.
入り乱れた集団となって振動し
衝突する様子を説明していたのを思い出します
00:38
But really, we tend not to think
about the air that much at all.
でも 実際には私たちは空気のことは
全く考えない傾向があります
00:44
We notice it mostly
大抵 空気に気付くのは
00:48
when there's some kind of unpleasant
sensory intrusion upon it,
例えば悪臭のように
感覚器が不快さを感じたり
00:50
like a terrible smell
or something visible like smoke or mist.
煙とか霧などが目に見える時です
00:54
But it's always there.
でも空気はいつも存在します
01:00
It's touching all of us right now.
今も空気は私たちに触れています
01:03
It's even inside us.
体内でさえそうです
01:05
Our air is immediate, vital and intimate.
空気は肌に触れていて 不可欠な上
身近なものですが
01:09
And yet, it's so easily forgotten.
いとも簡単に忘れさられます
01:15
So what is the air?
空気って何でしょう?
01:20
It's the combination of the invisible
gases that envelop the Earth,
空気は地球の引力に
引き付けられた
01:22
attracted by the Earth's
gravitational pull.
地球を包む目に見えない
気体の集まりです
01:25
And even though I'm a visual artist,
私は視覚芸術家なのに
01:29
I'm interested in
the invisibility of the air.
空気は目に見えないとうことに
興味があります
01:32
I'm interested in how we imagine it,
私たちがどう空気を想像し
01:36
how we experience it
どう空気を感じ
01:39
and how we all have an innate
understanding of its materiality
その大切さを呼吸を通じて
どう生得的に理解しているのかに
01:41
through breathing.
興味があります
01:45
All life on Earth changes the air
through gas exchange,
地上の生物は まさに今
私たちがしているように
01:48
and we're all doing it right now.
ガス交換により
空気の組成を変えます
01:54
Actually, why don't we all
right now together take
今から全員で
01:56
one big, collective, deep breath in.
大きく深呼吸してみましょう
01:59
Ready? In. (Inhales)
いいですか?
吸って
02:02
And out. (Exhales)
吐いて
02:07
That air that you just exhaled,
今吐いた空気には
02:10
you enriched a hundred times
in carbon dioxide.
二酸化炭素が
100倍に濃縮されています
02:13
So roughly five liters of air per breath,
17 breaths per minute
1回の呼吸で約5リットル
1分に17回呼吸し
02:18
of the 525,600 minutes per year,
1年は525,600分なので
02:24
comes to approximately
45 million liters of air,
約4,500万リットルの空気の
二酸化炭素を
02:30
enriched 100 times in carbon dioxide,
100倍に濃縮しています
02:35
just for you.
あなた1人がです
02:39
Now, that's equivalent to about 18
Olympic-sized swimming pools.
それはオリンピックの競泳用プールの
約18個分に相当します
02:41
For me, air is plural.
私にとって空気は複数形です
02:48
It's simultaneously
as small as our breathing
私たちの呼吸と同じくらい
小さくもあり 同時に
02:50
and as big as the planet.
地球と同じくらい大きくもあるのです
02:53
And it's kind of hard to picture.
だから想像するのが
やや難しいのです
02:56
Maybe it's impossible,
and maybe it doesn't matter.
おそらく不可能であり
重要でないのかもしれません
03:00
Through my visual arts practice,
視覚芸術を実践していく中で
03:03
I try to make air, not so much picture it,
空気を描くのではなく
03:06
but to make it visceral
and tactile and haptic.
直観に訴え 触れられる
空気を作ろうとしています
03:10
I try to expand this notion
of the aesthetic, how things look,
どう見えるのかという
美的概念を広げようとしています
03:15
so that it can include things
like how it feels on your skin
肌や肺で空気をどう感じるのか
03:20
and in your lungs,
肌や肺で空気をどう感じるのか
03:23
and how your voice sounds
as it passes through it.
そして声が空気を伝わる時に
どう聞こえるのか
03:25
I explore the weight, density and smell,
but most importantly,
私は空気の重さ、濃度、匂いを
探求していますが 一番大切なのは
03:30
I think a lot about the stories we attach
to different kinds of air.
様々な空気にまつわる
ストーリーがたくさんあることです
03:34
This is a work I made in 2014.
これは2014年に作った作品です
03:42
It's called "Different Kinds
of Air: A Plant's Diary,"
『様々な空気:ある植物の日記』と
名付けました
03:46
where I was recreating the air
from different eras in Earth's evolution,
地球の進化における
異なる時代の空気を再現し
03:49
and inviting the audience
to come in and breathe them with me.
ここで 私と一緒に
呼吸するよう観客を誘います
03:53
And it's really surprising,
so drastically different.
とても驚いたことに
全然違うのです
03:56
Now, I'm not a scientist,
私は科学者ではありませんが
04:01
but atmospheric scientists
will look for traces
大気科学者は
地質学的データに残された
04:03
in the air chemistry in geology,
大気組成の痕跡を探します
04:06
a bit like how rocks can oxidize,
岩石の酸化の仕組みを知り
04:09
and they'll extrapolate
that information and aggregate it,
それを地質情報にあてはめ
総合的な解釈により
04:12
such that they can
pretty much form a recipe
異なる時代の空気を作るための
04:15
for the air at different times.
レシピが得られるのです
04:18
Then I come in as the artist
and take that recipe
私は芸術家として
そのレシピを使い
04:20
and recreate it using the component gases.
気体成分を使って
空気を再現しています
04:23
I was particularly interested
in moments of time
私が特に興味を持っているのは
04:28
that are examples
of life changing the air,
例えば生命が大気を変える
時期についてですが
04:31
but also the air that can influence
how life will evolve,
逆に大気が生命の進化に
影響を与えうるのです
04:35
like Carboniferous air.
石炭紀に起きたようにです
04:40
It's from about 300 to 350
million years ago.
それは約3ー3.5億年前のことで
04:43
It's an era known
as the time of the giants.
巨大生物の時代として
知られています
04:47
So for the first time
in the history of life,
生命の歴史で初めて
04:51
lignin evolves.
リグニンが進化します
04:53
That's the hard stuff
that trees are made of.
リグニンとは木の構成物である
固い物質のことです
04:55
So trees effectively invent
their own trunks at this time,
事実上 木はこの時代に幹を作り出し
04:57
and they get really big,
bigger and bigger,
ますます大きくなり
05:01
and pepper the Earth,
地球全体に広がり
05:03
releasing oxygen, releasing
oxygen, releasing oxygen,
ひたすら酸素を放出し
05:04
such that the oxygen levels
are about twice as high
酸素濃度は現在の2倍となっています
05:07
as what they are today.
酸素濃度は現在の2倍となっています
05:11
And this rich air supports
massive insects --
酸素濃度が高いことで
昆虫が巨大化し
05:13
huge spiders and dragonflies
with a wingspan of about 65 centimeters.
巨大蜘蛛や
翼幅約65cmのとんぼがいます
05:17
To breathe, this air is really clean
and really fresh.
呼吸してみると この空気は
とても澄んで新鮮でした
05:24
It doesn't so much have a flavor,
風味があるわけでは
ありませんが
05:28
but it does give your body
a really subtle kind of boost of energy.
体のエネルギーを
幾分押し上げます
05:30
It's really good for hangovers.
二日酔いにも効果的です
05:34
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:36
Or there's the air of the Great Dying --
さらに 大量絶滅が起きた時の
大気の例があります
05:38
that's about 252.5 million years ago,
それは約2億5250万年前のことで
05:41
just before the dinosaurs evolve.
恐竜が進化する直前です
05:44
It's a really short time period,
geologically speaking,
地質学的に見ればごく短い
05:47
from about 20- to 200,000 years.
2万年から20万年ほどの期間です
05:50
Really quick.
一瞬のことですね
05:53
This is the greatest extinction event
in Earth's history,
地球史上 最大規模の絶滅で
05:56
even bigger than when
the dinosaurs died out.
恐竜の絶滅よりも大きいのです
05:58
Eighty-five to 95 percent of species
at this time die out,
この時期に85-95%の種が死滅し
06:02
and simultaneous to that is a huge,
dramatic spike in carbon dioxide,
同時に二酸化炭素の
急激な上昇も起きていました
06:06
that a lot of scientists agree
これらの現象は
06:11
comes from a simultaneous
eruption of volcanoes
同時に複数の火山が噴火し
温室効果が暴走して生じたという考えに
06:13
and a runaway greenhouse effect.
多くの科学者が同意しています
06:16
Oxygen levels at this time go
to below half of what they are today,
この時期の酸素濃度は
今日の半分以下に低下し
06:20
so about 10 percent.
約10%になりました
06:24
So this air would definitely not
support human life,
この空気では 間違いなく
人間は生きていけないでしょう
06:25
but it's OK to just have a breath.
呼吸1回くらいなら大丈夫ですよ
06:28
And to breathe, it's oddly comforting.
そして呼吸すると
妙に心地良いのです
06:30
It's really calming, it's quite warm
とても静かで温かく
06:33
and it has a flavor a little bit
like soda water.
少し炭酸水のような風味がします
06:36
It has that kind of spritz,
quite pleasant.
爽やかなミストのように
とても心地よいのです
06:41
So with all this thinking
about air of the past,
過去の空気について
思いを巡らすと
06:44
it's quite natural to start thinking
about the air of the future.
自然と未来の
空気についても考えます
06:47
And instead of being speculative with air
空気について思索し
06:52
and just making up what I think
might be the future air,
私が未来の空気と考えるものを
創造するのではなく
06:54
I discovered this human-synthesized air.
人間が合成した気体を
発見しました
06:58
That means that it doesn't occur
anywhere in nature,
つまり自然界には
どこにも存在しないもので
07:02
but it's made by humans in a laboratory
様々な産業の用途に応用するため
07:05
for application in different
industrial settings.
研究室で人間が作り出したものです
07:08
Why is it future air?
なぜそれが未来の気体でしょうか?
07:13
Well, this air is a really stable molecule
この気体はとても安定した分子で
07:15
that will literally be part of the air
once it's released,
いったん放出されると
300-400年の間 分解されることなく
07:19
for the next 300 to 400 years,
before it's broken down.
文字通り空気の一部となります
07:23
So that's about 12 to 16 generations.
約12--16世代分の期間に相当します
07:28
And this future air has
some very sensual qualities.
この未来の気体は人が十分に
感じることが出来る性質があります
07:33
It's very heavy.
とても重いです
07:37
It's about eight times heavier
than the air we're used to breathing.
私たちが普段呼吸する空気の
約8倍重いのです
07:39
It's so heavy, in fact,
that when you breathe it in,
とても重いので 呼吸をする時
07:45
whatever words you speak
are kind of literally heavy as well,
何を話すにしろ
文字通り重いので
07:48
so they dribble down your chin
and drop to the floor
顎から床にしたたり落ち
07:51
and soak into the cracks.
隙間に染み込みます
07:55
It's an air that operates
quite a lot like a liquid.
液体のように振る舞う気体です
07:57
Now, this air comes
with an ethical dimension as well.
さて この気体には
道徳的な側面もあります
08:02
Humans made this air,
人間はこの気体を作りました
08:06
but it's also the most potent
greenhouse gas
かつて分析された中では
もっとも高レベルの―
08:08
that has ever been tested.
温室効果ガスです
08:12
Its warming potential is 24,000 times
that of carbon dioxide,
温暖化の効果は二酸化炭素の
24,000倍で
08:15
and it has that longevity
of 12 to 16 generations.
しかも12-16世代分の寿命があります
08:20
So this ethical confrontation
is really central to my work.
この道徳的な問題に対峙することが
私の作品の中心にあります
08:25
(In a lowered voice) It has
another quite surprising quality.
(低い声で) 別の驚くべき
特性があります
08:43
It changes the sound of your voice
quite dramatically.
劇的に声を変えるのです
08:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:50
So when we start to think -- ooh!
It's still there a bit.
私たちが考え始める時 ウー
ちょっと残っていました
08:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:00
When we think about climate change,
気候変動について考える時
09:01
we probably don't think about
giant insects and erupting volcanoes
巨大な昆虫や火山の噴火は
考えませんよね
09:04
or funny voices.
変な声も
09:10
The images that more readily come to mind
すぐに思い浮かぶのは
09:13
are things like retreating glaciers
and polar bears adrift on icebergs.
後退する氷河や
流氷に乗って漂う北極熊などです
09:15
We think about pie charts
and column graphs
我々が考えることは
円グラフや棒グラフ それに―
09:21
and endless politicians
talking to scientists wearing cardigans.
カーディガンを着た科学者に
際限なく話しかける政治家のことです
09:24
But perhaps it's time we start
thinking about climate change
空気を感じるのと
同じ直感的なレベルで
09:30
on the same visceral level
that we experience the air.
気候変動について考える時期に
来ているのかもしれません
09:34
Like air, climate change is simultaneously
at the scale of the molecule,
空気と同様に 気候変動は
分子、呼吸そして地球という
09:39
the breath and the planet.
異なるスケールで同時に起きています
09:45
It's immediate, vital and intimate,
空気は形がなく
扱いにくいものである上に
09:49
as well as being amorphous and cumbersome.
肌に触れていて 不可欠な上
身近なものです
09:52
And yet, it's so easily forgotten.
それなのに
いとも簡単に忘れさられます
09:58
Climate change is the collective
self-portrait of humanity.
気候変動とは
人類の集合的な自画像です
10:03
It reflects our decisions as individuals,
各国政府や産業界に加え
10:07
as governments and as industries.
個々の人々の意思決定を
反映しているのです
10:10
And if there's anything
I've learned from looking at air,
私が空気を見て
学んだことがあるとすれば
10:13
it's that even though
it's changing, it persists.
空気は変化しているとはいえ
ずっと存在していることです
10:16
It may not support the kind of life
that we'd recognize,
私たちが認識できる生命を
育まないとしても
10:20
but it will support something.
別の生命を育むことでしょう
10:24
And if we humans are such a vital
part of that change,
人間がそのような変化の
決定的な要因となっているのなら
10:27
I think it's important
that we can feel the discussion.
議論に心を寄せることが
大切だと思います
10:30
Because even though it's invisible,
目に見えないのに
10:35
humans are leaving
a very vibrant trace in the air.
人間は とても反応しやすい空気に
痕跡を残しているのです
10:39
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
10:44
(Applause)
(拍手)
10:46
Translator:Masako Kigami
Reviewer:Tomoyuki Suzuki

sponsored links

Emily Parsons-Lord - Artist
Emily Parsons-Lord makes cross-disciplinary contemporary art that is informed by research and critical dialogue with materials and climate science.

Why you should listen

Through investigation into air and light, both conceptually, and culturally, Emily Parsons-Lord interrogates the materiality of invisibility, magic and the stories we tell about reality, the universe and our place in time and space. Tragi-humour, scale and invisibility are often used as access points her conceptual art practice.

Based in Sydney, Australia, Parsons-Lord's recent work includes recreating the air from past eras in Earth's evolution, recreating starlight in colored smoke, created multi-channel video and experimenting with pheromones, aerogel and chemistry. She has exhibited both nationally and internationally and participated in the Bristol Biennial – In Other Worlds, 2016, Primavera 2016 (Australia's flagship emerging art exhibition), Firstdraft Sydney and Vitalstatistix, Adelaide.

Parsons-Lord completed a bachelor of digital media (First Class Honours) 2008 at UNSW Art & Design, and a masters of peace and conflict studies from University of Sydney, 2010. She has been a researcher in residence at SymbioticA, at the Univeristy of Western Australia, and has had solo exhibitions at (forthcoming) Wellington St Projects 2017, Firstdraft in 2015, Gallery Eight in 2013 and the TAP Gallery in 2007, among many others.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.