sponsored links
TED2007

Jonathan Harris: The web as art

ジョナサン・ハリス:物語収集プロジェクトについて

December 12, 2007

2007年12月のEG conference にて、情報アーティストであるジョナサン・ハリスが、彼自身や他人の物語、そして画期的な「We Feel Fine」をはじめとする インターネット上での物語の収集に関連する最近のプロジェクトを紹介します。

Jonathan Harris - Artist, storyteller, Internet anthropologist
Artist and computer scientist Jonathan Harris makes online art that captures the world's expression -- and gives us a glimpse of the soul of the Internet. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So I'm going to talk today about collecting stories
今日は皆さんに ちょっと変わった方法で
00:16
in some unconventional ways.
物語を集めることについてお話します
00:20
This is a picture of me from a very awkward stage in my life.
これは私が子供の頃の写真です
00:22
You might enjoy the awkwardly tight, cut-off pajama bottoms with balloons.
きつそうな 風船模様のパジャマの
半ズボンがおかしいですが
00:26
Anyway, it was a time when I was mainly interested
この頃 私は主に架空の物語を
00:31
in collecting imaginary stories.
集めていました
00:33
So this is a picture of me
これは始めて描いた水彩画の
00:35
holding one of the first watercolor paintings I ever made.
一枚を持っている写真です
00:37
And recently I've been much more interested in collecting stories
最近はもっと現実の世界から
物語を収集するように なりました
00:39
from reality -- so, real stories.
つまり 実話です
00:42
And specifically, I'm interested in collecting my own stories,
特に私自身の物語やインターネット上の物語
00:44
stories from the Internet, and then recently, stories from life,
そして最近取り組んでいる新しい領域として
00:48
which is kind of a new area of work that I've been doing recently.
人々の生活の物語を集めています
00:51
So I'll be talking about each of those today.
今日はこれらの物語についてお話します
00:55
So, first of all, my own stories. These are two of my sketchbooks.
始めに私の物語を紹介します 
この二つは私のスケッチブックです
00:57
I have many of these books,
こういうスケッチブックを沢山持っていて
01:00
and I've been keeping them for about the last eight or nine years.
かれこれ8、9年間ずっと持ち続けています
01:02
They accompany me wherever I go in my life,
どこに行くにも一緒で
01:04
and I fill them with all sorts of things,
それらに私が体験した様々な出来事を
01:06
records of my lived experience:
記録していくのです
01:08
so watercolor paintings, drawings of what I see,
水彩画や 風景のスケッチ
01:10
dead flowers, dead insects, pasted ticket stubs, rusting coins,
枯れた花 虫の死骸
チケットの半券 錆びたコイン
01:14
business cards, writings.
名刺や文章などが記録されています
01:18
And in these books, you can find these short, little glimpses
中をみると 出来事や経験 出会いの断片を
01:21
of moments and experiences and people that I meet.
垣間見ることが出来ます
01:25
And, you know, after keeping these books for a number of years,
スケッチブックを何年間も持ち続けた結果
01:27
I started to become very interested in collecting
私は次第に自分の個人的な所産にとどまらず
01:30
not only my own personal artifacts,
他の人々の所産にも
01:32
but also the artifacts of other people.
興味を持つようになり
01:34
So, I started collecting found objects.
素材集めをし始めました
01:36
This is a photograph I found lying in a gutter in New York City
この写真は10年前 ニューヨーク市の
01:38
about 10 years ago.
排水溝に落ちていたのを拾ったものです
01:40
On the front, you can see the tattered black-and-white photo of a woman's face,
表は女性の顔が映っているボロボロの白黒写真で
01:42
and on the back it says, "To Judy, the girl with the Bill Bailey voice.
後ろ側には
「ビル ベイリーの声をした少女 ジュディーへ
01:45
Have fun in whatever you do."
何をするにも楽しんでね」と書いてあります
01:49
And I really loved this idea of the partial glimpse into somebody's life.
このように全体の物語を知ることなく
01:51
As opposed to knowing the whole story, just knowing a little bit of the story,
断片的な他人の人生を垣間見て
01:54
and then letting your own mind fill in the rest.
想像を膨らませるのは とても好きです
01:57
And that idea of a partial glimpse is something
この断片的に垣間見るという発想は
01:59
that will come back in a lot of the work I'll be showing later today.
後に紹介する多くの作品にも 繰り返し使われています
02:01
So, around this time I was studying computer science at Princeton University,
プリンストン大学で
コンピューターサイエンスを学んでいた頃
02:04
and I noticed that it was suddenly possible
このような個人的な所産が
02:07
to collect these sorts of personal artifacts,
道路脇のみならず インターネットでも
02:10
not just from street corners, but also from the Internet.
突然 収集可能になった事に気づきました
02:12
And that suddenly, people, en masse, were leaving scores and scores
人々が一斉にそれぞれの私生活を伝える物語を
02:15
of digital footprints online that told stories of their private lives.
多数のデジタルな足跡として
オンライン上に残すようになったのです
02:19
Blog posts, photographs, thoughts, feelings, opinions,
ブログの投稿や 写真 考えや 気持ち 意見などが
02:23
all of these things were being expressed by people online,
オンライン上で表現され
02:27
and leaving behind trails.
軌跡として残されていきます
02:29
So, I started to write computer programs
そこでその膨大な数のオンライン上の足跡を
02:31
that study very, very large sets of these online footprints.
分析するプログラムを書き始めたのです
02:33
One such project is about a year and a half old.
その一つが 約一年半前に始めたプロジェクト
02:36
It's called "We Feel Fine."
We Feel Fine です
02:38
This is a project that scans the world's newly posted blog entries
このプロジェクトは
世界に新規に投稿されたブログのエントリを
02:40
every two or three minutes, searching for occurrences of the phrases
2、3分毎にスキャンし
「I feel」や「I am feeling」といった語句を
02:43
"I feel" and "I am feeling." And when it finds one of those phrases,
見つけます そしてこれらの語句を探し出したら
02:46
it grabs the full sentence up to the period
それを含んだ全文を抽出して
02:50
and also tries to identify demographic information about the author.
著者の人口統計学的データの特定を試みます
02:52
So, their gender, their age, their geographic location
つまり人々の性別や 年齢 居場所
02:55
and what the weather conditions were like when they wrote that sentence.
そして彼らが文章を書いた時の天候といったものです
02:58
It collects about 20,000 such sentences a day
一日 約2万もの文を収集し
03:01
and it's been running for about a year and a half,
稼働し始めてから1年半で
03:03
having collected over 10 and a half million feelings now.
1500万人以上の感情を集めています
03:05
This is, then, how they're presented.
それらは このような形で表示されます
03:08
These dots here represent some of the English-speaking world's
この点はこの数時間の間に英語圏において
03:10
feelings from the last few hours,
表現されたいくつかの感情を表しています
03:13
each dot being a single sentence stated by a single blogger.
それぞれの点は一人のブロガーの一文に相当します
03:16
And the color of each dot corresponds to the type of feeling inside,
それぞれの点の色は感情の種類に対応するので
03:19
so the bright ones are happy, and the dark ones are sad.
明るいものはうれしく 暗いものは悲しいということです
03:22
And the diameter of each dot corresponds
そして点の直径は語句が含まれる
03:25
to the length of the sentence inside.
一文の長さを表しています
03:27
So the small ones are short, and the bigger ones are longer.
つまり 小さい点は短い文を
大きい点は長い文を表します
03:29
"I feel fine with the body I'm in, there'll be no easy excuse
「自分の身体に問題はないのに
03:32
for why I still feel uncomfortable being close to my boyfriend,"
なぜまだ彼氏と親密になって落ち着かないんだろう」
03:34
from a twenty-two-year-old in Japan.
日本に住む22歳の方からです
03:38
"I got this on some trading locally,
「ある地元の取引でこれをもらったけど
03:40
but really don't feel like screwing with wiring and crap."
配線やくだらないことに時間をかけたくない気分だ」
03:42
Also, some of the feelings contain photographs in the blog posts.
さらに いくつかの感情には
写真がブログの投稿に含まれていることがあり
03:44
And when that happens, these montage compositions are automatically created,
その場合は 一文と写真が組合わさった
03:47
which consist of the sentence and images being combined.
このような写真構成が 自動的に作成されます
03:52
And any of these can be opened up to reveal the sentence inside.
写真を開けると 中の文を読むことができます
03:55
"I feel good."
「気分がいい」
03:59
"I feel rough now, and I probably gained 100,000 pounds,
「体調悪くて 10万ポンドくらい太ったけど
04:04
but it was worth it."
その価値はあったわ」
04:07
"I love how they were able to preserve most in everything
「自然が肌で感じられるように保護されていて
04:11
that makes you feel close to nature -- butterflies,
素晴らしいわ 蝶や人口の森
04:14
man-made forests, limestone caves and hey, even a huge python."
鍾乳洞 それに巨大なニシキヘビまでいるのよ」
04:16
So the next movement is called mobs.
次はMobsと呼ばれるもので
04:21
This provides a slightly more statistical look at things.
もう少し統計的な情報を得ることができます
04:23
This is showing the world's most common feelings overall right now,
今 世界全体で 最も多くみられる感情を表しています
04:25
dominated by better, then bad, then good, then guilty, and so on.
「より良い」が圧倒的で
「悪い」「良い」「罪深い」などと続きます
04:28
Weather causes the feelings to assume the physical traits
Weatherは感情をそれに似合う天候の形で表現します
04:31
of the weather they represent. So the sunny ones swirl around,
晴れを表すものはくるくる回転し
04:34
the cloudy ones float along, the rainy ones fall down,
曇りはそこを漂い 雨の場合は落下していき
04:36
and the snowy ones flutter to the ground.
雪の場合は地面にはらはらと落ちてきます
04:39
You can also stop a raindrop and open the feeling inside.
さらに雨粒を止めて その中の感情を見ることができます
04:41
Finally, location causes the feelings to move to their spots
最後にLocationは感情が発信元に表示され
04:47
on a world map, giving you a sense of their geographic distribution.
世界地図上でその分布を見ることが出来ます
04:49
So I'll show you now some of my favorite montages from "We Feel Fine."
ここで We Feel Fineより
私の好きなMontageをいくつか紹介します
04:52
These are the images that are automatically constructed.
これらは自動的に構成された画像です
04:55
"I feel like I'm diagonally parked in a parallel universe."
「私はまるで平行宇宙において斜めに駐車した気分だ」
04:57
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:00
"I've kissed numerous other boys and it hasn't felt good,
「今までいろんな子とキスしたけど
05:03
the kisses felt messy and wrong,
いい気持ちはしなかった
05:05
but kissing Lucas feels beautiful and almost spiritual."
不潔で罪悪感もあったけど
ルーカスとのキスは美しく 神聖的だわ」
05:07
"I can feel my cancer grow."
「自分の癌が成長していくのを感じます」
05:13
"I feel pretty."
「自分を可愛らしく感じるわ」
05:16
"I feel skinny, but I'm not."
「痩せてるように感じるけど 痩せてないよ」
05:19
"I'm 23, and a recovering meth and heroin addict,
「23歳で覚醒剤とヘロイン依存から回復中です
05:22
and feel absolutely blessed to still be alive."
まだ生きてるなんて本当に恵まれています
05:24
"I can't wait to see them racing for the first time at Daytona next month,
「来月デイトナで
初めてレースを見るのが待ちきれないよ
05:27
because I feel the need for speed."
スピード最高」
05:30
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:32
"I feel sassy."
「粋な気分」
05:35
"I feel so sexy in this new wig."
「新しいかつらで セクシーな気分になるわ」
05:36
As you can see, "We Feel Fine" collects
このように We Feel Fineでは
05:39
very, very small-scale personal stories.
個人的でとても小さな物語を収集します
05:41
Sometimes, stories as short as two or three words.
時々二、三文字程度の短い物語もあったりします
05:43
So, really even challenging the notion
物語と呼べるものの限界にまで
05:45
of what can be considered a story.
挑戦しているようなものです
05:47
And recently, I've become interested in diving much more deeply into a single story.
最近は一つの物語に より深く関わってみたくなり
05:49
And that's led me to doing some work with the physical world,
インターネットではなく
現実の世界の作品に取り組むように
05:53
not with the Internet,
なりました
05:56
and only using the Internet at the very last moment, as a presentation medium.
インターネットは最終的な展示媒体としてのみ利用しました
05:57
So these are some newer projects that
これらは
06:01
actually aren't even launched publicly yet.
まだ公開されていないプロジェクトです
06:02
The first such one is called "The Whale Hunt."
初めのプロジェクトは The Whale Hunt というものです
06:04
Last May, I spent nine days living up in Barrow, Alaska,
昨年5月にアメリカの最北に位置する
06:06
the northernmost settlement in the United States,
アラスカ州のバローで
06:09
with a family of Inupiat Eskimos,
毎年恒例の春の捕鯨を記録するため
06:11
documenting their annual spring whale hunt.
イヌピアトのエスキモーの家族達と9日間過ごしました
06:13
This is the whaling camp here, we're about six miles from shore,
これは捕鯨キャンプ地で
私達は海岸から6マイル程離れた
06:16
camping on five and a half feet of thick, frozen pack ice.
5.5フィート程の厚さの叢氷の上でキャンプしました
06:19
And that water that you see there is the open lead,
そこに見られる水は開けた水路で
06:22
and through that lead, bowhead whales migrate north each springtime.
水路を通って ホッキョククジラが毎春北へ移動します
06:24
And the Eskimo community basically camps out on the edge of the ice here,
エスキモーの人々は基本的に氷上の端でキャンプし
06:28
waits for a whale to come close enough to attack. And when it does,
クジラが十分近づくのを待ち 近づいたら
06:31
it throws a harpoon at it, and then hauls the whale up
銛を投げて クジラを氷上まで水揚げし
06:34
under the ice, and cuts it up.
そして解体するのです
06:36
And that would provide the community's food supply for a long time.
これが この人々の長期間の食糧源になります
06:38
So I went up there, and I lived with these guys
私はそこで この人達と捕鯨キャンプで
06:40
out in their whaling camp here, and photographed the entire experience,
一緒に生活をし 全ての経験を写真に収めました
06:42
beginning with the taxi ride to Newark airport in New York,
ニューヨークのニューアーク空港へと
タクシーを乗った時に始まり
06:45
and ending with the butchering of the second whale, seven and a half days later.
7日半後 二匹目のクジラの解体を終えるまで
06:49
I photographed that entire experience at five-minute intervals.
全ての経験を5分毎に撮影しました
06:52
So every five minutes, I took a photograph.
つまり5分毎にシャッターを切ったわけです
06:55
When I was awake, with the camera around my neck.
起きている間は カメラを首にかけ
06:57
When I was sleeping, with a tripod and a timer.
寝ている時は 三脚とタイマーを用意しました
06:59
And then in moments of high adrenaline,
アドレナリンがほとばしる瞬間において
07:01
like when something exciting was happening,
例えば何かドキドキする場面では
07:03
I would up that photographic frequency to as many as
写真の撮影頻度を速め
07:05
37 photographs in five minutes.
5分間に37枚くらいまで撮りました
07:07
So what this created was a photographic heartbeat
これによって写真を元に速まったり遅くなったりする
07:09
that sped up and slowed down, more or less matching
心拍を表現でき 自分の心拍の変化と
07:11
the changing pace of my own heartbeat.
おおよそ一致するものが作れました
07:13
That was the first concept here.
それが一つ目のコンセプトです
07:16
The second concept was to use this experience to think about
二つ目のコンセプトはこの経験を使って
07:18
the fundamental components of any story.
物語における基本要素を考えることです
07:20
What are the things that make up a story?
物語にある要素とは何でしょう?
07:22
So, stories have characters. Stories have concepts.
物語には登場人物がいます 
物語にはコンセプトがあります
07:24
Stories take place in a certain area. They have contexts.
物語は特定の場所で起こり 背景があります
07:27
They have colors. What do they look like?
それは色彩をもちます どのように見えるのか?
07:29
They have time. When did it take place? Dates -- when did it occur?
時系列もあります 起きた日にちや時間はいつなのか?
07:31
And in the case of the whale hunt, also this idea of an excitement level.
この捕鯨の話の場合 興奮の度合いも要素になります
07:34
The thing about stories, though, in most of the existing mediums
物語というものが既存の媒体
07:37
that we're accustomed to -- things like novels, radio,
例えば 小説やラジオ 写真 映画
07:40
photographs, movies, even lectures like this one --
この様な講演などで表現されるとき
07:43
we're very accustomed to this idea of the narrator or the camera position,
ナレーターやカメラのアングルといった
07:45
some kind of omniscient, external body
なんらかの全知全能の外部者の
07:49
through whose eyes you see the story.
目を通して物語を見るのが普通です
07:51
We're very used to this.
私達は それに慣れています
07:54
But if you think about real life, it's not like that at all.
でも日常生活は 全然違います
07:56
I mean, in real life, things are much more nuanced and complex,
実際 物事は より複雑で違いが沢山あり
07:58
and there's all of these overlapping stories
いくつもの重なり合う物語が
08:00
intersecting and touching each other.
互いに交差し触れ合っています
08:02
And so I thought it would be interesting to build a framework
そこで私はそのような物語を表示させる
フレームワークを作ったら
08:04
to surface those types of stories. So, in the case of "The Whale Hunt,"
面白そうだと考えました The Whale Huntの場合
08:07
how could we extract something like the story of Simeon and Crawford,
野生生物、道具、血 という概念を含み
場所は北極海で主に赤色
08:11
involving the concepts of wildlife, tools and blood, taking place on the Arctic Ocean,
5月3日の10時頃発生し 興奮のレベルは高め という
08:14
dominated by the color red, happening around 10 a.m. on May 3,
シモンとクロフォードの物語を抽出するには
08:18
with an excitement level of high?
どうすれば良いでしょうか?
08:21
So, how to extract this order of narrative from this larger story?
物語全体からこの様な話の筋を抽出するには
どうすれば良いでしょうか?
08:23
I built a web interface for viewing "The Whale Hunt" that attempts to do just this.
私はThe Whale Huntの閲覧で この機能を行う
ウェブインターフェースを構築しました
08:28
So these are all 3,214 pictures taken up there.
これは向こうで撮った 全3214枚もの写真です
08:33
This is my studio in Brooklyn. This is the Arctic Ocean,
これはブルックリンの私のスタジオです 
ここは北極海で
08:37
and the butchering of the second whale, seven days later.
7日後の二匹目のクジラの解体場面です
08:41
You can start to see some of the story here, told by color.
表示された色によって いくつかの物語が見えてきます
08:44
So this red strip signifies the color of the wallpaper
この赤く細長い一片は私が泊まっていた
08:47
in the basement apartment where I was staying.
地下アパートの壁紙の色です
08:50
And things go white as we move out onto the Arctic Ocean.
そして北極海に移動するにつれて
色は白に変化していきます
08:52
Introduction of red down here, when whales are being cut up.
ここの赤色は クジラが解体されていることを表しています
08:55
You can see a timeline, showing you the exciting moments throughout the story.
時系列で 物語を通して興奮した出来事が表示されています
08:59
These are organized chronologically.
これらは日時順にまとめられます
09:02
Wheel provides a slightly more playful version of the same,
Wheelはさっきよりも遊び心をもった同質の機能で
09:04
so these are also all the photographs organized chronologically.
これらの写真も全て日時順にまとまっています
09:07
And any of these can be clicked,
好きな写真をクリックして
09:10
and then the narrative is entered at that position.
そこから話に入れます
09:12
So here I am sleeping on the airplane heading up to Alaska.
これは私がアラスカに向かう飛行機内で寝ているところ
09:14
That's "Moby Dick."
これは『白鯨』の本です
09:17
This is the food we ate.
これは私達が食べた食事です
09:19
This is in the Patkotak's family living room
これはバローにあるパトコタック家の
09:21
in their house in Barrow. The boxed wine they served us.
リビングルームです 
これはごちそうになった箱入りワインです
09:24
Cigarette break outside -- I don't smoke.
外でのタバコ休憩です 私は吸いません
09:27
This is a really exciting sequence of me sleeping.
とてもエキサイティングな 私の寝姿の連続写真です
09:30
This is out at whale camp, on the Arctic Ocean.
北極海にある捕鯨キャンプです
09:34
This graph that I'm clicking down here is meant to be
私がクリックしているこの下のグラフは
09:38
reminiscent of a medical heartbeat graph,
心電図のようなものです
09:40
showing the exciting moments of adrenaline.
アドレナリンがほとばしる程
ドキドキする瞬間を表します
09:42
This is the ice starting to freeze over. The snow fence they built.
これは氷結を始めた氷です 彼らが作った雪の塀です
09:47
And so what I'll show you now is the ability to pull out sub-stories.
それではサブストーリーを引き出す機能をお見せします
09:50
So, here you see the cast. These are all of the people in "The Whale Hunt"
これが登場人物です 
The Whale Huntに出てくる全ての人々と
09:53
and the two whales that were killed down here.
殺された2匹のクジラもここにいます
09:57
And we could do something as arbitrary as, say,
こんなことも出来ます 例えば
09:59
extract the story of Rony, involving the concepts of blood
「血やクジラや道具」という概念を含み
場所は「北極海のアーキガクキャンプ」で
10:01
and whales and tools, taking place on the Arctic Ocean,
心拍レベルは「速い」という条件にあう
10:07
at Ahkivgaq camp, with the heartbeat level of fast.
「ロニーの物語」を抽出することができます
10:12
And now we've whittled down that whole story
こうすると全体の物語が指定に合う
10:16
to just 29 matching photographs,
たった29枚の写真に落とし込まれます
10:18
and then we can enter the narrative at that position.
そこから物語を見始めることができます
10:20
And you can see Rony cutting up the whale here.
ここではロニーがクジラを解体しています
10:22
These whales are about 40 feet long,
このようなクジラは40フィート程の長さで
10:24
and weighing over 40 tons. And they provide the food source
重さは40トン以上です ほぼ一年を通して
10:26
for the community for much of the year.
このコミュニティーの食糧源になっています
10:29
Skipping ahead a bit more here, this is Rony on the whale carcass.
もう少し飛ばして
これはクジラの死骸の上にいるロニーです
10:33
They use no chainsaws or anything; it's entirely just blades,
彼らはチェインソーなど使いません 全て刃物で
10:38
and an incredibly efficient process.
とても効率的な方法で解体します
10:41
This is the guys on the rope, pulling open the carcass.
これはロープを持った人達が 死骸を開くところです
10:43
This is the muktuk, or the blubber, all lined up for community distribution.
これは鯨皮 もしくはクジラの脂肪で
配給の為に並んでいます
10:46
It's baleen. Moving on.
これはクジラのひげです 次に移ります
10:50
So what I'm going to tell you about next
次に皆さんにお話するのは
10:53
is a very new thing. It's not even a project yet.
とても新しいもので まだプロジェクトですらありません
10:55
So, just yesterday, I flew in here from Singapore, and before that,
昨日シンガポールから直接
ここに飛んできました その前は
10:58
I was spending two weeks in Bhutan, the small Himalayan kingdom
2週間チベットとインドの間の小さなヒマラヤの王国である
11:01
nestled between Tibet and India.
ブータンで過ごしていました
11:05
And I was doing a project there about happiness,
私はそこで幸せに関するプロジェクトの為に
11:07
interviewing a lot of local people.
多くの地元の人々にインタビューをしました
11:10
So Bhutan has this really wacky thing where they base
ブータンではとても変わった所があって
11:12
most of their high-level governmental decisions around the concept
政府が大切な方針を決めるのに
11:18
of gross national happiness instead of gross domestic product,
国民総生産の代わりに
国民総幸福というコンセプトに基づいて行っていて
11:20
and they've been doing this since the '70s.
70年代から続けているのです
11:24
And it leads to just a completely different value system.
これは全く異なる価値感に繋がります
11:26
It's an incredibly non-materialistic culture,
それは驚くべき非物質主義文化であり
11:29
where people don't have a lot, but they're incredibly happy.
人々は多くを持たないものの
信じられないくらいに幸せなのです
11:31
So I went around and I talked to people about some of these ideas.
そこで私は人々に この事について訊いて回りました
11:34
So, I did a number of things. I asked people a number of set questions,
人々に一連の質問を行い
11:37
and took a number of set photographs,
写真をいくらか撮りつつ
11:40
and interviewed them with audio, and also took pictures.
録音付きでインタービューしました
11:42
I would start by asking people to rate their happiness
まず彼らの幸福の度合いを
11:44
between one and 10, which is kind of inherently absurd.
本質的におかしいものの 1から10の間で評価してもらい
11:46
And then when they answered, I would inflate that number of balloons
彼らの答えの数だけ風船を膨らませ
11:49
and give them that number of balloons to hold.
それを渡して持ってもらいます
11:52
So, you have some really happy person holding 10 balloons,
風船10個の本当に幸せな人もいれば
11:54
and some really sad soul holding one balloon.
風船1個だけのとても悲しい人もいる訳です
11:56
But you know, even holding one balloon is like, kind of happy.
でも 風船を1個持っているだけでも幸せに見えますよね
12:00
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:03
And then I would ask them a number of questions like
そしていくつか質問をします 例えば
12:05
what was the happiest day in their life, what makes them happy.
人生で一番幸せだった日や 何を幸せと思うか
12:07
And then finally, I would ask them to make a wish.
そして最後に 彼らに一つ願い事をしてもらいます
12:09
And when they made a wish, I would write their wish
願い事をしたら 彼らの願いを
12:12
onto one of the balloons and take a picture of them holding it.
風船の一つに書き 風船と一緒に写真を撮ります
12:14
So I'm going to show you now just a few brief snippets
いくつかのインタビューを少しばかり
12:17
of some of the interviews that I did, some of the people I spoke with.
かいつまんでご紹介します
12:20
This is an 11-year-old student.
これは11歳の学生です
12:23
He was playing cops and robbers with his friends, running around town,
友達とケイドロをしていて 全員おもちゃの銃を持って
12:25
and they all had plastic toy guns.
町中を走り回っていました
12:28
His wish was to become a police officer.
彼の願いは警官になることです
12:30
He was getting started early. Those were his hands.
彼は用意が早いようです これは彼の手です
12:33
I took pictures of everybody's hands,
私は全員の手の写真を撮りました
12:36
because I think you can often tell a lot about somebody
手を見るだけで その人のことが
12:38
from how their hands look. I took a portrait of everybody,
よく解るものです それぞれの顔写真も撮り
12:40
and asked everybody to make a funny face.
それから面白い顔をしてもらって それも写真に撮りました
12:43
A 17-year-old student. Her wish was to have been born a boy.
17歳の学生です 
彼女の願いは男の子に生まれることです
12:46
She thinks that women have a pretty tough go of things in Bhutan,
女性はブータンでは
物事に対して何かと困難がつきまとうため
12:50
and it's a lot easier if you're a boy.
男の子なら楽だったと思っているようです
12:53
A 28-year-old cell phone shop owner.
28歳の携帯電話販売店の店主です
13:01
If you knew what Paro looked like, you'd understand
パロの実情を考えると
13:03
how amazing it is that there's a cell phone shop there.
携帯電話販売店の存在自体が 驚くべき事です
13:05
He wanted to help poor people.
彼の願いは貧しい人々を助けることです
13:10
A 53-year-old farmer. She was chaffing wheat,
53歳の農家です 麦のもみ殻を取り分けており
13:19
and that pile of wheat behind her
彼女の後ろにある麦の山は
13:22
had taken her about a week to make.
一週間かかって作られたものです
13:24
She wanted to keep farming until she dies.
彼女は死ぬまで農家を続けたいようです
13:26
You can really start to see the stories told by the hands here.
手から物語が伝わるのが 解って来たと思います
13:30
She was wearing this silver ring that had the word "love" engraved on it,
「愛」という文字が刻まれた 銀の指輪をはめており
13:33
and she'd found it in the road somewhere.
どこかの道で拾ったようでした
13:36
A 16-year-old quarry worker.
16歳の採石労働者です
13:43
This guy was breaking rocks with a hammer in the hot sunlight,
彼は熱い日光の下で
石をハンマーで破砕していましたが
13:45
but he just wanted to spend his life as a farmer.
彼はただ農家として 人生を過ごしたいとのことでした
13:49
A 21-year-old monk. He was very happy.
21歳の僧です 彼はとても幸せでした
13:59
He wanted to live a long life at the monastery.
彼は僧院で長い人生を送りたいようです
14:04
He had this amazing series of hairs growing out of a mole on the left side of his face,
顔の左側のほくろに驚くべき毛が生えており
14:10
which I'm told is very good luck.
とても縁起がいいものであると聞かされました
14:14
He was kind of too shy to make a funny face.
面白い顔をするには あまりにも恥ずかしがり屋でした
14:17
A 16-year-old student.
16歳の学生です
14:21
She wanted to become an independent woman.
彼女は独立した女性になりたいようです
14:26
I asked her about that, and she said she meant
聞き返すと
14:28
that she doesn't want to be married,
結婚したくないという意味だと言いました
14:29
because, in her opinion, when you get married in Bhutan as a woman,
彼女の意見では ブータンで女性として結婚した場合
14:31
your chances to live an independent life kind of end,
独立した人生を生きるチャンスがなくなるため
14:34
and so she had no interest in that.
結婚には興味がないようです
14:37
A 24-year-old truck driver.
24歳のトラック運転手です
14:45
There are these terrifyingly huge Indian trucks
恐ろしく巨大なインドのトラックが
14:47
that come careening around one-lane roads with two-lane traffic,
両方通行の1車線しかない道を
飛ばしてくるのを良く見かけます
14:49
with 3,000-foot drop-offs right next to the road,
道のすぐ横は3000フィートの絶壁で
14:53
and he was driving one of these trucks.
彼はそんなトラックの運転手でした
14:56
But all he wanted was to just live a comfortable life, like other people.
そんな彼の望みは平凡な快適な暮らしをする事でした
14:58
A 24-year-old road sweeper. I caught her on her lunch break.
24歳の道路清掃人です 
彼女が昼休みの時に声をかけました
15:08
She'd built a little fire to keep warm, right next to the road.
道路の横で暖をとるため 彼女は小さな火をおこしました
15:11
Her wish was to marry someone with a car.
彼女の願いは車を所有している人と結婚することです
15:14
She wanted a change in her life.
彼女は人生に変化を求めていました
15:18
She lives in a little worker's camp right next to the road,
道路のすぐ隣の小さな労働者キャンプで暮らしており
15:20
and she wanted a different lot on things.
物事への変化を願っていました
15:23
An 81-year-old itinerant farmer.
81歳の出稼ぎ農家です
15:33
I saw this guy on the side of the road,
道路の端で彼を見かけたのですが
15:35
and he actually doesn't have a home.
実は彼には家がありません
15:37
He travels from farm to farm each day trying to find work,
毎日農場から農場へ仕事を探して移り
15:39
and then he tries to sleep at whatever farm he gets work at.
仕事を見つけた農場で寝るようです
15:41
So his wish was to come with me, so that he had somewhere to live.
彼の願いはどこかで暮らせるように私についていくことです
15:45
He had this amazing knife that he pulled out of his gho
彼はとても驚くべきナイフを持っており
15:55
and started brandishing when I asked him to make a funny face.
面白い顔をして欲しいと頼んだら
それを取り出して振り回しました
15:57
It was all good-natured.
悪気は全くなしです
16:01
A 10-year-old.
10歳です
16:04
He wanted to join a school and learn to read,
学校で読み方を習いたいのですが
16:08
but his parents didn't have enough money to send him to school.
両親には彼を学校に行かせるお金がないとのことでした
16:10
He was eating this orange, sugary candy
オレンジ色の砂糖のようなキャンディーに
16:14
that he kept dipping his fingers into,
指をしきりに漬けては舐めていて
16:16
and since there was so much saliva on his hands,
手は唾液でベトベトで
16:18
this orange paste started to form on his palms.
手のひらがオレンジ色のペースト状になっていました
16:20
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:27
A 37-year-old road worker.
37歳の道路工事作業員です
16:30
One of the more touchy political subjects in Bhutan
ブータンにおける厄介な政策的課題のひとつは
16:33
is the use of Indian cheap labor
道路を作るためにインドからの安い労働者を使い
16:37
that they import from India to build the roads,
ひとたび道路が完成すれば
16:40
and then they send these people home once the roads are built.
彼らを本国に送り返す事ですが
16:43
So these guys were in a worker's gang
そんな彼らが ある朝高速道路の端で
16:45
mixing up asphalt one morning on the side of the highway.
集団でアスファルトを混ぜていました
16:47
His wish was to make some money and open a store.
彼の願いはお金を稼いで店を開くことです
16:50
A 75-year-old farmer. She was selling oranges on the side of the road.
75歳の農家です 彼女は道路の端でオレンジを売っていました
17:00
I asked her about her wish, and she said,
願いを聞いてみたところ 彼女は
17:04
"You know, maybe I'll live, maybe I'll die, but I don't have a wish."
「生きるか死ぬかしれないけど
私に願いはないよ」と言いました
17:06
She was chewing betel nut, which caused her teeth
ビンロウジを長年噛んでいたのでしょう
17:14
over the years to turn very red.
彼女の歯は真っ赤に染まっていました
17:17
Finally, this is a 26-year-old nun I spoke to.
最後に この子は私が話しかけた26歳の尼僧です
17:19
Her wish was to make a pilgrimage to Tibet.
彼女の願いはチベットへの巡礼です
17:25
I asked her how long she planned to live in the nunnery and she said,
いつまで尼僧院で暮らすのか聞いたところ
17:28
"Well, you know, of course, it's impermanent,
「もちろんずっとではないけれど
17:30
but my plan is to live here until I'm 30, and then enter a hermitage."
30歳まではここに居て その後は隠遁生活を始めるわ」
17:32
And I said, "You mean, like a cave?" And she said, "Yeah, like a cave."
「洞窟に住んだりするということ?」 
「ええ 洞窟に住んだりね」
17:36
And I said, "Wow, and how long will you live in the cave?"
「すごいな どれくらい洞窟で暮らすつもり?」
17:41
And she said, "Well, you know,
「うーん 実はね
17:44
I think I'd kind of like to live my whole life in the cave."
一生洞窟の中で暮らしてみたいと思っているわ」
17:46
I just thought that was amazing. I mean, she spoke in a way --
びっくりしました 彼女は実に
17:50
with amazing English, and amazing humor, and amazing laughter --
流暢な英語を喋り ユーモアのセンスや笑いかたも
17:52
that made her seem like somebody I could have bumped into
まるでニューヨークか 故郷のバーモントの道端で
17:55
on the streets of New York, or in Vermont, where I'm from.
ばったり出会ったかもと言う感じの人でした
17:57
But here she had been living in a nunnery for the last seven years.
でも彼女はこの7年間 尼僧院で暮らしているのです
18:00
I asked her a little bit more about the cave
私は洞窟のことや そこに行ったら
18:03
and what she planned would happen once she went there, you know.
何が彼女を待ち受けているのか
もう少し詳しく聞いてみました
18:06
What if she saw the truth after just one year,
もしたった1年で悟りを開いたら
18:10
what would she do for the next 35 years in her life?
次の35年 何をして暮らすのでしょう?
18:12
And this is what she said.
すると彼女はこう言いました
18:14
Woman: I think I'm going to stay for 35. Maybe -- maybe I'll die.
女性:35歳まで 私は洞窟で暮らすと思う 
その後は多分 死ぬわ
18:16
Jonathan Harris: Maybe you'll die? Woman: Yes.
ジョナサン:多分死ぬの? 
女性:そうよ
18:21
JH: 10 years? Woman: Yes, yes. JH: 10 years, that's a long time.
ジョナサン:あと10年? 
女性:ええ ジョナサン:10年か それは長いね
18:23
Woman: Yes, not maybe one, 10 years, maybe I can die
女性:ええ 1年ではなく10年よ
18:26
within one year, or something like that.
その後1年以内に多分私は死ねるわ
18:29
JH: Are you hoping to?
ジョナサン:君はそう願っているの?
18:31
Woman: Ah, because you know, it's impermanent.
女性:ええ だって永遠ではないもの
18:33
JH: Yeah, but -- yeah, OK. Do you hope --
ジョナサン:それはそうだけど うん そうだね
18:35
would you prefer to live in the cave for 40 years,
君は洞窟内で40年間暮らすのと
18:41
or to live for one year?
1年間だけ生きるのと どちらがいい?
18:44
Woman: But I prefer for maybe 40 to 50.
女性:多分40から50歳まで暮らしたいわ
18:46
JH: 40 to 50? Yeah.
ジョナサン:40から50歳だって?
18:50
Woman: Yes. From then, I'm going to the heaven.
女性:ええ その後私は天国に行くの
18:51
JH: Well, I wish you the best of luck with it.
ジョナサン:うまくいく様に願っているよ
18:54
Woman: Thank you.
女性:ありがとう
18:59
JH: I hope it's everything that you hope it will be.
ジョナサン:君の願い通りになるといいね
19:00
So thank you again, so much.
改めて本当にありがとう
19:03
Woman: You're most welcome.
女性:どう致しまして
19:05
JH: So if you caught that, she said she hoped to die
つまり彼女は40歳あたりで死ぬことを
19:07
when she was around 40. That was enough life for her.
願っていると言ったのです それで十分な人生だと
19:09
So, the last thing we did, very quickly,
最後に ちょっと急ぎますが
19:12
is I took all those wish balloons -- there were 117 interviews,
117のインタビューから得られた
19:14
117 wishes -- and I brought them up to a place called Dochula,
117の願いが込められた風船を持って
19:17
which is a mountain pass in Bhutan, at 10,300 feet,
標高10300フィートもの峠に位置するドシュラと呼ばれる
19:21
one of the more sacred places in Bhutan.
ブータンで有名な聖地の一つに持って行きました
19:25
And up there, there are thousands of prayer flags
そこには人々が長年にかけて広げていった
19:28
that people have spread out over the years.
数多くの祈祷旗があります
19:30
And we re-inflated all of the balloons, put them up on a string,
私達は風船を再度膨らませ それを糸でくくり付けて
19:32
and hung them up there among the prayer flags.
祈祷機と一緒につるしました
19:35
And they're actually still flying up there today.
実は今も あそこで風船が風になびいています
19:37
So if any of you have any Bhutan travel plans in the near future,
もし近い将来ブータンへの旅行計画がある方は
19:39
you can go check these out. Here are some images from that.
風船を見に行くことが出来ます これはその時の写真です
19:42
We said a Buddhist prayer so that all these wishes could come true.
これら全ての願いが叶うように念仏を唱えました
19:46
You can start to see some familiar balloons here.
見慣れた風船もいくつかあります
19:59
"To make some money and to open a store" was the Indian road worker.
「お金を稼いでお店を開く」 
これはインド人の道路工事作業員からの願いですね
20:02
Thanks very much.
ありがとうございました
20:15
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:17
Translator:Yuki Okada
Reviewer:Akiko Hicks

sponsored links

Jonathan Harris - Artist, storyteller, Internet anthropologist
Artist and computer scientist Jonathan Harris makes online art that captures the world's expression -- and gives us a glimpse of the soul of the Internet.

Why you should listen

Brooklyn-based artist Jonathan Harris' work celebrates the world's diversity even as it illustrates the universal concerns of its occupants. His computer programs scour the Internet for unfiltered content, which his beautiful interfaces then organize to create coherence from the chaos.

His projects are both intensely personal (the "We Feel Fine" project, made with Sep Kanvar, which scans the world's blogs to collect snapshots of the writers' feelings) and entirely global (the new "Universe," which turns current events into constellations of words). But their effect is the same -- to show off a world that resonates with shared emotions, concerns, problems, triumphs and troubles.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.