sponsored links
EG 2008

Miru Kim: My underground art explorations

ミル・キムのアンダーグラウンド アート

December 12, 2008

2008年のEGカンファレンスで、芸術家ミル・キムが自身の作品について語ります。キムはニューヨークの下にある産業廃墟を探検し、自分が裸になってモデルとなり写真を撮影をすることで、このような広大で危険な隠れた場所に鋭い焦点をあてます。

Miru Kim - Photographer and explorer
Miru Kim is a fearless explorer of abandoned and underground places. Her photography underscores the vulnerable nature of the human explorer in these no-woman's-lands. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
I was raised in Seoul, Korea,
私はソウル育ちですが
00:16
and moved to New York City in 1999 to attend college.
1999年に大学進学のためにニューヨーク市に引っ越してきました
00:18
I was pre-med at the time,
当時 医大生だった私は
00:22
and I thought I would become a surgeon
外科医を目指していました
00:25
because I was interested in anatomy
解剖学に興味があって 動物の
00:28
and dissecting animals really piqued my curiosity.
解剖には好奇心を駆り立てられました
00:31
At the same time, I fell in love with New York City.
同じ頃 私はニューヨークが大好きになり
00:35
I started to realize that I could look at the whole city
ニューヨークの街全体が生命体として
00:40
as a living organism.
見れる事に気づき始めたのです
00:44
I wanted to dissect it
街を切り裂いて
00:46
and look into its unseen layers.
隠れた層を見たかったのです
00:48
And the way to it, for me,
そのやり方とは
00:50
was through artistic means.
芸術的手段を用いるものでした
00:52
So, eventually I decided to pursue an MFA instead of an M.D.
結局 私は医師ではなく美術学修士号を取得することにしました
00:56
and in grad school I became interested
大学院生のとき
01:00
in creatures that dwell in the hidden corners of the city.
街の片隅に棲む生き物に興味を持つようになりました
01:03
In New York City, rats are part of commuters' daily lives.
ニューヨークでネズミは通勤者たちの生活の一部になっています
01:10
Most people ignore them or are frightened of them.
ネズミを見ても無視する人や 怖がる人がほとんどですが
01:13
But I took a liking to them
私は社会のへりで暮らしている―
01:17
because they dwell on the fringes of society.
ネズミが好きになりました
01:19
And even though they're used in labs to promote human lives,
ネズミは人間の命のために実験で使われますが
01:21
they're also considered pests.
害虫としても見られています
01:24
I also started looking around in the city
私はニューヨークを見て回り始め
01:27
and trying to photograph them.
写真を撮ろうとしました
01:31
One day, in the subway, I was snapping pictures of the tracks
ある日 地下鉄の線路を撮影していました
01:34
hoping to catch a rat or two,
ネズミが出てくるといいな と思っていると
01:37
and a man came up to me and said,
ある男性が近づいてきて
01:40
"You can't take photographs here.
“ここで撮影は出来ません
01:43
The MTA will confiscate your camera."
交通局がカメラを没収しますよ” と言われ
01:46
I was quite shocked by that,
私はかなりびっくりしました
01:49
and thought to myself, "Well, OK then.
それならば ネズミを追ってみようと
01:52
I'll follow the rats."
思ったわけです
01:55
Then I started going into the tunnels,
そしてトンネルの中へ入り込みました
01:58
which made me realize that there's a whole new dimension to the city
そこで この街の新しい側面に気づきました
02:01
that I never saw before and most people don't get to see.
人の目に触れる事はほとんどない光景です
02:04
Around the same time, I met like-minded individuals
同じ時期に 私は同じ趣味を持つ人たちと出会いました
02:09
who call themselves urban explorers, adventurers, spelunkers,
彼らは自らを都市探検家 冒険家 洞窟探検家
02:12
guerrilla historians, etc.
ゲリラ歴史家 などと呼んでいます
02:16
I was welcomed into this loose, Internet-based network
定期的に都市部にある廃墟を探検している―
02:18
of people who regularly explore urban ruins
インターネット基盤のネットワークに私は迎えられました
02:22
such as abandoned subway stations,
彼らは使われなくなった地下鉄の駅や
02:26
tunnels, sewers, aqueducts,
トンネル 下水溝 水路
02:29
factories, hospitals, shipyards and so on.
工場 病院 造船所などを探検しています
02:32
When I took photographs in these locations,
私は このような場所の写真を撮ったとき
02:39
I felt there was something missing in the pictures.
写真に何かが足りないと感じました
02:42
Simply documenting these soon-to-be-demolished structures
間もなく取り壊される建物を単に記録するのは
02:45
wasn't enough for me.
手ごたえがなかったので
02:50
So I wanted to create a fictional character
このような地下に棲む 架空の人物か
02:53
or an animal that dwells in these underground spaces,
動物を作り出したいと思いました
02:57
and the simplest way to do it, at the time,
当時 一番簡単だったのは
03:00
was to model myself.
自分がモデルになることでした
03:03
I decided against clothing
洋服を着用したくなかったのは
03:06
because I wanted the figure to be without any cultural implications
文化や時代を醸し出す要素が入らない―
03:09
or time-specific elements.
構図を作りたかったのです
03:12
I wanted a simple way to represent a living body
このような衰退していく放置された場所に存在する
03:14
inhabiting these decaying, derelict spaces.
生きている肉体を表す簡単な方法が欲しかったのです
03:18
This was taken in the Riviera Sugar Factory in Red Hook, Brooklyn.
これはブルックリンのレッドフックにあるリビエラ砂糖工場で撮りました
03:25
It's now an empty, six-acre lot
現在は空の状態の約7,300坪の敷地で
03:29
waiting for a shopping mall right across from the new Ikea.
新しいイケアの正面にあるショッピングモールとなる場所です
03:32
I was very fond of this space
ここは私の好きな場所です
03:35
because it's the first massive industrial complex I found on my own
放置されている巨大な産業用建物を自分で探しだしたのは
03:38
that is abandoned.
ここが初めてだからです
03:42
When I first went in, I was scared,
そこに初めて入った時 犬が吠えていて
03:44
because I heard dogs barking and I thought they were guard dogs.
番犬がいるのかと思い 怖くなりましたが
03:47
But they happened to be wild dogs living there,
そこに棲む野良犬でした
03:50
and it was right by the water,
水辺のそばだったので
03:53
so there were swans and ducks swimming around
白鳥やアヒルが泳いでいて
03:55
and trees growing everywhere
木が至る所に生えていて
03:58
and bees nesting in the sugar barrels.
蜂が砂糖樽の中に巣を作っていました
04:00
The nature had really reclaimed the whole complex.
その敷地全体に自然が息を吹き返していました
04:02
And, in a way, I wanted the human figure in the picture
私は写真の中の人物像を 自然と
04:05
to become a part of that nature.
一体化させたかったのです
04:08
When I got comfortable in the space,
この場所に慣れてしまうと
04:13
it also felt like a big playground.
大きな遊び場のようにも感じました
04:15
I would climb up the tanks and hop across exposed beams
私はタンクを上って 丸出しになった角材を跳び越えたりして
04:17
as if I went back in time and became a child again.
まるで 子どもに戻ったように感じました
04:20
This was taken in the old Croton Aqueduct,
これはクロトン水路で撮ったものです
04:25
which supplied fresh water to New York City for the first time.
初めてニューヨーク市に淡水を供給した水路です
04:29
The construction began in 1837.
建設は1837年に始まり
04:33
It lasted about five years.
約5年間続きました
04:36
It got abandoned when the new Croton Aqueducts opened in 1890.
1890年に新しいクロトン水路ができてから 放置された状態です
04:38
When you go into spaces like this,
このような空間に入ると
04:44
you're directly accessing the past,
過去に直接アクセスしていることになります
04:46
because they sit untouched for decades.
何十年も手付かずのままになっているからです
04:49
I love feeling the aura of a space that has so much history.
私は歴史をもつ空間のオーラを感じるのが大好きです
04:52
Instead of looking at reproductions of it at home,
再現された建物を家で見るのではなく
04:57
you're actually feeling the hand-laid bricks
手で積み上げられたレンガを実際に感じ
05:00
and shimmying up and down narrow cracks
わずかな隙間を上ったり下りたり
05:03
and getting wet and muddy
濡れて泥だらけになって
05:06
and walking in a dark tunnel with a flashlight.
懐中電灯で照らしながら暗い通路を歩くのです
05:09
This is a tunnel underneath Riverside Park.
これはリーバーサイドパークの下にあるトンネルです
05:13
It was built in the 1930s by Robert Moses.
ロバート モーゼが1930年代に建てたものです
05:17
The murals were done by a graffiti artist
この壁画はグラフィティ画家が
05:20
to commemorate the hundreds of homeless people
1991年にトンネルが再開した際に
05:23
that got relocated from the tunnel in 1991
追い出された何百人ものホームレスの人たちを
05:26
when the tunnel reopened for trains.
記憶に残すために描いたものです
05:29
Walking in this tunnel is very peaceful.
このトンネルの中は静かで とても落ち着きます
05:32
There's nobody around you,
回りには誰もいません
05:34
and you hear the kids playing in the park above you,
真上にある公園で遊ぶ子どもの声が聞こえ
05:37
completely unaware of what's underneath.
下にあるものの存在には全く気づくことはないのです
05:40
When I was going out a lot to these places,
このような場所へよく出かけていた頃の私は
05:43
I was feeling a lot of anxiety and isolation
大きな不安や孤独を感じていました
05:46
because I was in a solitary phase in my life,
人生の中で寂しい時期にいたのです
05:49
and I decided to title my series "Naked City Spleen,"
それで私は自分の作品を「裸都の憂鬱」と題しました
05:52
which references Charles Baudelaire.
シャルル ボードレールから取ったものです
05:57
"Naked City" is a nickname for New York,
「裸都」とはニューヨークの別名で
06:00
and "Spleen" embodies the melancholia and inertia
「憂鬱」とは都会の環境から疎外されている―
06:03
that come from feeling alienated in an urban environment.
感覚から生まれる 鬱や無力の状態を表現しています
06:06
This is the same tunnel.
これは同じトンネルです
06:12
You see the sunbeams coming from the ventilation ducts
通気口から太陽光が差し込んでいて
06:15
and the train approaching.
列車が近づいているのが見えます
06:18
This is a tunnel that's abandoned in Hell's Kitchen.
これはヘルズ キッチンにある使われなくなったトンネルです
06:23
I was there alone, setting up,
私は独りで撮影の準備をしていたら
06:27
and a homeless man approached.
ホームレスの男の人が近づいてきました
06:30
I was basically intruding in his living space.
私は彼の生活空間に侵入してしまったのです
06:33
I was really frightened at first,
初めは怖かったのですが
06:36
but I calmly explained to him that I was working on an art project
落ち着いて自分の計画を彼に説明したところ
06:39
and he didn't seem to mind
問題はないようでした
06:42
and so I went ahead and put my camera on self-timer
それでカメラをセルフタイマーにセットして
06:44
and ran back and forth.
行ったり来たり撮影しました
06:47
And when I was done, he actually offered me his shirt
撮影が終わった時 彼は自分のシャツを差し出し
06:49
to wipe off my feet
足を拭いていいと言い
06:52
and kindly walked me out.
親切に送り出してくれました
06:54
It must have been a very unusual day for him.
私のようなお客さんが来ることはないでしょうね
06:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:59
One thing that struck me, after this incident,
そんなことがあってから ある事に取りつかれました
07:05
was that a space like that holds so many deleted memories of the city.
このような空間には街から捨て去られた沢山の想い出が詰まっています
07:08
That homeless man, to me, really represented
そのホームレスの男性は 私にとって
07:13
an element of the unconscious of the city.
街の無意識な要素を象徴していました
07:16
He told me that he was abused above ground
彼は地上では暴力を受け
07:21
and was once in Riker's Island,
かつては刑務所にいましたが
07:24
and at last he found peace and quiet in that space.
ついに このトンネルで平穏無事な日々を得たそうです
07:27
The tunnel was once built for the prosperity of the city,
トンネルは以前 街の繁栄のために建てられたものですが
07:31
but is now a sanctuary for outcasts,
今は世間に見捨てられた人たちの避難所となっています
07:36
who are completely forgotten in the average urban dweller's everyday life.
彼らは 都会に住む普通の人の日常から完全に忘れられた存在です
07:40
This is underneath my alma mater, Columbia University.
これは私の母校であるコロンビア大学の下です
07:49
The tunnels are famous for having been used
このトンネルはマンハッタン計画の開発時期に
07:52
during the development of the Manhattan Project.
使われたことで有名です
07:55
This particular tunnel is interesting
このトンネルの面白さは
08:01
because it shows the original foundations of Bloomingdale Insane Asylum,
コロンビア大学を建設することになり 1890年に
08:03
which was demolished in 1890
取り壊された精神病院の
08:07
when Columbia moved in.
土台の原型が見れることです
08:09
This is the New York City Farm Colony,
これはニューヨーク市ファームコロニーです
08:14
which was a poorhouse in Staten Island
1890年代から1930年代にかけて
08:17
from the 1890s to the 1930s.
ステートンアイランドにあった救貧院です
08:20
Most of my photos are set in places
私の写真の大半は 何十年も
08:26
that have been abandoned for decades,
放置されている場所をとらえています
08:29
but this is an exception.
でもこれは例外です
08:31
This children's hospital was closed in 1997;
この小児病院は1997年に閉鎖されました
08:34
it's located in Newark.
ニューアークにあった病院です
08:37
When I was there three years ago,
そこへ3年前に行った時
08:40
the windows were broken and the walls were peeling,
窓は割れて 壁は剥がれ落ちていましたが
08:43
but everything was left there as it was.
何もかもが そのままになっていました
08:45
You see the autopsy table, morgue trays, x-ray machines
解剖台 遺体トレイ エックス線装置があり
08:47
and even used utensils,
使用済み手術器具まで
08:50
which you see on the autopsy table.
解剖台の上にあるのがわかります
08:52
After exploring recently-abandoned buildings,
使われなくなったばかりの建物を探検してから
08:56
I felt that everything could fall into ruins very fast:
何でもすぐに廃墟になりうると感じました
09:00
your home, your office, a shopping mall, a church --
家 会社 ショッピングモール 教会
09:03
any man-made structures around you.
周囲にある人間の作り出した建物なら何でも…
09:07
I was reminded of how fragile our sense of security is
私たちが感じる安心感とは いかにもろくて
09:11
and how vulnerable people truly are.
人がどれだけ無防備で傷つきやすいのか 気付かされました
09:18
I love to travel,
私は旅行が大好きで
09:21
and Berlin has become one of my favorite cities.
ベルリンはお気に入りの街のひとつです
09:24
It's full of history,
歴史ある街で
09:27
and also full of underground bunkers
戦時中に使われていた地下壕や
09:29
and ruins from the war.
廃墟もたくさんあります
09:32
This was taken under a homeless asylum
これは1885年に建てられた
09:34
built in 1885 to house 1,100 people.
1,100人を収容できるホームレスの保護施設で撮りました
09:37
I saw the structure while I was on the train,
電車に乗っている時に この建物が目に入ったので
09:41
and I got off at the next station and met people there
次の駅で降りて行ってみると そこの人たちが
09:44
that gave me access to their catacomb-like basement,
カタコンベのような地下へと入れてくれました
09:47
which was used for ammunition storage during the war
そこは戦時中に弾薬倉庫として使われていた場所で
09:50
and also, at some point, to hide groups of Jewish refugees.
ある時期にはユダヤ人避難民の隠れ家としても使われていました
09:54
This is the actual catacombs in Paris.
これはパリのカタコンベです
09:59
I explored there extensively
そこでは立ち入り禁止になっている場所を
10:02
in the off-limits areas
ずいぶん探検し
10:06
and fell in love right away.
一目惚れしてしまいました
10:08
There are more than 185 miles of tunnels,
地下通路は約300kmの長さがありますが
10:10
and only about a mile is open to the public as a museum.
博物館として公開されているのは約1.6kmだけです
10:13
The first tunnels date back to 60 B.C.
はじめの地下通路は紀元前60年まで遡ります
10:19
They were consistently dug as limestone quarries
ずっと石灰岩の採石場として採掘されていましたが
10:22
and by the 18th century,
18世紀に至る頃
10:26
the caving-in of some of these quarries posed safety threats,
陥没している箇所が危ないと指摘されました
10:29
so the government ordered reinforcing of the existing quarries
それで政府は既存の採石場の強化を命じ
10:32
and dug new observation tunnels
全体を監視して地図を作るために
10:37
in order to monitor and map the whole place.
新しい監視用の通路を掘ったのです
10:40
As you can see, the system is very complex and vast.
見てわかるように このシステムはとても複雑で広大です
10:43
It's very dangerous to get lost in there.
この中で迷い込んでしまうと非常に危険です
10:46
And at the same time,
同時期に
10:50
there was a problem in the city with overflowing cemeteries.
この街にはあまりにも墓地が多すぎるという問題があったため
10:52
So the bones were moved from the cemeteries into the quarries,
遺骨が墓地から採石場へと移され
10:56
making them into the catacombs.
カタコンベになりました
11:01
The remains of over six million people are housed in there,
600万人以上の骨がここに収容されていて
11:06
some over 1,300 years old.
中には1,300年以上前の骨もあります
11:10
This was taken under the Montparnasse Cemetery
これはモンパルナス墓地の下で撮りました
11:13
where most of the ossuaries are located.
ほとんどの骨つぼが ここにあります
11:17
There are also phone cables that were used in the '50s
50年代に使われていた電話線や第二次世界大戦時代の
11:21
and many bunkers from the World War II era.
えんぺい壕がたくさんあります
11:26
This is a German bunker.
これはドイツ軍のえんぺい壕で
11:29
Nearby there's a French bunker,
近くにはフランス軍のえんぺい壕があります
11:32
and the whole tunnel system is so complex
通路システム全体はあまりにも複雑で
11:35
that the two parties never met.
ドイツ軍とフランス軍は一度も遭遇しなかったそうです
11:38
The tunnels are famous for having been used by the Resistance,
この通路はレジスタンスが使っていたことで有名で
11:41
which Victor Hugo wrote about in "Les Miserables."
ビクトル ユーゴーがレミゼラブルの中で触れています
11:44
And I saw a lot of graffiti from the 1800s, like this one.
1800年代に描かれた このような落書きをたくさん見ました
11:47
After exploring the underground of Paris,
パリの地下を探検したあとは
11:56
I decided to climb up,
どこかに登ってみることにしました
11:59
and I climbed a Gothic monument
そして パリの真ん中にある
12:02
that's right in the middle of Paris.
ゴシック様式の記念塔に登りました
12:05
This is the Tower of Saint Jacques.
これはサン ジャックの塔です
12:11
It was built in the early 1500s.
1500年代初頭に建てられました
12:15
I don't recommend sitting on a gargoyle in the middle of January, naked.
一月中旬に裸でガーゴイルの上に座るのはお勧めしません
12:20
It was not very comfortable. (Laughter)
あまり気持ちのいいものではありませんでした
12:24
And all this time,
そして このかた
12:28
I never saw a single rat in any of these places,
ロンドンの下水溝に行くまで
12:30
until recently, when I was in the London sewers.
私はこのような場所でネズミを一匹も見かけたことはありませんでした
12:33
This was probably the toughest place to explore.
ここはおそらく探検するのが一番大変だった場所です
12:37
I had to wear a gas mask because of the toxic fumes --
有毒ガスが立ちこめていたので この写真を撮ったとき以外は
12:40
I guess, except for in this picture.
ガスマスクを装着しなくてはいけませんでした
12:43
And when the tides of waste matter come in
廃棄物の波が押し寄せると
12:46
it sounds as if a whole storm is approaching you.
まるで 嵐が近づいてきているような感じがします
12:49
This is a still from a film I worked on recently, called "Blind Door."
これは「盲目の扉」と題した私が最近作った映画からのスチールです
12:55
I've become more interested in capturing movement and texture.
私は動きや手触りをとらえることに興味がさらに湧いてきました
12:59
And the 16mm black-and-white film gave a different feel to it.
16ミリの白黒フィルムは異なる感じを醸し出します
13:05
And this is the first theater project I worked on.
これは私が初めて取り組んだシアタープロジェクトです
13:15
I adapted and produced "A Dream Play" by August Strindberg.
アウグスト ストリンドベリの「ドリームプレイ」を脚色して作り出しました
13:19
It was performed last September one time only
そしてブルックリンのアトランティック アヴェニュー トンネルで
13:24
in the Atlantic Avenue tunnel in Brooklyn,
一度きりの公演をしたのです
13:27
which is considered to be the oldest underground train tunnel in the world,
アトランティック アヴェニュー トンネルは1844年に建設された―
13:30
built in 1844.
世界で一番古い地下鉄トンネルとされています
13:35
I've been leaning towards more collaborative projects like these, lately.
最近は このような共同企画をやるようになりました
13:38
But whenever I get a chance I still work on my series.
でも 機会があるごとに いつも自分の作品シリーズに取り組んでいます
13:44
The last place I visited
最後に私が訪れたのは
13:48
was the Mayan ruins of Copan, Honduras.
ホンジュラスにあるコパンのマヤ遺跡です
13:51
This was taken inside an archaeological tunnel in the main temple.
これは本堂の中にある考古学通路の中で撮りました
13:54
I like doing more than just exploring these spaces.
私は探検だけではなく それ以上のことをするのが好きです
13:59
I feel an obligation to animate and humanize these spaces continually
このような空間が永遠に失われてしまう前に
14:05
in order to preserve their memories in a creative way --
思い出を残すために創造的な方法で命を吹き込み 人間味を与える義務を
14:11
before they're lost forever.
私は感じるのです
14:16
Thank you.
ありがとう
14:19
Translator:Takako Sato
Reviewer:Kayo Mizutani

sponsored links

Miru Kim - Photographer and explorer
Miru Kim is a fearless explorer of abandoned and underground places. Her photography underscores the vulnerable nature of the human explorer in these no-woman's-lands.

Why you should listen

Miru Kim is a photographer and filmmaker with a love of the new and unknown. In her best-known body of work, she investigates left-behind industrial spaces, infiltrates them with her camera, and then photographs herself in the space, nude. Like Wallace Stevens' jar upon a hill, the presence of her small body brings these massive, damp and dirty, unknown spaces into a new focus.

Extending her aesthetic, she has made a film of Strindberg's A Dream Play set in an abandoned tunnel underneath New York City.

Kim also runs a nonprofit called Naked City Arts to promote young local artists in Manhattan.  

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.