English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2005

Edward Burtynsky: My wish: Manufactured landscapes and green education

エドワード・バーティンスキー: 私の願い:製造された風景と環境保全教育

Filmed
Views 993,008

2005年のTEDプライズを受賞した写真家のエドワード・バーティンスキーが願いを語ります。それは、彼の作品 ―人類が世界に及ぼした影響を撮影した驚くような風景写真― が、全世界の人々が持続可能性への会話を持つきっかけになってほしい、というものです。

- Photographer
2005 TED Prize winner Edward Burtynsky has made it his life's work to document humanity's impact on the planet. His riveting photographs, as beautiful as they are horrifying, capture views of the Earth altered by mankind. Full bio

Walk around for four months with three wishes,
4ヶ月間 3つの願い事を考えながら歩き回る
00:25
and all the ideas will start to percolate up.
そうするとアイディアがだんだん滲み出てきます
00:29
I think everybody should do it -- think that you've got three wishes.
みなさんも考えてみるといいと思います
自分に3つの願い事があったらと
00:31
And what would you do? It's actually a great exercise
そして何をしようかと
00:33
to really drill down to the things that you feel are important,
考えを掘り下げて
何が大切なのかをつきとめて
00:35
and really reflect on the world around us.
自分たちの回りの世界のことを
じっくり考えるいい頭の運動になります
00:40
And thinking that, can an individual actually do something,
そして考えることによって 人々の注意を引き
00:43
or come up with something,
世の中を変えるような行動を起こしたり
00:47
that may actually get some traction out there and make a difference?
アイディアを提案することができるでしょうか?
00:49
Inspired by nature -- that's the theme here.
自然からひらめきを受ける -- これが今回のテーマです
00:53
And I think, quite frankly, that's where I started.
率直に言うと これが私の
出発地点でもあったように思います
00:57
I became very interested in the landscape as a Canadian.
カナダ人の私は
風景にとても興味を持つようになりました
01:02
We have this Great North. And there was a pretty small population,
カナダ北部は雄大で 人口も少なく
01:07
and my father was an avid outdoorsman.
父は熱心なアウトドア愛好家だったので
01:10
So I really had a chance to experience that.
私はアウトドアをたくさん経験しました
01:12
And I could never really understand exactly what it was, or how it was informing me.
自然が何なのか 自分にどのように影響しているのか
はっきりと分かっていませんでしたが
01:15
But what I think it was telling me
今思うに 教えてくれたのはこのようなことです
01:19
is that we are this transient thing that's happening,
我々は一時的な存在でしかないこと
01:21
and that the nature that you see out there -- the untouched shorelines,
そして はるかに広がる自然…
01:26
the untouched forest that I was able to see --
目に見える手つかずの海岸線や森からは…
01:30
really bring in a sense of that geological time,
地質年代的な時間が
01:33
that this has gone on for a long time,
長い間流れたこと
01:40
and we're experiencing it in a different way.
人間は異なる方法で時間を経験している
ということを教えてくれました
01:42
And that, to me, was a reference point that I think I needed to have
そして それが私にとっては作品を作る上で
01:45
to be able to make the work that I did.
必要となる基準点となりました
01:51
And I did go out, and I did this picture of grasses coming through in the spring,
春に道ばたで草が生えつつある様子を
01:53
along a roadside.
この写真に撮影しました
01:58
This rebirth of grass. And then I went out for years
これは草の再生です
その後 何年もの間
02:00
trying to photograph the pristine landscape.
汚れのない風景を撮ろうとしました
02:03
But as a fine-art photographer I somehow felt
しかし芸術写真では食っていけないと
02:06
that it wouldn't catch on out there,
気付いていました
02:09
that there would be a problem with trying to make this as a fine-art career.
このまま 芸術写真を目指しても
問題だとなんとなく感じていました
02:11
And I kept being sucked into this genre of the calendar picture,
カレンダー写真や
それに似た写真のジャンルにとらわれ
02:15
or something of that nature, and I couldn't get away from it.
そこから離れることができずにいました
02:20
So I started to think of, how can I rethink the landscape?
このような理由で 風景をどのように再考できるか
考え始めるようになりました
02:22
I decided to rethink the landscape
そして決めたことは
風景を
02:26
as the landscape that we've transformed.
我々人間が変えた風景として
見直してみることです
02:28
I had a bit of an epiphany being lost in Pennsylvania,
ひらめいたのは ペンシルバニアで
道に迷ったときです
02:31
and I took a left turn trying to get back to the highway.
高速道路に戻ろうとして左に曲がったとき
02:33
And I ended up in a town called Frackville.
フラックビルという町に行き着きました
02:37
I got out of the car, and I stood up,
車を降りて 立ち上がると
02:39
and it was a coal-mining town. I did a 360 turnaround,
そこは炭坑の町でした
360度ぐるっと見渡すと
02:41
and that became one of the most surreal landscapes I've ever seen.
そこは私が今まで見た中で
最も現実離れした景色のひとつとなりました
02:45
Totally transformed by man.
人間によって完全に変えられた景色
02:49
And that got me to go out and look at mines like this,
その後 似たような鉱山に注目しました
02:52
and go out and look at the largest industrial incursions
それから風景の中の大規模産業の爪痕にも
02:55
in the landscape that I could find.
注目しました
02:58
And that became the baseline of what I was doing.
やがてそれが作品の基本線となり
03:00
And it also became the theme that I felt that I could hold onto,
自分を変えずに撮り続けることができると感じた
03:03
and not have to re-invent myself --
テーマとなりました
03:08
that this theme was large enough to become a life's work,
このテーマはライフワークとして
03:10
to become something that I could sink my teeth into
深くかかわれるほど大きなものであり
03:13
and just research and find out where these industries are.
調査をすると
そういう産業がどこにあるかわかりました
03:17
And I think one of the things I also wanted to say in my thanks,
感謝の気持ちを述べる中で
03:21
which I kind of missed,
言い忘れてしまいましたが
03:24
was to thank all the corporations who helped me get in.
現場に立ち入りを許可してくれた企業にも
感謝の意を表したいと思います
03:26
Because it took negotiation for almost every one of these photographs --
これからお見せするほとんどの写真を撮るために
03:29
to get into that place to make those photographs,
立ち入り許可の交渉が必要で
03:33
and if it wasn't for those people letting me in
企業の幹部の方々で
03:37
at the heads of those corporations,
許可をしてくれる人がいなかったら
03:40
I would have never made this body of work.
この作品群は存在しませんでした
03:42
So in that respect, to me, I'm not against the corporation.
その点で 私は企業に反対ではありません
03:44
I own a corporation. I work with them,
自分の企業も持っています
企業と共に仕事をしています
03:49
and I feel that we all need them and they're important.
企業は必要かつ重要であるとも感じています
03:52
But I am also for sustainability.
しかし 私は持続可能性も大切だと思っています
03:55
So there's this thing that is pulling me in both directions.
ですから 両方から引っ張られているような感じです
03:57
And I'm not making an indictment towards what's happening here,
起こっていることについて
告発をするつもりはありません
04:00
but it is a slow progression.
しかし 進歩のスピードが遅いのです
04:04
So I started thinking, well, we live in all these ages of man:
私は考え始めました
我々はいろいろな人間の時代を生きています
04:06
the Stone Age, and the Iron Age, and the Copper Age.
石器時代 鉄器時代 銅器時代
04:09
And these ages of man are still at work today.
これらの時代は現在でも存在しています
04:13
But we've become totally disconnected from them.
しかし 我々はこれらの時代から
完全に切り離されてしまいました
04:17
There's something that we're not seeing there.
我々が見ていない何かがあるようです
04:19
And it's a scary thing as well. Because when we start looking
それは怖いことでもあります
04:22
at the collective appetite for our lifestyles,
なぜなら
我々が集団として追及するライフスタイルや
04:26
and what we're doing to that landscape --
景観に対する行為を考えてみると
04:29
that, to me, is something that is a very sobering moment for me to contemplate.
それは私が熟考して
現実に引き戻される時です
04:32
And through my photographs,
自分の撮った写真を通して
04:38
I'm hoping to be able to engage the audiences of my work,
見る人を引き込み
04:40
and to come up to it and not immediately be rejected by the image.
近くで見て
作品に直ちに拒絶されないことを望みます
04:46
Not to say, "Oh my God, what is it?" but to be challenged by it --
「え 一体これなに?」と言わせるのではなく
刺激を受けて
04:49
to say, "Wow, this is beautiful," on one level,
一方で「わぁ きれい」と言わせ
04:52
but on the other level, "This is scary. I shouldn't be enjoying it."
他方では「恐ろしい
楽しんで鑑賞すべきではない」と言わせる
04:54
Like a forbidden pleasure. And it's that forbidden pleasure
禁断の快楽のように
そして その禁断の快楽こそが
04:58
that I think is what resonates out there,
世の中から共感を得るのだと思います
05:01
and it gets people to look at these things,
それが人々にこのような画像を見させ
05:03
and it gets people to enter it. And it also, in a way, defines kind of what I feel, too --
引き込ませるのです
また それは私の感情をどこかで表してもいます
05:05
that I'm drawn to have a good life.
いい人生を送りたい
05:12
I want a house, and I want a car.
家もほしいし 車もほしい
05:15
But there's this consequence out there.
しかし その後にはつけが回ってきます
05:17
And how do I begin to have that attraction, repulsion?
どのようにして引きつけられたり反発する感情を
持つようになるのでしょうか?
05:19
It's even in my own conscience I'm having it,
自分の良心の中でさえいつも戦っています
05:22
and here in my work, I'm trying to build that same toggle.
そして 作品の中でこの両極の感情を
表現したいと思っています
05:25
These things that I photographed -- this tire pile here
この写真にあるタイヤの山ですが
05:29
had 45 million tires in it. It was the largest one.
4500万ものタイヤが積まれていました
最大のタイヤの山です
05:32
It was only about an hour-and-a-half away from me, and it caught fire
家から1時間半ほどで行ける場所でしたが
4年ほど前に火事になりました
05:35
about four years ago. It's around Westley, California, around Modesto.
カリフォルニアのモデストから近い
ウェストリーのあたりです
05:38
And I decided to start looking at something that, to me, had --
その後新しいテーマを探すことにしました
05:42
if the earlier work of looking at the landscape
初期の私の風景作品が
05:46
had a sense of lament to what we were doing to nature,
人間が自然に対して行っていることへの嘆きを
表現しているとすれば
05:48
in the recycling work that you're seeing here
今ご覧いただいている
リサイクルがテーマの作品は
05:51
was starting to point to a direction. To me, it was our redemption.
この方向性を示しています
私にとって これは人間の罪滅ぼしです
05:54
That in the recycling work that I was doing,
このリサイクルが主題の作品で
05:58
I'm looking for a practice, a human activity that is sustainable.
私は持続可能な人間の活動を探しました
06:00
That if we keep putting things, through industrial and urban existence,
産業や都心での暮らしを通じて
06:07
back into the system --
モノをシステムに戻し続ければ
06:12
if we keep doing that -- we can continue on.
それを続けていけば…今まで通りのままでいられます
06:14
Of course, listening at the conference,
もちろん このカンファレンスでも紹介があった―
06:17
there's many, many things that are coming. Bio-mimicry,
バイオミミクリー(生物模倣)など
様々な新技術もありますし
06:19
and there's many other things that are coming on stream --
市場に導入されつつあるものも多くあります
06:22
nanotechnology that may also prevent us from having
ナノテクノロジーも
06:24
to go into that landscape and tear it apart.
風景の破壊を防いでくれるかもしれません
06:29
And we all look forward to those things.
このような新しい技術に
我々は期待を寄せています
06:32
But in the meantime, these things are scaling up.
しかし その間にも
事態はどんどん拡大しています
06:34
These things are continuing to happen.
そして継続して起こっています
06:36
What you're looking at here -- I went to Bangladesh,
ご覧いただいているのは
バングラデシュです
06:38
so I started to move away from North America;
北米から離れ
06:41
I started to look at our world globally.
地球規模で世界を見始めるようになりました
06:44
These images of Bangladesh
バングラデシュの映像は
06:46
came out of a radio program I was listening to.
当時聴いていたラジオ番組がきっかけです
06:48
They were talking about Exxon Valdez,
番組ではエクソン・バルディーズ号の
話題(原油流出)が取り上げられ
06:51
and that there was going to be a glut of oil tankers
保険の問題で 石油タンカーの過剰供給が
06:54
because of the insurance industries.
起こるというニュースでした
06:56
And that those oil tankers needed to be decommissioned,
石油タンカーは退役させねばならず
06:58
and 2004 was going to be the pinnacle.
2004年にタンカー数が最大だったということでした
07:00
And I thought, "My God, wouldn't that be something?"
「すごいことだ」と思いました
07:02
To see the largest vessels of man being deconstructed by hand,
最大級のタンカーが人の手で解体されるところを
07:04
literally, in third-world countries.
発展途上国で見られるなんて
07:08
So originally I was going to go to India.
始めはインドに行こうと思いましたが
07:10
And I was shut out of India because of a Greenpeace situation there,
グリーンピースの影響で入国できず
07:12
and then I was able to get into Bangladesh,
バングラデシュに入国することになりました
07:15
and saw for the first time a third world, a view of it,
そこで初めて予想もできなかった
発展途上国の現状を
07:17
that I had never actually thought was possible.
目の当たりにしました
07:22
130 million people living in an area the size of Wisconsin --
ウィスコンシン州と同じ面積に
1億3000万人もの人が住み
07:26
people everywhere -- the pollution was intense,
どこへ行っても人ごみで 公害も深刻
07:29
and the working conditions were horrible.
労働条件も最悪でした
07:32
Here you're looking at some oil fields in California,
この写真はカルフォルニアの油田です
07:35
some of the biggest oil fields. And again, I started to think that --
最大規模の油田です
私が再び思い始めたことは…
07:37
there was another epiphany --
ひらめいたのですが…
07:42
that the whole world I was living in was
私の住んでいる世界の全ては
07:45
a result of having plentiful oil.
豊富な石油があるから成り立っているのだと
07:47
And that, to me, was again something that I started building on,
これも作品を積み上げた
基盤だったのだと
07:50
and I continued to build on.
そして撮り続けました
07:54
So this is a series I'm hoping to have ready
このシリーズは 2、3年で
07:56
in about two or three years,
完成させたいと思っています
08:00
under the heading of "The Oil Party."
タイトルは「石油パーティー」
08:02
Because I think everything that we're involved in --
我々がすることなすこと全て
08:04
our clothing, our cars, our roads, and everything -- are directly a result.
服 車 道など全てのものが石油の産物だからです
08:06
I'm going to move to some pictures of China.
さて 中国の写真をお見せしたいと思います
08:10
And for me China -- I started photographing it four years ago,
4年前から撮影を始めた中国ですが
08:15
and China truly is a question of sustainability in my mind,
中国は 私にとって
持続可能性に関する問題の焦点です
08:18
not to mention that China, as well,
言うまでもありませんが 中国も
08:21
has a great effect on the industries that I grew up around.
私の育った周囲の産業に
大きな影響を持っています
08:24
I came out of a blue-collar town,
私は労働者の町で育ちました
08:27
a GM town, and my father worked at GM,
GMの町で 父もGMで働いていました
08:29
so I was very familiar with that kind of industry
私はこのような産業を大変よく知っていて
08:32
and that also informed my work. But you know,
作品にも影響を与えていると思っていましたが
08:36
to see China and the scale at which it's evolving, is quite something.
中国とその拡大規模を目の当たりにすると本当に驚きます
08:41
So what you see here is the Three Gorges Dam,
ここに写っているのは三峡ダムです
08:47
and this is the largest dam by 50 percent ever attempted by man.
今まで建設された最大のダムより
50%大きい世界最大のダムです
08:50
Most of the engineers around the world left the project
世界中から集められた技術者のほとんどは
プロジェクトの途中で辞めてしまいました
08:55
because they said, "It's just too big."
「大きすぎる」と言ってです
08:59
In fact, when it did actually fill with water a year and a half ago,
1年半前に実際に貯水した際
09:01
they were able to measure a wobble within the earth as it was spinning.
地球が自転する際の震動が観測できました
09:05
It took fifteen days to fill it.
貯水には15日を要しました
09:08
So this created a reservoir 600 kilometers long,
長さ600キロにも及ぶ
09:10
one of the largest reservoirs ever created.
世界最大の貯水池の一つです
09:15
And what was also one of the bigger projects around that
ダム建設プロジェクトの中で
大きかったもののひとつが
09:17
was moving 13 full-size cities up out of the reservoir,
13の都市をダムから引き揚げ
09:22
and flattening all the buildings so they could make way for the ships.
船が通れるよう
全ての建物を潰すことでした
09:26
This is a "before and after." So that was before.
これが「ビフォー・アンド・アフター」の写真です
1枚前の写真がビフォーで
09:29
And this is like 10 weeks later, demolished by hand.
これがその10週間ほど後
人の手で取り壊された後の写真です
09:33
I think 11 of the buildings they used dynamite,
確か11棟ほどはダイナマイトが使われましたが
09:36
everything else was by hand. That was 10 weeks later.
その他はすべて人力です
たった10週間後です
09:38
And this gives you an idea.
こうするとよくお分かりになるでしょう
09:40
And it was all the people who lived in those homes,
家に住んでいた人々が
09:42
were the ones that were actually taking it apart
実際に自分たちの家を取り壊したのです
09:45
and working, and getting paid per brick to take their cities apart.
れんが1枚あたりで賃金をもらい
都市を取り壊していったのです
09:47
And these are some of the images from that.
お見せしているのがその様子の写真です
09:52
So I spent about three trips to the Three Gorges Dam,
三峡ダムには3度ほど訪れました
09:54
looking at that massive transformation of a landscape.
その間の風景の変化は大変なものです
09:57
And it looks like a bombed-out landscape, but it isn't.
爆弾で破壊された風景のように
見えますが そうではありません
10:01
What it is, it's a landscape that is an intentional one.
意図された風景なのです
10:04
This is a need for power, and they're willing to go through this
エネルギーへの渇望のためです
このような大変化を
10:08
massive transformation, on this scale, to get that power.
エネルギーを得るために起こしたのです
10:13
And again, it's actually a relief for what's going on in China
しかしこれは 今中国で起こっていることと
比べれば小さなことです
10:20
because I think on the table right now,
今 中国で議論されているのは
10:26
there's 27 nuclear power stations to be built.
27カ所の原発の建設です
10:28
There hasn't been one built in North America for 20 years
北アメリカでは20年間
原発が1カ所も建設されていません
10:31
because of the "NIMBY" problem -- "Not In My BackYard."
「ニンビー(NIMBY)」 「自分の裏庭には来ないで」
のせいです
10:33
But in China they're saying, "No, we're putting in 27 in the next 10 years."
しかし中国では「向こう10年間で27基建設する」と
言っているのです
10:35
And coal-burning furnaces are going in there
そして文字通り毎週のように水力発電の代わりに
10:38
for hydroelectric power literally weekly.
石炭加熱炉が設置されています
10:42
So coal itself is probably one of the largest problems.
ですから石炭はおそらく
最大の問題のうちのひとつでしょう
10:45
And one of the other things that happened in the Three Gorges --
三峡ダムで起こったもう一つの問題は
10:50
a lot of the agricultural land that you see there on the left was also lost;
写真の左に見えているように
多くの農地が失われたことです
10:52
some of the most fertile agricultural land was lost in that.
とても肥沃な農地が失われました
10:57
And 1.2 to 2 million people were relocated,
また統計により数は変わりますが
120万から200万人もの人が
11:00
depending on whose statistics you're looking at.
移住を余儀なくされました
11:03
And this is what they were building.
そして これが新しく建設されていた都市です
11:06
This is Wushan, one of the largest cities that was relocated.
巫山といい 移転された都市の中で
最大のもののひとつです
11:08
This is the town hall for the city.
これが市庁舎です
11:12
And again, the rebuilding of the city -- to me, it was sad to see
再建設の際に 私が残念だと思ったのは
11:15
that they didn't really grab a lot of, I guess,
いわゆる都市計画が
11:20
what we know here, in terms of urban planning.
あまりなされなかったことです
11:22
There were no parks; there were no green spaces.
公園もないし 緑もありません
11:25
Very high-density living on the side of a hill.
丘の斜面に非常にたくさんの人が住んでいるだけです
11:28
And here they had a chance to rebuild cities from the bottom up,
せっかく一から都市を建設する機会があったのに
11:31
but somehow were not connecting with them.
うまく連携することができませんでした
11:34
Here is a sign that, translated, says, "Obey the birth control law.
この看板には「産児制限法に従うように
11:37
Build our science, civilized and advanced idea of marriage and giving birth."
文明的で進歩的な結婚・出産観念の
科学を樹立しよう」と書いてあります
11:42
So here, if you look at this poster,
このポスターを見ると
11:46
it has all the trappings of Western culture.
西洋文化を見ているようです
11:49
You're seeing the tuxedos, the bouquets.
タキシードや花束が描かれています
11:52
But what's really, to me, frightening about the picture
しかし 私にとってこの絵の何が怖いかというと
11:56
and about this billboard is the refinery in the background.
後ろに精油所が描かれていることです
11:59
So it's like marrying up all the things that we have
西洋人が持っているものを全て融合しており
12:02
and it's an adaptation of our way of life, full stop.
我々の生き方への盲目的な適応です
12:05
And again, when you start seeing that kind of embrace,
そしてこのような受容を見て
12:11
and you start looking at them leading their rural lifestyle
彼らがとても小さな「(エネルギー)フットプリント」の
田舎暮らしから
12:17
with a very, very small footprint and moving into an urban lifestyle
ずっと大きな「フットプリント」の
都会生活に導かれるのを見ると
12:21
with a much higher footprint, it starts to become very sobering.
現実について何か考えさせられます
12:26
This is a shot in one of the biggest squares in Guangdong --
これは 広東の大きな広場の一つです
12:29
and this is where a lot of migrant workers are coming in from the country.
ここには多くの出稼ぎ労働者が
田舎から集まって来るところです
12:32
And there's about 130 million people in migration
1億3000万人もの人が
12:37
trying to get into urban centers at all times,
常に都心に移住しようとしています
12:40
and in the next 10 to 15 years, are expecting
この先10年から15年の間には
12:42
another 400 to 500 million people to migrate
さらに4億人から5億人が
12:46
into the urban centers like Shanghai and the manufacturing centers.
上海のような都市や工業中心地に
移住すると見込まれています
12:49
The manufacturers are --
工員は…
12:54
the domestics are usually -- you can tell a domestic factory by the fact
全寮制の工員はふつう…
12:56
that they all use the same color uniforms.
同じ色の制服を着用するのでそうだとわかります
13:00
So this is a pink uniform at this factory. It's a shoe factory.
この工場ではピンクの制服です
靴の工場です
13:03
And they have dorms for the workers.
そして従業員のための寮があります
13:06
So they bring them in from the country and put them up in the dorms.
田舎から連れてきて 寮に入れるのです
13:08
This is one of the biggest shoe factories, the Yuyuan shoe factory
この靴工場は大きいものの一つで
深圳の近くの
13:11
near Shenzhen. It has 90,000 employees making shoes.
裕元靴工場です
9万人の従業員が靴を作っています
13:15
This is a shift change, one of three.
この写真は3回の交替時間のひとつです
13:20
There's two factories of this scale in the same town.
同様の大きさの工場がこの町に2つあります
13:23
This is one with 45,000, so every lunch,
この工場は4万5000人ぐらいいますので
13:26
there's about 12,000 coming through for lunch.
昼食には1万2000人がここに来ます
13:29
They sit down; they have about 20 minutes.
座って 20分ぐらいが休憩時間です
13:31
The next round comes in. It's an incredible workforce
そして次のグループが来るのです
驚くべき労働人口です
13:33
that's building there. Shanghai --
上海…
13:36
I'm looking at the urban renewal in Shanghai,
上海での都市再開発を追っています
13:39
and this is a whole area that will be flattened
この写真のエリアは全て取り壊されて
13:42
and turned into skyscrapers in the next five years.
5年のうちに高層ビル群となる予定です
13:44
What's also happening in Shanghai is --
上海で起こっていることは
13:49
China is changing because this wouldn't have happened
中国の変化を表しています
例えば5年前にはこんなことは起こりえなかったからです
13:51
five years ago, for instance. This is a holdout.
立ち退き拒否者です
13:55
They're called dengzahoos -- they're like pin tacks to the ground.
釘子戸(ネイルハウス)と呼ばれていて
地面に刺さる画鋲のようです
13:57
They won't move. They're not negotiating.
移住することを拒み 交渉もしません
14:00
They're not getting enough, so they're not going to move.
十分な補償がないため 移住しないのです
14:02
And so they're holding off until they get a deal with them.
有利な取引ができるまで待っているのです
14:05
And they've been actually quite successful in getting better deals
そして取引の成功例が増えています
14:08
because most of them are getting a raw deal.
なぜならほとんどの人は
不当な扱いを受けているからです
14:11
They're being put out about two hours --
2時間ほどでつぶされてしまうコミュニティーは
14:13
the communities that have been around for literally hundreds of years,
100年以上の歴史を持っている場合もあります
14:15
or maybe even thousands of years,
いや1000年のところもあるかもしれません
14:18
are being broken up and spread across in the suburban areas
それが壊され 上海の郊外に分散されているのです
14:20
outside of Shanghai. But these are a whole series of guys
この人たちは
14:23
holding out in this reconstruction of Shanghai.
上海の再開発に抵抗しています
14:26
Probably the largest urban-renewal project, I think,
これはおそらく世界中で一番大きな
14:31
ever attempted on the planet.
都市再開発のプロジェクトだと思います
14:35
And then the embrace of the things that they're replacing it with --
再開発で建て直されている周囲の様子です
14:38
again, one of my wishes, and I never ended up going there,
願うだけで実行できませんでしたが
何とかして
14:41
was to somehow tell them that there were better ways to build a house.
もっと上手な家の建て方があると
教えてあげたいものです
14:44
The kinds of collisions of styles and things were quite something,
スタイル等の衝突はすごいものです
14:47
and these are called the villas.
これは郊外住宅と呼ばれています
14:53
And also, like right now, they're just moving.
そして今もどんどん引っ越してきています
14:57
The scaffolding is still on, and this is an e-waste area,
足場がまだ残っています
ここは電子ゴミ置場です
15:00
and if you looked in the foreground on the big print,
この写真を引き延ばして前景を見ると
15:04
you'd see that the industry -- their industry -- they're all recycling.
全てリサイクル産業だということがわかります
15:06
So the industry's already growing
新しい建設地の周りで
15:09
around these new developments.
すでに工業も盛んになっています
15:11
This is a five-level bridge in Shanghai.
これは上海の5層の橋です
15:14
Shanghai was a very intriguing city -- it's exploding on a level
上海はとてもおもしろい都市でした
15:16
that I don't think any city has experienced.
他の都市が経験したことのないような
スピードで成長しています
15:22
In fact, even Shenzhen, the economic zone --
経済特区の深圳もそうです
15:26
one of the first ones -- 15 years ago was about 100,000 people,
最初に経済特区となった場所のひとつで
15年前には10万人ほどの人口でしたが
15:31
and today it boasts about 10 to 11 million.
現在では1000万から1100万人に増加しています
15:36
So that gives you an idea of the kinds of migrations and the speed with which --
移住の規模とスピードがお分かりいただけるでしょう
15:39
this is just the taxis being built by Volkswagen.
これはフォルクスワーゲンのタクシーです
15:44
There's 9,000 of them here,
ここには9000台あります
15:47
and they're being built for most of the big cities,
北京 上海や深圳などの
15:50
Beijing and Shanghai, Shenzhen.
大都市のために生産されているのです
15:54
And this isn't even the domestic car market; this is the taxi market.
国内車市場ではなく タクシーだけです
15:57
And what we would see here as a suburban development --
ここには郊外開発が写っていますが
16:06
a similar thing, but they're all high-rises.
同じように 全てが高層ビルです
16:11
So they'll put 20 or 40 up at a time,
20から40棟が一気に建設されます
16:14
and they just go up in the same way
そして一軒家が建てられるのと同じようにして
16:16
as a single-family dwelling would go up here in an area.
この地域に高層ビルが建設されるのです
16:18
And the density is quite incredible.
その密度は信じられないくらいのものです
16:25
And one of the things in this picture that I wanted to point out
この写真でお見せしたいところのひとつは
16:28
is that when I saw these kinds of buildings,
これと同じような建物を見たとき
16:35
I was shocked to see
驚いたのですが
16:38
that they're not using a central air-conditioning system;
セントラル空調が使われていないことです
16:40
every window has an air conditioner in it.
全ての窓にエアコンが取り付けられています
16:44
And I'm sure there are people here who probably
この会場には私よりも効率に関して
16:47
know better than I do about efficiencies,
詳しい方がいらっしゃるでしょうが
16:50
but I can't imagine that every apartment having its own air conditioner
全ての部屋にエアコンがあるというのは
16:52
is a very efficient way to cool a building on this scale.
このサイズのビルで効率がいいとは思えません
16:56
And when you start looking at that,
こういうものを見て
16:58
and then you start factoring up into a city the size of Shanghai,
上海のようなサイズの都市のことを考えると
17:00
it's literally a forest of skyscrapers.
上海は文字通り高層ビルの森です
17:05
It's breathtaking, in terms of the speed at which this city is transforming.
息をのまずにはいられません
あまりものスピードで都市が変化しているのです
17:08
And you can see in the foreground of this picture,
この写真の前景は
17:14
it's still one of the last areas that was being held up.
最後に取り残された場所でした
17:16
Right now that's all cleared out -- this was done about eight months ago --
現在は全て取り壊され
この写真は8ヶ月ぐらい前に撮影されたものですが
17:19
and high-rises are now going up into that central spot.
今は高層ビルが写真の中央部に建設されています
17:22
So a skyscraper is built, literally, overnight in Shanghai.
上海では高層ビルが文字通り
一夜にして建設されているのです
17:25
Most recently I went in, and I started looking
最新のプロジェクトでは
中国の大規模工場を
17:34
at some of the biggest industries in China.
撮影し始めました
17:36
And this is Baosteel, right outside of Shanghai.
この写真は上海のすぐ外にある宝鋼集団です
17:39
This is the coal supply for the steel factory -- 18 square kilometers.
これは製鉄所のための石炭置き場です
18平方キロメートルあります
17:43
It's an incredibly massive operation, I think 15,000 workers,
とてつもなく大きな企業で 1万5千ほどの従業員
17:48
five cupolas, and the sixth one's coming in here.
5つの熔銑炉(ようせんろ)があり
ここに6つ目も建設予定です
17:55
So they're building very large blast furnaces
巨大な熔鉱炉を建設し
17:59
to try to deal with the demand for steel in China.
中国国内での鉄鋼の需要をまかなおうとしているのです
18:04
So this is three of the visible blast furnaces within that shot.
この写真には熔鉱炉が3つ写っています
18:08
And again, looking at these images, there's this constant, like, haze that you're seeing.
そして写真でもわかりますが
常にもやがかかっているようです
18:13
This is going to show you, real time, an assembler. It's a circuit breaker.
このビデオでは組立工をリアルタイムでお見せします
ブレーカーの組み立てです
18:19
10 hours a day at this speed.
毎日10時間 このスピードです
18:38
I think one of the issues
中国について
18:52
that we here are facing with China,
我々が直面している問題は
18:58
is that they're using a lot of the latest production technology.
中国では 最新の製造テクノロジーが
多用されていることだと思います
19:03
In that one, there were 400 people that worked on the floor.
400人がこのフロアで働いており
19:06
And I asked the manager to point out five of your fastest producers,
監督に最も早い工員を5人教えてもらいました
19:09
and then I went and looked at each one of them for about 15 or 20 minutes,
15分から20分 その5人の作業を見せてもらい
19:14
and picked this one woman.
この女性を選び撮影しました
19:18
And it was just lightning fast;
稲妻のようにすばやく
19:20
the way she was working was almost unbelievable.
作業の様子は信じられないぐらいでした
19:22
But that is the trick that they've got right now,
これが今の中国製造業の秘訣です
19:24
that they're winning with, is that they're using
これで勝利しているのです
19:27
all the latest technologies and extrusion machines,
最新テクノロジーと押出成形機を使い
19:30
and bringing all the components into play,
全ての部品を統合する
19:32
but the assembly is where they're actually bringing in --
組み立ての部分が
実際に移住者たちが活躍している場所です
19:36
the country workers are very willing to work. They want to work.
彼らは働く意欲が強いのです
19:39
There's a massive backlog of people wanting their jobs.
このような仕事を探している人も大勢います
19:44
That condition's going to be there for the next 10 to 15 years
これから10年、15年はこのような状態のままでしょう
19:48
if they realize what they want, which is, you know,
移住者が都市へ出たいという
希望をかなえれば
19:51
400 to 500 million more people coming into the cities.
4、 5億人が都市へ移住することになるでしょう
19:54
In this particular case -- this is the assembly line that you saw;
この写真の場合
19:57
this is a shot of it.
組み立てラインの写真ですが
20:00
I had to use a very small aperture to get the depth of field.
被写界深度を得るために
絞りを小さくしなくてはならず
20:01
I had to have them freeze for 10 seconds to get this shot.
10秒間静止してもらわければなりませんでした
20:04
It took me five fake tries
5回も騙し撮りをしました
20:09
because they were just going. To slow them down was literally impossible.
皆の動きを止めることが不可能に近かったからです
20:12
They were just wound up doing these things all day long,
一日中こういう事をすることになっていました
20:16
until the manager had to, with a stern voice, say,
監督が断固たる声で
20:19
"Okay, everybody freeze."
「全員 動くな」と言わなくてはなりませんでした
20:21
It wasn't too bad,
撮影はまあまあでした
20:23
but they're driven to produce these things at an incredible rate.
ものすごい勢いで生産することに
駆り立てられているのです
20:26
This is a textile mill doing synthetic silk, an oil byproduct.
これは石油の副産物であるレーヨンを使った織物工場です
20:32
And what you're seeing here is,
ここでご覧いただいているのは
20:39
again, one of the most state-of-the-art textile mills.
最新式織物工場です
20:41
There are 500 of these machines; they're worth about 200,000 dollars each.
このような機械が500台もあり
それぞれ20万ドルほどします
20:45
So you have about 12 people running this,
12人ほどの従業員が
20:48
and they're just inspecting it -- and they're just walking the lines.
検査をし 歩き回って機械を操作しています
20:50
The machines are all running,
この全ての機械が動いているのです
20:53
absolutely incredible to see what the scale of industries are.
工場の規模に全く驚いてしまいます
20:55
And I started getting in further and further into the factories.
その後 このような工場の
奥深くまでのぞくようになりました
20:58
And that's a diptych. I do a lot of pairings
これは見開き写真です
このような場所のスケール感を伝えるのに
21:03
to try and get the sense of scale in these places.
私はよく写真を組み合わせます
21:06
This is a line where they get the threads
これは糸を生産する場所です
21:09
and they wind the threads together,
機織り機に行く前に
21:11
pre-going into the textile mills.
糸を巻いているところです
21:13
Here's something that's far more labor-intensive,
これは もっと労働集約的です
21:17
which is the making of shoes.
靴の製造です
21:19
This floor has about 1,500 workers on this floor.
約1500人の従業員がこの階にいます
21:21
The company itself had about 10,000 employees,
会社全体では1万人ほどの従業員がいて
21:26
and they're doing domestic shoes.
国内用に靴を製造しています
21:30
It was very hard to get into the international companies
海外企業に立ち入ることはとても困難でした
21:33
because I had to get permission from companies like Nike and Adidas,
ナイキやアディダスから許可を
取らなくてはならないからです
21:36
and that's very hard to get.
許可はなかなかおりませんし
21:40
And they don't want to let me in.
立ち入りも許されません
21:42
But the domestic was much easier to do.
国内会社はそれに比べて簡単でした
21:44
It just gives you a sense of, again -- and that's where,
ここでもそのスケールがよくわかります
21:46
really, the whole migration of jobs started going over to China
中国に仕事や靴工場が移ってきたのがここです
21:49
and making the shoes. Nike was one of the early ones.
ナイキが中国に工場を移したのは早い時期でした
21:52
It was such a high labor component to it
とても労働集約的であるため
21:55
that it made a lot of sense to go after that labor market.
労働供給のある場所に移ることは
道理にかなっていたのです
22:00
This is a high-tech mobile phone: Bird mobile phone,
これはハイテク携帯電話の工場です
宁波波导股份(Bird mobile phone) といいます
22:03
one of the largest mobile makers in China.
中国の携帯工場で最大級です
22:07
I think mobile phone companies
携帯電話メーカーは
22:09
are popping up, literally, on a weekly basis,
文字通り毎週のように出現しており
22:12
and they have an explosive growth in mobile phones.
爆発的な成長を見せています
22:16
This is a textile where they're doing shirts --
これは織物工場で
シャツを作っています
22:20
Youngor, the biggest shirt factory and clothing factory in China.
雅戈尓(Youngor)といい中国で最大規模の
シャツや洋服の工場です
22:24
And this next shot here is one of the lunchrooms.
この写真は食堂のひとつです
22:27
Everything is very efficient.
全てが効率的です
22:31
While setting up this shot,
撮影準備中には
22:33
people on average would spend eight to 10 minutes having a lunch.
平均8から10分で昼食をすましていました
22:35
This was one of the biggest factories I've ever seen.
これは私が見学した中でも最大規模の工場です
22:43
They make coffeemakers here, the biggest coffeemaker
コーヒーメーカーの製造において最大であり
22:45
and the biggest iron makers --
またアイロンの製造においても最大です
22:50
they make 20 million of them in the world.
世界の2千万台を製造しています
22:54
There's 21,000 employees. This one factory -- and they had several of them --
2万1千人の従業員がおり
いくつかある工場の中で
22:56
is half a kilometer long.
この工場は500メーターもの長さがあります
23:01
These are just recently shot -- I just came back about a month ago,
この写真は最新のもので
1ヶ月ほど前に撮影されたものです
23:03
so you're the first ones to be seeing these,
初めてお見せする物です
23:06
these new factory pictures I've taken.
撮りたての工場写真です
23:09
So it's taken me almost a year to gain access into these places.
工場立ち入り許可をもらうまでに
約1年かかっています
23:12
The other aspect of what's happening in China
中国で現在起こっていることのもう一つの側面ですが
23:18
is that there's a real need for materials there.
原料への需要が大変高くなっています
23:21
So a lot of the recycled materials that are collected here
ここ北米で集められたリサイクル資源の多くは
23:24
are being recycled and taken to China by ships.
中国に船で運ばれています
23:27
That's cubed metal. This is armatures, electrical armatures,
これは四角く固められた金属です
電機子です
23:30
where they're getting the copper and the high-end steel
モーターから銅や高級鋼を集めて
23:34
from electrical motors out, and recycling them.
リサイクルしています
23:36
This is certainly connected to California and Silicon Valley.
これはカリフォルニアと
シリコンバレーに関係していますが
23:41
But this is what happens to most of the computers.
パソコンのほとんどがこうなります
23:44
Fifty percent of the world's computers end up in China to be recycled.
世界中のパソコンの半分が
中国にリサイクルするために集められます
23:47
It's referred to as "e-waste" there.
中国では電子ゴミと呼ばれています
23:51
And it is a bit of a problem. The way they recycle the boards
多少の問題があります
電子回路ボードのリサイクルに
23:53
is that they actually use the coal briquettes,
練炭を使っており
23:57
which are used all through China, but they heat up the boards,
中国全土で使われているのですが
ボードを熱し
24:00
and with pairs of pliers they pull off all the components.
全ての部品をペンチでばらばらにします
24:03
They're trying to get all the valued metals out of those components.
部品から価値のある金属を
全て取り出そうとしているのです
24:06
But the toxic smells -- when you come into a town
しかし 有毒な臭いが出ます
町にやってくると
24:09
that's actually doing this kind of burning of the boards,
ボードを燃やしているために
24:12
you can smell it a good five or 10 kilometers before you get there.
5キロ、10キロ先から臭いがします
24:15
Here's another operation. It's all cottage industries,
これは別の作業場です
全て家内工業ですから
24:18
so it's not big places -- it's all in people's front porches,
広い場所はありません
全て玄関先や
24:21
in their backyards, even in their homes they're burning boards,
裏庭や 人がやってくる心配があれば
24:26
if there's a concern for somebody coming by --
家の中でさえボードを燃やしています
24:32
because it is considered in China to be illegal, doing it,
中国ではこのような行為は
法律違反とされているからです
24:35
but they can't stop the product from coming in.
しかし原料が入ってくることを
止めることができないのです
24:38
This portrait -- I'm not usually known for portraits,
この人物写真は
― 私はあまり人物を撮らないのですが
24:42
but I couldn't resist this one, where she's been through Mao,
撮らずにはいられませんでした
彼女は毛沢東の時代も
24:45
and she's been through the Great Leap Forward,
大躍進運動も
24:49
and the Cultural Revolution, and now she's sitting on her porch
文化大革命も生き抜き
今は玄関先で
24:51
with this e-waste beside her. It's quite something.
電子ゴミと一緒に座っているのです
信じられないことです
24:54
This is a road where it's been shored up by computer boards
リサイクルをしている大きな町の中で
24:57
in one of the biggest towns where they're recycling.
コンピューターボードで固められた道です
25:01
So that's the photographs that I wanted to show you.
以上がお見せしたかった写真です
25:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
25:08
I want to dedicate my wishes to my two girls.
願い事を2人の娘に捧げたいと思います
25:10
They've been sitting on my shoulder the whole time while I've been thinking.
考えている間中この2人のことを常に思っていました
25:12
One's Megan, the one of the right, and Katja there.
右がミーガンで もう一人がカチャです
25:15
And to me the whole notion --
私にとって全ての考えは…
25:18
the things I'm photographing are out of a great concern
私の被写体は 我々の進歩の規模と
進歩と呼ぶものに対する
25:20
about the scale of our progress and what we call progress.
大きな懸念を捉えています
25:22
And as much as there are great things around the corner --
この会場でも感ずることができますが
25:27
and it's palpable in this room --
素晴らしいものがすぐ近くまでやってきていて
25:30
of all of the things that are just about to break
多くの問題を解決してくれる全てのものが
25:33
that can solve so many problems,
今にも起ころうとしています
25:35
I'm really hoping that those things will spread around the world
それが世界中に広がって
25:38
and will start to have a positive effect.
いい影響を与え始めてくれればと私は願います
25:41
And it isn't something that isn't just affecting our world,
我々の世界に影響を与えているだけでなく
25:44
but it starts to go up -- because I think we can start correcting
拡大しているものもあります
「エネルギーフットプリント」を見直し
25:46
our footprint and bring it down -- but there's a growing footprint
縮小できると信じていますが
アジアでは「エネルギーフットプリント」が
25:49
that's happening in Asia, and is growing at a rapid, rapid rate,
拡大していることも事実です
そしてたいへん急速に成長しています
25:54
and so I don't think we can equalize it. So ultimately the strategy,
成長を均等化することはできません
ですから最終的に
25:58
I think, here is that we have to be very concerned about their evolution,
ここでの戦略は 彼らの発展について
十分案じなければなりません
26:03
because it is going to be connected to our evolution as well.
我々の発展にも直接関係するからです
26:07
So part of my thinking, and part of my wishes,
私の考えの一部 それから私の願いの一部は
26:11
is sitting with these thoughts in mind,
このことを念頭に置きながら
26:14
and thinking about,
次のようなことを考えることです
26:17
"How is their life going to be when they want to have children,
「娘達が子供を持とうと思ったときに
どのような人生になっているのか」
26:19
or when they're ready to get married 20 years from now -- or whatever,
「20年後に彼らが結婚しようというときには?」
26:22
15 years from now?"
「15年後は?」
26:25
And to me that has been the core behind most of my thinking --
私にとってはこれが考えの中心となっています
26:27
in my work, and also for this incredible chance to have some wishes.
それから私の仕事や
この願いを考える素晴らしいチャンスにとってもです
26:30
Wish one: world-changing. I want to use my images
1つめの願いは世界を変えること
私の作品を通じて
26:38
to persuade millions of people to join in the global conversation on sustainability.
持続可能性に関する地球規模での会話に
百万人規模の人が参加するきっかけを作りたいです
26:42
And it is through communications today
今日のコミュニケーション技術を使えば
26:47
that I believe that that is not an unreal idea.
非現実的なアイディアではないと思います
26:50
Oh, and I went in search -- I wanted to put what I had in mind,
ああ それからですね 調べ物もしました
頭の中にあるものを
26:54
hitch it onto something. I didn't want a wish just to start from nowhere.
何かと結びつけたいと考えました
何もないところから始めたくはなかったので
26:58
One of them I'm starting from almost nothing, but the other one,
願い事の1つは何もないところから始めましたが
27:02
I wanted to find out what's going on that's working right now.
現在 何がうまくいっているか調べようとしました
27:05
And Worldchanging.com is a fantastic blog, and that blog
worldchanging.comは素晴らしいブログで
27:08
is now being visited by close to half-a-million people a month.
1ヶ月に50万人近くもの人が訪れています
27:16
And it just started about 14 months ago.
約14ヶ月前に始められたばかりなのにです
27:21
And the beauty of what's going on there
このブログの素晴らしいところは
27:26
is that the tone of the conversation is the tone that I like.
会話の論調が私の好きなものだということです
27:28
What they're doing there is that they're not --
何をしようとしているかというと…
27:34
I think the environmental movement has failed
私は環境運動は鞭を使い過ぎた点が
27:37
in that it's used the stick too much;
良くなかったと思います
27:40
it's used the apocalyptic tone too much;
世界の終わりのような論調を使いすぎました
27:42
it hasn't sold the positive aspects of
環境問題を真剣に考え
解決策を考えるという
27:45
being environmentally concerned and trying to pull us out.
建設的な側面がなかったのです
27:50
Whereas this conversation that is going on in this blog
一方でこのブログでもたれている対話は
27:53
is about positive movements,
建設的な運動に関してです
27:56
about how to change our world in a better way, quickly.
一刻も早く世界を良い方向に
変える方法に関してです
27:59
And it's looking at technology, and it's looking at new energy-saving devices,
テクノロジーを考え
新しい省エネ機器を考え
28:02
and it's looking at how to rethink and how to re-strategize
持続可能性のための運動を再考し
28:07
the movement towards sustainability.
新しい戦略を練ろうとしているのです
28:11
And so for me, one of the things that I thought
ですから 私の考えの中には
28:14
would be to put some of my work in the service of promoting
私の作品をworldchanging.comの
ウェブサイトのプロモーションに
28:18
the Worldchanging.com website.
使えれば というものがあったのです
28:24
Some of you might know, he's a TEDster -- Stephen Sagmeister and I
ご存知の方もいらっしゃるかと思いますが
ステファン・サグマイスターと一緒に
28:27
are working on some layouts. And this is still in preliminary stages;
レイアウトを考えているところです
これはまだ準備中のもので
28:32
these aren't the finals. But these images, with Worldchanging.com,
完成していませんが これらの画像は
worldchanging.comの文字と一緒であれば
28:36
can be placed into any kind of media.
どんな媒体にも掲載できます
28:42
They could be posted through the Web;
ウェブサイトに掲載することもできますし
28:44
they could be used as a billboard or a bus shelter, or anything of that nature.
広告掲示板にも バス停の広告にも
その類似の物にも使う事ができます
28:47
So we're looking at this as trying to build out.
ですから
これは多くの人に見てもらうためのものです
28:54
And what we ended up discussing
それから話題にのぼったのは
28:58
was that in most media you get mostly an image with a lot of text,
ほとんどの媒体では画像に
たくさんの文字が付いていて
29:00
and the text is blasted all over.
文字ばかりになっています
29:05
What was unusual, according to Stephen,
ステファンによると 何が珍しいといって
29:07
is less than five percent of ads are actually leading with image.
広告の5パーセント以下が
画像が主役だというのです
29:09
And so in this case,
ですから 今回
29:14
because it's about a lot of these images and what they represent,
作品とその象徴するもの
29:16
and the kinds of questions they bring up,
そしてそれが提示する問題点がメインですから
29:19
that we thought letting the images play out and bring someone to say,
写真を前面に押し出し
29:21
"Well, what's Worldchanging.com, with these images, have to do?"
人々に「worldchanging.comとこの写真とには
どんな関係があるのか」と言わせ
29:26
And hopefully inspire people to go to that website.
ウェブサイトを見るきっかけになってくれればと
願っています
29:31
So Worldchanging.com, and building that blog, and it is a blog,
worldchanging.comというブログは
29:35
and I'm hoping that it isn't -- I don't see it as the kind of blog
皆が常にチェックしなければならない
29:39
where we're all going to follow each other to death.
ブログであってほしくはないし
そうではないと思っていますが
29:42
This one is one that will spoke out, and will go out,
このブログは広がり
多くの人に伝わっていくと思います
29:44
and to start reaching. Because right now there's conversations
なぜなら現にインド 中国 南米などで
29:47
in India, in China, in South America --
会話がもたれているからです
29:50
there's entries coming from all around the world.
世界中から書き込みがあります
29:52
I think there's a chance to have a dialogue, a conversation
持続可能性に関する対話や会話を持つ可能性が
29:55
about sustainability at Worldchanging.com.
worldchanging.comにはあると思います
29:58
And anything that you can do to promote that would be fantastic.
これを応援できるなら
何であっても素晴らしいことです
30:01
Wish two is more of the bottom-up, ground-up one that I'm trying to work with.
2つ目の願いは
一から企画しようとしている物です
30:06
And this one is: I wish to launch a groundbreaking competition
今までなかったコンテストを始めたいという願いです
30:09
that motivates kids to invest ideas on, and invent ideas on, sustainability.
子供達に持続可能性へのアイディアを考えさせ
実行させるきっかけを与えるのです
30:13
And one of the things that came out --
そこで生まれてきたことのひとつが…
30:20
Allison, who actually nominated me, said something earlier on
私を推薦してくれたアリソンが
ブレインストーミング中に教えてくれたのですが
30:22
in a brainstorming. She said that recycling in Canada
カナダでのリサイクル活動は
30:25
had a fantastic entry into our psyche through kids between grade four and six.
小学4年から6年の間の子供達のおかげで
全国民にいい影響を与えているというのです
30:28
And you think about it, you know,
考えてみてください
30:36
grade four -- my wife and I, we say age seven is the age of reason,
小学4年生…妻と私は
7歳が分別がつく年齢だと思っています
30:38
so they're into the age of reason. And they're pre-puberty.
ですから4年生は分別がつきます
また思春期の前でもあります
30:42
So it's this great window where they actually are --
そのため これはいい年代です
30:46
you can influence them. You know what happens at puberty?
影響を及ぼしやすい年代です
思春期にはどうなるか お分かりでしょう?
30:48
You know, we know that from earlier presentations.
この前には そんなプレゼンもありましたね
30:51
So my thinking here is that we try to motivate those kids
ですから 私のここでの考えは
この年齢の子供達に
30:54
to start driving home ideas. Let them understand what sustainability is,
アイディアを出させ
持続可能性とはなにか理解させ
31:01
and that they have a vested interest in it to happen.
持続可能性は自分のことだと理解させましょう
31:05
And one of the ways I thought of doing it is to use my prize,
そしてこれを実現するひとつのやり方に
私がいただいた賞金を使おうと思ったのです
31:07
so I would take 30,000 or 40,000 dollars of the winnings,
賞金の3、4万ドルを使って
31:12
and the rest is going to be to manage this project,
残りはこのプロジェクトを運営することに使います
31:16
but to use that as prizes for kids to get into their hands.
賞として子供達に渡します
31:18
But the other thing that I thought would be fantastic
もうひとついいなと思ったのは
31:21
was to create these -- call them "prize targets."
賞ターゲットというものを作ります
31:23
And so one could be for the best sustainable idea
カテゴリーは
持続可能性のアイディアの特賞
31:27
for an in-school project, the best one for a household project,
学校内プロジェクトの特賞
家族内プロジェクトの特賞
31:31
or it could be the best community project for sustainability.
地域プロジェクトの特賞なんかもいいですね
31:36
And I also thought there should be a nice prize
それから 賞を
31:39
for the best artwork for "In My World." And what would happen --
「In My World」のアート作品にも
あげるべきだと思います
31:42
it's a scalable thing. And if we can get people to put in things --
多くても少なくてもいいですが
31:46
whether it's equipment, like a media lab,
メディアラボのような機器や
31:51
or money to make the prize significant enough --
賞金を増やすお金などを提供してもらい
31:53
and to open it up to all the schools that are public schools,
公立学校の全てを対象にして
31:55
or schools that are with kids that age,
その年齢の子供のいる学校全てを対象にして
32:00
and make it a wide-open competition for them
みんなが応募できるコンテストとし
32:02
to go after those prizes and to submit them.
賞を狙って応募してもらうのです
32:05
And the prize has to be a verifiable thing, so it's not about just ideas.
賞は実現できるものでなくてはなりません
アイディアで終わらせないために
32:07
The art pieces are about the ideas and how they present them
アート作品はアイディアと
それをどのように表現するか
32:12
and do them, but the actual things have to be verifiable.
そしてそれを生み出すものですが
実際に実現できるものでなくてはなりません
32:15
In that way, what's happening is that
そうすることで 何が起こっているかと言うと
32:18
we're motivating a certain age group to start thinking.
特定の年齢層に考えるきっかけを与えているのです
32:20
And they're going to push that up, from the bottom -- up into,
そして下から上へと押し上げるのです
32:23
I believe, into the households. And parents will be reacting to it,
家族や親も反応を示すでしょうし
32:28
and trying to help them with the projects.
プロジェクトの手助けもするでしょう
32:32
And I think it starts to motivate the whole idea towards sustainability
持続可能性について考えることの
手助けとなると思っています
32:34
in a very positive way,
建設的な方法を使ってです
32:38
and starts to teach them. They know about recycling now,
そして教育にもなります
リサイクルのことは知っているでしょうが
32:40
but they don't really, I think, get sustainability in all the things,
全てのことの持続可能性を
考えたりはしていないでしょう
32:43
and the energy footprint, and how that matters.
エネルギーフットプリント'や
それがどうして重要なのかも
32:46
And to teach them, to me, would be a fantastic wish,
このようなこと教えるということは
私にとって素晴らしい願いです
32:49
and it would be something that I would certainly put my shoulder into.
そしてぜひ参加したいものです
32:53
And again, in "In My World," the competition --
「In My World」のコンテストですが
32:58
we would use the artwork that comes in from that competition to promote it.
これもコンテストに応募された作品を
プロモーションに使います
33:00
And I like the words, "in my world,"
In My World (私の世界)
という言葉が気に入っています
33:04
because it gives possession of the world to the person who's doing it.
なぜならその人に世界の所有権を与えるからです
33:06
It is my world; it's not someone else's. I want to help it;
これは私の世界で 他の人のものではない
何か手助けをしたい それで何かをしたい
33:09
I want to do something with it. So I think it has a great opportunity
ということですから 想像力をかきたてる
素晴らしい機会となると思っています
33:12
to engage the imaginations -- and great ideas, I think, come from kids --
そして 私は 素晴らしいアイディアは
子供が生み出すと思っています
33:17
and engage their imagination into a project,
彼らの想像力をプロジェクトに役立てる
33:22
and do something for schools.
そして学校のために何かをする
33:24
I think all schools could use extra equipment, extra cash --
どこの学校も もっと機器やお金が
あっても困ることはないでしょう
33:26
it's going to be an incentive for them to do that.
これが動機となるはずです
33:29
And these are some of the ideas in terms of where
そして これがどのような場所で「In My World」の
33:33
we could possibly put in some promotion for "In My World."
プロモーションができるかというアイディアです
33:36
And wish three is: Imax film. So I was told I should do one for myself,
そして3つ目の願いはアイマックス映画です
自分で制作してみるべきと言われたのです
33:42
and I've always wanted to actually get involved with doing something.
こんなことやってみたいと
いつも思っていたからです
33:48
And the scale of my work, and the kinds of ideas I'm playing with --
私の作品の規模と
考えているアイディアの種類が…
33:52
when I first saw an Imax film, I almost immediately thought,
初めてアイマックス映画を見たとき
即座に思いました
33:55
"There's a real resonance between what I'm trying to do
「私がやろうとしていること
33:58
and the scale of what I try to do as a photographer."
写真家としてやろうとしていることの大きさに
共鳴するものがある」と
34:00
And I think there's a real possibility
そして もしこれができれば
新しい観客に届けられる可能性が
34:03
to reach new audiences if I had a chance.
広がると思います
34:07
So I'm looking, really, for a mentor, because I just had my birthday.
ですから指導者を探しています
ちょうど誕生日がすぎて
34:09
I'm 50, and I don't have time to go back to school right now --
50歳になったところで
学校に行く暇がありません
34:13
I'm too busy. So I need somebody
忙しすぎるのです
誰かアイマックス映画のようなものを
34:16
who can put me on a quick catch-up course on how to do something like that,
どうやって作るのか
手短かなレッスンや
34:18
and lead me through the maze of how one does something like this.
この難しい作業の手引きを
してくれる人を探しています
34:23
That would be fantastic. So those are my three wishes.
これができたら素晴らしいと思います
これが私の3つの願いです
34:27
(Applause)
(拍手)
34:30
Translated by Yumi Sato
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Edward Burtynsky - Photographer
2005 TED Prize winner Edward Burtynsky has made it his life's work to document humanity's impact on the planet. His riveting photographs, as beautiful as they are horrifying, capture views of the Earth altered by mankind.

Why you should listen

To describe Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky's work in a single adjective, you have to speak French: jolie-laide. His images of scarred landscapes -- from mountains of tires to rivers of bright orange waste from a nickel mine -- are eerily pretty yet ugly at the same time. Burtynsky's large-format color photographs explore the impact of humanity's expanding footprint and the substantial ways in which we're reshaping the surface of the planet. His images powerfully alter the way we think about the world and our place in it.

With his blessing and encouragement, WorldChanging.com and others use his work to inspire ongoing global conversations about sustainable living. Burtynsky's photographs are included in the collections of over 50 museums around the world, including the Tate, London and the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim in New York City. A large-format book, 2003's Manufactured Landscapes, collected his work, and in 2007, a documentary based on his photography, also called Manufactured Landscapes, debuted at the Toronto Film Festival before going on to screen at Sundance and elsewhere. It was released on DVD in March 2007. In 2008, after giving a talk at the Long Now Foundation, Burtynsky proposed "The 10,000 Year Gallery," which could house art to be curated over thousands of years preserved through carbon transfers in an effort to reflect the attitudes and changes of the world over time. 

When Burtynsky accepted his 2005 TED Prize, he made three wishes. One of his wishes: to build a website that will help kids think about going green. Thanks to WGBH and the TED community, the show and site Meet the Greens debuted at TED2007. His second wish: to begin work on an Imax film, which morphed into the jaw-dropping film Manufactured Landscapes with Jennifer Baichwal. And his third wish, wider in scope, was simply to encourage "a massive and productive worldwide conversation about sustainable living." Thanks to his help and the input of the TED community, the site WorldChanging.com got an infusion of energy that has helped it to grow into a leading voice in the sustainability community.

In 2016, he won a Governor General's Award in Visual and Media Arts for his work.

More profile about the speaker
Edward Burtynsky | Speaker | TED.com