sponsored links
TEDxWomen 2011

Jane Fonda: Life's third act

ジェーン・フォンダ「人生の第三幕」

December 7, 2011

今の時代を生きる人たちは、以前よりも30年長い平均寿命を持っています。そしてそれは、ただ付け加えられただけのものではありませんし、病気のようなものでもありません。TEDxWomenで、ジェイン・フォンダは、この人生の新たな段階をどのように考えるべきかを問いかけました。

Jane Fonda - Actor and activist
Jane Fonda has had three extraordinary careers (so far): Oscar-winning actor, fitness guru, impassioned activist. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
There have been many revolutions
20世紀には
00:15
over the last century,
さまざまな大変化が起きました
00:17
but perhaps none as significant
中でも最も重要なのは
00:19
as the longevity revolution.
恐らく長寿革命でしょう
00:21
We are living on average today
私たちの平均寿命は 3世代前より
00:24
34 years longer than our great-grandparents did.
34年長くなりました
00:26
Think about that.
考えてみて下さい
00:29
That's an entire second adult lifetime
成人してからの人生が
00:31
that's been added to our lifespan.
2倍に伸びたのです
00:34
And yet, for the most part,
でも 私たちの文化は
00:36
our culture has not come to terms with what this means.
この変化にあまり上手く対応できていません
00:38
We're still living with the old paradigm
私たちは未だに 人生はアーチのようなものだという
00:41
of age as an arch.
古い考えに捉われています
00:44
That's the metaphor, the old metaphor.
アーチというのは古いたとえで
00:46
You're born, you peak at midlife
人生の真ん中でピークに達し
00:48
and decline into decrepitude.
その後は衰えていくというものです
00:50
(Laughter)
(笑)
00:52
Age as pathology.
加齢を病気のように捉えています
00:54
But many people today --
でも今では 多くの人が -
00:56
philosophers, artists, doctors, scientists --
哲学者や芸術家から医者や科学者まで -
00:58
are taking a new look at what I call the third act,
私が第三幕と呼ぶ人生最後の30年を
01:01
the last three decades of life.
新たな見方で考えています
01:04
They realize that this is actually a developmental stage of life
この時期は それ自身が重要な
01:07
with its own significance --
発展期だと気づいているのです
01:12
as different from midlife
青年期が子ども時代と異なるのと同様
01:14
as adolescence is from childhood.
人生の第三幕は中年期とは異なります
01:17
And they are asking -- we should all be asking --
この時期をどう過ごすのか
01:20
how do we use this time?
考えなければなりません
01:23
How do we live it successfully?
どうやって上手く過ごすのか?
01:26
What is the appropriate new metaphor
年を取ることは
01:28
for aging?
何に例えればよいのでしょう?
01:30
I've spent the last year researching and writing about this subject.
1年かけてこのテーマを研究し
01:32
And I have come to find
年を取ることは
01:35
that a more appropriate metaphor for aging
階段を上るようなものだと考えるのが
01:37
is a staircase --
ふさわしいと思うようになりました
01:41
the upward ascension of the human spirit,
精神的な成長が
01:43
bringing us into wisdom, wholeness
知性や全体性 信頼性に
01:47
and authenticity.
つながるのです
01:49
Age not at all as pathology;
年を取ることは病気ではなく
01:51
age as potential.
将来性のあることなのです
01:53
And guess what?
そしてこの将来性は
01:55
This potential is not for the lucky few.
少数の幸運な人だけのものではなく
01:57
It turns out,
50歳以上の人の多くが
01:59
most people over 50
精神状態が良く ストレスが少なく
02:01
feel better, are less stressed,
敵対心も不安も少ないことが
02:03
are less hostile, less anxious.
わかっています
02:05
We tend to see commonalities
50歳以上の人は
02:07
more than differences.
違いより共通点に目を向けます
02:09
Some of the studies even say
50歳を超えるとより幸せになるという
02:11
we're happier.
調査結果さえあります
02:13
This is not what I expected, trust me.
これは予想もしていなかったことでした
02:15
I come from a long line of depressives.
私は長いこと鬱を抱えていました
02:17
As I was approaching my late 40s,
40代の後半を迎えた頃は
02:20
when I would wake up in the morning
朝目覚めて最初に考えることは
02:22
my first six thoughts would all be negative.
全て悲観的なことでした
02:24
And I got scared.
私は怯えていました
02:26
I thought, oh my gosh.
あぁ なんてことだ
02:28
I'm going to become a crotchety old lady.
自分は偏屈な年寄りになろうとしている
02:30
But now that I am actually smack-dab in the middle of my own third act,
でも今 私は人生の第三幕のど真ん中にいますが
02:32
I realize I've never been happier.
これまでになかったほど幸せです
02:36
I have such a powerful feeling of well-being.
大きな幸福感に満たされています
02:39
And I've discovered
私は気づきました
02:44
that when you're inside oldness,
自らが老年期に差しかかると
02:46
as opposed to looking at it from the outside,
外から見ているのとは対照的に
02:48
fear subsides.
恐れは弱まるのです
02:50
You realize, you're still yourself --
自分らしさはそのままですし
02:52
maybe even more so.
一層自分らしくなるかもしれません
02:54
Picasso once said, "It takes a long time to become young."
かつてピカソはこう言いました「若くなるには時間がかかる」
02:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:00
I don't want to romanticize aging.
加齢を美化したい訳ではありません
03:02
Obviously, there's no guarantee
老年期が実りと成長の時期になる
03:04
that it can be a time of fruition and growth.
保証などないのはもちろんです
03:06
Some of it is a matter of luck.
運の問題や
03:08
Some of it, obviously, is genetic.
遺伝的なことも関わってきます
03:10
One third of it, in fact, is genetic.
遺伝的な要素は3分の1を占めます
03:13
And there isn't much we can do about that.
それに対してできることはあまりありません
03:15
But that means that two-thirds
でも 老年期の幸せを決める要素の
03:18
of how well we do in the third act,
3分の2は
03:20
we can do something about.
自分で何とかできることなのです
03:22
We're going to discuss what we can do
長くなった老年期を上手に過ごし
03:25
to make these added years really successful
その期間を使って変化を生み出すために
03:28
and use them to make a difference.
何ができるのかをお話ししていきましょう
03:31
Now let me say something about the staircase,
まず 階段モデルについて説明します
03:34
which may seem like an odd metaphor for seniors
年配者の方々は階段に苦労することが多いので
03:36
given the fact that many seniors are challenged by stairs.
階段を例えに使うのは変だと思うかもしれません
03:40
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:43
Myself included.
私も階段は苦手です
03:45
As you may know,
ご存知かもしれませんが
03:48
the entire world operates on a universal law:
この世界は普遍的法則の上に成り立っています
03:50
entropy, the second law of thermodynamics.
エントロピー すなわち熱力学の第二法則です
03:53
Entropy means that everything in the world, everything,
エントロピーが意味するのは 全てのものは
03:57
is in a state of decline and decay,
衰え朽ちていくということです
04:00
the arch.
先にお話ししたアーチのようなものです
04:02
There's only one exception to this universal law,
この基本法則には一つだけ例外があります
04:04
and that is the human spirit,
人間の精神です
04:07
which can continue to evolve upwards --
人間の精神は 階段を上るように
04:09
the staircase --
上に向かって発展し
04:12
bringing us into wholeness,
全体性 信頼性 そして知性へと
04:14
authenticity and wisdom.
我々を導きます
04:16
And here's an example of what I mean.
1つの例をお話ししましょう
04:19
This upward ascension
この上昇は 肉体的な困難に
04:21
can happen even in the face of extreme physical challenges.
直面した時にでさえ起きることがあります
04:23
About three years ago,
3年ほど前 私はニューヨーク・タイムズの
04:27
I read an article in the New York Times.
記事を読みました
04:29
It was about a man named Neil Selinger --
ニール・セリンガーという 57歳の
04:31
57 years old, a retired lawyer --
引退した弁護士についての記事でした
04:33
who had joined the writers group at Sarah Lawrence
彼はサラ・ローレンス大学の作家コースに参加し
04:36
where he found his writer's voice.
そこで自らの作家としての内なる声に気づきました
04:39
Two years later,
2年後彼は筋萎縮側索硬化症にかかりました
04:42
he was diagnosed with ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
ルー・ゲーリック病として知られる
04:44
It's a terrible disease. It's fatal.
命に関わる難病です
04:47
It wastes the body, but the mind remains intact.
この病気は体を蝕みますが 心は侵しません
04:50
In this article, Mr. Selinger wrote the following
記事の中で セリンガー氏は自らに起きていることを
04:54
to describe what was happening to him.
このように書き記していました
04:57
And I quote,
引用します
05:00
"As my muscles weakened,
「筋肉が衰えるにつれて
05:03
my writing became stronger.
私の文章は力強さを増した
05:05
As I slowly lost my speech,
少しずつ会話ができなくなるにつれて
05:08
I gained my voice.
私は自分の声を得た
05:11
As I diminished, I grew.
私は衰えるにつれて成長し
05:14
As I lost so much,
数多くのものを失う一方で
05:16
I finally started to find myself."
ついに自分自身を見つけ始めた」
05:18
Neil Selinger, to me,
私にとってニール・セリンガー氏は
05:22
is the embodiment of mounting the staircase
人生の第三幕で階段を上ることを
05:24
in his third act.
体現した人です
05:27
Now we're all born with spirit, all of us,
人は皆 生まれた時には元気いっぱいです
05:30
but sometimes it gets tamped down
しかし暴力 虐待 育児放棄など
05:32
beneath the challenges of life,
人生の困難が立ちはだかる中
05:35
violence, abuse, neglect.
時にそれは抑えつけられてしまいます
05:37
Perhaps our parents suffered from depression.
両親は鬱で苦しんでいたかもしれません
05:40
Perhaps they weren't able to love us
子どものことを どれほど活躍したかという
05:42
beyond how we performed in the world.
視点でしか愛せなかったのかもしれません
05:44
Perhaps we still suffer
私たちは今でも 心の痛みや傷に
05:48
from a psychic pain, a wound.
苦しんでいるかもしれません
05:50
Perhaps we feel that many of our relationships have not had closure.
そして そうした関係の多くには結末がなく
05:52
And so we can feel unfinished.
まだ終わっていないと感じているかもしれません
05:56
Perhaps the task of the third act
恐らく 人生の第三幕が果たす役割は
06:00
is to finish up the task of finishing ourselves.
人生の最後に向けての仕上げをすることです
06:03
For me, it began as I was approaching my third act,
私は60歳の誕生日を迎え 自らが人生の第三幕に
06:08
my 60th birthday.
入ろうとする頃 そう気づきました
06:12
How was I supposed to live it?
自分はこれからどう過ごせばよいか?
06:14
What was I supposed to accomplish in this final act?
この人生の最終章で何を成し遂げるべきか?
06:16
And I realized that, in order to know where I was going,
向かうべき方向を知るためには 自分がこれまで辿ってきた
06:19
I had to know where I'd been.
道筋を知らねばならないと思いました
06:23
And so I went back
そこで私は自分の人生の
06:25
and I studied my first two acts,
最初の二幕を振り返り
06:27
trying to see who I was then,
その時自分がどういう人物だったのか
06:29
who I really was --
自分は何者だったのかを知ろうとしました
06:32
not who my parents or other people told me I was,
両親や他の人が私のことをどう語ったり
06:34
or treated me like I was.
どう接したのかということではありません
06:37
But who was I? Who were my parents --
私とは何者だったのでしょう?
06:39
not as parents, but as people?
両親は 親でなく人間としてどんな人だったのでしょう?
06:41
Who were my grandparents?
私の祖父母はどうでしょう?
06:44
How did they treat my parents?
どのように両親に接したのでしょう?
06:46
These kinds of things.
そうしたことを知ろうとしたのです
06:48
I discovered a couple of years later
数年後に知ったのですが
06:51
that this process that I had gone through
私が体験した過程は
06:54
is called by psychologists
心理学者たちの間では
06:57
"doing a life review."
「回想法」と呼ばれていて
06:59
And they say it can give new significance
その人の人生に
07:01
and clarity and meaning
新たな意義や 明瞭さ 意味合いを
07:03
to a person's life.
与えるとされています
07:05
You may discover, as I did,
やってみると気づくかもしれません
07:07
that a lot of things that you used to think were your fault,
ずっと自分のせいだと思っていたことや
07:10
a lot of things you used to think about yourself,
自分について考えていたことの多くが
07:13
really had nothing to do with you.
実は自分とは何の関係もなかったのだと
07:16
It wasn't your fault; you're just fine.
自分の落ち度ではなく 何も問題はないのだと知ると
07:19
And you're able to go back
人は当時に思いを巡らせ
07:22
and forgive them
相手も自分も
07:24
and forgive yourself.
許すことができます
07:26
You're able to free yourself
自分を過去から解放することが
07:28
from your past.
できるのです
07:31
You can work to change
自らの過去との関係性を変えるために
07:33
your relationship to your past.
できることがあるのです
07:35
Now while I was writing about this,
このことを書き物にまとめている時
07:37
I came upon a book called "Man's Search for Meaning"
ヴィクトール・フランクルの
07:39
by Viktor Frankl.
「夜と霧」に出会いました
07:42
Viktor Frankl was a German psychiatrist
フランクルはオーストリアの精神科医で
07:44
who'd spent five years in a Nazi concentration camp.
5年間 ナチスの強制収容所に入れられていました
07:47
And he wrote that, while he was in the camp,
彼は 収容所にいた時
07:50
he could tell, should they ever be released,
もし解放されたとして
07:53
which of the people would be okay
問題なく社会復帰できる人と
07:57
and which would not.
そうでない人を見分けられたと言います
07:59
And he wrote this:
そしてこう記しています
08:01
"Everything you have in life can be taken from you
「人生で得たものは全て奪い去られかねないが
08:06
except one thing,
一つだけ例外がある
08:09
your freedom to choose
それは 与えられた状況に
08:11
how you will respond
どのようにふるまうかという
08:13
to the situation.
選択の自由だ
08:15
This is what determines
それが私たちの人生の
08:17
the quality of the life we've lived --
質を決めるのだ
08:19
not whether we've been rich or poor,
人生の質は 金持ちか貧乏か
08:21
famous or unknown,
有名か無名か 健康か病気かによって
08:23
healthy or suffering.
決まるものではない
08:25
What determines our quality of life
人生の質を決めるのは
08:27
is how we relate to these realities,
そうした現実をいかに関連づけ
08:30
what kind of meaning we assign them,
そこにどんな意味を与え
08:33
what kind of attitude we cling to about them,
いかなる態度で臨み
08:35
what state of mind we allow them to trigger."
どのような思いを引き出すのかということだ」
08:38
Perhaps the central purpose of the third act
人生の第三幕の核となる目的は
08:42
is to go back and to try, if appropriate,
必要に応じて
08:45
to change our relationship
過去との関係性を
08:49
to the past.
変えることなのだと思います
08:51
It turns out that cognitive research shows
認知研究によると
08:53
when we are able to do this,
過去との関係性を変えることができると
08:56
it manifests neurologically --
神経学的にも変化が現れ
08:58
neural pathways are created in the brain.
脳内に神経経路が作られるのだそうです
09:01
You see, if you have, over time,
もし長年に渡って
09:04
reacted negatively to past events and people,
過去の出来事や人に否定的な対応をしていると
09:06
neural pathways are laid down
脳からの化学的・電気的な信号により
09:09
by chemical and electrical signals that are sent through the brain.
否定的な考えの神経経路が形成されます
09:12
And over time, these neural pathways become hardwired,
その神経回路は 時間の経過とともに硬くなり
09:15
they become the norm --
それが常態になります
09:18
even if it's bad for us
でもこれは望ましいことではありません
09:20
because it causes us stress and anxiety.
ストレスや不安の原因になります
09:22
If however,
でも もし私たちが
09:25
we can go back and alter our relationship,
昔に戻って 過去の人や出来事との
09:27
re-vision our relationship
関係性を変え
09:31
to past people and events,
それを再構築することができれば
09:33
neural pathways can change.
神経経路も変わります
09:35
And if we can maintain
過去に対してより肯定的な感覚を
09:37
the more positive feelings about the past,
保つことができれば
09:39
that becomes the new norm.
それが新しい常態になります
09:42
It's like resetting a thermostat.
温度調節器をリセットするようなものです
09:44
It's not having experiences
私たちを賢くするような
09:47
that make us wise,
経験を新たにするということではありません
09:50
it's reflecting on the experiences that we've had
これまでにあった 自分を賢くする体験に
09:53
that makes us wise --
しっかり向き合うことで
09:57
and that helps us become whole,
全体性を高め
09:59
brings wisdom and authenticity.
知性と信頼性を得る助けとするのです
10:01
It helps us become what we might have been.
それは自らの可能性を発揮させる一助となります
10:03
Women start off whole, don't we?
女性は思春期までは全き存在です
10:07
I mean, as girls, we start off feisty -- "Yeah, who says?"
少女の頃は元気が良いものです - 「へえ 誰が言ったのよ?」
10:09
We have agency.
実行力があり
10:12
We are the subjects of our own lives.
自らの人生の主人公です
10:14
But very often,
でも 多くの場合
10:16
many, if not most of us, when we hit puberty,
思春期を迎えると
10:18
we start worrying about fitting in and being popular.
周りに合わせて上手くやろうと心配し始めます
10:21
And we become the subjects and objects of other people's lives.
他人の人生の主役や脇役になるのです
10:24
But now, in our third acts,
でも今 人生の第三幕を迎えると
10:28
it may be possible
自分の出発点にぐるりと戻って
10:31
for us to circle back to where we started
生きるべきは自分の人生なのだと
10:33
and know it for the first time.
初めて気づくことができるかもしれません
10:36
And if we can do that,
もしそうすることができれば
10:38
it will not just be for ourselves.
それは自分以外の人のためにもなります
10:41
Older women
年配の女性は
10:44
are the largest demographic in the world.
世界で最大の人口集団です
10:46
If we can go back and redefine ourselves
私たちが過去に戻り 自らを再定義して
10:48
and become whole,
全き人間になることができれば
10:51
this will create a cultural shift in the world,
世界の文化が変わることになりますし
10:53
and it will give an example to younger generations
若い人たちが生き方を見直すための
10:58
so that they can reconceive their own lifespan.
モデルを提示することにもなります
11:01
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとうございました
11:04
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:06
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:HIROKO ITO

sponsored links

Jane Fonda - Actor and activist
Jane Fonda has had three extraordinary careers (so far): Oscar-winning actor, fitness guru, impassioned activist.

Why you should listen

Jane Fonda is an actor, author, producer and activist supporting environmental issues, peace and female empowerment. She founded the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention, and established the Jane Fonda Center for Adolescent Reproductive Health at  Emory. She cofounded the Women’s Media Center, and sits on the board of V-Day, a global effort to stop violence against women and girls.

Fonda's remarkable screen and stage career includes two Best Actress Oscars, an Emmy, a Tony Award nomination and an Honorary Palme d’Or from the Cannes Film Festival. Offstage, she revolutionized the fitness industry in the 1980s with Jane Fonda’s Workout — the all-time top-grossing home video. She has written a best-selling memoir, My Life So Far, and Prime Time, a comprehensive guide to living life to the fullest.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.