sponsored links
TED2008

Amy Tan: Where does creativity hide?

エイミ・タンの創造性について

February 2, 2008

小説家エイミ・タンが、創作の過程について深く掘り下げ、彼女の創造性が生まれ出るヒントを探します。

Amy Tan - Novelist
Amy Tan is the author of such beloved books as The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife and The Hundred Secret Senses. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
The Value of Nothing: Out of Nothing Comes Something.
「無の価値:何もないところから何かが生まれる」
00:18
That was an essay I wrote when I was 11 years old
これが、私が11歳の時に書いた作文でした。
00:22
and I got a B+. (Laughter)
そして、評価はB+でした。(笑い)
00:26
What I'm going to talk about: nothing out of something, and how we create.
これから話すのは、無から生まれる有について、そしていかに私たちが創造するかです。
00:28
And I'm gonna try and do that within
しかも、私たちに許された
00:32
the 18-minute time span that we were told to stay within,
18分という時間の中で、そしてTEDの決まりに従って、
00:34
and to follow the TED commandments:
この話を進めていきたいと思います。
00:39
that is, actually, something that creates
言葉を換えれば、実際これは
00:41
a near-death experience,
死に近い経験を創り出すものですが、
00:44
but near-death is good for creativity.
仮死というのは創造性によく働くのです。
00:46
(Laughter) OK.
(笑い)さて。
00:48
So, I also want to explain,
そう、これも説明しておきたいのです。
00:52
because Dave Eggers said he was going to heckle me
もし私が普遍的な創造性について嘘を言ったり、本当でないことを言えば
00:54
if I said anything that was a lie, or not true to universal creativity.
私を質問攻めにするぞ、とデイヴ・エガーズが言ってきたからです。
00:57
And I've done it this way for half the audience, who is scientific.
ですが、私はこの方法でお話しています。皆さんのうちの半分は科学者でいらっしゃいますね。
01:02
When I say we, I don't mean you, necessarily;
私が「私たち」と言う時、必ずしも皆さんのことを指す訳ではありません。
01:05
I mean me, and my right brain, my left brain
私が言っているのは、自分自身と、私の右脳と左脳、
01:09
and the one that's in between that is the censor
そして、私の言っていることは間違っていると指摘する
01:12
and tells me what I'm saying is wrong.
私の中にある検査官を指しています。
01:14
And I'm going do that also by looking at
そして、私は話を進めていくにあたって、
01:16
what I think is part of my creative process,
私が創造する過程の一部であると思われるものを見ていきます。
01:19
which includes a number of things that happened, actually --
それには過去の数々の出来事が含まれています。実際には、
01:22
the nothing started even earlier than the moment
無というものは、私が新しい何かを作り出しているその瞬間よりも
01:25
in which I'm creating something new.
前から始まっているのです。
01:28
And that includes nature, and nurture,
そして、それには遺伝、養育、
01:31
and what I refer to as nightmares.
そして私の言うところの悪夢が含まれています。
01:36
Now in the nature area, we look at whether or not
さて、遺伝の領域では、
01:39
we are innately equipped with something, perhaps
私たちが何かを先天的に持っているかどうかに注目します。
01:43
in our brains, some abnormal chromosome
おそらく脳の中の、芸術的な霊感を起こさせるような効果を持つ
01:46
that causes this muse-like effect.
染色体異常のようなものなのでしょう。
01:49
And some people would say that we're born with it in some other means.
私たちは他の手段で何かを持って生まれてくると言う人もいますし、
01:53
And others, like my mother,
私の母のように、
01:59
would say that I get my material from past lives.
前世から何かを得ていると言う人たちもいます。
02:01
Some people would also say that creativity
創造性は何かの神経のねじれの作用かもしれないと
02:07
may be a function of some other neurological quirk --
言う人たちもいます。
02:10
van Gogh syndrome -- that you have a little bit of, you know, psychosis, or depression.
ゴッホ症―ご存じかも知れませんが、多少の精神病やうつ病ですね。
02:15
I do have to say, somebody -- I read recently
ただし、誰かが・・・最近読んだのですが、
02:20
that van Gogh wasn't really necessarily psychotic,
ゴッホは必ずしも精神病を患っていたわけではなく、
02:23
that he might have had temporal lobe seizures,
側頭葉てんかんの発作があり、そのおかげで
02:26
and that might have caused his spurt of creativity, and I don't --
彼の創造性があふれ出たのかもしれない、ということでした。
02:28
I suppose it does something in some part of your brain.
私も、側頭葉てんかんが脳の一部に何かしら働くと思います。
02:32
And I will mention that I actually developed
それと言うのも、実は私自身
02:35
temporal lobe seizures a number of years ago,
随分前に側頭葉てんかんの発作を経験したからです。
02:37
but it was during the time I was writing my last book,
この頃、私は近著を書いている最中でしたが、
02:41
and some people say that book is quite different.
その作品は他とは随分違う、と言うコメントを受けています。
02:44
I think that part of it also begins with a sense of identity crisis:
創造性の一部は、自我意識の危機という感覚からも生まれると思います。
02:48
you know, who am I, why am I this particular person,
いわゆる、私は誰、私はどうしてこの人間なのか、
02:53
why am I not black like everybody else?
私はなぜ他のみんなと違って黒人ではないのか?
02:57
And sometimes you're equipped with skills,
時折、秀でた能力を持っている人もいますが、
03:02
but they may not be the kind of skills that enable creativity.
それが創造性に役立つものではないかもしれません。
03:04
I used to draw. I thought I would be an artist.
私は昔、絵を描いていて、画家になると思っていました。
03:08
And I had a miniature poodle.
ミニチュアプードルを飼っていたのです。
03:11
And it wasn't bad, but it wasn't really creative.
悪くはありませんでしたが、そこまで創造的とは言えませんでした。
03:13
Because all I could really do was represent in a very one-on-one way.
私にできたことは、厳密な一対一の方法で物事を表現することくらいだったからです。
03:15
And I have a sense that I probably copied this from a book.
今から思えば、おそらくこれは本からの写しだったのだと思います。
03:20
And then, I also wasn't really shining in a certain area that I wanted to be,
私は自分のなりたいと思った分野で特に目立っている訳ではありませんでした。
03:24
and you know, you look at those scores, and it wasn't bad,
そして、ご覧のとおりの点数で、悪くはありませんでしたよ。
03:30
but it was not certainly predictive that I would one day make
しかし、まさか巧妙に言葉を羅列することで、
03:34
my living out of the artful arrangement of words.
自分の生計を立てることになるとは、全く予想だにしませんでした。
03:38
Also, one of the principles of creativity is to have a little childhood trauma.
又、創造性の法則の一つに幼児期のトラウマがあります。
03:42
And I had the usual kind that I think a lot of people had,
私も、たくさんの人々が持つような、一般的なタイプのトラウマがあります。
03:48
and that is that, you know, I had expectations placed on me.
それというのも、お分かりのように、周囲からの自分に対する期待です。
03:52
That figure right there, by the way,
ちなみに、この人形、
03:56
figure right there was a toy given to me when I was but nine years old,
この人形は私がまだたったの9歳の時にもらったおもちゃですが、
03:59
and it was to help me become a doctor from a very early age.
随分小さい時から私をお医者さんにするのを助けるためのものでした。
04:04
I have some ones that were long lasting: from the age of five to 15,
もっと長い期間続いたトラウマもいくつかあります。それは5歳から15歳までの間で、
04:09
this was supposed to be my side occupation,
この写真は、私の副業となるはずでした。
04:14
and it led to a sense of failure.
しかし後に残ったのは、失敗したなという感覚でした。
04:17
But actually, there was something quite real in my life
ですが実際、私の人生の中で非常に鮮明なものがあります。
04:20
that happened when I was about 14.
それは私が14歳くらいの時のことです。
04:23
And it was discovered that my brother, in 1967, and then my father,
1967年に私の兄、そしてその6か月後に私の父に、
04:25
six months later, had brain tumors.
脳腫瘍が見つかったのです。
04:30
And my mother believed that something had gone wrong,
母は、何かがおかしいと信じ、
04:32
and she was gonna find out what it was, and she was gonna fix it.
それが何かを探そうとしました。そしてそれを元通りにしようともしました。
04:37
My father was a Baptist minister, and he believed in miracles,
父はバプティスト教会の牧師で、奇跡を信じていました。
04:40
and that God's will would take care of that.
そして、神の意思で全てがうまくいくと。
04:44
But, of course, they ended up dying, six months apart.
しかし勿論、それから6か月後に二人とも結局死んでしまいました。
04:47
And after that, my mother believed that it was fate, or curses
その後、母はそれが運命か、又は呪いだと信じるようになりました。
04:50
-- she went looking through all the reasons in the universe
母は何故二人が死んだのか、その理由を求めて
04:54
why this would have happened.
あらゆる森羅万象を探し回りました。
04:57
Everything except randomness. She did not believe in randomness.
偶然以外のことを。母は、偶然を信じていませんでした。
04:59
There was a reason for everything.
全てのものに理由があるのだ、と。
05:04
And one of the reasons, she thought, was that her mother,
そして母は、自分がまだ幼い時に亡くなった母親が、
05:06
who had died when she was very young, was angry at her.
自分に対して怒っているのが理由の一つだと考えました。
05:08
And so, I had this notion of death all around me,
なので、私は死の概念をいつも身近に感じていました。
05:13
because my mother also believed that I would be next, and she would be next.
母が、次は私、その次は母自身であると信じていたからです。
05:16
And when you are faced with the prospect of death very soon,
そして、そのように早い時期に死の概念に直面すると、
05:21
you begin to think very much about everything.
全ての事柄について深く深く考えるようになります。
05:24
You become very creative, in a survival sense.
生き残るという意味において、創造的になるのです。
05:29
And this, then, led to my big questions.
そして、これが私の大きな疑問へとつながったのです。
05:33
And they're the same ones that I have today.
その疑問は、今日私が持っているものと同じです。
05:37
And they are: why do things happen, and how do things happen?
なぜ物事は起こるのか、そしてどのように起こるのか?
05:40
And the one my mother asked: how do I make things happen?
そして母が抱いた疑問―私はどのように、物事を実現させるのか?
05:45
It's a wonderful way to look at these questions, when you write a story.
物語を書くとき、この疑問を考えてみることは素晴らしい方法です。
05:52
Because, after all, in that framework, between page one and 300,
そもそも、1ページから300ページまでの枠組みの中で、
05:57
you have to answer this question of why things happen, how things happen,
なぜ、どのように物事が起こるか、どのような順序で起るのか
06:03
in what order they happen. What are the influences?
答えなければならないからです。それはどう影響するのか?
06:07
How do I, as the narrator, as the writer, also influence that?
語り手として、書き手として、私はどのように影響するのか?
06:10
And it's also one that, I think, many of our scientists have been asking.
そしてそれは、多くの科学者たちも抱いてきた疑問だと思うのです。
06:14
It's a kind of cosmology, and I have to develop a cosmology of my own universe,
宇宙論のようなものです。そして、私は自分の宇宙の創造者として、
06:18
as the creator of that universe.
自分の宇宙の宇宙論を作り出さなければならない。
06:24
And you see, there's a lot of back and forth
ご覧のように、何年にもわたって何度も何度も
06:26
in trying to make that happen, trying to figure it out
何かを起こそう、理解しようとして
06:30
-- years and years, oftentimes.
しょっちゅう試行錯誤した跡が山ほどあります。
06:33
So, when I look at creativity, I also think that it is this sense or this inability
私が創造性に着目する際、この感覚、もしくはこの無力感が
06:37
to repress, my looking at associations in practically anything in life.
人生における事実上全てのものの関連性へ目を向けることを、抑制していると思います。
06:44
And I got a lot of them during what's been going on
そのような感覚は、この会議の間でも
06:48
throughout this conference,
たくさん感じました。
06:52
almost everything that's been going on.
おそらく、ほとんど全ての出来事について。
06:55
And so I'm going to use, as the metaphor, this association:
この関連性を、比喩として使ってみます。
06:57
quantum mechanics, which I really don't understand,
量子力学。私自身さっぱりわかりませんが、
07:01
but I'm still gonna use it as the process
これを用いて、これがどのように比喩になるのかを
07:05
for explaining how it is the metaphor.
説明していこうと思います。
07:07
So, in quantum mechanics, of course, you have dark energy and dark matter.
量子力学には、勿論、ダーク・エネルギーと暗黒物質があります。
07:11
And it's the same thing in looking at these questions of how things happen.
これは、物事がどのように起こるのかという疑問を検討するのと同じです。
07:18
There's a lot of unknown, and you often don't know what it is except by its absence.
分からないことはたくさんあります。しかし、それが分からないということ以外何も知らないことが多いのです。
07:22
But when you make those associations,
しかし、このように連想すると、
07:28
you want them to come together in a kind of synergy in the story,
物語の中の相乗効果のようなものと一緒になってやってきて
07:30
and what you're finding is what matters. The meaning.
そして、見つけたものが大事なものです。それが、意味です。
07:34
And that's what I look for in my work, a personal meaning.
そして、それが私が仕事をする上で求めるもの、つまり個人的な意味なのです。
07:38
There is also the uncertainty principle, which is part of quantum mechanics,
量子力学の中には、不確定性原理というのもあります。
07:42
as I understand it. (Laughter)
私が知っている限りでは。(笑い)
07:47
And this happens constantly in the writing.
そして、これは作家活動において頻繁に起こります。
07:49
And there's the terrible and dreaded observer effect,
そして、恐るべき観察者効果もあるのです。
07:53
in which you're looking for something, and
何かを探しているとき、ほら、あるでしょう、
07:56
you know, things are happening simultaneously,
物事が同時にいくつも起こっていて、
07:58
and you're looking at it in a different way,
それを違う視点から見ている。
08:01
and you're trying to really look for the about-ness,
そして、それが大体どんなものか、物語は何についてのものか、というのを
08:03
or what is this story about. And if you try too hard,
一生懸命見つけようとするのです。そして一生懸命になりすぎると、
08:07
then you will only write the about.
大体の事しか書けないのです。
08:11
You won't discover anything.
何も見つけることはできません。
08:14
And what you were supposed to find,
そして、見つけるはずだったもの、
08:17
what you hoped to find in some serendipitous way,
偶然にでも見つけたいと願っていたものは、
08:19
is no longer there.
もうそこにはないのです。
08:22
Now, I don't want to ignore
さて、私たちの宇宙において起こっていることの
08:25
the other side of what happens in our universe,
反対側を、多くの科学者たちがしてきたように
08:27
like many of our scientists have.
無視したくはありません。
08:30
And so, I am going to just throw in string theory here,
なので、ここで「ひも理論」を少し付け加えようと思うのですが、
08:33
and just say that creative people are multidimensional,
ただ単に、創造的な人たちは多面的である、
08:36
and there are 11 levels, I think, of anxiety.
それから、私が思うに、11の不安レベルがあるという程度にしておこうと思います。
08:39
(Laughter) And they all operate at the same time.
(会場笑い)そして、それらのレベルは全て、同時に機能します。
08:43
There is also a big question of ambiguity.
そこには、多義性という大きな疑問も存在します。
08:47
And I would link that to something called the cosmological constant.
そしてそれを、今度は宇宙定数と呼ばれるものへとリンクさせていきます。
08:50
And you don't know what is operating, but something is operating there.
何が機能しているのかは分からないが、何かが働いている。
08:56
And ambiguity, to me, is very uncomfortable
そして私にとって、多義性というのは人生において
08:58
in my life, and I have it. Moral ambiguity.
非常に不快なものです。倫理的多義性。
09:02
It is constantly there. And, just as an example,
それはいつでもあるものです。これは単なる例ですが、
09:05
this is one that recently came to me.
最近私が経験した多義性があります。
09:09
It was something I read in an editorial by a woman
それはある女性が書いたイラク戦争についての
09:12
who was talking about the war in Iraq. And she said,
社説でした。彼女いわく、
09:14
"Save a man from drowning, you are responsible to him for life."
「溺れる者を救え。彼に対して命の責任がある。」
09:18
A very famous Chinese saying, she said.
これは、非常に有名な中国のことわざです。
09:21
And that means because we went into Iraq, we should stay there
つまり、イラクに行ったのだから、全てが収まるまで
09:24
until things were solved. You know, maybe even 100 years.
そこに居座るべきである、と。おそらく100年間であっても。
09:28
So, there was another one that I came across,
それから、たまたまもう一つの言い回しを見つけました。
09:32
and it's "saving fish from drowning."
それは「魚を溺死から救う」です。
09:37
And it's what Buddhist fishermen say,
これは、仏教徒の漁師の言葉で、
09:40
because they're not supposed to kill anything.
生きものを殺してはいけないとされていたことから来たものです。
09:42
And they also have to make a living, and people need to be fed.
しかし彼らも生活しなければなりませんし、人々も食べなければいけません。
09:45
So their way of rationalizing that is they are saving the fish from drowning,
なので、彼らの理屈は、彼らは魚を溺れさせないようにしていて、
09:48
and unfortunately, in the process the fish die.
その過程で不幸にも魚は死んでしまう、ということだったのです。
09:52
Now, what's encapsulated in both these drowning metaphors
では、この二つの溺れることについての比喩が何を意味しているか、というと、
09:55
-- actually, one of them is my mother's interpretation,
―実は、一つは母の解釈であって、
10:00
and it is a famous Chinese saying, because she said it to me:
有名な中国の言葉なのですが、
10:03
"save a man from drowning, you are responsible to him for life."
「溺れる者を救え。彼に対して命の責任がある。」
10:06
And it was a warning -- don't get involved in other people's business,
そして、これは警告であると・・・他人の用事に巻き込まれるな。
10:09
or you're going to get stuck.
そうでないと、そこで行き止まりになってしまうから。
10:13
OK. I think if somebody really was drowning, she'd save them.
もし誰かが本当に溺れていたら、母は救助に向かっただろうと思いますけどね。
10:15
But, both of these sayings -- saving a fish from drowning,
しかしこの二つの言い回し、つまり魚を溺れさせないことと、
10:19
or saving a man from drowning -- to me they had to do with intentions.
溺れる者を救うこととでは、意図が関係していたのだと私には思われます。
10:23
And all of us in life, when we see a situation, we have a response.
人生において、ある状況を観察する時、私たちは反応します。
10:27
And then we have intentions.
そこから、意図を持つようになります。
10:32
There's an ambiguity of what that should be that we should do,
ここに、私たちがすべきである、なすべきことに多義性が生じます。
10:34
and then we do something.
ここで、私たちは何かを行います。
10:39
And the results of that may not match what our intentions had been.
その結果は、私たちの意図とは適合しないかもしれない。
10:41
Maybe things go wrong. And so, after that, what are our responsibilities?
もしかしたら間違っているかもしれない。それなら、私たちの責任はどうなるのか?
10:44
What are we supposed to do?
私たちは何をするべきなのか?
10:49
Do we stay in for life,
生涯その場にとどまるのか、
10:51
or do we do something else and justify and say, well, my intentions were good,
それとも何か他のことをして正当化し、「でも、意図していたことは良かった、
10:53
and therefore I cannot be held responsible for all of it?
だから全ての責任を負うことはできない」と言うのか?
10:58
That is the ambiguity in my life
これが私の人生における多義性です。
11:04
that really disturbed me, and led me to write a book called
このせいで非常に不愉快な思いをし、後に
11:06
"Saving Fish From Drowning."
「溺れる魚を救う」という本を書くことになりました。
11:10
I saw examples of that. Once I identified this question, it was all over the place.
この疑問がはっきりして以来、その例をたくさん見ました。そこら中にあるのです。
11:12
I got these hints everywhere.
そのきっかけは至るところにありました。
11:19
And then, in a way, I knew that they had always been there.
そして、ある意味では、あらゆるところにそれがいつもあるという事を知っていたとも言えます。
11:21
And then writing, that's what happens. I get these hints, these clues,
そして、書く、これが起きるのです。このようなヒントや鍵を得て、
11:24
and I realize that they've been obvious, and yet they have not been.
疑問ははっきりしていた、けれどもまだはっきりしていない、ということを知る。
11:27
And what I need, in effect, is a focus.
そして実際には、焦点が必要なのです。
11:34
And when I have the question, it is a focus.
何か疑問を持つ時、それは焦点なのです。
11:38
And all these things that seem to be flotsam and jetsam in life actually go through
人生においてくだらなく見えるもの全てが実は、その疑問を通り抜けます。
11:40
that question, and what happens is those particular things become relevant.
それから起ることは、そのような具体的な物事が関係するようになる。
11:45
And it seems like it's happening all the time.
これは絶えず起こっているようなのです。
11:50
You think there's a sort of coincidence going on, a serendipity,
皆さんも、偶然や思いがけない幸運のようなものがあって、
11:52
in which you're getting all this help from the universe.
そこから宇宙からの全ての助けを得ていると思っていらっしゃることでしょう。
11:55
And it may also be explained that now you have a focus.
それは、皆さんが今は焦点を持っているからとも説明できるかもしれません。
11:58
And you are noticing it more often.
そして、それに前よりも頻繁にそれに気づいています。
12:01
But you apply this.
しかし、それをあてはめます。
12:05
You begin to look at things having to do with your tensions.
自分の中にある矛盾と物事がどう関係しているのかを見始める。
12:08
Your brother, who's fallen in trouble, do you take care of him?
トラブルに陥った兄弟の世話をするのかどうか?
12:11
Why or why not?
なぜするか、もしくはなぜしないのか?
12:14
It may be something that is perhaps more serious
もしかしたら、考える対象はもっと深刻なものかもしれません。
12:16
-- as I said, human rights in Burma.
先にも言ったとおり、ミャンマーの人権について。
12:20
I was thinking that I shouldn't go because somebody said, if I did, it would show
私が行けばミャンマーの軍事政権を認めることになる、と誰かに言われたので、
12:23
that I approved of the military regime there.
私はそこに行くべきではないと考えていました。
12:27
And then, after a while, I had to ask myself,
しかししばらくした後、
12:30
"Why do we take on knowledge, why do we take on assumptions
「なぜ他人の知識や予測に対して自分が責任を取るのだろうか?」と
12:33
that other people have given us?"
自分に問わねばなりませんでした。
12:35
And it was the same thing that I felt when I was growing up,
それは、私が小さかった頃、バプティスト教会の牧師であった父親から
12:38
and was hearing these rules of moral conduct from my father,
道徳的行いのルールを聞いた時に感じた事と
12:41
who was a Baptist minister.
同じだったのです。
12:46
So I decided that I would go to Burma for my own intentions,
なので、私は自分の意図でミャンマーに行こうと決めました。
12:48
and still didn't know that if I went there,
しかし、そこに行ったらどうなるのか、
12:53
what the result of that would be, if I wrote a book --
本を書いたらどのような結果になるのか、まだ分かっていませんでした。
12:56
and I just would have to face that later, when the time came.
ただ、時が来たらそれに直面しなければならない、と考えていました。
12:59
We are all concerned with things that we see in the world that we are aware of.
私たちは、自分が意識する世界で見えるものに、心を砕きます。
13:03
We come to this point and say, what do I as an individual do?
この点までたどり着いて、私は一個人として何をするのか?と問うのです。
13:08
Not all of us can go to Africa, or work at hospitals,
全ての人がアフリカに行ったり、病院で働ける訳ではない。
13:13
so what do we do, if we have this moral response, this feeling?
ならば、この道徳的反応、この気持ちがある時、何をするか?
13:17
Also, I think one of the biggest things we are all looking at,
さらに、私たちみんなが目にしている、今日話したことでもある
13:24
and we talked about today, is genocide.
最も大きな問題のうちの一つが、大量虐殺だと考えます。
13:27
This leads to this question.
これは、次の疑問に通じています。
13:30
When I look at all these things that are morally ambiguous and uncomfortable,
道徳的に曖昧で不快である全てのものを見る時、
13:33
and I consider what my intentions should be,
そして自分の意図がどのようであるべきか考える時、
13:38
I realize it goes back to this identity question that I had when I was a child
それが私が子どもの時に抱いていた自我意識の疑問へとさかのぼることに気づきます。
13:40
-- and why am I here, and what is the meaning of my life,
なぜ私はここにいるのか、私の人生の意味は何なのか、
13:45
and what is my place in the universe?
そして、宇宙における私の役割は何なのか?
13:48
It seems so obvious, and yet it is not.
それはとてもはっきりしているようで、未だはっきりとはしていません。
13:50
We all hate moral ambiguity in some sense,
私たちは、ある意味で道徳的多義性をひどく嫌っていますが、
13:53
and yet it is also absolutely necessary.
それは絶対的に必要なものでもあるのです。
13:58
In writing a story, it is the place where I begin.
物語を書くとき、それが私の始点なのです。
14:02
Sometimes I get help from the universe, it seems.
どうやら、私は宇宙から時たま助けを得ているようでもあります。
14:06
My mother would say it was the ghost of my grandmother from the very first book,
母は、私の最初の著作から、それは私の祖母の霊であると言っていました。
14:10
because it seemed I knew things I was not supposed to know.
私が、知っているはずのないことを知っていたからだそうです。
14:13
Instead of writing that the grandmother died accidentally,
祖母が、アヘンをやりすぎてしまったため
14:16
from an overdose of opium, while having too much of a good time,
事故で死んでしまった、と書く代わりに
14:19
I actually put down in the story that the woman killed herself,
私は、その女性が自殺したと物語に書きました。
14:22
and that actually was the way it happened.
そして、それが実際起こったことだったのです。
14:27
And my mother decided that that information must have come from my grandmother.
母は、その情報は祖母から来たに違いないと決めつけました。
14:29
There are also things, quite uncanny,
他にも、作品を書いているときに
14:34
which bring me information that will help me in the writing of the book.
役立つ情報をもたらしてくれる、神秘的な何かも存在しています。
14:37
In this case, I was writing a story
これについては、私はある物語を書いていたのですが、
14:41
that included some kind of detail, period of history, a certain location.
それはある種の詳細、歴史のとある時期、具体的な場所を含んでいて、
14:43
And I needed to find something historically that would match that.
そして、それにぴったり合う歴史的な何かを探していたのです。
14:47
And I took down this book, and I --
私はある本を手に取り、そして・・・
14:50
first page that I flipped it to was exactly the setting, and the time period,
めくった最初のページはまさにその設定、その時期のもので、
14:52
and the kind of character I needed -- was the Taiping rebellion,
私が必要としていたキャラクターは
14:58
happening in the area near Guilin, outside of that,
桂林の近く、その外側の地域で起きた太平天国軍で、
15:01
and a character who thought he was the son of God.
自分を神の子だと思っている男でした。
15:05
You wonder, are these things random chance?
こういったことは、偶然に起こるのか?とお思いでしょう。
15:08
Well, what is random? What is chance? What is luck?
では、偶然とは何でしょうか?運とは?幸運とは?
15:11
What are things that you get from the universe that you can't really explain?
宇宙から得るうまく説明できないことは、何なのか?
15:15
And that goes into the story, too.
そして、それも物語に含まれるのです。
15:19
These are the things I constantly think about from day to day.
これらは、毎日毎日私がずっと考えていることです。
15:21
Especially when good things happen,
特に良いことが起こったときや、
15:24
and, in particular, when bad things happen.
悪いことが起こったときに。
15:26
But I do think there's a kind of serendipity,
しかし、そこには思いもよらない偶然のようなものがあると、心から思いますし
15:30
and I do want to know what those elements are,
その要素が何なのかも、心から知りたいと思います。
15:32
so I can thank them, and also try to find them in my life.
それらに感謝し、人生の中でそれを見つけようとするためです。
15:35
Because, again, I think that when I am aware of them, more of them happen.
なぜならば繰り返しますが、私がそのことを意識しているとき、それがより頻繁に起こるからです。
15:40
Another chance encounter is when I went to a place
他の偶然の出会いは、私がある場所に行った時のことです。
15:44
-- I just was with some friends, and we drove randomly to a different place,
私はたまたま数人の友達と、違う場所へ行き当たりばったりに車で移動していました。
15:48
and we ended up in this non-tourist location,
そして、観光地ではないある場所に行きついたのです。
15:52
a beautiful village, pristine.
そこは、美しい村で、素朴なところでした。
15:56
And we walked three valleys beyond,
そこから3つの谷を歩いて越え、
15:58
and the third valley, there was something quite mysterious and ominous,
その3つ目の谷で、私は何やら非常に神秘的で不吉な
16:00
a discomfort I felt. And then I knew that had to be [the] setting of my book.
不快感を覚えました。その時、そこが私の本の背景になるのだと感じました。
16:03
And in writing one of the scenes, it happened in that third valley.
そしてあるシーンを書いていた時、それはその3つ目の谷で起こりました。
16:09
For some reason I wrote about cairns -- stacks of rocks -- that a man was building.
なぜか私は、ある男が作った石塚、積み重なった岩のことを書いていました。
16:12
And I didn't know exactly why I had it, but it was so vivid.
なぜ自分がそれを書いていたのかははっきり分かりませんが、それは非常に鮮明でした。
16:19
I got stuck, and a friend, when she asked if I would go for a walk with her dogs,
そこで行き詰まり、ある友達が犬の散歩についてこないかと誘ってきたので
16:22
that I said, sure. And about 45 minutes later,
私は一緒に行くと言いました。そして45分くらい経った後、
16:27
walking along the beach, I came across this.
海岸を歩きながら、私はこの風景に出くわしたのです。
16:30
And it was a man, a Chinese man,
それは男、中国人の男で、
16:34
and he was stacking these things, not with glue, not with anything.
石を糊も何も使わずに、積み上げていたのです。
16:36
And I asked him, "How is it possible to do this?"
私はその男に、どうしてそのようなことができるんですか?とたずねました。
16:39
And he said, "Well, I guess with everything in life, there's a place of balance."
彼は、そうだね、この世の全てにはうまく釣り合う点があると思うよ、と言いました。
16:42
And this was exactly the meaning of my story at that point.
それがまさに、その時点で私の物語の持つ意味だったのです。
16:46
I had so many examples -- I have so many instances like this, when I'm writing a story,
そのような例はいくつもあります。物語を描いているときはこのような偶然に多く出くわします。
16:51
and I cannot explain it.
そして、それを説明できないのです。
16:56
Is it because I had the filter that I have such a strong coincidence
私がこういった例を執筆活動により強く結び付けることができるから、
16:58
in writing about these things?
私の持つ疑問との間にこんなに強い関連性を持つのか?
17:02
Or is it a kind of serendipity that we cannot explain, like the cosmological constant?
それとも、宇宙定数のような、説明できない偶然なのか?
17:05
A big thing that I also think about is accidents.
私が考える大きなこととして、事故も挙げられます。
17:12
And as I said, my mother did not believe in randomness.
お話したとおり、母は偶然を信じていませんでした。
17:15
What is the nature of accidents?
事故の性質とは何なのか?
17:18
And how are we going to assign what the responsibility and the causes are,
そして、裁判所を抜きにして、どのように
17:20
outside of a court of law?
その責任と原因を判断していくのか?
17:24
I was able to see that in a firsthand way,
私が中国最貧しい貴州省のトン族の美しい村を訪れた時、
17:27
when I went to beautiful Dong village, in Guizhou, the poorest province of China.
それを実感することができました。
17:30
And I saw this beautiful place. I knew I wanted to come back.
その美しい場所を見て、戻ってきたいと思いました。
17:36
And I had a chance to do that, when National Geographic asked me
そして、ナショナル・ジオグラフィック誌が中国について何でも好きな事を書いてくれと言ってきた時、
17:38
if I wanted to write anything about China.
そこに戻るチャンスを得たのです。
17:41
And I said yes, about this village of singing people, singing minority.
私は了承し、歌う人々、歌う少数民族の村について書きたいと言いました。
17:43
And they agreed, and between the time I saw this place and the next time I went,
先方も納得しましたが、私が前回そこを見た時から2回目に訪れるまでの間に
17:48
there was a terrible accident. A man, an old man, fell asleep,
そこでひどい事故がありました。お年寄りの男性が居眠りをして、
17:53
and his quilt dropped in a pan of fire that kept him warm.
彼の掛け布団が、身体を温めるための火の中に落ちてしまったのです。。
17:57
60 homes were destroyed, and 40 were damaged.
60軒が焼失し、40軒に被害が及びました。
18:00
Responsibility was assigned to the family.
その家族全員が責任を負うことになり、
18:06
The man's sons were banished to live three kilometers away, in a cowshed.
男の息子たちは追放され、3キロ離れた牛小屋で暮らすことになりました。
18:08
And, of course, as Westerners, we say, "Well, it was an accident. That's not fair.
勿論、欧米人は「単なる事故だったんだからそれは不公平だ。
18:12
It's the son, not the father."
当の父親ではなく、息子じゃないか。」と言うでしょう。
18:16
When I go on a story, I have to let go of those kinds of beliefs.
私が物語を書くとき、そういった信条から解き放たれなければならないのです。
18:18
It takes a while, but I have to let go of them and just go there, and be there.
時間はかかりますが、それを解き放ち、そこに行って滞在しなくてはいけない。
18:24
And so I was there on three occasions, different seasons.
そんな訳で私はそこを3回、異なる季節に訪れました。
18:28
And I began to sense something different about the history,
そして、その場所の歴史や、以前に何が起こったのか、
18:31
and what had happened before, and the nature of life in a very poor village,
非常に貧しい村での生活の本質がどのようなものか、
18:35
and what you find as your joys, and your rituals, your traditions, your links
娯楽、儀式、伝統、他の家族とのつながりに見出すものについて、異なるものを感じ取り始めました。
18:39
with other families. And I saw how this had a kind of justice, in its responsibility.
そして、それがどのように、事件の責任の中である種の正義を持つのかを見たのです。
18:42
I was able to find out also about the ceremony that they were using,
私は彼らが行う式典についても、発見することができました。
18:52
a ceremony they hadn't used in about 29 years. And it was to send some men
29年間、行われていなかった式典です。それは、数人の男を派遣するもので・・・
18:57
-- a Feng Shui master sent men down to the underworld on ghost horses.
風水の達人が馬の霊に乗せて、男たちを地下世界へ送るというものでした。
19:05
Now you, as Westerners, and I, as Westerners,
欧米人である皆さんや、私も含めてですが、
19:09
would say well, that's superstition. But after being there for a while,
そんなものは迷信である、と思うことでしょう。しかし、そこにしばらく滞在し、
19:12
and seeing the amazing things that happened,
信じられない出来事が起こるのを目撃すると、
19:15
you begin to wonder whose beliefs are those that are in operation in the world,
どのように物事が起こるのかということを決める、
19:18
determining how things happen.
世界で動いている信条は誰のものなのか、ということを考えるようになるのです。
19:23
So I remained with them, and the more I wrote that story,
なので私は彼らとともにしばらく残り、その物語を書くにつれ
19:26
the more I got into those beliefs, and I think that's important for me
そういった信条に入り込むようになりました。
19:29
-- to take on the beliefs, because that is where the story is real,
重要なことだと思います。なぜなら、そこが物語が真実である場であり、
19:33
and that is where I'm gonna find the answers
そこで私は、人生に対して持ついくつかの疑問をどう感じているのか、
19:36
to how I feel about certain questions that I have in life.
それに答えを出す場でもあるからです。
19:38
Years go by, of course, and the writing, it doesn't happen instantly,
勿論、年月は過ぎ、物語というのは、
19:43
as I'm trying to convey it to you here at TED.
このTEDの場でお伝えしようとしているとおり、瞬時には出来上がりません。
19:46
The book comes and it goes. When it arrives, it is no longer my book.
物語はやってきては去ります。それが皆さんの手元に届いたら、もう私の本ではなくなります。
19:50
It is in the hands of readers, and they interpret it differently.
読者の手に渡ったら、解釈は人それぞれです。
19:55
But I go back to this question of, how do I create something out of nothing?
しかし、どうやって無から有を創り出すのか?という疑問に戻っていくのです。
19:59
And how do I create my own life?
そして、いかに自分の人生を創り上げるか?
20:05
And I think it is by questioning,
そして人生を創造するには、
20:08
and saying to myself that there are no absolute truths.
疑問を抱き続けること、絶対的真実はないのだと自分に言い聞かせることだ、と私は思います。
20:10
I believe in specifics, the specifics of story,
私は細かいことを信頼しています。物語の詳細や
20:15
and the past, the specifics of that past,
過去、その過去の詳細、
20:19
and what is happening in the story at that point.
そしてその時点で物語に何が起こっているのか、といったことを。
20:22
I also believe that in thinking about things --
そして、物事や幸運、運命、偶然、事故、神の意思、
20:26
my thinking about luck, and fate, and coincidences and accidents,
神秘的な力の一致に対する私の考察が、
20:29
God's will, and the synchrony of mysterious forces --
それが何なのか、どのように私たちは創造するのかという
20:33
I will come to some notion of what that is, how we create.
何らかの考えに行き当たると信じています。
20:37
I have to think of my role. Where I am in the universe,
自分の役割について、考えなくてはいけません。私は宇宙の中のどこにいるのか、
20:43
and did somebody intend for me to be that way, or is it just something I came up with?
誰かが今ある私を意図したのか、それとも自分で思いついたものなのか?
20:47
And I also can find that by imagining fully, and becoming what is imagined --
それも、心ゆくまで想像し、想像したものになることで見つけられると思います。
20:52
and yet is in that real world, the fictional world.
しかし、それは現実世界、虚構の世界に存在するのです。
21:00
And that is how I find particles of truth, not the absolute truth, or the whole truth.
そうやって、私は絶対的真実や全体的真実ではなく、真実の分子を見つけます。
21:03
And they have to be in all possibilities,
そして、それは私が今まで考えもしなかったものも含めて、
21:11
including those I never considered before.
全ての可能性の中になくてはいけません。
21:13
So, there are never complete answers.
ですから、完全な解答は、ありえません。
21:16
Or rather, if there is an answer, it is to remind
むしろ、もし答えが一つあるのならば、それは
21:19
myself that there is uncertainty in everything,
全てに不確定な部分があることを、自分に確認させるためなのです。
21:24
and that is good, because then I will discover something new.
そして、それはいいことであると。私は何か新しいものを発見するからです。
21:28
And if there is a partial answer, a more complete answer from me,
そしてそこに半端な答え、私自身から生まれるより完全な答えがあるなら、
21:33
it is to simply imagine.
それは単に、想像することなのだ、と。
21:37
And to imagine is to put myself in that story,
そして想像することは、物語の中に自分を入れることです。
21:40
until there was only -- there is a transparency between me and the story that I am creating.
そこに何も・・・自分と自分が創っている物語との間に何もなくなるまで。
21:44
And that's how I've discovered that if I feel what is in the story
そうやって、物語、ある物語の中に何があるのかを自分が感じ取れるかを
21:50
-- in one story -- then I come the closest, I think,
見つけてきました。そしてそこで、
21:56
to knowing what compassion is, to feeling that compassion.
共感とは何なのか、共感を感じることは何なのかを知ることに最も近づくと思います。
22:02
Because for everything,
なぜなら、全てにおいて
22:06
in that question of how things happen, it has to do with the feeling.
どのように物事が起こるのかという疑問は、感情と関係しているからです。
22:08
I have to become the story in order to understand a lot of that.
共感を深く理解するために、私自身が物語にならなければいけないのです。
22:12
We've come to the end of the talk,
さて、この講演も終わりに近づいてきましたので、
22:18
and I will reveal what is in the bag, and it is the muse,
かばんの中に何があるのかをお見せしましょう。それは、芸術的霊感です。
22:20
and it is the things that transform in our lives,
それは私たちの人生の中で形を変え、
22:24
that are wonderful and stay with us.
素晴らしく、私たちと共にあるものなのです。
22:27
There she is.
ほら、出てきた。
22:37
Thank you very much!
ご静聴ありがとうございました。
22:38
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:40
Translator:Kaori Naiki
Reviewer:Masahiro Baba

sponsored links

Amy Tan - Novelist
Amy Tan is the author of such beloved books as The Joy Luck Club, The Kitchen God's Wife and The Hundred Secret Senses.

Why you should listen

Born in the US to immigrant parents from China, Amy Tan rejected her mother's expectations that she become a doctor and concert pianist. She chose to write fiction instead. Her much-loved, best-selling novels have been translated into 35 languages. In 2008, she wrote a libretto for The Bonesetter's Daughter, which premiered that September with the San Francisco Opera.

Tan was the creative consultant for Sagwa, the Emmy-nominated PBS series for children, and she has appeared as herself on The Simpsons. She's the lead rhythm dominatrix, backup singer and second tambourine with the Rock Bottom Remainders, a literary garage band that has raised more than a million dollars for literacy programs.

The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.