sponsored links
TED2003

Steven Pinker: Human nature and the blank slate

スティーブン・ピンカー:書き込まれた「空白の石版」

February 28, 2003

「ブランク・スレート」(空白の石版)という本では、スティーブン・ピンカーは全ての人間が生まれつきの特徴を持って生まれると主張しています。このビデオでは、ピンカーは自分の仮説について話し、その説に対して不満な人達がいるのはなぜなのかを説明します。(山口篤子訳「人間の本性を考える―心は空白の石版か」参照)

Steven Pinker - Psychologist
Steven Pinker questions the very nature of our thoughts -- the way we use words, how we learn, and how we relate to others. In his best-selling books, he has brought sophisticated language analysis to bear on topics of wide general interest. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
A year ago, I spoke to you about a book
一年前に
00:18
that I was just in the process of completing,
ちょうど仕上げの最中で
00:22
that has come out in the interim, and I would like to talk to you today
その後に出版された本について話しました
00:25
about some of the controversies that that book inspired.
今日はその本が引き起こした論争について話したいと思います
00:28
The book is called "The Blank Slate,"
本の題名は「ブランク スレート」(空白の石版)です
00:32
based on the popular idea
この言葉は人間の心は生まれつき空白であり
00:34
that the human mind is a blank slate,
その構成は全て
00:36
and that all of its structure comes from
社会生活 文化 育児 経験によるという
00:38
socialization, culture, parenting, experience.
通俗的な考えに由来しています
00:41
The "blank slate" was an influential idea in the 20th century.
20世紀にこの「空白の石版」という考えは大きな影響を及ぼしました
00:45
Here are a few quotes indicating that:
そのことを示す いくつかの引用を挙げます
00:49
"Man has no nature," from the historian
「人間は本性をもたない」
00:52
Jose Ortega y Gasset;
歴史家のホセ オルテガ イ ガセット
00:54
"Man has no instincts," from the
「人間には本能がない」
00:56
anthropologist Ashley Montagu;
人類学者のアシュリー モンタギュー
00:58
"The human brain is capable of a full range of behaviors
「人間の脳は幅広い行動ができ 偏りがない」
01:00
and predisposed to none," from the late scientist Stephen Jay Gould.
科学者故スティーブン ジェイ グールド
01:03
There are a number of reasons to doubt that the human mind
「空白の石版」の理論を
01:08
is a blank slate,
疑う理由はたくさんあり
01:10
and some of them just come from common sense.
そのうちのいくつかは常識に基づいています
01:12
As many people have told me over the years,
私も何度も聞かされてきたように
01:14
anyone who's had more than one child
また子供が二人以上いる人ならだれでも
01:17
knows that kids come into the world
子供はある気質や才能を持って
01:19
with certain temperaments and talents;
この世に生まれるという事をご存じでしょう
01:22
it doesn't all come from the outside.
全てが外部からもたらされるわけではありません
01:24
Oh, and anyone who
それに子供もペットも
01:27
has both a child and a house pet
両方がいる家庭の方も
01:29
has surely noticed that the child, exposed to speech,
お気づきですね?
01:32
will acquire a human language,
子供は話を聞いて話せるようになるのに比べて
01:34
whereas the house pet won't,
ペットは話せるようになりません
01:36
presumably because of some innate different between them.
たぶん何か先天的な違いがあるために
01:38
And anyone who's ever been
異性と付き合ったことがある人も
01:41
in a heterosexual relationship knows that
女と男の心は同じではないと
01:43
the minds of men and the minds of women are not indistinguishable.
知っています
01:45
There are also, I think,
人間はやはり
01:49
increasing results from
「空白の石版」ではないと
01:51
the scientific study of humans
立証する研究も
01:53
that, indeed, we're not born blank slates.
最近増えています
01:55
One of them, from anthropology,
その一つが人類学の分野なのですが
01:58
is the study of human universals.
「人間の普遍的特性」についての研究です
02:01
If you've ever taken anthropology, you know that it's a --
人類学を勉強したことがある方なら
02:03
kind of an occupational
だれでもご存じのように
02:05
pleasure of anthropologists to show
人類学者のいわば職業上の楽しみは
02:07
how exotic other cultures can be,
他の文化がいかにエキゾチックで
02:09
and that there are places out there where, supposedly,
私達と何もかも正反対のやり方を
02:12
everything is the opposite to the way it is here.
する地域がある事を 示すことです
02:14
But if you instead
でも一方
02:17
look at what is common to the world's cultures,
世界の諸文化の共通点をみてみると
02:19
you find that there is an enormously rich set
世界中の6,000もある
02:23
of behaviors and emotions
全ての文化に見られる
02:25
and ways of construing the world
行動や感情や世界観が
02:28
that can be found in all of the world's 6,000-odd cultures.
たくさんあります
02:30
The anthropologist Donald Brown has tried to list them all,
人類学者ドナルド ブラウンは
02:34
and they range from aesthetics,
美学 愛情
02:37
affection and age statuses
年齢地位に始まり
02:39
all the way down to weaning, weapons, weather,
乳離れ 武器 天候 支配
02:42
attempts to control, the color white
白の意識 世界観に至る領域の
02:45
and a worldview.
全ての共通点をまとめようとしました
02:47
Also, genetics and neuroscience
また 遺伝学と神経科学では
02:49
are increasingly showing that the brain
脳の構造は複雑であることを
02:51
is intricately structured.
立証する研究が増えています
02:53
This is a recent study by the neurobiologist Paul Thompson
これは 神経科学者ポール トンプソンらの
02:56
and his colleagues in which they --
最近の研究です
02:58
using MRI --
彼らはMRIを使って
03:00
measured the distribution of gray matter --
多数の二人組被験者の脳の灰白質
03:02
that is, the outer layer of the cortex --
―つまり 脳の皮質―の
03:05
in a large sample of pairs of people.
分布を測ったのです
03:08
They coded correlations in the thickness
彼らは脳のいろいろな部分の
03:11
of gray matter in different parts of the brain
灰白質の厚さの相互関係を色分けし
03:15
using a false color scheme, in which
関連性のない部分は紫
03:17
no difference is coded as purple,
紫以外の色は統計的に
03:20
and any color other than purple indicates
著しい関連がある事を
03:23
a statistically significant correlation.
示すものとしました
03:25
Well, this is what happens when you pair people up at random.
さて ランダムで二人組を組めば このようになります
03:27
By definition, two people picked at random
定義によれば
03:30
can't have correlations in the distribution
ランダムに選んだ二人の脳には皮質内の灰白質の分布に
03:33
of gray matter in the cortex.
相互関係がないはずです
03:35
This is what happens in people who share
DNAの半分が同じである二卵性双生児なら
03:38
half of their DNA -- fraternal twins.
このようになります
03:41
And as you can see, large amounts of the brain
御覧の通り
03:44
are not purple, showing that if one person
脳の多くの部分は紫ではありません
03:46
has a thicker bit of cortex
双子の一方のある部分の皮質が厚ければ
03:49
in that region, so does his fraternal twin.
もう一方も厚いのです
03:52
And here's what happens if you
DNAの全てが同じである
03:55
get a pair of people who share all their DNA --
クローンや一卵性双生児の場合は
03:59
namely, clones or identical twins.
このようになります
04:01
And you can see huge areas of cortex where there are
二人の脳の皮質の広い範囲で灰白質の分布に
04:04
massive correlations in the distribution of gray matter.
強い相互関係があることがわかります
04:08
Now, these aren't just
さて これらは 耳たぶの形のように
04:11
differences in anatomy,
解剖学上の相違にとどまるものではありません
04:13
like the shape of your ear lobes,
チャールズ アダムズが描いた
04:15
but they have consequences in thought and behavior
この有名な漫画に見られるように
04:17
that are well illustrated in this famous cartoon by Charles Addams:
考え方や行動にも影響を及ぼしています
04:21
"Separated at birth, the Mallifert twins meet accidentally."
「生後すぐ別れたマリファートの双子が偶然出会う」という
04:25
As you can see, there are two inventors
御覧のようにまったく同じ発明品を
04:30
with identical contraptions in their lap, meeting
ひざに乗せている二人の発明家が
04:32
in the waiting room of a patent attorney.
弁理士の待合室で出会っています
04:34
Now, the cartoon is not such an exaggeration, because
この漫画は信じられない話ではありません
04:36
studies of identical twins who were separated at birth
生後すぐ別れ 大人になってのち
04:39
and then tested in adulthood
検査を受けた一卵性双生児には
04:42
show that they have astonishing similarities.
驚くべき類似点があります
04:44
And this happens in every pair of identical twins
この現象は 科学者が研究した全ての
04:47
separated at birth ever studied --
生後すぐ別れた一卵性双生児に見られますが
04:50
but much less so with fraternal twins separated at birth.
生後すぐ別れた二卵性双生児の場合はそれほどではありません
04:52
My favorite example is a pair of twins,
私のお気に入りの例は ある双子のケースです
04:55
one of whom was brought up
双子の一人はドイツのナチス家庭で
04:58
as a Catholic in a Nazi family in Germany,
カトリック信者として育ち もう一方は
05:00
the other brought up in a Jewish family in Trinidad.
トリニダードのユダヤ人家庭に育ったという話です
05:04
When they walked into the lab in Minnesota,
ミネソタ州の研究所に入った時
05:08
they were wearing identical navy blue shirts with epaulettes;
二人とも全く同じ肩飾りの付いた紺色のシャツを着ていて
05:10
both of them liked to dip buttered toast in coffee,
コーヒーにバターを塗ったトーストを浸すことが好きで
05:13
both of them kept rubber bands around their wrists,
手首にゴムバンドをしていて
05:16
both of them flushed the toilet before using it as well as after,
トイレを使う後だけでなく 使う前にも水を流す癖があり
05:20
and both of them liked to surprise people
混んだエレベーターでくしゃみをして
05:23
by sneezing in crowded elevators to watch them jump.
周りの人が驚くのを見るのが好きでした
05:26
Now --
それは
05:30
the story might seem to good to be true,
信じられない話と思うかもしれませんが
05:32
but when you administer
何回心理テストを繰り返しても
05:34
batteries of psychological tests,
同じ結果を得るでしょう
05:36
you get the same results -- namely,
つまり生後すぐ別れた
05:39
identical twins separated at birth show
一卵性双生児には
05:41
quite astonishing similarities.
驚くべき類似点があるのです
05:43
Now, given both the common sense
さて 一般常識と科学的なデータの
05:45
and scientific data
両方から考えてもこの空白の石版の理論は
05:47
calling the doctrine of the blank slate into question,
疑問視されています にもかかわらず
05:49
why should it have been such an appealing notion?
なぜこの考えがこんなにも人々を惹き付けるのでしょうか
05:51
Well, there are a number of political reasons why people have found it congenial.
人々がこの考えを好ましいとする たくさんの政治的な理由があります
05:54
The foremost is that if we're blank slates,
第一に もし私達が空白の石版であるとすれば
05:57
then, by definition, we are equal,
定義によれば私達は平等です なぜなら
06:00
because zero equals zero equals zero.
ゼロ イコール ゼロ どこまでいってもゼロだからです
06:02
But if something is written on the slate,
でももし何かが石版に書かれていたら
06:05
then some people could have more of it than others,
ある人々は他の人々より恵まれていて
06:07
and according to this line of thinking, that would justify
その考え方によると差別や不平等は
06:09
discrimination and inequality.
正当化されることになります
06:11
Another political fear of human nature
もうひとつの人間性の政治的な恐れは
06:14
is that if we are blank slates,
もし私達が空白の石版なら
06:17
we can perfect mankind --
人間を完璧なものにすることができるということです
06:19
the age-old dream of the perfectibility of our species
それは社会工学による私達の種の完成という
06:21
through social engineering.
長年の夢です
06:24
Whereas, if we're born with certain instincts,
一方 私達がある本能を持って生まれるとすれば
06:26
then perhaps some of them might condemn us
それは私達を利己主義と偏見と暴力に
06:28
to selfishness, prejudice and violence.
運命づけるものであるかもしれません
06:30
Well, in the book, I argue that these are, in fact, non sequiturs.
本の中で私は これらは実際不合理な推論だと主張しました
06:34
And just to make a long story short:
手短に言うとまず第一に
06:38
first of all, the concept of fairness
公平の概念は同一性の概念と
06:40
is not the same as the concept of sameness.
同じではないということです
06:42
And so when Thomas Jefferson wrote
そしてトーマス ジェファソンが
06:45
in the Declaration of Independence,
独立宣言で書いている
06:47
"We hold these truths to be self-evident,
「我々は以下の事実を自明のことと考える
06:49
that all men are created equal,"
人は生まれながらにしてみな平等である」
06:51
he did not mean "We hold these truths to be self-evident,
というのは「人はみなクローンである」
06:54
that all men are clones."
という意味ではないのです
06:56
Rather, that all men are equal in terms of their rights,
むしろ 全ての人間は
06:59
and that every person ought to be treated
彼らの権利において平等であり
07:02
as an individual, and not prejudged
誰もが個人として扱われるべきであり
07:05
by the statistics of particular groups
彼らが属する特定の集団の統計によって
07:07
that they may belong to.
判断されるべきではないのです
07:09
Also, even if we were born
また もし私達が劣った本能を持って
07:12
with certain ignoble motives,
生まれたとしても それが劣った行動に
07:14
they don't automatically lead to ignoble behavior.
自動的につながるわけではないのです
07:16
That is because the human mind
なぜなら人間の心というのは
07:19
is a complex system with many parts,
たくさんの要素からなる複雑なシステムで
07:21
and some of them can inhibit others.
ある部分が他の部分を抑止することもできるからです
07:23
For example, there's excellent reason to believe
たとえば 事実上全ての人間は
07:26
that virtually all humans are born with a moral sense,
道徳心をもって生まれ 私達には歴史の教訓から
07:29
and that we have cognitive abilities that allow us
学ぶことを可能にする認識能力があると
07:33
to profit from the lessons of history.
信じるべき理由が大いにあるからです
07:36
So even if people did have impulses
ですからもし人が利己的または
07:38
towards selfishness or greed,
欲深い衝動を持ったとしても
07:40
that's not the only thing in the skull,
それだけが脳の中にあるのではありません
07:42
and there are other parts of the mind that can counteract them.
心の他の部分がその衝動を打ち消すことができるのです
07:44
In the book, I
この本の中で私は
07:47
go over controversies such as this one,
このような論争点及び
07:49
and a number of other hot buttons,
芸術 クローン
07:51
hot zones, Chernobyls, third rails, and so on --
犯罪 自由意思 教育
07:54
including the arts, cloning, crime,
進化 性差 神
07:57
free will, education, evolution,
同性愛 嬰児殺し 不平等
07:59
gender differences, God, homosexuality,
マルクス主義 道徳 ナチズム
08:01
infanticide, inequality, Marxism, morality,
育児 政治 人種
08:04
Nazism, parenting, politics,
宗教 資源減少 社会工学 技術の危険
08:06
race, rape, religion, resource depletion,
戦争などを含めて 激しい反応や論争を呼ぶ
08:08
social engineering, technological risk and war.
多くの論点について書きました
08:10
And needless to say, there were certain risks
言うまでもありませんが これらの問題を
08:13
in taking on these subjects.
取り組むには危険が伴います
08:15
When I wrote a first draft of the book,
最初の草稿を書き終えた時
08:19
I circulated it to a number of colleagues for comments,
仲間に回して感想を聞いたのですが
08:22
and here are some of
次の様な反応を受けました
08:24
the reactions that I got:
「家に監視カメラを
08:27
"Better get a security camera for your house."
つけたほうがいいよ」
08:29
"Don't expect to get any more awards, job offers
「学者世界で賞や仕事を
08:33
or positions in scholarly societies."
もらう望みはないね」
08:36
"Tell your publisher not to list your hometown
「出版社へ 著者経歴に君の住所を書かないように
08:39
in your author bio."
言っておいたほうがいい」
08:41
"Do you have tenure?"
「きみ、終身教授職を持っている?」
08:44
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:46
Well, the book came out in October,
本は十月に出版されましたが
08:48
and nothing terrible has happened.
私はまだひどい目に逢っていません
08:50
I -- I like --
実際 神経質になる
08:55
There was indeed reason to be nervous,
理由があったのです
08:58
and there were moments in which I did feel nervous,
行動科学で論議をかもす理論を
09:00
knowing the history
主張した人や 不穏な発見をした人が
09:02
of what has happened to people
どんな目に逢ったかを
09:04
who've taken controversial stands
知っていたので
09:06
or discovered disquieting findings
本当に緊張を感じた時が
09:08
in the behavioral sciences.
ありました
09:11
There are many cases, some of which I talk about in the book,
本でも書きましたが
09:13
of people who have been slandered, called Nazis,
議論を招く発見や主張をする人は 中傷を受けたり
09:16
physically assaulted, threatened with criminal prosecution
ナチスと呼ばれたり
09:20
for stumbling across or arguing
暴力を受けたり 刑事訴追すると脅されたりする
09:23
about controversial findings.
ケースがたくさんあります
09:27
And you never know when you're going to
いつ こういう落とし穴に
09:30
come across one of these booby traps.
落ちてしまうか分かりません
09:32
My favorite example is a pair of psychologists
私のお気に入りの例は
09:34
who did research on left-handers,
左利きについて研究した二人組の心理学者のことです
09:36
and published some data showing that left-handers are, on average,
彼らは平均すると 左利きの人の方が
09:39
more susceptible to disease, more prone to accidents
病気になりがちで 事故を経験しがちで
09:42
and have a shorter lifespan.
寿命が短いと指摘するデータを発表しました
09:45
It's not clear, by the way, since then,
その後その概念が正確かどうかは
09:47
whether that is an accurate generalization,
はっきりしないのですが その時点で
09:49
but the data at the time seemed to support that.
データはその結果を支持するように見えました
09:52
Well, pretty soon they were barraged
そしてすぐさま 彼らは怒った左利きの人と
09:55
with enraged letters,
その代弁者からの
09:57
death threats,
立腹した手紙
10:00
ban on the topic in a number of scientific journals,
殺すという脅迫
10:02
coming from irate left-handers
このトピックに関しての
10:05
and their advocates,
科学刊行物掲載禁止などの
10:08
and they were literally afraid to open their mail
集中砲火を受け
10:10
because of the venom and vituperation
思いもよらなかった憎悪や罵倒のせいで
10:13
that they had inadvertently inspired.
郵便を開くのを本当に怖がっていました
10:16
Well,
さて 本が出版されてからは
10:19
the night is young, but the book has been out
6カ月が経ちました
10:21
for half a year,
まだ宵の口ですが
10:23
and nothing terrible has happened.
幸いひどい目には逢っていません
10:25
None of the dire professional consequences
恐ろしい職業上の危機にも
10:27
has taken place --
陥っていません
10:29
I haven't been
ケンブリッジから追放も
10:31
exiled from the city of Cambridge.
されていません
10:33
But what I wanted to talk about
でも私が今日お話ししたいのは
10:36
are two of these hot buttons
「空白の石版」が受け取った
10:38
that have aroused the strongest response
80いくつもの書評の中で
10:41
in the 80-odd reviews
最も強い反応を起こした
10:45
that The Blank Slate has received.
2つの重要な争点についてです
10:47
I'll just put that list up for a few seconds,
ちょっとそのリストを出しますので
10:50
and see if you can guess which two
どの2つか当てて下さい
10:53
-- I would estimate that probably two of these topics
私はこの2つのトピックが
10:55
inspired probably 90 percent
たくさんの書評とラジオインタビューの中で
10:57
of the reaction in the various reviews
おそらく人々の反応の90パーセントを
11:00
and radio interviews.
占めていると思うのですが
11:03
It's not violence and war,
それは暴力でも戦争でも
11:05
it's not race, it's not gender,
人種でもジェンダーでも
11:07
it's not Marxism, it's not Nazism.
マルクス主義でもナチズムでもありません
11:09
They are: the arts and parenting.
その二つは 芸術と育児です
11:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
11:15
So let me tell you what
なぜそれらがそんな怒りを呼んだのかを
11:17
aroused such irate responses,
説明いたします
11:19
and I'll let you decide if whether they --
私の主張が本当に
11:21
the claims are really that outrageous.
とんでもないかを判断して下さい
11:24
Let me start with the arts.
まずは芸術です
11:26
I note that among the long list of human universals
何枚か前のスライドでお見せした
11:29
that I presented a few slides ago
人間の普遍的特性の長い表の中に
11:31
are art.
芸術がありました
11:34
There is no society ever discovered
世界でどんなに遠隔なところでも
11:36
in the remotest corner of the world that has not had something
芸術と見なされるものをもたない社会は
11:39
that we would consider the arts.
まだ発見されていません
11:42
Visual arts -- decoration of surfaces and bodies --
視覚的な美術 体や外観を飾ることは
11:46
appears to be a human universal.
人間の普遍的な特性の一つと思われます
11:48
The telling of stories, music,
物話を語ること 音楽 ダンス
11:50
dance, poetry -- found in all cultures,
詩などは あらゆる文化に見られ
11:52
and many of the motifs and themes
私たちを喜ばす芸術の中の
11:55
that
テーマやモチーフの多くは
11:58
give us pleasure in the arts
全ての人間社会に
12:01
can be found in all human societies:
見られます
12:03
a preference for symmetrical forms,
対称形 反復と変化の使用を
12:07
the use of repetition and variation,
好むことも
12:10
even things as specific as the fact
そして世界中の詩の一行が
12:12
that in poetry all over the world,
休止で区切られて約3秒に近い
12:14
you have lines that are very close
という事実のような
12:16
to three seconds long, separated by pauses.
特殊なことでさえも
12:19
Now, on the other hand,
一方で 20世紀の後半現在
12:22
in the second half of the 20th century,
芸術は衰えつつある
12:24
the arts are frequently said to be in decline.
とよく言われます
12:26
And I have a collection,
私は高級な雑誌に載っている
12:29
probably 10 or 15 headlines, from highbrow magazines
現代 芸術が衰えていることを
12:31
deploring the fact that
嘆く記事を
12:34
the arts are in decline in our time.
10-15持っています
12:36
I'll give you a couple of representative quotes:
代表的な引用をいくつかお見せしましょう
12:39
"We can assert with some confidence that our own period is
「私達はある程度の自信を持ってこう言える
12:42
one of decline, that the standards of culture are lower
私たちの時代は衰退の時代である
12:44
than they were 50 years ago, and that the evidences of this decline
文化の標準は50年前よりも低い この衰退の証拠は
12:47
are visible in every department of human activity."
人間活動のあらゆる分野においてあきらかである」
12:50
That's a quote from T. S. Eliot, a little more than 50 years ago.
これは50年以上前のTSエリオットからの引用です
12:53
And a more recent one:
もう少し近いところでは
12:56
"The possibility of sustaining high culture in our time
「今日 ハイカルチャーを維持できる
12:58
is becoming increasing problematical.
可能性はますます疑わしくなっている
13:00
Serious book stores are losing their franchise,
本格的な書店は支店を減らし
13:03
nonprofit theaters are surviving primarily
非営利の劇場はレパートリーを
13:05
by commercializing their repertory,
商業化することで生きのび
13:07
symphony orchestras are diluting their programs,
交響楽団はプログラムの中身を軽くし
13:09
public television is increasing its dependence
公共テレビはブリティッシュ コメディーの
13:11
on reruns of British sitcoms,
再放送への依存の度を高め
13:13
classical radio stations are dwindling,
クラシックのラジオ局は減り 美術館は大当たりをとれる
13:16
museums are resorting to blockbuster shows, dance is dying."
展覧会に頼り 舞踏は死にかけている」
13:18
That's from Robert Brustein,
これは5年ほど前のニュー リパブリック誌での
13:20
the famous drama critic and director,
有名な舞台演出家で評論家の
13:22
in The New Republic about five years ago.
ロバート ブルースタインの言葉です
13:25
Well, in fact, the arts are not in decline.
実は 芸術は衰えていません
13:28
I don't think this will as a surprise to anyone in this room,
この部屋にいる誰も驚かないと思いますが
13:31
but by any standard
どんな基準から見ても
13:34
they have never been flourishing
芸術が今までこんなに
13:36
to a greater extent.
栄えたことはありません
13:38
There are, of course, entirely new art forms
もちろん まったく新しい芸術形式
13:40
and new media, many of which you've heard
新しいメディアがでてきています
13:43
over these few days.
この数日たくさんの例を見ましたよね
13:45
By any economic standard,
どんな経済指標から見ても
13:48
the demand for art of all forms
すべての形式の芸術に対する
13:50
is skyrocketing,
需要は急上昇しています
13:53
as you can tell from the price of opera tickets,
オペラの切符の値段
13:55
by the number of books sold,
本の売れ行き数
13:57
by the number of books published,
出版された本の数
13:59
the number of musical titles released,
リリースされた曲の数
14:01
the number of new albums and so on.
新しいアルバムの数などからわかります
14:04
The only grain of truth to this
芸術が衰えているという不満に
14:07
complaint that the arts are in decline
一片の真実があるとすれば
14:09
come from three spheres.
それは三つの領域においてです
14:11
One of them is in elite art since the 1930s --
一つは1930年代以降のエリート芸術です
14:15
say, the kinds of works performed
例えばレパートリーの大半は
14:18
by major symphony orchestras,
1930年以前に作られた大手の交響楽団が
14:20
where most of the repertory is before 1930,
演奏する音楽とか 大手のギャラリーと
14:22
or the works shown in
高名な美術館で
14:26
major galleries and prestigious museums.
展示されている作品とか
14:28
In literary criticism and analysis,
また、40-50年前には
14:32
probably 40 or 50 years ago,
文学の批評と分析の世界で
14:34
literary critics were a kind of cultural hero;
批評家は文化の勇者と思われていました
14:36
now they're kind of a national joke.
今日 彼らは国中の笑いの種です
14:39
And the humanities and arts programs
さらに大学の芸術学部や人文科学部は
14:41
in the universities, which by many measures,
いろんな基準から見て
14:44
indeed are in decline.
衰えています
14:46
Students are staying away in droves,
生徒は群れをなして逃げていて
14:48
universities are disinvesting
大学も芸術や人文学への
14:50
in the arts and humanities.
投資を減額しています
14:52
Well, here's a diagnosis.
これが私の分析です
14:54
They didn't ask me, but by their own admission,
頼まれたわけではありませんが 彼ら自身の説明によれば
14:57
they need all the help that they can get.
できるかぎりの助力が必要だということなのでー
14:59
And I would like to suggest that it's not a coincidence
エリート芸術と評論の衰退と
15:02
that this supposed decline
みなされる事態が
15:04
in the elite arts and criticism
人間性が広く否定されたことと
15:06
occurred in the same point in history in which
歴史上の同一時点で生じたのは
15:09
there was a widespread denial of human nature.
偶然ではないと私は提唱したいと思います
15:11
A famous quotation can be found --
ある有名な引用は ウェブをご覧になれば
15:14
if you look on the web, you can find it in
多数の英語の授業の
15:16
literally scores
主要な講義予定表で
15:18
of English core syllabuses --
見られます
15:20
"In or about December 1910,
「1910年12月かそのあたりに
15:23
human nature changed."
人間の本性は変化した」
15:26
A paraphrase of a quote by Virginia Woolf,
これはバージニア ウルフの引用の言い換えですが
15:28
and there's some debate
ウルフが実際何を意味していたかには
15:31
as to what she actually meant by that.
いろんな意見があるでしょう
15:33
But it's very clear, looking at these syllabuses,
でも これらの講義予定表を見ると
15:35
that -- it's used now
何百年
15:37
as a way of saying that all forms
何千年続いていた
15:39
of appreciation of art
芸術の鑑賞のし方は
15:43
that were in place for centuries, or millennia,
20世紀に捨てられた
15:45
in the 20th century were discarded.
ということは明白です
15:49
The beauty and pleasure in art --
芸術の美しさや喜び
15:52
probably a human universal --
たぶん人間の普遍的な特性の一つは
15:54
were -- began to be considered saccharine,
甘ったるいか くだらないか 商業化し過ぎたかのように
15:56
or kitsch, or commercial.
思われるようになりました
15:58
Barnett Newman had a famous quote that "the impulse of modern art
バーネット ニューマン(抽象画家)の有名な言葉は
16:01
is the desire to destroy beauty" --
「モダンアートの推進力は ブルジョア又は俗物的な美を
16:04
which was considered bourgeois or tacky.
破壊したいという欲求だ」というものです
16:07
And here's just one example.
一例をあげます
16:10
I mean, this is perhaps a representative example
これは15世紀の
16:12
of the visual depiction of the female form
女性の体の描写の
16:15
in the 15th century;
代表的な絵で
16:18
here is a representative example
こちらは20世紀の
16:20
of the depiction of the female form in the 20th century.
女性の体の描写の代表的な絵です
16:22
And, as you can see, there -- something has changed
エリート芸術が人々の感覚を
16:26
in the way the elite arts
引きつける方法に何らかの
16:28
appeal to the senses.
変化があったのでしょう
16:30
Indeed, in movements of modernism
実際 モダニズムと
16:32
and post-modernism,
ポストモダニズムというのは
16:34
there was visual art without beauty,
美のない視覚芸術
16:36
literature without narrative and plot,
話も筋もない文学
16:38
poetry without meter and rhyme,
韻もリズムもない詩
16:40
architecture and planning without ornament,
飾りも適度な大きさも緑も
16:42
human scale, green space and natural light,
自然光もない建築や都市計画
16:44
music without melody and rhythm,
メロディーもリズムもない音楽
16:47
and criticism without clarity,
明快さも美学の考慮も
16:49
attention to aesthetics and insight into the human condition.
人間性への洞察力もない評論でした
16:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:54
Let me give just you an example to back up that last statement.
その言葉を証明するために一つの例をあげます
16:56
But here, there -- one of the most famous literary
こちらです 現代のもっとも有名な
16:59
English scholars of our time
英語の文学の専門家の一人
17:01
is the Berkeley professor,
バークリー大学の教授の
17:03
Judith Butler.
ジュディス バトラー
17:05
And here is an example of
これは彼女による分析の
17:07
one of her analyses:
一例です
17:09
"The move from a structuralist account in which capital
「資本が 権力関係は反復 収束 再分節化にしたがう
17:12
is understood to structure social relations
というヘゲモニーの観点と比較的相同な方法で
17:14
in relatively homologous ways
社会的関係に構造をあたえると理解される
17:16
to a view of hegemony in which power relations are subject to repetition,
構造主義者の見解から出た運動が 一時性の問題を
17:18
convergence and rearticulation
構造についての考えにもちこみ 構造的な全体性を理論上の客体
17:21
brought the question of temporality into the thinking of structure,
ととらえる一種のアルチュセール的理論から 構造の偶発的可能性
17:23
and marked a shift from the form of Althusserian theory
構造的な全体性を理論上の客体ととらえる結びついたものとして
17:26
that takes structural totalities as theoretical objects ..."
ヘゲモニーをとらえる概念把握を新たに創始する理論へのシフトを特徴づけた」
17:28
Well, you get the idea.
こんな感じです
17:31
By the way, this is one sentence --
ところで これがワンセンテンスなのです
17:34
you can actually parse it.
品詞を分析したら 文法上では正しい英語です
17:36
Well, the argument in "The Blank Slate"
「空白の石版」で主張したのは
17:40
was that elite art and criticism
芸術一般がそうだというのではありませんが
17:42
in the 20th century,
20世紀のエリート芸術と評論は
17:44
although not the arts in general,
美 快適さ 明快さ
17:46
have disdained beauty, pleasure,
洞察力 スタイルを軽蔑していると
17:48
clarity, insight and style.
いうことです
17:50
People are staying away from elite art and criticism.
人々はエリート芸術や評論に距離を置いています
17:53
What a puzzle -- I wonder why.
謎ですね なぜなのでしょう?
17:57
Well, this turned out to be probably
これが本の中でおそらく
18:00
the most controversial claim in the book.
一番騒ぎをおこした主張になりました
18:02
Someone asked me whether I stuck it in
ジェンダーやナチズムや人種の議論からの
18:04
in order to deflect ire
怒りをそらせるために
18:06
from discussions of gender and Nazism
この主張を本に入れたのかと
18:09
and race and so on. I won't comment on that.
聞いた人がいました それについてはノー コメントです
18:12
But it certainly inspired
でも 確かに
18:16
an energetic reaction
たくさんの大学の教授からの
18:19
from many university professors.
激しい反応を呼びました
18:22
Well, the other hot button is parenting.
もう一つの扱いにくい話題は育児です
18:25
And the starting point is the -- for that discussion
こういう問題から始めてみましょうか
18:28
was the fact that we have all
私たちはみんな育児産業複合体からの
18:31
been subject to the advice
アドバイスを無理に受けさせられた
18:33
of the parenting industrial complex.
ことがありますよね
18:35
Now, here is -- here is a
こちらは勝手なアドバイスに悩まされた母の
18:38
representative quote from a besieged mother:
代表的な引用の一つです
18:40
"I'm overwhelmed with parenting advice.
「育児のアドバイスがあまりにも多くて閉口します
18:43
I'm supposed to do lots of physical activity with my kids
体を使った活動をたくさんさせて
18:45
so I can instill in them a physical fitness habit
運動の習慣をつけて はつらつとした
18:47
so they'll grow up to be healthy adults.
健康な大人に育つようにしなくてはいけない
18:50
And I'm supposed to do all kinds of intellectual play
いろんな種類の知育遊びをさせて
18:52
so they'll grow up smart.
賢く育つようにしなくてはならない
18:54
And there are all kinds of play -- clay for finger dexterity,
そのほかにもいろいろな遊び 手先を器用にする粘土遊び
18:56
word games for reading success, large motor play,
読む力をつける言葉のゲーム 細かい運動遊び
18:59
small motor play. I feel like I could devote my life
全身を使った運動遊び 子どもたちと何をして遊ぶかを考えるのに
19:02
to figuring out what to play with my kids."
一生を捧げなければならない気がします」
19:04
I think anyone who's recently been a parent can sympathize
私は 最近の親なら誰でも
19:07
with this mother.
この母親に同情すると思います
19:09
Well, here's some sobering facts about parenting.
育児についてのいくつかの厳粛な事実があります
19:12
Most studies of parenting on which this advice is based
このアドバイスを基にしたほとんどの育児の研究は
19:15
are useless. They're useless because they don't control
役に立ちません なぜなら 遺伝を考慮していないからです
19:19
for heritability. They measure some correlation
これらの研究は 親がしたことと
19:22
between what the parents do, how the children turn out
子どもがどのようになったかの相互関係を調べ
19:25
and assume a causal relation:
一つの因果関係を推定しています
19:28
that the parenting shaped the child.
すなわち育児が子どもを作り上げるというわけです
19:30
Parents who talk a lot to their kids
子どもにたくさん話しかける親の子どもは
19:32
have kids who grow up to be articulate,
雄弁になり
19:34
parents who spank their kids have kids who grow up
子どもを叩く親の子供は
19:36
to be violent and so on.
暴力的になるなど
19:38
And very few of them control for the possibility
そしてほとんどの研究が
19:40
that parents pass on genes for --
親から遺伝子を受け継ぐという可能性
19:43
that increase the chances a child will be articulate
つまり遺伝が子どもを雄弁にしたり 暴力的にするなどという可能性 は
19:46
or violent and so on.
ないとしているのです
19:48
Until the studies are redone with adoptive children,
遺伝子ではなく 環境の影響しか受けない養子で
19:50
who provide an environment
研究がやり直されない限り
19:53
but not genes to their kids,
こうした結論が確かかどうか
19:55
we have no way of knowing whether these conclusions are valid.
知る術はありません
19:57
The genetically controlled studies
遺伝を考慮した研究には
20:00
have some sobering results.
いくつかの厳粛な結果があります
20:02
Remember the Mallifert twins:
マリファートの双子を思い出して下さい
20:04
separated at birth, then they meet in the patent office --
生後すぐ別れ 特許事務所で再会し
20:06
remarkably similar.
驚くほど似ていた双子
20:09
Well, what would have happened if the Mallifert twins had grown up together?
さて もし彼らが一緒に育っていたとしたらどうなっていたでしょう
20:11
You might think, well, then they'd be even more similar,
もっと似ていたとあなたは考えるかもしれません
20:14
because not only would they share their genes,
なぜなら彼らは遺伝子だけでなく
20:17
but they would also share their environment.
環境まで共有していますから
20:19
That would make them super-similar, right?
ものすごく似るに違いないと
20:22
Wrong. Identical twins, or any siblings,
はずれです 生まれてすぐ別れた一卵性双生児
20:24
who are separated at birth are no less similar
またはどんな兄弟でも
20:27
than if they had grown up together.
一緒に育った場合に劣らず似ています
20:31
Everything that happens to you in a given home
何年もの間にわたって
20:33
over all of those years
与えられた環境で起こったこと全ては
20:35
appears to leave no permanent stamp
あなたの性格や知性に永続的に影響を
20:37
on your personality or intellect.
及ぼすものではないようです
20:39
A complementary finding, from a completely different methodology,
全く違った方法でのもう一つの研究結果では
20:42
is that adopted siblings reared together --
一緒に育った養子の兄弟は
20:45
the mirror image of identical twins reared apart,
別れて育った一卵性双生児と正反対で
20:49
they share their parents, their home,
家も親も環境も同じで
20:51
their neighborhood,
遺伝子は違うのですが
20:53
don't share their genes -- end up not similar at all.
結局全く似ていません
20:55
OK -- two different bodies of research with a similar finding.
そうです 2つの違った研究で 同じ結果が出ています
20:58
What it suggests is that children are shaped
これが示すのは 子ども達は長期的には
21:01
not by their parents over the long run,
親によって作り上げられるものではなく
21:03
but in part -- only in part -- by their genes,
ある部分は―ある部分は と言うにすぎません―遺伝子によって
21:06
in part by their culture --
また彼らの文化―大きく見るとその国の文化
21:09
the culture of the country at large
そして子供達自身の文化
21:11
and the children's own culture, namely their peer group --
例えば仲間集団によって作り上げられる ということです
21:13
as we heard from Jill Sobule earlier today,
今日ジル ソブレの話を聞きましたが
21:15
that's what kids care about --
それこそ子供にとって大切なことです
21:18
and, to a very large extent, larger than most people are prepared to acknowledge,
そして 大部分は ほとんどの人が認めているより
21:21
by chance: chance events in the wiring of the brain in utero;
ずっと多くの部分は全く偶然によってなのです
21:24
chance events as you live your life.
子宮の中での脳の形成の段階での偶然
21:27
So let me conclude
日々の生活の中での偶然によって
21:31
with just a remark
最後に選択のテーマに戻って
21:33
to bring it back to the theme of choices.
話を締めくくりたいと思います
21:35
I think that the sciences of human nature --
私が思うに 人間の本性についての科学
21:38
behavioral genetics, evolutionary psychology,
―行動遺伝学 進化心理学
21:40
neuroscience, cognitive science --
神経科学 認知科学―は
21:43
are going to, increasingly in the years to come,
これからますます多様な定説や経歴や
21:45
upset various dogmas,
根強く信じられている政治信条システムを
21:48
careers and deeply-held political belief systems.
揺るがすであろうということです
21:51
And that presents us with a choice.
そしてそれは私達に 選択を呈示します
21:54
The choice is whether certain facts about humans,
その選択とは 人間や真理についての
21:56
or topics, are to be considered taboos,
ある事実は タブーと考えられるべきか
21:59
forbidden knowledge, where we shouldn't go there
私達が知っても何もいいことがないので
22:03
because no good can come from it,
知ることを禁じられるか
22:05
or whether we should explore them honestly.
または正直にそれを探究するべきかです
22:07
I have my own
私自身の答えは
22:10
answer to that question,
19世紀の偉大な芸術家の
22:12
which comes from a great artist of the 19th century,
アントン チェホフの言った
22:14
Anton Chekhov, who said,
言葉にあります
22:17
"Man will become better when you show him
「ありのままの姿を見せた時
22:20
what he is like."
人は成長する」
22:22
And I think that the argument
これ以上雄弁に語ることは
22:24
can't be put any more eloquently than that.
私にはできません
22:26
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございます
22:29
(Applause)
(拍手)
22:32
Translator:Masami Mutsukado and Kacie Landrum
Reviewer:Tomoko Choda

sponsored links

Steven Pinker - Psychologist
Steven Pinker questions the very nature of our thoughts -- the way we use words, how we learn, and how we relate to others. In his best-selling books, he has brought sophisticated language analysis to bear on topics of wide general interest.

Why you should listen

Steven Pinker's books have been like bombs tossed into the eternal nature-versus-nurture debate. Pinker asserts that not only are human minds predisposed to certain kinds of learning, such as language, but that from birth our minds -- the patterns in which our brain cells fire -- predispose us each to think and behave differently.

His deep studies of language have led him to insights into the way that humans form thoughts and engage our world. He argues that humans have evolved to share a faculty for language, the same way a spider evolved to spin a web. We aren't born with “blank slates” to be shaped entirely by our parents and environment, he argues in books including The Language Instinct; How the Mind Works; and The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature.

Time magazine named Pinker one of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2004. His book The Stuff of Thought was previewed at TEDGlobal 2005. His 2012 book The Better Angels of Our Nature looks at our notion of violence.

For the BBC, he picks his Desert Island Discs >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.