sponsored links
TED2008

John Francis: Walk the earth ... my 17-year vow of silence

ジョン・フランシスはひたすら地球を歩いてきました

February 2, 2008

30年近くに渡り、ジョン・フランシスは地球を歩いてきました。環境に敬意を払い、そして責任を持つよう伝えるため、地球を徒歩と船で旅してきたのです(そのうち17年間は、ひと言も言葉を発しませんでした)。バンジョーの音色も織り交ぜられた、楽しくて思索に満ちた講演です。

John Francis - Planet walker
John Francis walks the Earth, carrying a message of careful, truly sustainable development and respect for our planet. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
(Music)
(音楽)
00:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
00:55
Thank you for being here.
来てくれてありがとう
01:01
And I say "thank you for being here" because I was silent for 17 years.
というのも、私は17年にわたって無言で過ごしたからです
01:04
And the first words that I spoke were in Washington, D.C.,
その後初めて言葉を発したのはワシントンDCで
01:12
on the 20th anniversary of Earth Day.
アースデーの20年目の記念祭があった時でした
01:16
And my family and friends had gathered there to hear me speak.
私の家族や友人たちが皆、私の話を聴きにきました
01:18
And I said, "Thank you for being here."
そして私は「来てくれてありがとう」と言ったのです
01:23
My mother, out in the audience, she jumped up,
観客の中にいた母は飛び上がって言いました
01:27
"Hallelujah, Johnny’s talking!"
「あらまあ、ジョニーが話してる!」
01:28
(Laughter)
(笑い)
01:31
Imagine if you were quiet for 17 years
もしあなたが17年間何も話さなくて
01:33
and your mother was out in the audience, say.
母親が観客席にいたらどうなるか、想像してみてください
01:35
My dad said to me, "That’s one" --
父はこう言いました 「それはひとつの-」
01:39
I’ll explain that.
後ほど説明しましょう
01:42
But I turned around because I didn’t recognize where my voice was coming from.
でも私は別のところを見ました 自分の声がどこから来ているのかわからなかったのです
01:45
I hadn’t heard my voice in 17 years,
私は17年間自分の声を聞いていませんでした
01:50
so I turned around and I looked and I said,
それで振り返って言ったのです
01:53
"God, who's saying what I’m thinking?"
「誰が私の考えを声に出しているんだ?」
01:55
And then I realized it was me, you know, and I kind of laughed.
そしてそれは自分だとわかりました それでちょっと可笑しかったのです
01:59
And I could see my father: "Yeah, he really is crazy."
それから父の姿が目に入りました-「あいつは本当におかしくなってる」と言ってました
02:04
Well, I want to take you on this journey.
私の旅のことをお話ししましょう
02:09
And the journey, I believe, is a metaphor for all of our journeys.
私がしてきた旅は、他のどんな旅にも例えられるものだと思います
02:13
Even though this one is kind of unusual,
だから、私のしてきたことは確かに普通でないことだけれど
02:16
I want you to think about your own journey.
あなた方には自らの旅のことを考えてほしいのです
02:20
My journey began in 1971
私の旅は1971年に始まりました
02:25
when I witnessed two oil tankers collide beneath the Golden Gate,
2隻のタンカーがゴールデン・ゲート・ブリッジの下で衝突して
02:29
and a half a million gallons of oil spilled into the bay.
50万ガロンの石油が湾に流れ出すのを見て
02:35
It disturbed me so much
私はとても混乱しました
02:39
that I decided that I was going to give up riding and driving in motorized vehicles.
それで車やバスなどに乗るのを一切やめることにしました
02:43
That’s a big thing in California.
それはカリフォルニアでは大変なことです
02:50
And it was a big thing in my little community of Point Reyes Station
私が住んでいたカリフォルニア州インヴァネスのポイント・レイズ・ステーションという小さなコミュニティの中では
02:53
in Inverness, California, because there were only
一大事だったのです
02:59
about 350 people there in the winter – this was back in '71 now.
冬になると350人ぐらいしかいないような場所だったからです-1971年当時のことです
03:01
And so when I came in and I started walking around, people --
だから、私がやってきて歩き回り始めると、人々は
03:07
they just knew what was going on.
何が起きているのかを察知して
03:12
And people would drive up next to me
私のそばに車でやって来て言うのです
03:14
and say, "John, what are you doing?"
「ジョン、何をしてるんだい?」
03:16
And I’d say, "Well, I’m walking for the environment."
私は答えました「環境を守るために歩いているんだ」
03:18
And they said, "No, you’re walking to make us look bad, right?
すると彼らは言いました 「いや、俺たちが格好悪く見えるようにするためだろう、
03:22
You’re walking to make us feel bad."
俺たちを困らせるために歩いてるんだろう」と
03:26
And maybe there was some truth to that,
おそらく、それはある意味で当たっていました
03:28
because I thought that if I started walking, everyone would follow.
自分が歩き始めれば皆もついてくるだろうと思っていたからです
03:30
Because of the oil, everybody talked about the polllution.
石油の流出が起きたので、皆が環境汚染のことを話していました
03:35
And so I argued with people about that, I argued and I argued.
そして私はそのことについて人々と議論に議論を重ねました
03:37
I called my parents up.
両親に電話して
03:44
I said, "I’ve given up riding and driving in cars."
「車に乗ったり運転したりするのをやめたんだ」と言いました
03:46
My dad said, "Why didn’t you do that when you were 16?"
父は言いました 「なんで16の時にそうしなかったんだ」
03:48
(Laughter)
(笑い)
03:51
I didn’t know about the environment then.
その時は環境のことを知らなかったのです
03:53
They’re back in Philadelphia.
両親はフィラデルフィアにいました
03:54
And so I told my mother, "I’m happy though, I’m really happy."
私は母に言いました 「でも僕は本当に幸せだよ」
03:56
She said, "If you were happy, son, you wouldn’t have to say it."
母は 「もし幸せならそれを口に出さなくてもいいのよ」と答えました
04:00
Mothers are like that.
母親というのはそういうものです
04:03
And so, on my 27th birthday I decided, because I argued so much
その後、27歳の誕生日に、私は決断しました たくさん議論をしてきたし
04:06
and I talk so much, that I was going to stop speaking
たくさん話もしてきたから、しゃべるのをやめよう
04:14
for just one day -- one day -- to give it a rest.
1日だけ、休みを取ろう
04:20
And so I did.
それを実行しました
04:24
I got up in the morning and I didn’t say a word.
朝起きて、何も言いませんでした
04:27
And I have to tell you, it was a very moving experience,
それはすごく感動的な体験だったと言わねばなりません
04:30
because for the first time, I began listening -- in a long time.
長い年月の中で初めて私は聴くことを始めたのです
04:33
And what I heard, it kind of disturbed me.
聞こえてきたことは、私を混乱させました
04:40
Because what I used to do, when I thought I was listening,
それまで私が聴いていると思っていた時にしていたことは
04:44
was I would listen just enough to hear what people had to say
他の人が何を言っていることが聞こえる程度に耳を傾け
04:47
and think that I could -- I knew what they were going to say,
自分はもう彼らの言わんとすることがわかったと思えば
04:50
and so I stopped listening.
聴くのをやめていたのです
04:55
And in my mind, I just kind of raced ahead
そして心の中で先回りをして
04:57
and thought of what I was going to say back,
私は自分が返す言葉を考えていました
05:00
while they were still finishing up.
人がまだ話しているというのに
05:02
And then I would launch in.
それから私はまくし立てていたのです
05:04
Well, that just ended communication.
それではコミュニケーションが終わってしまうだけでした
05:06
So on this first day I actually listened.
だからこの初めての日に私は本当に耳を傾けました
05:10
And it was very sad for me,
そして悲しくなりました
05:12
because I realized that for those many years I had not been learning.
それまでの長い年月、私は学んでいなかったことを理解したからです
05:14
I was 27. I thought I knew everything.
私は27歳で、何でも知っていると思っていました
05:20
I didn’t.
大違いでした
05:25
And so I decided I’d better do this for another day,
だから私はもう1日聴くのを続けてみようと思いました
05:27
and another day, and another day until finally,
そしてもう1日、もう1日と ついには
05:31
I promised myself for a year I would keep quiet
1年間無言でいようと心に決めました
05:35
because I started learning more and more and I needed to learn more.
聴くことでより多くを学ぶようになり、さらに多くを学ばねばならなかったからです
05:38
So for a year I said I would keep quiet,
1年の間何も話さないでいよう
05:42
and then on my birthday I would reassess what I had learned
そして来年の誕生日に自分が何を学んだのかを見直そう
05:44
and maybe I would talk again.
それからまた話し始めればいいと思っていました
05:48
Well, that lasted 17 years.
それが17年間続いたのです
05:50
Now during that time -- those 17 years -- I walked and I played the banjo
その17年の間、私は歩き、バンジョーを弾きました
05:54
and I painted and I wrote in my journal, and
絵を描いたり日記を記したり
06:00
I tried to study the environment by reading books.
本を読んで環境のことを学ぼうとしたりもしました
06:05
And I decided that I was going to go to school. So I did.
学校に行こうと思い立ち、実行しました
06:10
I walked up to Ashland, Oregon,
歩いてオレゴンのアッシュランドに行きました
06:14
where they were offering an environmental studies degree.
環境学の学位コースを持つ学校があったからです
06:16
It’s only 500 miles.
たったの500マイルでした
06:21
And I went into the Registrar’s office and --
学生課に行って-
06:23
"What, what, what?"
何だ、何だ、何だ?
06:32
I had a newspaper clipping.
私は新聞の切り抜きを持っていました
06:34
"Oh, so you really want to go to school here?
本当に君はこの学校に通いたいの?
06:37
You don’t …?
もしかして…?
06:39
We have a special program for you." They did.
君のために特別のプログラムを用意しよう
06:41
And in those two years, I graduated with my first degree -- a bachelor’s degree.
それからの2年で 私は最初の学位-学士号を得て卒業しました
06:44
And my father came out, he was so proud.
父がやって来ました とても喜んでいました
06:49
He said, "Listen, we’re really proud of you son,
父は言いました 「お前のことを本当に誇りに思う
06:52
but what are you going to do with a bachelor’s degree?
でもその学位で何をしようとしてるんだ?
06:55
You don’t ride in cars, you don’t talk --
お前は車にも乗らないししゃべりもしない
06:57
you’re going to have to do those things."
そういうことをしていかなくちゃならないんだ」
06:59
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:01
I hunched my shoulder, I picked my backpack up again
私は肩をすくめて、再びリュックを背負い
07:03
and I started walking.
歩き始めました
07:05
I walked all the way up to Port Townsend, Washington, where I built a wooden boat,
ワシントン州のポート・タウンゼントまでずっと歩いて行きました そこで木造の船を造り
07:09
rode it across Puget Sound
ピュゼット湾を巡りました
07:14
and walked across Washington [to] Idaho and down to Missoula, Montana.
ワシントン州を横断して、アイダホを通り、モンタナ州のミズーラに行きました
07:17
I had written the University of Montana two years earlier
その2年前、モンタナ大学に手紙を書いて
07:22
and said I'd like to go to school there.
大学に通いたいと伝えていました
07:26
I said I'd be there in about two years.
大体2年後ぐらいに行きますと言っておいたのです
07:29
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:32
And I was there. I showed up in two years and they --
2年後、私はそこにいました そして大学の人たちは-
07:34
I tell this story because they really helped me.
この話をしているのは、彼らが本当に私を手助けしてくれたからです
07:37
There are two stories in Montana.
モンタナでのことは2つ話さなくてはいけません
07:39
The first story is I didn’t have any money -- that’s a sign I used a lot.
まず、私は全くお金を持っていませんでした-この仕草を私は幾度も使いました
07:43
And they said,"Don't worry about that."
大学の人たちは言ってくれました 「その点は心配しなくていい」
07:46
The director of the program said, "Come back tomorrow."
学科のディレクターは「明日また来なさい」と言いました
07:49
He gave me 150 dollars,
彼は私に150ドルくれて、
07:52
and he said, "Register for one credit.
「1単位分だけ登録しなさい
07:54
You’re going to go to South America, aren’t you?"
南アメリカに行くつもりなんだろう?」と言ったのです
07:57
And I said --
私は答えました-
07:59
Rivers and lakes, the hydrological systems, South America.
川や湖、水理学のシステム、南アメリカ
08:01
So I did that.
それで私は登録したのです
08:05
He came back; he said to me,
ディレクターが戻って来て言いました
08:08
"OK John, now that you've registered for that one credit,
「ジョン、OKだ 君は1単位分登録したから、
08:10
you can have a key to an office, you can matriculate --
オフィスの鍵も持てるし、大学への入学資格もある-
08:14
you’re matriculating, so you can use the library.
入学資格もあるから図書館が使える
08:17
And what we’re going to do
私たちは
08:19
is, we’re going to have all of the professors allow you to go to class.
全ての教授に君の授業参加を認めてもらうつもりだ
08:20
They’re going to save your grade,
彼らは君の成績を取っておいてくれるだろう
08:26
and when we figure out how to get you the rest of the money,
残りの授業料を調達する方法を見つけたら
08:28
then you can register for that class and they’ll give you the grade."
君はそのクラスに登録できる そして成績がつく」
08:30
Wow, they don’t do that in graduate schools, I don’t think.
普通大学院ではそんなことはしてくれません
08:37
But I use that story because they really wanted to help me.
この話をしたのは、彼らが本当に私のことを助けたがっていたからです
08:40
They saw that I was really interested in the environment,
彼らは私が本当に環境に興味を持っているのを知りました
08:44
and they really wanted to help me along the way.
そして私の手助けをしようとしてくれたのです
08:47
And during that time, I actually taught classes without speaking.
その頃、私は話すことなしにクラスで教えていました
08:49
I had 13 students when I first walked into the class.
初めて教室に入って行った時、13人の学生がいました
08:54
I explained, with a friend who could interpret my sign language,
私の身振りを通訳してくれる友人の助けを借りて
08:57
that I was John Francis, I was walking around the world,
私は自分の名前がジョン・フランシスで、世界を歩き回っていて、
09:03
I didn’t talk and this was the last time
自分は言葉を話さず、友人がここで通訳してくれるのは
09:05
this person’s going to be here interpreting for me.
これが最後だと説明しました
09:06
All the students sat around and they went ...
学生たちは皆座っていましたが茫然としてしまいました-
09:09
(Laughter)
(笑い)
09:12
I could see they were looking for the schedule,
彼らが時間割を探して
09:17
to see when they could get out.
いつになれば外に出られるのかを見ているのがわかりました
09:19
They had to take that class with me.
彼らはそのクラスを私と一緒に取らなければなりませんでした
09:21
Two weeks later, everyone was trying to get into our class.
2週間後、皆が私たちのクラスに入ろうとしました
09:25
And I learned in that class -- because I would do things like this ...
私はそのクラスでいろいろ学びました-私がこんなことをすると、
09:28
and they were all gathered around, going, "What's he trying to say?"
学生たちは皆で集まって、先生は何を言おうとしてるんだ?
09:32
"I don't know, I think he's talking about clear cutting." "Yeah, clear cutting."
わからないよ 彼は森の皆伐のことを話してるんじゃないの そうだ、皆伐だ
09:34
"No, no, no, that's not clear cutting, that’s -- he's using a handsaw."
いや、ちがうよ あれは皆伐じゃないよ 先生は手引きのこぎりを使ってる
09:39
"Well, you can’t clearcut with a ..."
そうだ それじゃ皆伐はできないな
09:43
"Yes, you can clear cut ..."
いや、できるさ
09:46
"No, I think he’s talking about selective forestry."
そうじゃなくて、先生は森林の選択管理について話してるんだと思うよ
09:48
Now this was a discussion class and we were having a discussion.
それはディスカッションのクラスで、私たちは議論をしていました
09:50
I just backed out of that, you know, and I just kind of kept the fists from flying.
私は議論からは身を引き、乱闘にならないようにだけは気を配っていました
09:54
But what I learned was that sometimes I would make a sign
私が学んだのは、時折私が身振りをすると
09:57
and they said things that I absolutely did not mean,
学生たちは私が全く意図していなかったけれどそうすべきだったことに
10:01
but I should have.
ついて話をするということでした
10:05
And so what came to me is, if you were a teacher
もし教師をしている人が教えている時に
10:07
and you were teaching, if you weren’t learning
自らが学んでいないのなら
10:12
you probably weren’t teaching very well.
多分あまり上手に教えていないのです
10:15
And so I went on.
私はそうやって過ごしました
10:17
My dad came out to see me graduate
父がやってきて私の卒業を見届けました
10:19
and, you know, I did the deal,
もちろん、私はもてなしました
10:21
and my father said, "We’re really proud of you son, but ... "
父は言いました 「お前のことを本当に誇りに思う でも-」
10:23
You know what went on,
何が起きたかはご存知ですね
10:25
he said, "You’ve got to start riding and driving and start talking.
父は「車に乗ったり運転したり話をしたりしなくちゃいけないよ
10:27
What are you going to do with a master’s degree?"
修士号を持って何をするつもりなんだい?」と言いました
10:30
I hunched my shoulder, I got my backpack
私は肩をすくめ、リュックを持って
10:32
and I went on to the University of Wisconsin.
ウィスコンシン大学に行きました
10:34
I spent two years there writing on oil spills.
そこで2年間過ごし、石油の流出についての論文を書きました
10:37
No one was interested in oil spills.
誰もそんなことには興味を持っていませんでした
10:42
But something happened --
でもあの事件が起きたのです-
10:44
Exxon Valdez.
エクソン・バルデス号の石油流出事故です
10:47
And I was the only one in the United States writing on oil spills.
アメリカで石油の流出を研究していたのは私だけでした
10:50
My dad came out again.
また父がやってきました
10:54
He said, "I don't know how you do this, son --
「息子よ お前がどうやっていくのかわからない
10:56
I mean, you don't ride in cars, you don’t talk.
お前は車に乗らないし、話もしない
10:58
My sister said maybe I should leave you alone,
姉は、お前を放っておくようと言っている
11:01
because you seem to be doing a lot better
お前は何も言わない時の方が
11:03
when you’re not saying anything."
ずっと良くやっているようだから」
11:05
(Laughter)
(笑い)
11:07
Well, I put on my backpack again.
私はまたリュックを背負い、
11:10
I put my banjo on and I walked all the way to the East Coast,
バンジョーを持って東海岸までずっと歩き、
11:12
put my foot in the Atlantic Ocean --
足を大西洋に入れました-
11:14
it was seven years and one day it took me to walk across the United States.
7年と1日かかって、私はアメリカを歩いて横断したのです
11:16
And on Earth Day, 1990 --
そして1990年のアースデイで、
11:22
the 20th anniversary of Earth Day -- that’s when I began to speak.
アースデイの20年目の記念祭で、私は話し始めました
11:27
And that’s why I said, "Thank you for being here."
「来てくれてありがとう」と言ったのです
11:30
Because it's sort of like that tree in the forest falling;
なぜなら、森で木が倒れるように、
11:32
and if there's no one there to hear, does it really make a sound?
もし誰も聞く人がいなければ本当に音を立てたかどうかわからないからです
11:36
And I’m thanking you, and I'm thanking my family
私はあなた方や私の家族に感謝しています
11:39
because they had come to hear me speak.
私の話を聴きに来てくれたのですから
11:42
And that’s communication.
それがコミュニケーションです
11:44
And they also taught me about listening -- that they listened to me.
彼らはまた私に聴くことについて教えてくれました-彼らが私のことを聴いてくれたからです
11:47
And it’s one of those things that came out of the silence,
沈黙から生まれてきたのはそういうものでした
11:53
the listening to each other.
お互いに耳を傾けることです
11:57
Really, very important --
本当に、とても重要です-
11:59
we need to listen to each other.
私たちはお互いに聴かねばなりません
12:01
Well, my journey kept going on.
私の旅は続きました
12:04
My dad said, "That’s one,"
父は言いました 「それは、ひとつの」
12:06
and I still didn’t let that go.
でも私はまだその先は言わせませんでした
12:09
I worked for the Coastguard, was made a U.N. Goodwill Ambassador.
私は沿岸警備隊で働き、国連の親善大使になりました
12:12
I wrote regulations for the United States --
私はアメリカの規制を書きました
12:15
I mean, I wrote oil spill regulations.
石油の流出についての規制です
12:18
20 years ago, if someone had said to me,
20年前、もし誰かが私に
12:20
"John, do you really want to make a difference?"
「ジョン、君は本当に変化を起こしたいのかい?」と聞いたなら
12:24
"Yeah, I want to make a difference."
「その通り 変化を起こしたいよ」と答えたでしょう
12:27
He said, "You just start walking east;
彼は言うのです 「ただ東に歩き始めるんだ
12:28
get out of your car and just start walking east."
車から降りてただ東に歩くんだ」
12:30
And as I walked off a little bit, they'd say, "Yeah, and shut up, too."
そして私が少し歩いたところで、また言うのです 「そうだ、話すのもやめるんだ」
12:33
(Laughter)
(笑い)
12:37
"You’re going to make a difference, buddy."
「君は変化を生み出せるだろう」
12:40
How could that be, how could that be?
どうしてでしょう、何故なのでしょう?
12:42
How could doing such a simple thing like walking and not talking
どうして歩くことや話さないことといった単純なことが
12:45
make a difference?
変化を生み出したのでしょう?
12:49
Well, my time at the Coast Guard was a really good time.
沿岸警備隊での日々は本当に良いものでした
12:51
And after that -- I only worked one year --
そしてその後-私は1年しか働きませんでした-
12:55
I said, "That's enough. One year's enough for me to do that."
私は思いました 「もう十分だ これをするのは1年で十分だ」
12:58
I got on a sailboat and I sailed down to the Caribbean,
私はヨットに乗り、カリブ海に下って
13:02
and walked through all of the islands, and to Venezuela.
すべての島々を歩き回り、ベネズエラに行きました
13:05
And you know, I forgot the most important thing,
そうだ、一番大切なことを忘れていました
13:12
which is why I started talking, which I have to tell you.
なぜ私が話を始めたのかということです そのことを言わなければなりません
13:16
I started talking because I had studied environment.
私が話を始めたのは環境について学んだからです
13:21
I’d studied environment at this formal level,
私は環境を公式なレベルで学びました
13:26
but there was this informal level.
でも非公式なレベルもあったのです
13:30
And the informal level --
そしてその非公式なレベルで-
13:32
I learned about people, and what we do and how we are.
私は人々のことや自分たちが何をどのようにしているのかを学びました
13:35
And environment changed from just being about trees and birds
そして環境はただ木や鳥や絶滅危惧種についてのことから
13:41
and endangered species to being about how we treated each other.
私たちがお互いをどのように扱うのかということに変わったのです
13:44
Because if we are the environment,
もし私たちが環境であるならば
13:50
then all we need to do is look around us
私たちがすべきことはあたりを見回し
13:52
and see how we treat ourselves and how we treat each other.
自分たちやお互いをどのように扱っているのかを知ることだけです
13:54
And so that’s the message that I had.
それが私からのメッセージです
13:59
And I said, "Well, I'm going to have to spread that message."
私はそのメッセージを伝えなければならなかったのです
14:03
And I got in my sailboat, sailed all the way through the Caribbean --
それで私はヨットに乗り、カリブ海をずっと帆走し-
14:05
it wasn't really my sailboat, I kind of worked on that boat --
それは自分のヨットではありませんでした 私はそこで働いていたのです-
14:09
got to Venezuela and I started walking.
ベネズエラについて歩き始めました
14:13
This is the last part of this story, because it’s how I got here,
私の話の最後の部分に入ります どうやってここに来たのかという話です
14:17
because I still didn't ride in motorized vehicles.
今でも私は車に乗らないので
14:20
I was walking through El Dorado -- it's a prison town, famous prison,
ベネズエラのエルドラドを歩き抜けてきました-有名な刑務所の町で
14:23
or infamous prison -- in Venezuela, and I don’t know what possessed me,
悪名高くもあるところです-何が私をそうさせたのか、わかりません
14:30
because this was not like me.
まるで自分ではないかのようでした
14:35
There I am, walking past the guard gate and the guard stops and says,
私はそこにいて、門を歩き抜けたときに門番が私を止めて言いました
14:37
"Pasaporte, pasaporte," and with an M16 pointed at me.
「パスポート、パスポート」 M16ライフルが私に向けられています
14:44
And I looked at him and I said, "Passport, huh?
私は彼を見て言いました「パスポートだって、ふん、
14:49
I don't need to show you my passport. It’s in the back of my pack.
あんたにパスポートを見せる必要はない リュックに入ってる
14:53
I'm Dr. Francis; I'm a U.N. Ambassador and I'm walking around the world."
私はフランシス博士で、国連の大使をしていて、世界中を歩いているんだ」
14:56
And I started walking off.
そして私は歩き去りました
15:02
What possessed me to say this thing?
何が私にそんなことを言わせたのでしょうか?
15:04
The road turned into the jungle.
道はジャングルに変わりました
15:09
I didn’t get shot.
私は撃たれませんでした
15:11
And I got to -- I start saying, "Free at last --
そして私は言いました-ようやく自由になった
15:13
thank God Almighty, I’m free at last."
全能の神よ感謝します、私はついに自由になったのだ、と
15:17
"What was that about," I’m saying. What was that about?
あれは何だったのだろうかと私は自問しました
15:24
It took me 100 miles to figure out that, in my heart, in me,
自分の中で理解するのに100マイルかかりました
15:27
I had become a prisoner.
私は囚人になっていたのです
15:35
I was a prisoner and I needed to escape.
私は囚われの身で、逃げなければならなかったのです
15:38
The prison that I was in was the fact that I did not drive
私が入っていた刑務所とは、自分が運転もしなければ
15:42
or use motorized vehicles.
自動車にも乗らないという事実でした
15:48
Now how could that be?
どうしてそうなったのでしょうか?
15:50
Because when I started, it seemed very appropriate to me
私がそれを始めた時、自動車を使わないというのは
15:52
not to use motorized vehicles.
とても自分に合っているように思えました
15:56
But the thing that was different
でも、違っていたのは
15:58
was that every birthday, I asked myself about silence,
毎年誕生日に私は沈黙について自問しましたが
16:00
but I never asked myself about my decision to just use my feet.
自分の足だけを使うという決断については自らに問いかけていなかったのです
16:03
I had no idea I was going to become a U.N. Ambassador.
私は自分が国連大使になるとは思ってもいませんでした
16:11
I had no idea I would have a Ph.D.
私は博士号を持つようになるとは思ってもいませんでした
16:14
And so I realized that I had a responsibility to more than just me,
私は、自分が抱える責任は私個人に関わることよりも広いもので
16:18
and that I was going to have to change.
自分は変わらなくてはいけないと理解しました
16:24
You know, we can do it.
それは可能なのです
16:26
I was going to have to change.
私は変わらなくてはなりませんでした
16:29
And I was afraid to change,
でも変わることを恐れていました
16:31
because I was so used to the guy who only just walked.
ただ歩くだけの人間でいることに慣れていたからです
16:33
I was so used to that person that I didn’t want to stop.
その人間であることに慣れ切っていたので、やめたくありませんでした
16:36
I didn’t know who I would be if I changed.
もし変わったなら自分がどんな人間になるのかわかりませんでした
16:42
But I know I needed to.
でもそうしなければならないということはわかっていました
16:45
I know I needed to change, because it would be the only way
変わらなければならないのはわかっていました それが今日この場に
16:48
that I could be here today.
来られる唯一の方法だったからです
16:52
And I know that a lot of times
ようやく素晴らしい場所にたどり着いたのに
16:56
we find ourselves in this wonderful place where we’ve gotten to,
また別の場所に行かなければならないということが
16:59
but there’s another place for us to go.
私たちには何度も起こります
17:03
And we kind of have to leave behind the security of who we’ve become,
すでに到達した安心できる領域を後に残して
17:06
and go to the place of who we are becoming.
自分がなろうとしているところまで進まなければならないのです
17:12
And so, I want to encourage you to go to that next place,
あなた方がそうした次の場所に行く応援をしたいのです
17:19
to let yourself out of any prison that you might find yourself in,
あなた方が囚われているかもしれない檻の中から抜け出すために
17:28
as comfortable as it may be, because we have to do something now.
それは心地よいことなのかもしれません 私たちは今何かをしなくてはいけないのだから
17:33
We have to change now.
私たちは今変わらなくてはなりません
17:41
As our former Vice President said,
元副大統領は言いました
17:47
we have to become activists.
私たちは活動家にならなければならないと
17:52
So if my voice can touch you,
もしわたしの言葉があなた方の心に響くのなら
17:56
if my actions can touch you, if my being here can touch you,
もし私の行動や私がここにいることがあなた方の心に響くのなら
18:00
please let it be.
それを止めないで下さい
18:04
And I know that all of you have touched me
ここに来て、あなた方の全てが
18:06
while I’ve been here.
私の心を動かしています
18:11
So, let’s go out into the world
だから、世界に出て行きましょう
18:16
and take this caring, this love, this respect
TEDで見せあった
18:19
that we’ve shown each other right here at TED,
思いやりや愛、敬意を連れて行くのです
18:22
and take this out into the world.
それらを連れて世界に出ましょう
18:27
Because we are the environment,
私たちこそが環境なのです
18:29
and how we treat each other
私たちがお互いをどう扱うかということは
18:34
is really how we’re going to treat the environment.
環境をどう扱うかということなのです
18:37
So I want to thank you for being here
だから、あなた方に来てくれてありがとうと言いたいのです
18:42
and I want to end this in five seconds of silence.
5秒間の沈黙で私の話を終えたいと思います
18:46
Thank you.
ありがとう
18:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:01
Translator:Wataru Narita
Reviewer:Masahiro Kyushima

sponsored links

John Francis - Planet walker
John Francis walks the Earth, carrying a message of careful, truly sustainable development and respect for our planet.

Why you should listen

One day in 1983, John Francis stepped out on a walk. For the next 22 years, he trekked and sailed around North and South America, carrying a message of respect for the Earth -- for 17 of those years, without speaking. During his monumental, silent trek, he earned
an MA in environmental studies and a PhD in land resources.

Today his Planetwalk foundation consults on sustainable development and works with educational groups to teach kids about the environment.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.