English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDWomen 2010

Courtney E. Martin: This isn't her mother's feminism

コートニー・マーティン フェミニズムの再発明

Filmed
Views 961,276

ブロガーであるコートニー・マーティンはこの誠実な講演の中で、 彼女達の世代が自己を探求しようとして直面する、三つの代表的なパラドックスを通して 「フェミニズム」という、長年様々な意味で使われてきた言葉について考察しています。

- Journalist
Courtney E. Martin’s work has two obsessions at its core: storytelling and solutions. Full bio

So I was born
わたしは
00:15
on the last day
70年代最後の年の
00:17
of the last year of the '70s.
大晦日に生まれました。
00:19
I was raised on "Free to be you and me" --
わたしは、幼児番組「Free to be you and me」と
00:23
(cheering)
(歓声)
00:26
hip-hop --
ヒップホップで育ちました。
00:28
not as many woohoos for hip-hop in the house.
今日ヒップホップファンは少ないのかな?
00:30
Thank you. Thank you for hip-hop --
ありがとう。ヒップホップと
00:32
and Anita Hill.
アニタ・ヒルです。
00:35
(Cheering)
(歓声)
00:37
My parents were radicals --
わたしの両親は急進主義者が、
00:40
(Laughter)
(笑い)
00:43
who became,
成長して
00:45
well, grown-ups.
大人になった人たちでした。
00:47
My dad facetiously says,
わたしの父はおどけて言ったものです
00:50
"We wanted to save the world,
僕らは世界を救うつもりで
00:52
and instead we just got rich."
気がついたらただの金持ちになりさがっていたのさ、と。
00:54
We actually just got "middle class"
実際は、我が家はコロラドスプリングスの
00:58
in Colorado Springs, Colorado,
中流家庭でしたが
01:00
but you get the picture.
でもご理解いただけるでしょう?
01:02
I was raised with a very heavy sense
わたしは強烈な、まだ完成していない過去の遺産があるという
01:04
of unfinished legacy.
感覚とともに育ったのです。
01:06
At this ripe old age of 30,
今、円熟の三十歳を迎え、
01:08
I've been thinking a lot about what it means to grow up
わたしはずっと考えてきました。この恐ろしくも素晴らしい時代に
01:11
in this horrible, beautiful time,
「成長する」ということはどういうことなのかと。
01:14
and I've decided, for me,
そしてわたしは確信しました。
01:17
it's been a real journey and paradox.
それは長い道のりであり、パラドックスであると。
01:19
The first paradox
第1のパラドックスは
01:22
is that growing up is about rejecting the past
「成長する」ということは、過去を拒絶しながらも
01:24
and then promptly reclaiming it.
すぐそれを取り戻したがるということです。
01:26
Feminism was the water I grew up in.
フェミニズムはわたしが育った庭でした。
01:28
When I was just a little girl,
わたしが幼い頃に
01:31
my mom started what is now
母は、始めました。今や
01:33
the longest-running women's film festival in the world.
世界で最も長く続いている女性映画際を。
01:35
So while other kids were watching sitcoms and cartoons,
他の子供立ちがコメディやアニメを見ている間
01:38
I was watching very esoteric documentaries
わたしは難解なドキュメンタリーを見ていました。
01:41
made by and about women.
女性による女性についてのドキュメンタリーです。
01:44
You can see how this had an influence.
これが子供にどのくらい影響を与えたかはおわかりでしょう。
01:46
But she was not the only feminist in the house.
しかも、我が家のフェミニストは母だけではありませんでした。
01:48
My dad actually resigned
父は、実際に男性に限った
01:51
from the male-only business club in my hometown
地元のビジネスクラブを退会しました。
01:53
because he said he would never be part of an organization
将来、息子を歓迎するかもしれないが
01:56
that would one day welcome his son, but not his daughter.
娘を拒絶するような組織にかかわるつもりはないとの理由でです。
01:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:02
He's actually here today.
実は今日父はここに来ています。
02:07
(Applause)
(拍手)
02:09
The trick here
実を言えば、結局
02:14
is my brother would become an experimental poet,
わたしの兄はビジネスマンではなく
02:16
not a businessman,
前衛詩人になったわけですが、
02:18
but the intention was really good.
でもその意気やよし、です。
02:20
(Laughter)
(笑い)
02:22
In any case, I didn't readily claim the feminist label,
ともかく、当時のわたしはフェミニストと呼ばれたくありませんでした。
02:24
even though it was all around me,
フェミニズムに取り囲まれていたにも関わらずです。
02:26
because I associated it with my mom's women's groups,
なぜならわたしは、フェミニズムというものを母の婦人グループや
02:28
her swishy skirts and her shoulder pads --
母のスカートや肩パットなどと結びつけて考えていて、
02:30
none of which had much cachet
当時通っていたパルマー高校で
02:33
in the hallways of Palmer High School
クールに振る舞いたかったわたしには
02:35
where I was trying to be cool at the time.
ぐっとこなかったからです。
02:37
But I suspected there was something really important
でも、フェミニズムというものが実は
02:39
about this whole feminism thing,
すごく大事なのではないかという気はしていたので
02:41
so I started covertly tiptoeing into my mom's bookshelves
こっそりと母の本棚に行っては
02:43
and picking books off and reading them --
本を取り出して読んでいました。
02:47
never, of course, admitting that I was doing so.
もちろん絶対にそのことは認めたりしませんでしたが。
02:50
I didn't actually claim the feminist label
私は実際、自分がフェミニストだとは言っていませんでした。
02:52
until I went to Barnard College
バーナード大学に入学して
02:55
and I heard Amy Richards and Jennifer Baumgardner speak for the first time.
エミー・リチャードとジェニファー・バウムガードナーの話を初めて聞くまでは。
02:57
They were the co-authors of a book called "Manifesta."
二人は「マニフェスタ」という本の著者です。
03:01
So what very profound epiphany, you might ask,
たぶんみなさんはお尋ねになりたいでしょうね。
03:04
was responsible for my feminist click moment?
わたしが何でフェミニズムに目覚めたのかを?
03:07
Fishnet stockings.
きっかけは「網タイツ」です。
03:10
Jennifer Baumgardner was wearing them.
ジェニファー・バウムガードナーが身に付けていて
03:12
I thought they were really hot.
わたしはかっこいいと思い、
03:14
I decided, okay, I can claim the feminist label.
OK、わたしもフェミニストになる、と思ったのです。
03:16
Now I tell you this --
このことを
03:18
I tell you this at the risk of embarrassing myself,
恥を忍んでお話するのは
03:21
because I think part of the work of feminism
わたしがこう考えているからです。
03:24
is to admit that aesthetics, that beauty,
美しさや楽しむことは重要だと認めることも
03:26
that fun do matter.
フェミニズムの1つの役割だと。
03:28
There are lots of very modern political movements
近代における政治的運動では、文化的なかっこよさが
03:30
that have caught fire in no small part
火付け役となったものが
03:33
because of cultural hipness.
たくさんあります。
03:35
Anyone heard of these two guys as an example?
たとえばこの人達のことをご存知ないですか?
03:37
So my feminism is very indebted to my mom's,
こうしたことから、わたしにとってのフェミニズムは、母からの影響を
03:40
but it looks very different.
非常に受けてはいますが、見た目はだいぶ違っています。
03:43
My mom says, "patriarchy."
たとえば母が「家父長制」と言えば
03:45
I say, "intersectionality."
わたしは「交叉性」と言います。
03:47
So race, class, gender, ability,
ジェンダーや階級・階層、人種や能力
03:49
all of these things go into our experiences
これらすべてが女性としての体験の中に
03:52
of what it means to be a woman.
入り込んでいるからです。
03:54
Pay equity? Yes. Absolutely a feminist issue.
男女平等賃金?もちろんフェミニズムが扱う問題ですが
03:56
But for me, so is immigration. (Applause)
わたしにとって、移民問題もそうです。
03:58
Thank you.
ありがとう。
04:01
My mom says, "Protest march."
母は「デモ行進」と言い、
04:04
I say, "Online organizing."
わたしは「オンラインでの組織づくり」と言います。
04:06
I co-edit, along with a collective
わたしは、Feministing.comと呼ばれるサイトを
04:09
of other super-smart, amazing women,
非常に聡明で素晴らしい女性達と共に
04:11
a site called Feministing.com.
運営しています。
04:13
We are the most widely read feminist publication ever,
このサイトは、フェミニストの出版物としてはもっとも広く読まれているものです。
04:16
and I tell you this
このことをお話しするのは
04:21
because I think it's really important to see
これが重要なことだと思うからです。
04:23
that there's a continuum.
続いているということを知ることがです。
04:25
Feminist blogging is basically the 21st century version
フェミニストブログとは、いわば21世紀版の
04:27
of consciousness raising.
コンシャスネス・レイジング(意識覚醒)です。
04:30
But we also have a straightforward political impact.
しかしわたしたちは、直接的な政治的影響力も持っています。
04:32
Feministing has been able
フェミニズム運動はウォールマートの棚から
04:35
to get merchandise pulled off the shelves of Walmart.
商品を撤去させることができます。
04:37
We got a misogynist administrator sending us hate-mail
わたしたちに嫌がらせメールを送りつけた女嫌いの理事を
04:39
fired from a Big Ten school.
学校から解雇させたこともあります。
04:42
And one of our biggest successes
そしてわたしたちの最大の成功の一つは
04:44
is we get mail from teenage girls in the middle of Iowa
アイオワ中部の10代の女の子からメールをもらったことです。
04:47
who say, "I Googled Jessica Simpson and stumbled on your site.
「ジェシカ・シンプソンをgoogleで調べててあなたたちのサイトに来たの。
04:50
I realized feminism wasn't about man-hating and Birkenstocks."
フェミニズムって、男嫌いとビルケンシュトックだけってわけじゃないのね。」
04:53
So we're able to pull in the next generation
わたしたちは、次の世代を惹きつけることができたのです。
04:56
in a totally new way.
フェミニズムを全く新しい形でです。
04:59
My mom says, "Gloria Steinem."
母が「グロリア・スタイネム」と言えば、
05:01
I say, "Samhita Mukhopadhyay,
わたしは、「サミータ・ムコパダイ、
05:04
Miriam Perez, Ann Friedman,
ミリアム・ペレーズ、アン・フリードマン、
05:06
Jessica Valenti, Vanessa Valenti,
ジェシカ・ヴァレンティ、ヴァネッサ・ヴァレンティ
05:08
and on and on and on and on."
それから、それから」と続けます。
05:10
We don't want one hero.
わたしたちはたった一人の勇者を
05:12
We don't want one icon.
たった一人の象徴を求めません。
05:14
We don't want one face.
わたしたちには(フェミニズムを代表する)1人の顔はいらないのです。
05:16
We are thousands of women and men across this country
国内にいる何千人もの男女が、
05:18
doing online writing, community organizing,
オンラインに記事を投稿し、コミュニティをつくり、
05:21
changing institutions from the inside out --
内側から組織を変えていくー
05:24
all continuing the incredible work
これらすべての素晴らしい成果は、脈々と受け継がれているのです。
05:27
that our mothers and grandmothers started.
わたしたちの母、またその母が始めたことを。
05:29
Thank you.
ありがとう。
05:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
05:35
Which brings me to the second paradox:
そのことが第2のパラドックスにつながります。
05:37
sobering up about our smallness
「成長する」ということは、自分の存在の小ささに気づきながらも
05:39
and maintaining faith in our greatness
自分の素晴らしさについて
05:41
all at once.
同時に信じ続けることです。
05:43
Many in my generation --
わたしたちの世代の多くは
05:45
because of well-intentioned parenting and self-esteem education --
よい子育てと、自尊心を育てる教育によって
05:47
were socialized to believe
信じこまされてきました。
05:50
that we were special little snowflakes --
わたしたちは特別な小さい雪ひらであり
05:52
(Laughter)
(笑い)
05:54
who were going to go out and save the world.
大きくなったら世界を救うのだと。
05:56
These are three words many of us were raised with.
「世界を救う」という言葉と共に育てられたのです。
05:59
We walk across graduation stages,
やがて過剰に膨らんだ期待を胸に
06:02
high on our overblown expectations,
卒業を迎えて
06:04
and when we float back down to earth,
気がついてみたら
06:06
we realize we don't know what the heck it means
実際に「世界を救う」とはどうすればよいのか
06:08
to actually save the world anyway.
さっぱりわからないことに気づくのです。
06:10
The mainstream media often paints my generation
マスメディアはよくわたしたちの世代のことを
06:13
as apathetic,
「無関心」だと言います。
06:16
and I think it's much more accurate
わたしは、より正確には
06:18
to say we are deeply overwhelmed.
わたしたちは圧倒されている、というべきだと思います。
06:20
And there's a lot to be overwhelmed about, to be fair --
そして実際のところ、圧倒されてもしかたない問題がたくさんあります。
06:22
an environmental crisis,
環境危機、
06:24
wealth disparity in this country
国内の貧富の格差、
06:26
unlike we've seen since 1928,
これは1928年以来、目にしてきたものとは違うものです。
06:28
and globally,
そして世界的に見ても
06:30
a totally immoral and ongoing wealth disparity.
道義にもとるような、貧富の差は拡大しています。
06:32
Xenophobia's on the rise. The trafficking of women and girls.
外国人排斥問題も出てきており、女性や女児の売買問題もです。
06:35
It's enough to make you feel very overwhelmed.
これらのことは、圧倒されてしまうには十分です。
06:38
I experienced this firsthand myself
わたし自身、このことを経験しました。
06:41
when I graduated from Barnard College in 2002.
2002年にバーナード大学を卒業した年にです。
06:43
I was fired up; I was ready to make a difference.
わたしは希望に燃え、成果を挙げる気満々でした。
06:46
I went out and I worked at a non-profit,
家を出て、NPOで働き、
06:48
I went to grad school, I phone-banked,
大学院に通い、コールサービスをし、
06:50
I protested, I volunteered,
抗議をし、ボランティアをし、
06:53
and none of it seemed to matter.
でも、わたしの努力は全く意味が無いように見えました。
06:56
And on a particularly dark night
そしてある、とても暗い夜
07:00
of December of 2004,
2004年の12月に
07:02
I sat down with my family,
家族と一緒に座っている時、
07:04
and I said that I had become very disillusioned.
わたしは自分が心底失望しており、
07:06
I admitted that I'd actually had a fantasy -- kind of a dark fantasy --
ある思いつき、暗い妄想があることを白状しました。
07:10
of writing a letter
それは手紙を、
07:13
about everything that was wrong with the world
この世界の全ての問題点を記した手紙を書いて
07:15
and then lighting myself on fire
ホワイトハウスの階段の上で
07:17
on the White House steps.
自分自身に火をつけようと考えていると。
07:19
My mom
母は、
07:22
took a drink of her signature Sea Breeze,
彼女の特製のシー・ブリーズに口をつけ、
07:24
her eyes really welled with tears,
今にも涙があふれそうな目で
07:28
and she looked right at me and she said,
わたしをまっすぐに見て、言いました。
07:31
"I will not stand
絶望には
07:34
for your desperation."
賛同しない。
07:36
She said, "You are smarter, more creative
あなたは、もっと頭が良くて、もっと創造的で
07:38
and more resilient than that."
もっと忍耐強いはずよ、と。
07:41
Which brings me to my third paradox.
このことがわたしに第3のパラドックスを気づかせました。
07:44
Growing up is about aiming to succeed wildly
「成長する」ということは、成功することを大胆に狙いながらも
07:47
and being fulfilled by failing really well.
しっかりと失敗をすることによって成し遂げられるのだと。
07:49
(Laughter)
(笑い)
07:52
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:54
There's a writer I've been deeply influenced by, Parker Palmer,
わたしが多大な影響を受けた作家のパーカー・パルマーは
07:56
and he writes that many of us are often whiplashed
わたしたちの多くが、両極端に揺れていると書いています。
07:59
"between arrogant overestimation of ourselves
傲慢なまでの自分への買いかぶりと
08:01
and a servile underestimation of ourselves."
卑屈なまでの自分を過小評価することに。
08:04
You may have guessed by now,
もうお気づきとは思いますが
08:07
I did not light myself on fire.
わたしは抗議の焼身自殺はしませんでした。
08:09
I did what I know to do in desperation, which is write.
わたしは、必死に自分にできるとわかっていること、すなわち執筆をしました。
08:11
I wrote the book I needed to read.
わたしは、わたしが読むべき本を書きました。
08:14
I wrote a book about eight incredible people
わたしは、8人の素晴らしい人々
08:17
all over this country
この国中にいる
08:19
doing social justice work.
社会を正すための仕事をしている人々についての本を書きました。
08:21
I wrote about Nia Martin-Robinson,
わたしはニア・マーティン-ロビンソンについて書きました。
08:23
the daughter of Detroit and two civil rights activists,
彼女はデトロイトの市民権運動家の両親を持ち
08:25
who's dedicating her life
彼女自身のすべてを
08:27
to environmental justice.
環境正義に捧げています。
08:29
I wrote about Emily Apt
わたしはエミリー・アプトについて書きました。
08:31
who initially became a caseworker in the welfare system
彼女は初め社会福祉制度のケースワーカになりました。
08:33
because she decided that was the most noble thing she could do,
自分にできる最も尊い仕事であると考えたからです。
08:35
but quickly learned, not only did she not like it,
しかし、すぐに彼女は、自分がその仕事を好きになれないだけでなく
08:38
but she wasn't really good at it.
全く向いていないことに気づき、
08:40
Instead, what she really wanted to do was make films.
代わりに彼女が本当にしたいこと、すなわち映画を作ることにしたのです。
08:42
So she made a film about the welfare system
彼女は社会福祉制度についての映画を作り
08:44
and had a huge impact.
社会に大きな衝撃を与えました。
08:46
I wrote about Maricela Guzman, the daughter of Mexican immigrants,
わたしはマリセラ・グズマンについて書きました。彼女はメキシコ移民の娘で
08:48
who joined the military so she could afford college.
大学の学費のために軍に入隊しました。
08:51
She was actually sexually assaulted in boot camp
彼女は新兵訓練所で性的暴行を受け
08:55
and went on to co-organize a group
「女性軍人活動ネットワーク」というグループを
08:57
called the Service Women's Action Network.
共同で立ち上げました。
08:59
What I learned from these people and others
わたしが、彼女達をはじめ、他の多くの人から学んだことは
09:02
was that I couldn't judge them
判断することはできないということです。
09:04
based on their failure to meet their very lofty goals.
彼らがその非常に高い目標を達成する元になった失敗からは。
09:06
Many of them are working in deeply intractable systems --
彼らの多くは、解決の大変困難なシステムで働いています。
09:09
the military, congress,
軍隊、議会
09:12
the education system, etc.
教育制度、などです。
09:14
But what they managed to do within those systems
しかしそのシステムの中で、彼らは
09:16
was be a humanizing force.
そのシステムに、より人間的な影響力を与えようとしているのです。
09:18
And at the end of the day,
そして、結局は
09:21
what could possibly be more important than that?
これ以上に重要なことがあるでしょうか。
09:23
Cornel West says, "Of course it's a failure.
コーネル・ウェストは言いました。「もちろんそれは失敗さ。
09:25
But how good a failure is it?"
でも、なんてみごとな失敗だろうか?」
09:27
This isn't to say we give up our wildest, biggest dreams.
これは、わたしたちの最も大胆で大きな夢をあきらめろと言っているのではありません。
09:30
It's to say we operate on two levels.
二つの側面から物事を進めなさいということなのです。
09:33
On one,
一つ目は、
09:35
we really go after changing these broken systems
この破綻したシステムを追求することです。
09:37
of which we find ourselves a part.
私たちがその一部となっているシステムを。
09:39
But on the other, we root our self-esteem
でももう一つは、自分の可能性を信じ、
09:41
in the daily acts of trying to make one person's day
1日を少しでもよくしようと行動することです。
09:43
more kind, more just, etc.
もっと親切に、もっと正しく、などを日々心がけることによって。
09:46
So when I was a little girl,
わたしが小さかったころ、
09:49
I had a couple of very strange habits.
いくつかの変わった癖を持っていました。
09:51
One of them was
その一つが、わたしが子供のころの家で
09:53
I used to lie on the kitchen floor of my childhood home,
台所で寝転がり、
09:55
and I would suck the thumb of my left hand
左手の親指をしゃぶりながら
09:57
and hold my mom's cold toes with my right hand.
右手で母の冷たい足の指を握るというものでした。
09:59
(Laughter)
(笑い)
10:02
I was listening to her talk on the phone, which she did a lot.
その格好で母がよく電話で話をしているのを聞いていました。
10:04
She was talking about board meetings,
母は理事会や
10:07
she was founding peace organizations,
平和団体の立ち上げについて話していました。
10:10
she was coordinating carpools, she was consoling friends --
相乗り車の利用をとりまとめたり、友達をなぐさめたり
10:12
all these daily acts of care and creativity.
気配りや、創造性に富んだことを日々行っていました。
10:15
And surely, at three and four years old,
ほんの3歳か4歳の頃ですから、その当時は
10:18
I was listening to the soothing sound of her voice,
母の心地良い声音を聞いているだけでした。
10:20
but I think I was also getting my first lesson in activist work.
でも、同時にわたしは人生最初の活動家運動のレッスンを受けていたことになります。
10:23
The activists I interviewed
わたしがインタビューした活動家には
10:26
had nothing in common, literally, except for one thing,
文字通り共通点はなにもありませんでした。
10:28
which was that they all cited their mothers
活動家としての自分のルーツであり、
10:31
as their most looming and important
もっとも影響された人物は母であると
10:33
activist influences.
全員が言ってることを除いては。
10:35
So often, particularly at a young age,
だからわたしたちは、折りにふれ、特に幼い頃に
10:37
we look far afield
はるか先を見つめていたのです。
10:39
for our models of the meaningful life,
わたしたちの意味のある人生のお手本を、です。
10:42
and sometimes they're in our own kitchens,
時に母達は台所で、
10:44
talking on the phone, making us dinner,
電話をし、わたしたちの食事を作り、
10:47
doing all that keeps the world going around and around.
世の中を回していくために必要なことをずっと続けてきていたのです。
10:49
My mom and so many women like her
わたしの母や、母のような女性達が教えてくれました。
10:53
have taught me that life is not about glory,
人生とは、栄光や
10:55
or certainty, or security even.
確実性や、安定性を求めるものではないと。
10:58
It's about embracing the paradox.
人生とはパラドックスを受け入れること。
11:01
It's about acting in the face of overwhelm.
人生とは圧倒されるような出来事を前にしながら行動すること。
11:03
And it's about loving people really well.
人生とは人々を本当に愛することであると。
11:06
And at the end of the day,
そしてこれこそが
11:09
these things make for a lifetime
人生を通じての
11:11
of challenge and reward.
挑戦であり、恩恵であるのです。
11:14
Thank you.
ありがとうございました。
11:16
(Applause)
(拍手)
11:18
Translated by HIROKO ITO
Reviewed by Mikiko Ando

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Courtney E. Martin - Journalist
Courtney E. Martin’s work has two obsessions at its core: storytelling and solutions.

Why you should listen

In her upcoming book, The New Better Off, Courtney E. Martin explores how people are redefining the American dream with an eye toward fulfillment. Martin is a columnist for On Being, and the cofounder of the Solutions Journalism Network, Valenti Martin Media, and FRESH Speakers, as well as a strategist for the TED Prize and an editor emeritus at Feministing.com.

In her previous book Do It Anyway: The New Generation of Activists, she profiled eight young people doing social justice work, a fascinating look at the generation of world-changers who are now stepping up to the plate.

More profile about the speaker
Courtney E. Martin | Speaker | TED.com