English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDGlobal 2005

Aubrey de Grey: A roadmap to end aging

オーブリー・デグレイ 「老化は避けられる」

Filmed
Views 3,308,510

ケンブリッジ大学研究員であるオーブリー・デグレイは「老化は病気であり、治癒が可能だ」と主張ており、7つの基本アプローチがそれを可能にする。

- Crusader against aging
Aubrey de Grey, British researcher on aging, claims he has drawn a roadmap to defeat biological aging. He provocatively proposes that the first human beings who will live to 1,000 years old have already been born. Full bio

18 minutes is an absolutely brutal time limit,
18分だと時間が足りないので
00:25
so I'm going to dive straight in, right at the point
率直に ポイントを絞ってお話しします
00:27
where I get this thing to work.
私が得た事実について
00:29
Here we go. I'm going to talk about five different things.
ご覧下さい 私が伝えたいポイントは
00:31
I'm going to talk about why defeating aging is desirable.
5つです まず なぜ老化を阻止すべきか
00:33
I'm going to talk about why we have to get our shit together,
なぜ 老化阻止を上手に進めねばならないのか
00:36
and actually talk about this a bit more than we do.
今より積極的な行動が必要になる その理由も
00:38
I'm going to talk about feasibility as well, of course.
次に 老化を阻止できる可能生についてお話します
00:40
I'm going to talk about why we are so fatalistic
また「老化」について 我々はなぜか
00:42
about doing anything about aging.
運命に身を任せがちなのですが
00:44
And then I'm going spend perhaps the second half of the talk
その問題点について 全体の半分を割いてお話します
00:46
talking about, you know, how we might actually be able to prove that fatalism is wrong,
運命論的な見方が いかにバカげているか 実際に
00:48
namely, by actually doing something about it.
何をどう進めるかについても話します
00:53
I'm going to do that in two steps.
私は大きく2ステップで老化を阻止しようと考えていますが
00:55
The first one I'm going to talk about is
最初にお話しするのは まず
00:57
how to get from a relatively modest amount of life extension --
ささやかな寿命延長について まずは これをいかに実現するか
00:59
which I'm going to define as 30 years, applied to people
仮に延長できる寿命が30年だとして 適用できるのは
01:02
who are already in middle-age when you start --
いわゆる中年の方々ですね
01:05
to a point which can genuinely be called defeating aging.
まさに 老化を阻止できる方々です
01:07
Namely, essentially an elimination of the relationship between
本質的に 切り離そうとする試みです
01:10
how old you are and how likely you are to die in the next year --
あなた方の年齢と死との関係を
01:14
or indeed, to get sick in the first place.
あるいは より本質的に年齢と病気との関係を
01:16
And of course, the last thing I'm going to talk about
そしてもちろん 前半の最後にお話するのは
01:18
is how to reach that intermediate step,
30年 寿命を延ばすための
01:20
that point of maybe 30 years life extension.
具体的なアプローチについてです
01:22
So I'm going to start with why we should.
では始めましょう 「なぜ老化を阻止すべきか」
01:25
Now, I want to ask a question.
まず 皆さんにお尋ねしたいのですが
01:28
Hands up: anyone in the audience who is in favor of malaria?
手を挙げて 誰かマラリアが好きな人?
01:30
That was easy. OK.
ああ 良かった ありがとう
01:33
OK. Hands up: anyone in the audience
また手を挙げて この中で
01:34
who's not sure whether malaria is a good thing or a bad thing?
マラリアが良い事か悪い事か わからない人は?
01:36
OK. So we all think malaria is a bad thing.
全員 マラリアが悪いものだと考えている
01:39
That's very good news, because I thought that was what the answer would be.
よかった それこそ 私の答えです
01:41
Now the thing is, I would like to put it to you
申し上げましょう
01:43
that the main reason why we think that malaria is a bad thing
マラリアを悪いものだと思う その理由
01:45
is because of a characteristic of malaria that it shares with aging.
それは「老化」が悪いものである理由と同じ
01:48
And here is that characteristic.
老化の特徴なんですよ ただ一つ 違うのは
01:52
The only real difference is that aging kills considerably more people than malaria does.
老化はマラリアより遥かに多くの命を奪ってる
01:55
Now, I like in an audience, in Britain especially,
今日は特別に イギリスの方向けに
02:00
to talk about the comparison with foxhunting,
キツネ狩りと比較してお話しましょう
02:02
which is something that was banned after a long struggle,
キツネ刈りは議論の末 禁止されました
02:04
by the government not very many months ago.
政府の手でね さほど昔の話じゃない
02:07
I mean, I know I'm with a sympathetic audience here,
今日 ここに居る皆さんは共感してくれるでしょうが
02:10
but, as we know, a lot of people are not entirely persuaded by this logic.
老化について多くの人はロジカルに考えない
02:12
And this is actually a rather good comparison, it seems to me.
これは わかりやすい比較だと思います
02:15
You know, a lot of people said, "Well, you know,
多くの方が言うでしょう
02:18
city boys have no business telling us rural types what to do with our time.
「都会人は地方の慣習と関わろうとしないけど
02:20
It's a traditional part of the way of life,
地方にとっては 生活の一部であり伝統だ
02:25
and we should be allowed to carry on doing it.
我々はそれを受け入れるべきだ」とね
02:27
It's ecologically sound; it stops the population explosion of foxes."
環境保護的に聞こえるし キツネの繁殖も防いでる
02:29
But ultimately, the government prevailed in the end,
しかし 最終的には政府によって潰されました
02:32
because the majority of the British public,
イギリス世論や
02:34
and certainly the majority of members of Parliament,
議員たちの大半が
02:35
came to the conclusion that it was really something
こういう結論に至ったからです
02:37
that should not be tolerated in a civilized society.
洗練された社会では受け入れられない と
02:39
And I think that human aging shares
私から見れば 老化とこの問題は
02:41
all of these characteristics in spades.
共通の特性を持っています
02:42
What part of this do people not understand?
では 何が理解を妨げているのか?
02:45
It's not just about life, of course --
もちろん 生活と関係ないからですよ
02:47
(Laughter) --
(笑)
02:49
it's about healthy life, you know --
ただ 健康的な生活という意味で言えば
02:50
getting frail and miserable and dependent is no fun,
衰え みじめで 孤独では楽しくないですよね
02:53
whether or not dying may be fun.
死ぬことが楽しいかどうかは別としてね
02:56
So really, this is how I would like to describe it.
だから 本当の所こう言ってやりたい
02:58
It's a global trance.
それこそ「国際的な妄想」だと
03:00
These are the sorts of unbelievable excuses
今ご覧頂いているように老化に対する言い訳には
03:02
that people give for aging.
実に 信じがたいものもありますが
03:04
And, I mean, OK, I'm not actually saying
私が言いたいのは それらの言い訳が
03:06
that these excuses are completely valueless.
まったく価値がないということではなくて
03:08
There are some good points to be made here,
良い点もあるんですよ
03:10
things that we ought to be thinking about, forward planning
事前に 色々と考えているわけです
03:12
so that nothing goes too -- well, so that we minimize
地獄行きにならないため 混乱を最小限に食いとめるため
03:15
the turbulence when we actually figure out how to fix aging.
実際 老化防止法が理解できた時に備えてね
03:17
But these are completely crazy, when you actually
しかし これはやはり変なんですよ
03:20
remember your sense of proportion.
ご自身の感性に従って考えればわかります
03:23
You know, these are arguments; these are things that
いいですか? これは問題提起であり
03:25
would be legitimate to be concerned about.
しごく真っ当なテーマなのです
03:29
But the question is, are they so dangerous --
この問題提起は そんなに危険ですか?
03:31
these risks of doing something about aging --
老化に対処するリスクが
03:34
that they outweigh the downside of doing the opposite,
その逆 すなわち老化に対処しないことのリスクを
03:36
namely, leaving aging as it is?
上回ってしまう それは危険でしょうか?
03:40
Are these so bad that they outweigh
そうなることで かえってマズいのは
03:42
condemning 100,000 people a day to an unnecessarily early death?
1日10万人が猛スピードで死ぬという状況を 克服してしまうからですか
03:44
You know, if you haven't got an argument that's that strong,
熱く議論したいわけではないのなら
03:50
then just don't waste my time, is what I say.
諦めたほうがいいですよ
03:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:55
Now, there is one argument
現在 議論はされていますが
03:56
that some people do think really is that strong, and here it is.
人々の頭は非常に頑なです
03:57
People worry about overpopulation; they say,
皆さん人口増加問題を懸念しつつ こう仰る
03:59
"Well, if we fix aging, no one's going to die to speak of,
「老化を止めたりしたら 誰も死ななくなるし
04:01
or at least the death toll is going to be much lower,
少なくとも 死者は激減する
04:03
only from crossing St. Giles carelessly.
うっかりサンジルを横切ったりしない限りはね
04:06
And therefore, we're not going to be able to have many kids,
子供を多くは持とうとしなくなるだろうし
04:08
and kids are really important to most people."
子供は貴重なものとなってしまう」
04:10
And that's true.
ええ そう その通りです
04:12
And you know, a lot of people try to fudge this question,
多くの人がこの問題を曖昧にしようとしたり
04:14
and give answers like this.
こんな回答で済まそうとしますが
04:17
I don't agree with those answers. I think they basically don't work.
同意できません 質問の答えになってない
04:18
I think it's true, that we will face a dilemma in this respect.
まもなく我々はジレンマに直面するでしょう
04:21
We will have to decide whether to have a low birth rate,
選ばなければならない 低い出生率か
04:24
or a high death rate.
高い死亡率 そのどちらかを
04:28
A high death rate will, of course, arise from simply rejecting these therapies,
高い死亡率は これらの老化治療を拒絶することで高まるでしょう
04:30
in favor of carrying on having a lot of kids.
その場合は引き続き 多く子供を持つことが奨励されます
04:33
And, I say that that's fine --
そして 明らかなのは
04:37
the future of humanity is entitled to make that choice.
人類の未来が この選択にかかっているという事です
04:39
What's not fine is for us to make that choice on behalf of the future.
我々がその選択をするかどうかはわかりません
04:42
If we vacillate, hesitate,
とまどったり 迷ったり
04:46
and do not actually develop these therapies,
老化治療を現実的に育てない場合
04:48
then we are condemning a whole cohort of people --
多くの人々を死に追いやってしまうでしょう
04:51
who would have been young enough and healthy enough
老化治療の恩恵に預かれる程度に若く
04:55
to benefit from those therapies, but will not be,
健康的な人々だったとしても 救えない
04:57
because we haven't developed them as quickly as we could --
老化治療の確立を急げないことで
04:59
we'll be denying those people an indefinite life span,
寿命が不透明な人の治療は拒むでしょう
05:01
and I consider that that is immoral.
非道徳的なことだと思います
05:03
That's my answer to the overpopulation question.
これが 人口増加問題に対する私の答えです
05:05
Right. So the next thing is,
では 次にいきましょう
05:08
now why should we get a little bit more active on this?
なぜ 老化問題にもっと積極的になるべきか?
05:10
And the fundamental answer is that
なぜなら 侮ってはならないからです
05:12
the pro-aging trance is not as dumb as it looks.
老化への誤った妄想は根強く人々を縛り付けます
05:14
It's actually a sensible way of coping with the inevitability of aging.
積極性こそ 避けがたい老化に対処する賢明な道なのです
05:17
Aging is ghastly, but it's inevitable, so, you know,
老化はいやだ でも老化は避けられない だからこそ
05:21
we've got to find some way to put it out of our minds,
我々はその考えをくつがえす方法を探し求めました
05:25
and it's rational to do anything that we might want to do, to do that.
我々がやろうとしている方法は 極めて合理的です
05:27
Like, for example, making up these ridiculous reasons
例えば バカげた理由をこさえて
05:31
why aging is actually a good thing after all.
老化は良いことだ という意見もありますが
05:34
But of course, that only works when we have both of these components.
しかし そういった事も既に織り込み済みです
05:36
And as soon as the inevitability bit becomes a little bit unclear --
すぐには避けがたく 不透明なままだとしたら
05:40
and we might be in range of doing something about aging --
老化に対して 出来る範囲のことをするしかない
05:43
this becomes part of the problem.
これも 問題の一部分なのです
05:45
This pro-aging trance is what stops us from agitating about these things.
老化への誤った妄想は 問題に対処する力を奪います
05:47
And that's why we have to really talk about this a lot --
本当に議論すべき多くの事から目を逸らせてしまう
05:51
evangelize, I will go so far as to say, quite a lot --
ですから わざとこういった言い方をしてます
05:55
in order to get people's attention, and make people realize
人々の注意をひき 気が付いてもらうため
05:57
that they are in a trance in this regard.
彼らは 未だ妄想の中にいるのだと
06:00
So that's all I'm going to say about that.
それが 私がお伝えしたい事です
06:02
I'm now going to talk about feasibility.
私は今 可能性について話をしているのです
06:04
And the fundamental reason, I think, why we feel that aging is inevitable
なぜ 老いは避けられないと考えるのか?
06:07
is summed up in a definition of aging that I'm giving here.
それは年を重ねてきたからだ
06:11
A very simple definition.
シンプルですね
06:14
Aging is a side effect of being alive in the first place,
老化は この世に生を受けことの副産物
06:15
which is to say, metabolism.
別名 メタボリズムとも言いますが
06:18
This is not a completely tautological statement;
完璧な説明ではなくとも
06:20
it's a reasonable statement.
まあ 便利な説明ではあります
06:23
Aging is basically a process that happens to inanimate objects like cars,
老化は 無生物にも訪れます 例えば車
06:24
and it also happens to us,
そして 我々のような生物にも
06:28
despite the fact that we have a lot of clever self-repair mechanisms,
高い自己修復機能を持っているのに老化するのは
06:30
because those self-repair mechanisms are not perfect.
自己修復機能の不完全さが原因ですが
06:33
So basically, metabolism, which is defined as
基本的に 新陳代謝の定義は
06:35
basically everything that keeps us alive from one day to the next,
生まれて死ぬまでの全てを指していて
06:37
has side effects.
副産物を伴うものなのです
06:40
Those side effects accumulate and eventually cause pathology.
副産物は蓄積し ついに病気を引き起こす
06:42
That's a fine definition. So we can put it this way:
明確な定義です だから それを取り除く
06:44
we can say that, you know, we have this chain of events.
新陳代謝と病気はつながっているのです
06:46
And there are really two games in town,
今 巷では2つ戦いが繰り広げられています
06:48
according to most people, with regard to postponing aging.
老化を遅らせるための戦いです
06:50
They're what I'm calling here the "gerontology approach" and the "geriatrics approach."
それらを「老年学」的アプローチと「老年医学」的アプローチと呼んでいますが
06:53
The geriatrician will intervene late in the day,
老年医学では 介入が遅れてしまうでしょう
06:57
when pathology is becoming evident,
病気が判明してから介入しても遅い
06:59
and the geriatrician will try and hold back the sands of time,
老年医学者はまるで 砂時計を逆さまにして
07:01
and stop the accumulation of side effects
病原となる副産物の蓄積を止めようします
07:04
from causing the pathology quite so soon.
それも大急ぎで
07:07
Of course, it's a very short-term-ist strategy; it's a losing battle,
ただ これは極めて短期的な手法です
07:09
because the things that are causing the pathology
なぜなら 病気の原因となるものは
07:12
are becoming more abundant as time goes on.
時間と共に どんどん増えていくからです
07:15
The gerontology approach looks much more promising on the surface,
一方「老年学」的アプローチは有望に見えます
07:17
because, you know, prevention is better than cure.
なぜなら常に 予防は治療に勝るからです
07:21
But unfortunately the thing is that we don't understand metabolism very well.
しかし残念ながら この手法では代謝に関する理解が限られます
07:24
In fact, we have a pitifully poor understanding of how organisms work --
事実 我々は組織の働きについて理解に乏しいのです
07:27
even cells we're not really too good on yet.
まして 細胞の機能不全については全く解明できてない
07:30
We've discovered things like, for example,
例えば 数年前に我々が発見した
07:32
RNA interference only a few years ago,
RNAインターフェレンスがありますが
07:34
and this is a really fundamental component of how cells work.
細胞の活動において 非常に重要なものです
07:37
Basically, gerontology is a fine approach in the end,
老年学は 基本的には良いアプローチなのですが
07:39
but it is not an approach whose time has come
老化に介入する しないの議論となると
07:42
when we're talking about intervention.
まったく役に立ちません
07:44
So then, what do we do about that?
では一体 どうしたらいいのでしょうか?
07:46
I mean, that's a fine logic, that sounds pretty convincing,
ロジックは明確 説得力もある
07:49
pretty ironclad, doesn't it?
非の打ち所がない説明ができるか?
07:51
But it isn't.
いや そんな事はありえません
07:53
Before I tell you why it isn't, I'm going to go a little bit
その理由をお話する前に 少し横道に逸れますが
07:55
into what I'm calling step two.
私が「ステップ2」と呼んでいるものについて
07:58
Just suppose, as I said, that we do acquire --
すでに 我々は手に入れているんです
08:00
let's say we do it today for the sake of argument --
更に30年以上健康で過ごす力を手に入れる
08:04
the ability to confer 30 extra years of healthy life
今日はその議論のために 申し上げます
08:06
on people who are already in middle age, let's say 55.
中年の方 55歳前後の方が対象です
08:10
I'm going to call that "robust human rejuvenation." OK.
私が「人類の若返り」と呼んでいるもの
08:13
What would that actually mean
これが一体 何を意味しているのか?
08:16
for how long people of various ages today --
様々な年齢の人々にとって どんな意味が?
08:17
or equivalently, of various ages at the time that these therapies arrive --
この老化治療法が行き着く先には 何がある?
08:20
would actually live?
実際 本当に生きられるのか?
08:24
In order to answer that question -- you might think it's simple,
答えがあると思われるかもしれませんが
08:26
but it's not simple.
ことは そう単純ではありません
08:28
We can't just say, "Well, if they're young enough to benefit from these therapies,
「もしあなたがこの老化治療に相応しい年齢なら
08:29
then they'll live 30 years longer."
更に30年長く生きられるでしょう」だなんて
08:32
That's the wrong answer.
そんな回答は イマイチですよ
08:33
And the reason it's the wrong answer is because of progress.
技術の進歩を見落としているからです
08:35
There are two sorts of technological progress really,
2つの大きな技術的な進歩が
08:37
for this purpose.
関わってくるのです
08:39
There are fundamental, major breakthroughs,
本質的なブレイクスルーが
08:40
and there are incremental refinements of those breakthroughs.
ブレイクスルーは 徐々に増加してる
08:43
Now, they differ a great deal
今はまだ 時間間隔の視点からみて
08:47
in terms of the predictability of time frames.
大きな扱いにはなっていません
08:49
Fundamental breakthroughs:
本質的なブレイクスルーとは言っても
08:52
very hard to predict how long it's going to take
実現までどれだけ時間がかかるかは
08:53
to make a fundamental breakthrough.
予測するのが困難だからです
08:55
It was a very long time ago that we decided that flying would be fun,
遥か昔 人類は飛ぶことの楽しみを見いだし
08:56
and it took us until 1903 to actually work out how to do it.
1903年までには現実のものとしました
08:59
But after that, things were pretty steady and pretty uniform.
しかしその後 我々はやや固定観念的になってしまった
09:02
I think this is a reasonable sequence of events that happened
人力飛行技術の進歩を起こした数々の出来事は
09:06
in the progression of the technology of powered flight.
理に叶っていると私は思います
09:09
We can think, really, that each one is sort of
我々は考えることができるのです
09:13
beyond the imagination of the inventor of the previous one, if you like.
かつての発明者の想像力を越えて
09:17
The incremental advances have added up to something
進歩の増加は 増加的ではない何かに
09:20
which is not incremental anymore.
つねに依拠してきたんです
09:24
This is the sort of thing you see after a fundamental breakthrough.
それは基礎的なブレイクスルーの後にやってくる
09:26
And you see it in all sorts of technologies.
こういった現象が あらゆる技術分野に見受けられます
09:29
Computers: you can look at a more or less parallel time line,
コンピューターの進歩も 多かれ少なかれそういった現象が
09:31
happening of course a bit later.
見て取れます
09:34
You can look at medical care. I mean, hygiene, vaccines, antibiotics --
メディカルケアについては 衛生からワクチン 抗生物質へ
09:35
you know, the same sort of time frame.
ご覧のように 同じ時間間隔です
09:38
So I think that actually step two, that I called a step a moment ago,
ですから 私がステップ2だと考えて そう呼んでいたものが
09:40
isn't a step at all.
過去となり ステップではなくなってしまう
09:44
That in fact, the people who are young enough
実際 老化治療法から恩恵を受けるほど
09:45
to benefit from these first therapies
十分に若い人たちであっても
09:48
that give this moderate amount of life extension,
ほどよい寿命延長が行える程度の段階で
09:50
even though those people are already middle-aged when the therapies arrive,
治療を受けることになる 既に中年の方々でも
09:52
will be at some sort of cusp.
同じことなのです
09:56
They will mostly survive long enough to receive improved treatments
彼らはより進んだ治療を受ける位には長生きするでしょう
09:58
that will give them a further 30 or maybe 50 years.
そのことで 30年から50年ほど寿命が延びるでしょう
10:02
In other words, they will be staying ahead of the game.
言い換えればこれはゲームです
10:04
The therapies will be improving faster than
この治療法がより早く発展し 我々の寿命より早く
10:07
the remaining imperfections in the therapies are catching up with us.
不完全な部分を克服できるか というゲーム
10:10
This is a very important point for me to get across.
これは ご理解を頂く上で非常に重要です
10:14
Because, you know, most people, when they hear
なぜなら多くの人々は既に耳にしているでしょう
10:16
that I predict that a lot of people alive today are going to live to 1,000 or more,
「今生きてる多くの人々の寿命は1000歳を超える」という私の予測について
10:18
they think that I'm saying that we're going to invent therapies in the next few decades
今後数10年かけて確立しようとしている治療法について話していると
10:23
that are so thoroughly eliminating aging
そう考えている
10:27
that those therapies will let us live to 1,000 or more.
この老化治療法によって寿命は1000歳かそれ以上になる?
10:30
I'm not saying that at all.
私は そんなこと一言も言ってませんよ
10:33
I'm saying that the rate of improvement of those therapies
この治療法の進歩が速まればそれも可能だと
10:35
will be enough.
そう言っているだけです
10:37
They'll never be perfect, but we'll be able to fix the things
完成できるのではなく 着手できるというだけです
10:38
that 200-year-olds die of, before we have any 200-year-olds.
我々が200歳になる前にね
10:41
And the same for 300 and 400 and so on.
それが300年だろうが400年だろうが同じです
10:44
I decided to give this a little name,
私はこの一件について名前をつけました
10:46
which is "longevity escape velocity."
「スピードからの逃亡」とね
10:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:51
Well, it seems to get the point across.
ええと ご理解頂けたようですね
10:53
So, these trajectories here are basically how we would expect people to live,
このグラフの軌道は我々の寿命の期待値です
10:56
in terms of remaining life expectancy,
残りの寿命という観点から見ています
11:01
as measured by their health,
今の健康状態から推測して
11:03
for given ages that they were at the time that these therapies arrive.
この老化治療法が与えてくれる時間です
11:05
If you're already 100, or even if you're 80 --
もし すでに100歳か80歳
11:08
and an average 80-year-old,
80歳前後の方々については
11:10
we probably can't do a lot for you with these therapies,
この老化治療法に出来ることは多くないかもしれません
11:12
because you're too close to death's door
そういった方々は 既に死に限りなく近いからです
11:14
for the really initial, experimental therapies to be good enough for you.
初期の実験的治療から恩恵は得られるでしょうが
11:16
You won't be able to withstand them.
まあ それまで保たないでしょうね
11:20
But if you're only 50, then there's a chance
ですが 50歳前後の方にとってはチャンスです
11:21
that you might be able to pull out of the dive and, you know --
こんな風に ギリギリで間に合うかも
11:23
(Laughter) --
(笑)
11:26
eventually get through this
ついには うまく生き抜けてしまうかも
11:27
and start becoming biologically younger in a meaningful sense,
生物学的は若返りが始まります
11:30
in terms of your youthfulness, both physical and mental,
心身共に 若々しくなるということです
11:33
and in terms of your risk of death from age-related causes.
老年性の死亡リスクという観点から見ても 若くなる
11:35
And of course, if you're a bit younger than that,
そして 仮にあなた方がもっと若ければ
11:37
then you're never really even going
老化に原因があるとされる病気に脅かされ
11:39
to get near to being fragile enough to die of age-related causes.
弱っていくことなど 決してないでしょう
11:41
So this is a genuine conclusion that I come to, that the first 150-year-old --
正真正銘 これが結論です 最初に150歳まで生きることになる人が
11:44
we don't know how old that person is today,
今日 何歳なのかを知ることはできません
11:49
because we don't know how long it's going to take
なぜなら我々には知る事ができないからです
11:51
to get these first-generation therapies.
この治療を受ける最初の世代は どの世代なのか
11:53
But irrespective of that age,
しかし 年齢に関係なく
11:55
I'm claiming that the first person to live to 1,000 --
私はこう主張します 最初に1000歳まで生きる人は
11:57
subject of course, to, you know, global catastrophes --
つまり 世界的な大災害まで生きる残る人は
12:01
is actually, probably, only about 10 years younger than the first 150-year-old.
現実的に見ても 初めて150歳まで生きる人より せいぜい10年若い程度だと思います
12:04
And that's quite a thought.
本当に そう考えているんです
12:08
Alright, so finally I'm going to spend the rest of the talk,
さて ここでちょっと休憩しましょうか
12:10
my last seven-and-a-half minutes, on step one;
最後の7分半は ステップ1について話をします
12:13
namely, how do we actually get to this moderate amount of life extension
老化のスピードから逃れながら
12:16
that will allow us to get to escape velocity?
寿命を延ばすにはどうしたらいいのか? それを説明するには
12:21
And in order to do that, I need to talk about mice a little bit.
マウスの実験についてお話する必要があります
12:24
I have a corresponding milestone to robust human rejuvenation.
「人類の若返り」につながるマイルストーンです
12:28
I'm calling it "robust mouse rejuvenation," not very imaginatively.
私はこれを「ねずみの若返り」と呼んでます
12:31
And this is what it is.
これです
12:34
I say we're going to take a long-lived strain of mouse,
十分に生きるマウスというのは
12:36
which basically means mice that live about three years on average.
基本的に 平均寿命が3年程度なのです
12:38
We do exactly nothing to them until they're already two years old.
実験ではマウスが2歳になるまで何もしません
12:41
And then we do a whole bunch of stuff to them,
その後 スタッフの総力を結集して
12:44
and with those therapies, we get them to live,
この治療法で寿命を延ばすよう試みると
12:46
on average, to their fifth birthday.
2歳のマウスが 平均5歳まで生きるのです
12:48
So, in other words, we add two years --
すなわち この2年に加えて
12:50
we treble their remaining lifespan,
我々は この治療を開始した頃と比べて
12:52
starting from the point that we started the therapies.
残りの寿命を3倍にする事ができる
12:54
The question then is, what would that actually mean for the time frame
1つ疑問があるとすると この成果が人類の若返りに
12:56
until we get to the milestone I talked about earlier for humans?
適用の目処が付くほど 時間間隔を早められるか?
12:59
Which we can now, as I've explained,
それは可能であり 既にご説明した通り
13:02
equivalently call either robust human rejuvenation or longevity escape velocity.
「人類の若返り」や「スピードからの逃亡」と呼んでいたものがそれです
13:04
Secondly, what does it mean for the public's perception
2つ目の疑問は 大衆の理解が得られるかということ
13:08
of how long it's going to take for us to get to those things,
マウスにおける成功から初めて それで一体
13:11
starting from the time we get the mice?
どの程度 時間がかかるのか?
13:13
And thirdly, the question is, what will it do
そして 3つめの疑問は
13:15
to actually how much people want it?
何人がそれを望むか?
13:17
And it seems to me that the first question
1つ目の疑問は私にとっては
13:19
is entirely a biology question,
生物学的な問題なので
13:21
and it's extremely hard to answer.
お答えするのが極めて難しいのです
13:22
One has to be very speculative,
2つ目の疑問は予測可能なのですが
13:24
and many of my colleagues would say that we should not do this speculation,
同僚の多くが予測を控えろと言うでしょう
13:26
that we should simply keep our counsel until we know more.
もっと多くの事がわかるまで 情報公開は最小限にすべきだと
13:29
I say that's nonsense.
しかし それはナンセンスです
13:33
I say we absolutely are irresponsible if we stay silent on this.
我々が沈黙するのは 極めて無責任です
13:34
We need to give our best guess as to the time frame,
限られた時間の中で ベストを尽くすべきです
13:37
in order to give people a sense of proportion
人々が 本来のバランス感覚を取り戻す機会を提供したい
13:40
so that they can assess their priorities.
それが 優先順位を考え直すことにつながります
13:43
So, I say that we have a 50/50 chance
チャンスは五分五分
13:45
of reaching this RHR milestone,
「人類の若返り」の幕開け すなわち
13:48
robust human rejuvenation, within 15 years from the point
「人類の若返り」は 「ねずみの若返り」の実現からおよそ
13:50
that we get to robust mouse rejuvenation.
15年後にやってくるでしょう
13:53
15 years from the robust mouse.
いいですか マウスから15年後です
13:55
The public's perception will probably be somewhat better than that.
その間 一般常識は良い方向へ変わって行くでしょう
13:58
The public tends to underestimate how difficult scientific things are.
一般大衆は 科学的難題を甘く見がちです
14:01
So they'll probably think it's five years away.
人類への適用も せいぜい5年と考えるかもしれません
14:03
They'll be wrong, but that actually won't matter too much.
それは間違いだし 認識が欠けているのですが
14:05
And finally, of course, I think it's fair to say
最終的に 私はこう考えているのです
14:07
that a large part of the reason why the public is so ambivalent about aging now
大衆の老化に対するアンビバレントな態度の理由が
14:10
is the global trance I spoke about earlier, the coping strategy.
「国際的な妄想」と私が呼んでいるものだと
14:14
That will be history at this point,
それすら 過去の物となっていくでしょう
14:16
because it will no longer be possible to believe that aging is inevitable in humans,
人類が老化を避けられないとは もう信じれなくなるからです
14:18
since it's been postponed so very effectively in mice.
マウスの寿命が延長された影響で
14:21
So we're likely to end up with a very strong change in people's attitudes,
人々の態度は 急激に変わっていくでしょう
14:24
and of course that has enormous implications.
ここには 大きな意味があるんです
14:28
So in order to tell you now how we're going to get these mice,
マウス実験の成功についてあなた方に語るために
14:31
I'm going to add a little bit to my description of aging.
老化の説明に一つ 用語を付け加えましょう
14:34
I'm going to use this word "damage"
「ダメージ」という言葉です
14:36
to denote these intermediate things that are caused by metabolism
ダメージは新陳代謝が原因で起こる中間物質で
14:38
and that eventually cause pathology.
いずれ 病気の引き金になるものです
14:42
Because the critical thing about this
なぜそう言えるか 決定的証拠があるんです
14:44
is that even though the damage only eventually causes pathology,
我々が生まれてから 一生を通じて
14:46
the damage itself is caused ongoing-ly throughout life, starting before we're born.
ダメージそのものが病気につながる証拠が
14:48
But it is not part of metabolism itself.
ですが ダメージは新陳代謝の一部ではなく
14:53
And this turns out to be useful.
より 有用なものなのです
14:56
Because we can re-draw our original diagram this way.
なぜなら このような図として表せるからです
14:57
We can say that, fundamentally, the difference between gerontology and geriatrics
老年学と老年医学との違いをご説明しましょう
15:00
is that gerontology tries to inhibit the rate
老年学はダメージを予防しようとする
15:03
at which metabolism lays down this damage.
代謝が引き起こすダメージをね
15:05
And I'm going to explain exactly what damage is
ご説明しておきますが ここでいう「ダメージ」とは
15:07
in concrete biological terms in a moment.
厳密には 生物学用語として使っています
15:09
And geriatricians try to hold back the sands of time
一方 老年医学者は時間を戻そうとする
15:12
by stopping the damage converting into pathology.
ダメージが病気に変わるのを止めようとする
15:14
And the reason it's a losing battle
しかし これが所詮 負け戦なのは
15:16
is because the damage is continuing to accumulate.
結果的にダメージは 蓄積し続けるからです
15:18
So there's a third approach, if we look at it this way.
そこで第三のアプローチをご覧に入れます
15:20
We can call it the "engineering approach,"
我々は「工学」的アプローチと呼んでますが
15:23
and I claim that the engineering approach is within range.
工学的アプローチがこの範囲です
15:25
The engineering approach does not intervene in any processes.
工学的アプローチは 老化プロセスには介入しません
15:28
It does not intervene in this process or this one.
いいですか 老化プロセスに介入しないのです
15:31
And that's good because it means that it's not a losing battle,
それこそが 負け戦にならない理由です
15:33
and it's something that we are within range of being able to do,
この範囲で できることをするのです
15:36
because it doesn't involve improving on evolution.
生物の進化発展とは関係ないからです
15:39
The engineering approach simply says,
工学アプローチはこう主張するのです
15:42
"Let's go and periodically repair all of these various types of damage --
「あらゆる種類のダメージを 定期的に修復しましょう
15:44
not necessarily repair them completely, but repair them quite a lot,
完全に修復する必要はなく 出来る限りでい
15:48
so that we keep the level of damage down below the threshold
存在可能 かつ病気になる臨界以下の水準まで
15:52
that must exist, that causes it to be pathogenic."
ダメージを下げ その状態を維持します
15:55
We know that this threshold exists,
我々はその限界水準について理解してます
15:58
because we don't get age-related diseases until we're in middle age,
中年まで老年性の病気にならないことから明らかなのです
16:00
even though the damage has been accumulating since before we were born.
生まれてからダメージが蓄積し続けているにも関わらずね
16:03
Why do I say that we're in range? Well, this is basically it.
なぜ 私はこの範囲でモノを語るのか
16:06
The point about this slide is actually the bottom.
スライドのこのポイントは 最低限の項目です
16:10
If we try to say which bits of metabolism are important for aging,
もし代謝が老化にとって重要だと もっと発信しようとすると
16:13
we will be here all night, because basically all of metabolism
一晩中ここに居る事になる なぜなら代謝の全てが
16:16
is important for aging in one way or another.
老化にとって 他の何より重要だからです
16:19
This list is just for illustration; it is incomplete.
このリストは説明用であり 未完成です
16:21
The list on the right is also incomplete.
この右側のリストも 同様に未完成です
16:24
It's a list of types of pathology that are age-related,
これは老化に関する病原のリストであり
16:26
and it's just an incomplete list.
まさに 未完成のリストです
16:29
But I would like to claim to you that this list in the middle is actually complete --
しかし声を大にして言います このリストはこの状態で完成してる
16:31
this is the list of types of thing that qualify as damage,
これはダメージによる制限のリストです
16:34
side effects of metabolism that cause pathology in the end,
代謝の副作用であり 病気の原因になるか
16:37
or that might cause pathology.
もしくは そうなりうるものです
16:40
And there are only seven of them.
それがなんと たった7つなのです
16:42
They're categories of things, of course, but there's only seven of them.
これらは7つのカテゴリーです
16:45
Cell loss, mutations in chromosomes, mutations in the mitochondria and so on.
細胞喪失 核の突然変異 ミトコンドリアの突然変異 などなど
16:48
First of all, I'd like to give you an argument for why that list is complete.
最初に なぜこのリストで完全なのかお話しましょう
16:53
Of course one can make a biological argument.
もちろん 生物学的な議論の上で
16:58
One can say, "OK, what are we made of?"
我々は何からできていますか? そう
17:00
We're made of cells and stuff between cells.
細胞と 細胞との間にある物質からできています
17:02
What can damage accumulate in?
ではダメージはどこに蓄積されるでしょうか?
17:04
The answer is: long-lived molecules,
答えは 老化した分子の中です
17:07
because if a short-lived molecule undergoes damage, but then the molecule is destroyed --
なぜなら 若い分子はダメージを受けても それを打ち破れるからです
17:09
like by a protein being destroyed by proteolysis -- then the damage is gone, too.
タンパク質がプロテオリシスを破壊するかのように ダメージは消え去ります
17:12
It's got to be long-lived molecules.
老化した分子でこそ ダメージの蓄積は起こるのです
17:16
So, these seven things were all under discussion in gerontology a long time ago
この7つのポイントは水面下で 老年学者の間で議論されてきました 長い間ね
17:18
and that is pretty good news, because it means that,
そして とても良いニュースなのですが
17:21
you know, we've come a long way in biology in these 20 years,
実に20年に渡る 生物学的研究の結果
17:25
so the fact that we haven't extended this list
このリストは延長しないで済みそうなのです
17:27
is a pretty good indication that there's no extension to be done.
リストはこれ以上長くならない 良い兆しです
17:29
However, it's better than that; we actually know how to fix them all,
しかし本当は 完成させる方法を知っているんです
17:33
in mice, in principle -- and what I mean by in principle is,
あくまでマウスの話 原則 マウスでの話ですが
17:35
we probably can actually implement these fixes within a decade.
我々は10年以内にこの老化治療法を実行するでしょう
17:38
Some of them are partially implemented already, the ones at the top.
これらは部分的には既に実行されています
17:41
I haven't got time to go through them at all, but
あまり時間がありません
17:45
my conclusion is that, if we can actually get suitable funding for this,
結論 適当な資金さえ得られれば 我々は
17:48
then we can probably develop robust mouse rejuvenation in only 10 years,
10年以内に「ねずみの若返り」を確立できるでしょう
17:52
but we do need to get serious about it.
しかし 資金不足は深刻です
17:56
We do need to really start trying.
それでも 着手する必要があるのです
17:59
So of course, there are some biologists in the audience,
さて 聴衆の方々の中には生物学者の方もいるでしょう
18:01
and I want to give some answers to some of the questions that you may have.
私はその方たちに 幾つかの回答を投げかけたいのです
18:04
You may have been dissatisfied with this talk,
おそらく 講演内容にご不満があるでしょう
18:07
but fundamentally you have to go and read this stuff.
しかし内心 そうすべきだと思う所もある
18:09
I've published a great deal on this;
私は この本を出版しました
18:11
I cite the experimental work on which my optimism is based,
私の楽観的見解の土台となる 実験的な仕事を引用してます
18:13
and there's quite a lot of detail there.
極めて些細なことまで含めて
18:16
The detail is what makes me confident
ここで得た結果により
18:18
of my rather aggressive time frames that I'm predicting here.
時間感覚を打ち破って 私は確信することができました
18:20
So if you think that I'm wrong,
ですから もし私が間違っているとお考えであれば
18:22
you'd better damn well go and find out why you think I'm wrong.
いかように疑っても 見破って頂いても結構
18:24
And of course the main thing is that you shouldn't trust people
あなた方は 老年学者を信用しない方がいい
18:28
who call themselves gerontologists because,
なぜなら ある分野において
18:31
as with any radical departure from previous thinking within a particular field,
既存の考え方を乗り越えた 新展開が起こると
18:33
you know, you expect people in the mainstream to be a bit resistant
主流派にいる人達の抵抗を期待するからです
18:37
and not really to take it seriously.
さほど心配することではないんですが
18:41
So, you know, you've got to actually do your homework,
ですから 宿題を持ち帰って頂きたい
18:43
in order to understand whether this is true.
私の話が真実か そうでないか理解するため
18:45
And we'll just end with a few things.
いくつかの事案は いずれ決着するでしょう
18:46
One thing is, you know, you'll be hearing from a guy in the next session
一つは 次のセッションで話を聞く機会があると思いますが
18:48
who said some time ago that he could sequence the human genome in half no time,
彼は数年前 すぐにヒトゲノムを解析できると言った
18:51
and everyone said, "Well, it's obviously impossible."
当時 皆が言ったでしょう「うーん 明らかに困難だね」と
18:55
And you know what happened.
あなた方は 何が起こるか知っています
18:57
So, you know, this does happen.
これは必ず起こるのです
18:58
We have various strategies -- there's the Methuselah Mouse Prize,
我々は様々な施策も打ってます 例えばメトセラマウス賞
19:02
which is basically an incentive to innovate,
イノベーションを動機付けるため
19:04
and to do what you think is going to work,
ご自分の考えを 実行に移してもらうため
19:07
and you get money for it if you win.
そして 勝ち取った成果に十分な金額を支払うために
19:10
There's a proposal to actually put together an institute.
ちなみに メトセラ財団に寄付するという手もあります
19:13
This is what's going to take a bit of money.
ほんのわずかでいい 資金提供をお願いしたい
19:16
But, I mean, look -- how long does it take to spend that on the war in Iraq?
しかし 見て下さい イラク戦争だってどのくらい続いたでしょうか?
19:18
Not very long. OK.
それほど長くないでしょう
19:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:22
It's got to be philanthropic, because profits distract biotech,
金銭的利益は生物学の技術を阻害しますが
19:23
but it's basically got a 90 percent chance, I think, of succeeding in this.
しかし 基本的に90%が成功するでしょう
19:26
And I think we know how to do it. And I'll stop there.
我々は どうすればいいか知ってる 老化は止まるでしょう
19:30
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:33
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:34
Chris Anderson: OK. I don't know if there's going to be any questions
(クリス)オーブリー どんな質問が飛び出すかわかりませんが
19:39
but I thought I would give people the chance.
質疑応答の時間を取りたいと思います
19:42
Audience: Since you've been talking about aging and trying to defeat it,
(質問者)博士は老化を打ち負かす試みについて話してましたが
19:44
why is it that you make yourself appear like an old man?
なぜ博士は 老人のような外見を装うのですか?
19:48
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:52
AG: Because I am an old man. I am actually 158.
(オーブリー)結構 年なんです 158歳
19:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
19:59
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:00
Audience: Species on this planet have evolved with immune systems
(質問者)この星の生物は免疫機能を持っていて
20:03
to fight off all the diseases so that individuals live long enough to procreate.
あらゆる病と戦ったり 生殖に必要な期間を生き抜いたり
20:07
However, as far as I know, all the species have evolved to actually die,
しかし 私の知る限り 全ての生物は死にます
20:11
so when cells divide, the telomerase get shorter, and eventually species die.
細胞分裂も テロメラーゼが短くなり いずれ死ぬ
20:16
So, why does -- evolution has -- seems to have selected against immortality,
だから 進化は 不死を許さないのではないか
20:21
when it is so advantageous, or is evolution just incomplete?
進化そのものが 不完全なのではないですか?
20:26
AG: Brilliant. Thank you for asking a question
(オーブリー)素晴らしい 良い質問をありがとう
20:30
that I can answer with an uncontroversial answer.
議論の余地がない形で お答えしましょう
20:32
I'm going to tell you the genuine mainstream answer to your question,
あなたの質問に 根本的にお答えします
20:34
which I happen to agree with,
図らずも 私が同意している説です
20:37
which is that, no, aging is not a product of selection, evolution;
老化とは 選別ではありません
20:39
[aging] is simply a product of evolutionary neglect.
進化は単純に 怠慢な進化の結果に過ぎません
20:42
In other words, we have aging because it's hard work not to have aging;
言葉を変えれば 老化そのものではなくハードワークによって老化する
20:45
you need more genetic pathways, more sophistication in your genes
より多くの遺伝的な通り道を求め 多くの複雑性を遺伝の中に求めます
20:50
in order to age more slowly,
よりゆっくりと年を取るために
20:52
and that carries on being true the longer you push it out.
より長く生きるために
20:54
So, to the extent that evolution doesn't matter,
従って 進化の程度は問題にならず
20:57
doesn't care whether genes are passed on by individuals,
個体として遺伝子が何を受け入れ 拒絶するかわからない
21:02
living a long time or by procreation,
長い時間をかけるか 新種を作り出すか
21:04
there's a certain amount of modulation of that,
膨大なモジュールがありますから
21:07
which is why different species have different lifespans,
種が違うと なぜ寿命が違うのか
21:09
but that's why there are no immortal species.
なぜ不死の種がいないのか
21:12
CA: The genes don't care but we do?
(クリス)遺伝子はそんな事を気にしない?
21:15
AG: That's right.
(オーブリー)そうです
21:17
Audience: Hello. I read somewhere that in the last 20 years,
(質問者)私も20年 色々と調べていますが
21:19
the average lifespan of basically anyone on the planet has grown by 10 years.
生物の平均寿命は ここ10年伸び続けている
21:24
If I project that, that would make me think
ですから こう考えているんです
21:29
that I would live until 120 if I don't crash on my motorbike.
たぶん120歳位まで生きるだろう バイク事故にあわない限り
21:32
That means that I'm one of your subjects to become a 1,000-year-old?
博士 私も1000歳まで生きられますかね?
21:37
AG: If you lose a bit of weight.
(オーブリー)少し体重を落とせばね
21:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
21:44
Your numbers are a bit out.
あなたが挙げた数字は少し違ってますね
21:47
The standard numbers are that lifespans
一般的に言われている数字としては
21:50
have been growing at between one and two years per decade.
ここ10年で伸びた寿命はせいぜい1〜2年
21:53
So, it's not quite as good as you might think, you might hope.
ですから 期待しているようにはなりません
21:56
But I intend to move it up to one year per year as soon as possible.
しかし 私はこの数字を可能な限り伸ばしたいのです
22:00
Audience: I was told that many of the brain cells we have as adults
(質問者)年を取るに連れ 脳細胞の大部分は
22:03
are actually in the human embryo,
胎児のようになっていきます
22:06
and that the brain cells last 80 years or so.
脳細胞は80年やそこらが寿命のようで
22:08
If that is indeed true,
今日のお話が真実だとしても
22:10
biologically are there implications in the world of rejuvenation?
生物学的な意味で 若返りに影響してくると思いますが?
22:12
If there are cells in my body that live all 80 years,
仮に体細胞が80年しか生きられないなら
22:15
as opposed to a typical, you know, couple of months?
通例には反するように思いませんか?
22:18
AG: There are technical implications certainly.
(オーブリー)技術的な影響は確かにあるでしょう
22:20
Basically what we need to do is replace cells
基本的に 細胞の入れ替えが必要です
22:22
in those few areas of the brain that lose cells at a respectable rate,
脳細胞の一部分など 相当量を失うことになる
22:26
especially neurons, but we don't want to replace them
特に神経細胞は なるべく入れ替えたくない
22:29
any faster than that -- or not much faster anyway,
早過ぎても 遅過ぎてもダメです
22:32
because replacing them too fast would degrade cognitive function.
早く入れ替えれば 認知機能が落ちてしまう
22:34
What I said about there being no non-aging species earlier on
老化しない種などいない という意見は
22:38
was a little bit of an oversimplification.
少々 単純化が過ぎると思っています
22:41
There are species that have no aging -- Hydra for example --
老化しない種は 存在します 例えばヒドラ
22:43
but they do it by not having a nervous system --
ですが ヒドラは神経系を持っていません
22:47
and not having any tissues in fact that rely for their function
何らかの機能に依存した いかなる組織も持ち合わせない
22:49
on very long-lived cells.
とても長生きの細胞なのです
22:51
Translated by Tairo Moriyama
Reviewed by Lily Yichen Shi

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Aubrey de Grey - Crusader against aging
Aubrey de Grey, British researcher on aging, claims he has drawn a roadmap to defeat biological aging. He provocatively proposes that the first human beings who will live to 1,000 years old have already been born.

Why you should listen

A true maverick, Aubrey de Grey challenges the most basic assumption underlying the human condition -- that aging is inevitable. He argues instead that aging is a disease -- one that can be cured if it's approached as "an engineering problem." His plan calls for identifying all the components that cause human tissue to age, and designing remedies for each of them — forestalling disease and eventually pushing back death. He calls the approach Strategies for Engineered Negligible Senescence (SENS).

With his astonishingly long beard, wiry frame and penchant for bold and cutting proclamations, de Grey is a magnet for controversy. A computer scientist, self-taught biogerontologist and researcher, he has co-authored journal articles with some of the most respected scientists in the field.

But the scientific community doesn't know what to make of him. In July 2005, the MIT Technology Review challenged scientists to disprove de Grey's claims, offering a $20,000 prize (half the prize money was put up by de Grey's Methuselah Foundation) to any molecular biologist who could demonstrate that "SENS is so wrong that it is unworthy of learned debate." The challenge remains open; the judging panel includes TEDsters Craig Venter and Nathan Myhrvold. It seems that "SENS exists in a middle ground of yet-to-be-tested ideas that some people may find intriguing but which others are free to doubt," MIT's judges wrote. And while they "don't compel the assent of many knowledgeable scientists," they're also "not demonstrably wrong."

More profile about the speaker
Aubrey de Grey | Speaker | TED.com