English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2008

Jay Walker: My library of human imagination

ジェイ・ウォーカーによる「人間想像力の図書館」

Filmed
Views 487,314

「人間想像力の図書館」の館長であるジェイ・ウォーカーが、TED 2008 のステージの背景を飾った興味深い品々の中からいくつかを手に取って解説するという目を見張るようなセッションを行います。

- Entrepreneur
Jay Walker is fascinated by intellectual property in all its forms. His firm, Walker Digital, created Priceline and many other businesses that reframe old problems with new IT. In his private life, he's a bibliophile and collector on an epic scale. Full bio

These rocks have been hitting our earth for about three billion years,
この様な石はここ30億年程地球に衝突し続け、
00:18
and are responsible for much of what’s gone on on our planet.
この惑星で起こる様々な物事の原因となっていました
00:22
This is an example of a real meteorite,
これは隕石のサンプルで、
00:25
and you can see all the melting of the iron
鉄が溶けた跡があります
00:27
from the speed and the heat when a meteorite hits the earth,
地球に衝突するときのスピードと熱により、
00:29
and just how much of it survives and melts.
無くなったり解けたりします
00:33
From a meteorite from space,
宇宙から来る隕石の次は
00:36
we’re over here with an original Sputnik.
我々はオリジナルのスプートニクを見ています
00:38
This is one of the seven surviving Sputniks that was not launched into space.
これは実際には打ち上げられなかった7つあるスプートニクのうちの1つで
00:40
This is not a copy.
複製ではありません
00:43
The space age began 50 years ago in October,
宇宙時代は50年前の10月に始まり
00:45
and that’s exactly what Sputnik looked like.
スプートニクはその先駆けでした
00:48
And it wouldn’t be fun to talk about the space age
アポロ11ミッションで月へ運ばれ、
00:50
without seeing a flag that was carried
持ち帰られた旗を見る事無しに
00:53
to the moon and back, on Apollo 11.
宇宙時代を語っても面白くは無いでしょう
00:55
The astronauts each got to carry
宇宙飛行士は絹でできた
00:58
about ten silk flags in their personal kits.
10枚程の旗を、自分たちの持ち物の中に含め
01:00
They would bring them back and mount them.
持ち帰り、額装していました
01:03
So this has actually been carried to the moon
それでこの旗は実際に月まで行き
01:05
and back.
戻ってきたのです
01:08
So that’s for fun.
楽しいですね
01:10
The dawn of books is, of course, important.
本の夜明けも、当然、重要です
01:12
And it wouldn’t be interesting to talk about the dawn of books
そしてグーテンベルグ聖書の複製本無しに
01:14
without having a copy of a Guttenberg Bible.
本の夜明けを語っても面白く無いでしょう
01:16
You can see how portable and handy it was to have your own Guttenberg
1455年のグーテンベルグの本がどれほど携帯に便利だったか
01:20
in 1455.
分かるでしょう
01:22
But what’s interesting about the Guttenberg Bible, and the dawn of this technology,
しかしグーテンベルグ聖書や技術革命で興味深いのは
01:25
is not the book.
本ではありません
01:29
You see, the book was not driven by reading.
ご覧の通り、この本は読まれることで広まったのではありません
01:31
In 1455, nobody could read.
1455年では誰も読み書きできなかったのです
01:35
So why did the printing press succeed?
ではなぜ活版印刷術は成功したのでしょうか?
01:37
This is an original page of a Guttenberg Bible.
これはグーテンベルグ聖書の本物の1ページです
01:39
So you’re looking here at one of the first printed books
あなたは550年前の活版印刷を使った
01:43
using movable type in the history of man,
人類史上始めての出版物の1つを
01:46
550 years ago.
見ているのです
01:48
We are living at the age here at the end of the book,
我々は現在書物が終わり、電子ペーパーがそれに
01:51
where electronic paper will undoubtedly replace it.
取って代わろうとしている時代に生きています
01:53
But why is this so interesting? Here’s the quick story.
しかし何故それが面白いのでしょうか? こういうことです
01:55
It turns out that in the 1450s,
1450年頃には
01:59
the Catholic Church needed money,
カトリック教会はお金を必要としていて
02:01
and so they
「赦し」を発行しました
02:03
actually hand-wrote these things called indulgences,
実は彼らは「贖宥状(しょくゆうじょう / 免罪符)」と呼ばれる、
02:05
which were forgiveness’s on pieces of paper.
紙の赦しを手で書いていたのです
02:07
They traveled all around Europe
彼らはヨーロッパ中を旅してまわり
02:09
and sold by the hundreds or by the thousands.
何百、何千という単位で売り回ったのです
02:11
They got you out of purgatory faster.
煉獄から早めに抜け出せる様に
02:13
And when the printing press was invented
そして活版印刷が発明され
02:16
what they found was they could print indulgences,
贖宥状が印刷できる事と分かった時
02:18
which was the equivalent of printing money.
それはお金を印刷している様なものでした
02:20
And so all of Western Europe started buying printing presses in 1455 --
それで1455年に西ヨーロッパ中が活版印刷を買い始め
02:22
to print out thousands,
何千、何万、そして最終的には
02:26
and then hundreds of thousands,
何百万という
02:28
and then ultimately millions
煉獄の中からあなたを救い出し
02:29
of single, small pieces of paper
天国に連れて行くという
02:31
that got you out of middle hell and into heaven.
小さな紙を印刷したのです
02:34
That is why the printing press succeeded,
それが活版印刷が成功し、
02:37
and that is why Martin Luther
マルティン・ルターが
02:40
nailed his 90 theses to the door:
90ばかりの論題
02:42
because he was complaining that the Catholic Church had gone amok
彼はカトリック教会が
02:45
in printing out indulgences and selling them
西ヨーロッパ中の町や村、都市で贖宥状を印刷し、販売するなど
02:48
in every town and village and city in all of Western Europe.
狂った事だと訴えていました
02:51
So the printing press, ladies and gentlemen,
つまり、活版印刷は
02:55
was driven entirely by the printing of forgivenesses
読書では無く、贖宥状を印刷するところから
02:57
and had nothing to do with reading.
生まれたのです
03:00
More tomorrow. I also have pictures coming of the library
続きはまた明日 博物館の写真を見たいと
03:02
for those of you that have asked for pictures.
言った人の為に、いくつか持ってきました
03:04
We’re going to have some tomorrow.
明日はそれを見る事にしましょう
03:06
(Applause)
(拍手)
03:08
Instead of showing an object from the stage
ステージの上から何かを見せる代わりに
03:09
I’m going to do something special for the first time.
今回初めて特別な事をしてみようと思います
03:11
We are going to show, actually, what the library looks like, OK?
ライブラリーがどのようなものかお見せします いいですか?
03:13
So, I am married to the most wonderful woman in the world.
私は世界で最も素晴らしい女性と結婚しました
03:17
You’re going to find out why in a minute,
何故だかすぐに分かります
03:20
because when I went to see Eileen,
なぜならアイリーンに会った時
03:22
this is what I said I wanted to build.
こう言うものを作りたいと言ったからです
03:24
This is the Library of Human Imagination.
人類の想像の産物を集めたライブラリーです
03:26
The room itself is three stories tall.
部屋は3階建てになっており
03:29
In the glass panels are 5,000 years of human imagination
ガラスパネルの中には5000年に及ぶ人間の英知が
03:32
that are computer controlled.
コンピュータにより管理されています
03:35
The room is a theatre. It changes colors.
部屋は劇場になっていて、色を変えられます
03:37
And all throughout the library are different objects, different spaces.
ライブラリーの中には様々な物体や空間があり、
03:39
It’s designed like an Escher print.
まるでエッシャーの絵の様です
03:43
Here is some of the lower level of the library,
ここはライブラリーの階下で
03:45
where the exhibits constantly change.
展示物が常に変化します
03:47
You can walk through. You can touch.
中で歩く事ができ、触れる事ができます
03:49
You can see exactly how many of these types of items would fit in a room.
これだけのものが1つの部屋に納まるのです
03:51
There’s my very own Saturn V.
私自身のサターン5型ロケットもあり、
03:54
Everybody should have one, OK? (Laughter)
皆も持つべきでしょう
03:56
So you can see here in the lower level of the library
ライブラリーの階下であるここには、
03:59
the books and the objects.
本などの展示物があります
04:01
In the glass panels all along is sort of the history of imagination.
グラスパネルの中には、英知の歴史の様なものが詰められています
04:03
There is a glass bridge that you walk across
空中に架かっているガラスでできた
04:06
that’s suspended in space.
橋の上を歩く事ができます
04:08
So it’s a leap of imagination.
これは想像の跳躍です
04:10
How do we create?
どのようにして創るのでしょうか?
04:11
Part of the question that I have answered is,
既に私が答えた質問の1つは
04:13
is we create by surrounding ourselves with stimuli:
我々は周りの環境と刺激、人類の業績や、歴史、
04:15
with human achievement, with history,
我々を人間たらしめるものにより
04:18
with the things that drive us and make us human --
新しいものを創造するのです
04:20
the passionate discovery, the bones of dinosaurs long gone,
情熱的な発見、遠い過去からの恐竜の骨、
04:23
the maps of space that we’ve experienced,
我々が見た宇宙の地図
04:27
and ultimately the hallways that stimulate our mind and our imagination.
そして最終的には我々の精神や想像を刺激する通路です
04:30
So hopefully tomorrow I’ll show
それで明日、願わくば
04:34
one or two more objects from the stage,
ステージからいくつかのものを見せたいと思いますが、
04:36
but for today I just wanted to say thank you
今日のところは、ここまできて、話をしてくれた人達に
04:37
for all the people that came and talked to us about it.
感謝の気持ちを述べたいと思います
04:39
And Eileen and I are thrilled to open our home
アイリーンと私は我が家を公開し、TED コミュニティーと
04:41
and share it with the TED community.
共有できる事にワクワクしています
04:43
(Applause)
(拍手)
04:45
TED is all about patterns in the clouds.
TED は雲の織りなす模様であり、
04:46
It’s all about connections.
それは繋がりであり、
04:49
It’s all about seeing things
皆が既に見てきたものを見ながら
04:51
that everybody else has seen before
それについて
04:53
but thinking about them in ways that nobody has thought of them before.
誰も考えなかったように考える事です
04:55
And that’s really what discovery and imagination is all about.
そして、それが発見したり、想像したりするということなのです
05:00
For example, we can look
例えば我々は
05:04
at a DNA molecule model here.
DNA 分子のモデルを見る事ができます
05:06
None of us really have ever seen one,
これを本当に見た人はいません
05:09
but we know it exists because we’ve been taught
しかしこの分子について教えられる事で
05:11
to understand this molecule.
そこに存在する事を知っています
05:14
But we can also look at an Enigma machine
第2次世界大戦にナチスにより使われた
05:16
from the Nazis in World War II
暗号と復号を行っていた
05:19
that was a coding and decoding machine.
このエニグマ暗号機を見る事ができます
05:21
Now, you might say, what does this have to do with this?
さて、この2つにどんな関係があるのかと思われるかも知れません
05:23
Well, this is the code for life,
これは生命の暗号であり、
05:26
and this is a code for death.
そしてこれは死の暗号なのです
05:28
These two molecules
これら2つの分子、
05:31
code and decode.
暗号と復号
05:33
And yet, looking at them, you would see a machine and a molecule.
しかしこれらを見て、機械と分子だと言うかも知れません
05:35
But once you’ve seen them in a new way,
しかし新しい見方をする事で
05:39
you realize that both of these things really are connected.
これら2つが実は繋がりを持っている事に気がつくでしょう
05:41
And they’re connected primarily because of this here.
そしてこれらは、主にこちらのものにより繋がっています
05:44
You see, this is a human brain model, OK?
つまり、これは人間の脳のモデルで
05:48
And it’s rare, because we never really get to see a brain.
珍しいものです 普通は脳を見る機会などありませんから
05:52
We get to see a skull. But there it is.
見えるのは頭ですが 中身はこれです
05:54
All of imagination -- everything that we think,
全ての想像、我々が考える全てのもの、
05:56
we feel, we sense -- comes through the human brain.
感じる事、気がつく事は、人間の脳により現れます
05:58
And once we create new patterns in this brain,
そして、この脳の中で新しいパターンを作ると、
06:01
once we shape the brain in a new way,
ひとたび思考が形を変えてしまうと、
06:03
it never returns to its original shape.
元の形には2度と戻りません
06:05
And I’ll give you a quick example.
簡単な例をお見せしましょう
06:09
We think about the Internet;
インターネットを考えましょう
06:11
we think about information that goes across the Internet.
我々はインターネット上で交わされる情報について考えます
06:13
And we never think about the hidden connection.
そして隠された繋がりについて考える事はありません
06:15
But I brought along here a lump of coal --
しかし私は石炭のかけらを持ってきました
06:17
right here, one lump of coal.
ここです、石炭ひとつ
06:20
And what does a lump of coal have to do with the Internet?
石炭がインターネットと何の関係があるのでしょうか?
06:23
You see, it takes the energy in one lump of coal
1メガバイトの量の情報がインターネットを駆け巡るのに
06:25
to move one megabyte of information across the net.
必要なエネルギーというのが石炭ひとつ分なのです
06:29
So every time you download a file,
ファイルをダウンロードする時には
06:33
each megabyte is a lump of coal.
1メガバイトが石炭ひとつに相当するのです
06:35
What that means is, a 200-megabyte file
200メガバイトではどうでしょうか
06:38
looks like this, ladies and gentlemen. OK?
このようになります
06:43
So the next time you download a gigabyte,
つまり1ギガ、2ギガ(バイト)のデータを
06:46
or two gigabytes, it’s not for free, OK?
ダウンロードするのは、タダでは無いのです
06:48
The connection is the energy it takes to run the web ,
繋がりは、Webを動かし、我々ができると思うことを
06:52
and to make everything we think possible, possible.
可能にするために必要なエネルギーなのです
06:57
Thanks, Chris.
ありがとう、クリス
07:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
07:02
Translated by Akira KAKINOHANA
Reviewed by Masahiro Kyushima

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Jay Walker - Entrepreneur
Jay Walker is fascinated by intellectual property in all its forms. His firm, Walker Digital, created Priceline and many other businesses that reframe old problems with new IT. In his private life, he's a bibliophile and collector on an epic scale.

Why you should listen

It's befitting that an entrepreneur and inventor so prolific and acclaimed would curate a library devoted, as he says, to the astonishing capabilities of the human imagination. TIME twice named him one of the "50 most influential business leaders in the digital age," and he holds more than 200 patents. Jay Walker's companies -- under Walker Digital -- have alone served tens of millions of people and amassed billions in value. 

A chunk of his net worth went into building this enchanting library space, whose exhibits (please touch!) go back, roughly, to the point our species learned to write, with a slight post-moveable type bias. Brimming with exquisitely illustrated books and artifacts (Enigma machine; velociraptor skeleton), the library itself is a marvel. Is it the glowing etched glass panels, or the Vivaldi piped from hidden speakers that gives it that je ne sais quoi? Maybe it's Walker himself, whose passion for the stuff just glows. It's apparent to those lucky enough to snag a tour.

At the 2008 TED Conference, Walker lent many of his priceless and geeky artifacts to decorate the stage -- including a real Sputnik artificial satellite, a Star Wars stormtrooper helmet and a Gutenberg bible. After you've watched his talk, the WIRED article is a must-read.

More profile about the speaker
Jay Walker | Speaker | TED.com