English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TED2004

Richard Pyle: A dive into the reef's Twilight Zone

リチャード・パイル: サンゴ礁の未知の世界へのダイビング

Filmed
Views 356,851

啓発的なトークの中で、リチャード・パイルは、サンゴ礁に繁栄する生物や、開発を先導してきた革新的なダイビング技術を紹介しています。彼はチームとともに、未知なる種の神秘の解明に心血を注いでいます。

- Ichthyologist
Ichthyologist Richard Pyle is a fish nerd. In his quest to discover and document new species of fish, he has also become a trailblazing exploratory diver and a pioneer of database technology. Full bio

This is the first of two rather extraordinary photographs I'm going to show you today.
これは本日紹介する
2枚の驚くような写真の1つです
00:12
It was taken 18 years ago.
18年前に撮られたものです
00:16
I was 19 years old at the time.
当時私は19歳でした
00:18
I had just returned from one of the deepest dives I'd ever made at that time,
自分としては最も深いクラスとなる60m強のダイビングから戻って来たところで
00:20
-- a little over 200 feet --
自分としては最も深いクラスとなる60m強のダイビングから戻って来たところで
00:22
and, I had caught this little fish here.
そう この小さな魚を捕まえてきたのです
00:24
It turns out that that particular one was the first live one of that ever taken alive.
後に 初めて生け捕りにされた魚だと
明らかになりました
00:26
I'm not just an ichthyologist, I'm a bona fide fish nerd.
私はただの魚類学者ではなく
真の魚バカです
00:30
And to a fish nerd, this is some pretty exciting stuff.
そして魚バカにとっては、これはとてもわくわくするものなのです
00:33
And more exciting was the fact that the person who took this photo
さらに興奮させたのは
写真を撮影したのが
00:35
was a guy named Jack Randall,
ジャック・ランドールだったということです
00:38
the greatest living ichthyologist on Earth,
彼は現代最高の魚類学者であり
00:40
the Grand Poobah of fish nerds, if you will.
いわば魚バカの“お偉方”です
00:42
And so, it was really exciting to me to have this moment in time,
だから私はこのとき
本当にわくわくしましたし
00:45
it really set the course for the rest of my life.
残りの人生の方向性をも
決定づけました
00:49
But really the most significant thing, the most profound thing
しかし 最も重大 かつ自分の人生に
深い意味をもたらしたことは
00:52
about this picture is that it was taken two days before
この写真が撮られた2日後に
00:55
I was completely paralyzed from the neck down.
首から下が完全に麻痺したことです
00:57
I made a really stupid kind of mistake
私は本当に愚かな過ちを犯しました
00:59
that most 19-year-old males do when they think they're immortal,
多くの若者みたいに
死なないと過信していました
01:02
and I got a bad case of the bends,
その結果 重度の潜函病で麻痺し
01:05
and was paralyzed, and had to be flown back for treatment.
治療のために帰還を余儀なくされました
01:07
I learned two really important things that day.
私はあの日
とても重要なことを2つ学びました
01:11
The first thing I learned -- well, I'm mortal, that's a really big one.
1つ目は 人は必ず死ぬということ
そうとても大切な教訓です
01:14
And the second thing I learned was that I knew, with profound certainty,
そして 2つ目は 残りの人生で
やろうとしていたことは
01:17
that this is exactly what I was going to do for the rest of my life.
まさしくこれだと
確信を得たことでした
01:21
I had to focus all my energies towards going to find
サンゴ礁深くに生息する
新種の発見に
01:24
new species of things down on deep coral reefs.
全エネルギーを
集中させるべきだと
01:27
Now, when you think of a coral reef, this is what most people think of:
さて サンゴ礁というと
たいていの人はこう考えます
01:30
all these big, hard, elaborate corals and lots of bright, colorful fishes and things.
大きくしっかりとした複雑なサンゴ
たくさんの輝くカラフルな魚たち
01:33
But, this is really just the tip of the iceberg.
しかし これは氷山の一角に過ぎません
01:37
If you look at this diagram of a coral reef,
このサンゴ礁の図を見ると
01:39
we know a lot about that part up near the top,
海面付近のことが詳しくわかります
01:42
and the reason we know so much about it
スキューバ・ダイバーが容易に
潜って近づけるからです
01:44
is scuba divers can very easily go down there and access it.
スキューバ・ダイバーが容易に
潜って近づけるからです
01:46
There is a problem with scuba though,
けれども スキューバダイビングには
01:48
in that it imposes some limitations on how deep you can go,
潜れる深さに限界があります
01:51
and it turns out that depth is about 200 feet.
水深約60メートルが限界です
01:54
I'll get into why that is in just a minute.
すぐ後で理由を説明します
01:56
But, the point is that scuba divers generally stay less than 100 feet deep,
しかし ダイバーは一般に
30メートルより浅い場所にとどまり
01:59
and very rarely go much below this, at least, not with any kind of sanity.
それより深く潜ることは非常にまれで
正気を保つことはできません
02:02
So, to go deeper, most biologists have turned to submersibles.
より深く潜るために
生物学者は潜水艇に着目しました
02:06
Now, submersibles are great, wonderful things,
潜水艇はとても素晴らしいものですが
02:09
but if you're going to spend 30,000 dollars a day to use one of these things,
1隻使用するのに
1日3万ドルかかり
02:11
and it's capable of going 2,000 feet,
600メートル潜れるとしたら
02:15
you're sure not going to go farting around up here in a couple of hundred feet,
数十メートルのところで
ぶらぶらせずに
02:17
you're going to go way, way, way, down deep.
どんどん深く潜るに決まってます
02:20
So, the bottom line is that almost all research using submersibles
実際 潜水艇を使用した
研究のほとんどが
02:22
has taken place well below 500 feet.
150メートルよりずっと下で
行われてきました
02:25
Now, it's pretty obvious at this point that there's this zone here in the middle
さて 中央にその上下と明確に識別される
ゾーンがありますが
02:27
and that's the zone that really centers around my own personal pursuit of happiness.
そこにこそ私が求める幸福があるのです
02:30
I want to find out what's in this zone.
このゾーンに何があるか知りたいのです
02:34
We know almost nothing about it.
我々はここについて殆ど何も知りません
02:36
Scuba divers can't get there, submarines go right on past it.
ダイバーは行けず
潜水艇はまっすぐ通り過ぎます
02:38
It took me a year to learn how to walk again after I had my diving accident in Palau
パラオでの事故後
歩けるようになるのに1年かかりました
02:41
and during that year I spent a lot of time learning
その1年間 多くの時間を
02:44
about the physics and physiology of diving
物理学や潜水生理学の勉強と
02:46
and figuring out how to overcome these limitations.
潜水の限界をどう克服するかに
費やしました
02:48
So, I'm just going to show you a basic idea.
では 基本的な考えを示します
02:50
We're all breathing air right now. Air is a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen,
私たちは今呼吸をしています
空気は酸素と窒素から成り
02:52
about 20 percent oxygen. About 80 percent nitrogen is in our lungs.
肺に入る約20%が酸素で
約80%が窒素です
02:55
And there's a phenomenon called Henry's Law
ヘンリーの法則というものが作用し
02:59
that says that gases will dissolve into a fluid
水圧に晒されている気体は各々の分圧に
比例して液体に溶けるのです
03:01
in proportion to the partial pressures which you're exposing them to.
水圧に晒されている気体は各々の分圧に
比例して液体に溶けるのです
03:03
So, basically the gas dissolves into our body.
基本的に気体は体に取り込まれていきます
03:06
The oxygen is bound by metabolism, we use it for energy.
酸素は代謝作用により結合し
エネルギーとして使われることになります
03:09
The nitrogen just sort of floats around in our blood and tissues,
窒素は血中や組織内を漂います
03:12
and that's all fine, that's how we're designed.
人間の構造上それが普通です
03:14
The problem happens when you start to go underwater.
問題は水中に潜るとき生じます
03:16
Now, the deeper you go underwater, the higher the pressure is.
実際 深く潜れば潜るほど
圧力が高まります
03:18
If you were to go down to a depth of about 130 feet,
ほとんどのダイバーに
推奨される制限の
03:21
which is the recommended limit for most scuba divers,
約40メートルの深さまで潜ると
03:24
you get this pressure effect.
圧力の影響を受け始めます
03:26
And the effect of that pressure is that you have an increased density
圧力の影響により
呼吸のたびに
03:28
of gas molecules in every breath you take.
気体分子の密度が高まっていきます
03:31
Over time, those gas molecules dissolve into your blood and tissues
時間が経つにつれ 気体分子は
血中や組織内に溶け
03:33
and start to fill you up.
体内に蓄積され始めます
03:37
Now, if you were to go down to, say, 300 feet,
それから水深90メートルまで潜ると
03:39
you don't have five times as many gas molecules in your lungs --
肺に入る気体分子の数は
03:41
you've got 10 times as many gas molecules in your lungs.
5倍どころではなく
10倍にもなります
03:43
And, sure enough, they dissolve into your blood, and into your tissues as well.
そしてやはり 血中に溶けます
組織内にも同様です
03:46
And of course, if you were to down to where there's 15 times as much --
そしてもちろん15倍に達し
03:50
the deeper you go, the more exacerbating the problem becomes.
更に深く潜ると問題は
ますます深刻になっていきます
03:53
And the problem, the limitation of diving with air
空気潜水の制限の問題は
体中にある --
03:56
is all those dots in your body -- all the nitrogen and all the oxygen.
あの点のようなものです
全て窒素と酸素です
03:59
There're three basic limitations of scuba diving.
スキューバダイビングには
制限が3つあります
04:02
The first limitation is the oxygen --
1つ目は酸素 --
04:04
oxygen toxicity.
つまり 酸素中毒です
04:06
Now, we all know the song: "Love is like oxygen./
今や全員が知るこの歌
“愛は酸素と同じだ
04:08
You get too much, you get too high./
あまりにも多く吸い込むと
あまりにものぼせてしまう
04:10
Not enough, and you're going to die."
足りないとあなたは死んでしまう”
04:12
Well, in the context of diving, you get too much, you die also.
ダイビングでは
吸い込みすぎると死にます
04:14
You die also because oxygen toxicity can cause a seizure --
酸素中毒は発作を起こしうるからです
04:16
makes you convulse underwater, not a good thing to happen underwater.
水中で痙攣が起きては困ります
04:20
It happens because there's too much concentration of oxygen in your body.
それは体内の酸素濃度が
高くなりすぎることで起きます
04:23
The nitrogen has two problems.
窒素には2つの問題があります
04:27
One of them is what Jacques Cousteau called "rapture of the deep."
2つ目はジャック・クストーが
“深海の狂喜”と呼ぶ現象 --
04:29
It's nitrogen narcosis.
つまり窒素酔いです
04:32
It makes you loopy.
それにより頭がおかしくなります
04:34
The deeper you go, the loopier you get.
潜る深さに応じて強まります
04:36
You don't want to drive drunk, you don't want to dive drunk, so that's a real big problem.
飲酒運転と同じく
酔った状態でのダイビングは大問題です
04:38
And of course, the third problem is the one I found out the hard way in Palau,
3つ目の問題はもちろん
パラオでの苦い経験となった 潜函病です
04:41
which is the bends.
3つ目の問題はもちろん
パラオでの苦い経験となった 潜函病です
04:44
Now the one thing that I forgot to mention,
言い忘れましたが
04:46
is that to obviate the problem of the nitrogen narcosis --
窒素酔いを未然に防ぐ方法は
04:48
all of those blue dots in our body --
青い点で示された体内の
04:50
you remove the nitrogen and you replace it with helium.
窒素を除去し
ヘリウムと入れ替えることです
04:52
Now helium's a gas, there're a lot of reasons why helium's good,
ヘリウムが優れている理由は
たくさんあります
04:54
it's a tiny molecule, it's inert,
ごく小さい分子で不活性なため
04:57
it doesn't give you narcosis.
窒素酔いを起こしません
04:59
So that's the basic concept that we use.
基本的な考えはそういうことです
05:01
But, the theory's relatively easy.
しかし 原理は比較的簡単でも
05:03
The tricky part is the implementation.
実行するのは難しいのです
05:05
So, this is how I began, about 15 years ago.
これは私が15年ほど前に始めた方法です
05:07
I'll admit, it wasn't exactly the smartest of starts,
賢明なスタートとは言えませんが
05:09
but, you know, you got to start somewhere.
足がかりをつかみたかったのです
05:11
At the time, I wasn't the only one who didn't know what I was doing --
当時 自分が何をしているのか
わかりませんでした --
05:13
almost nobody did.
ほとんど誰も
05:16
And this rig was actually used for a dive of 300 feet.
この装置で約90メートル潜りました
05:18
Over time we got a little bit better at it,
時間をかけて少しずつ改良し
05:20
and we came up with this really sophisticated-looking rig
とてもカッコいい見かけの装置になりました
05:22
with four scuba tanks and five regulators
4つのタンクと5つのレギュレーターと
適正な割合の混合ガスなどからなります
05:24
and all the right gas mixtures and all that good stuff.
4つのタンクと5つのレギュレーターと
適正な割合の混合ガスなどからなります
05:27
And it was fine and dandy,
その素晴らしくカッコいい装置で
05:28
and it allowed us to go down and find new species.
深くもぐり
新種を発見することができました
05:30
This picture was taken 300 feet deep, catching new species of fish.
これは水深約90メートルで
新種の魚を捕まえた写真です
05:32
But, the problem was that it didn't allow us much time.
しかし問題は時間の不足でした
05:34
For all its bulk and size,
あれだけの容量やサイズでも
05:36
it only gave us about 15 minutes at most down at those sorts of depths.
せいぜい15分程度しか
いられませんでした
05:38
We needed more time.
もっと時間が必要でした
05:41
There had to be a better way.
より良い方法があるはずでした
05:43
And, indeed, there is a better way.
実際にあるのです
05:45
In 1994, I was fortunate enough to get access
1994年に 閉鎖式リブリーザーの試作品を
幸運にも使えました
05:47
to these prototype closed-circuit rebreathers.
1994年に 閉鎖式リブリーザーの試作品を
幸運にも使えました
05:49
Alright, closed-circuit rebreather --
それでは 閉鎖式リブリーザーですが
05:51
what is it about it that makes it different from scuba,
スキューバと何が違い
なぜ良いのでしょうか?
05:53
and why is it better?
スキューバと何が違い
なぜ良いのでしょうか?
05:55
Well, there are three main advantages to a rebreather.
リブリーザーの利点は3つあります
05:57
One, they're quiet, they don't make any noise.
1つ目は静かで音を出さないこと
05:59
Two, they allow you to stay underwater longer.
2つ目は水中に長くいられること
06:01
Three, they allow you to go deeper.
3つ目は深く潜れることです
06:03
How is it that they do that?
どうして可能なのでしょうか?
06:05
Well, in order to really understand how they do that
それをきちんと理解するために
06:07
you have to take off the hood, and look underneath and see what's going on.
カバーをとって内部の動きを見てみましょう
06:09
There are three basic systems to a closed- circuit rebreather.
閉鎖式リブリーザーには
基本的な装置が3つあります
06:12
The most fundamental of these is called the breathing loop.
最も基本的なものは
循環式呼吸装置です
06:14
It's a breathing loop because you breathe off of it,
吐き出した空気も閉じたループで
06:16
and it's a closed loop, and you breathe the same gas around and around and around.
再度吸気し 何度も循環しするので
循環式呼吸装置というのです
06:19
So there's a mouthpiece that you put in your mouth,
口にあてるマウスピースや
06:22
and there's also a counterlung,
カウンターラング(呼吸嚢)もあります
06:24
or in this case, two counterlungs.
この場合はカウンターラングが2つあります
06:26
Now, the counterlungs aren't high-tech, they're just simply flexible bags.
さて カウンターラングは
ハイテクではなくただの柔軟な袋です
06:28
They allow you to mechanically breathe, or mechanically ventilate.
それにより機械的な
吸気と呼気を可能にします
06:31
When you exhale your breath, it goes in the exhale counterlung:
呼気は排気カウンターラングに運ばれ
06:34
when you inhale a breath, it comes from the inhale counterlung.
吸気カウンターラングから息を吸います
06:36
It's just pure mechanics, allowing you to cycle air through this breathing loop.
循環式呼吸装置を通じて
空気を循環させる仕組みです
06:39
And, the other component on a breathing loop
循環式呼吸装置の
他の構成要素は
06:42
is the carbon dioxide absorbent canister.
二酸化炭素吸着剤です
06:45
Now, as we breathe, we produce carbon dioxide,
呼吸時に吐き出される
06:48
and that carbon dioxide needs to be scrubbed out of the system.
二酸化炭素を
装置から取り除く必要があります
06:50
There's a chemical filter in there
呼気から二酸化炭素を除去する
化学フィルターがあり
06:53
that pulls the carbon dioxide out of the breathing gas --
呼気から二酸化炭素を除去する
化学フィルターがあり
06:55
so that, when it comes back to us to breathe again, it's safe to breathe again.
再循環したガスを
安全に呼吸することができます
06:58
So that's the breathing loop in a nutshell.
これが循環式呼吸装置の要点です
07:01
The second main component of a closed-circuit rebreather is the gas system.
閉鎖式リブリーザーの
2つ目の構成要素である
07:04
The primary purpose of the gas system
ガスシステムの主な目的は
07:07
is to provide oxygen, to replenish the oxygen that your body consumes.
酸素の供給 つまり
体内で消費される酸素の補充です
07:10
So the main tank, the main critical thing,
特に重要である 主たるタンクは
07:14
is this oxygen gas supply cylinder we have here.
この酸素ガス供給シリンダーです
07:17
But, if we only had an oxygen gas supply cylinder
しかし これだけでは
07:19
we wouldn't be able to go very deep,
すぐに酸素中毒に陥ってしまい
あまり深く潜れないでしょう
07:21
because we'd run into oxygen toxicity very, very quickly.
すぐに酸素中毒に陥ってしまい
あまり深く潜れないでしょう
07:23
So we need another gas, something to dilute the oxygen with.
だから 酸素を薄めるような
他のガスが必要です
07:25
And that, fittingly enough, is called the diluent gas supply.
そしてそれはズバリ
希釈ガスの供給と呼ばれます
07:28
In our applications, we generally put air inside this diluent gas supply,
私たちの方法では 通常
希釈ガス供給制御器に空気を入れます
07:32
because it's a very cheap and easy source of nitrogen.
なぜなら 安価で手軽な
窒素の源だからです
07:36
So that's where we get our nitrogen from.
そこから窒素を得ます
07:39
But, if we want to go deeper, of course, we need another gas supply.
しかし より深く潜るには当然
他のガスが必要です
07:41
We need helium, and the helium is what we really need to go deep.
ヘリウムこそがそれに当たります
07:44
And usually we'll have a slightly larger cylinder
そしてリブリーザーの外側に付けられた
このような大きめのシリンダーを通常用います
07:46
mounted exterior on the rebreather, like this.
そしてリブリーザーの外側に付けられた
このような大きめのシリンダーを通常用います
07:48
And that's what we use to inject, as we start to do our deep dives.
深い潜水を始めるとき
そこからガスを注入します
07:51
We also have a second oxygen cylinder, that's solely as a back-up
2つある酸素シリンダーは
一方の酸素供給に
07:54
in case there's a problem with our first oxygen supply we can continue to breathe.
問題が生じた場合に
呼吸を続けさせるための予備品です
07:57
And the way you manage all these different gases and all these different gas supplies
これらの様々なガスと
供給装置の管理は
08:01
is this really high-tech, sophisticated gas block up on the front here,
容易に手の届く範囲にある
前面に配置された
08:04
where it's easy to reach.
ハイテクで高度な
ガスブロックで行います
08:08
It's got all the valves and knobs and things you need to do
ガスの注入を制御するのに必要な
バルブやスイッチなどが全て付いています
08:10
to inject the right gases at the right time.
ガスの注入を制御するのに必要な
バルブやスイッチなどが全て付いています
08:12
Now, normally you don't have to do that because all of it's done automatically for you
電子制御されており
通常自ら行う必要はありません
08:14
with the electronics, the third system of a rebreather.
それが3つ目の装置です
08:17
The most critical part of a rebreather is the oxygen sensors.
リブリーザーの最も重要な部分は
酸素センサーです
08:19
You need three of them, so that if one of them goes bad, you know which one it is.
酸素センサーが3つあることで
不調を特定できます
08:22
You need voting logic.
それに 多数決回路が必要です
08:25
You also have three microprocessors.
マイクロプロセッサも3つあります
08:27
Any one of those computers can run the entire system,
その内どの2つを失うことになっても
08:29
so if you have to lose two of them,
全システムを動かし続けることができます
08:31
there's also back-up power supplies.
バックアップ電源もあります
08:34
And of course there're multiple displays, to get the information to the diver.
情報を表示するディスプレイも複数あります
08:36
This is the high-tech gadgetry that allows us to do what we do
このようなハイテク機器によって
08:39
on these kinds of deep dives.
深い所を潜る時にに必要なことができるのです
08:41
And I can talk about it all day -- just ask my wife --
一日中話せる内容ですが 
- それは妻に聞いて頂くことにして -
08:43
but I want to move on to something that's kind of much more interesting.
もっと面白い話に移りたいと思います
08:45
I'm going to take you on a deep dive.
皆さんを水深の深い所にお連れします
08:47
I'm going to show you what it's like to do one of these dives that we do.
まずどのように潜水をするかですが
08:49
We start up here on the boat, and for all this high-tech, expensive equipment,
こんなにハイテクで高価な装備でも
ボートの上から
08:51
this is still the best way to get in the water -- just pfft! --
水に飛び込むのが最善の方法です
08:54
flop over the side of the boat.
ボートの端から飛び込みます
08:56
Now, as I showed you in the earlier diagram,
さて 先程の図で示したように
08:58
these reefs that we dive on start out near the surface
潜水するところにある岩礁は
水面近くから
09:01
and they go almost vertically, completely straight down.
ほとんど垂直にまっすぐ伸びています
09:04
So, we drop in the water, and we just sort of go over the edge of this cliff,
ですから 水に入ったら
崖っぷちから飛び降りるようなものです
09:07
and then we just start dropping, dropping, dropping.
そして ただひたすら落下していきます
09:10
People have asked me, "It must take a long time to get there?"
「時間がかかるはず」と言う人もいます
09:12
No, it only takes a couple of minutes to get all the way down
でも 目的の水深約100メートルまで潜るのに
数分しかかかりません
09:14
to three or four hundred feet, which is where we're aiming for.
でも 目的の水深約100メートルまで潜るのに
数分しかかかりません
09:16
It's kind of like skydiving in slow motion.
いわばスローなスカイダイビングです
09:19
It's really a very interesting --
とても面白いです
09:21
you ever see "The Abyss" where Ed Harris, you know,
映画『アビス』でエド・ハリスが
09:23
he's sinking down along the side of the wall?
壁に沿って落ちるのを見たでしょ?
09:25
That's kind of what it feels like. It's pretty amazing.
あんな感じで素晴らしいものです
09:27
Also, when you get down there, you find that the water is very, very clear.
さらに 水は澄みきっています
09:29
It's extremely clear water, because there's hardly any plankton.
プランクトンがほとんどいないためです
09:31
But, when you turn on your light, you look around at the caves,
しかし洞窟を照らして見ると
09:33
and all of a sudden you're confronted with a tremendous amount of diversity,
突如として 多様な生物に遭遇します
09:35
much more than anyone used to believe.
想像よりもはるかに多くのです
09:38
Now not all of it is new species --
すべてが新種というわけではなく
09:40
like that fish you see with the white stripe,
白い縞模様の魚のように
09:43
that's a known species.
既知の種もいます
09:45
But, if you look carefully into the cracks and crevices,
しかし 注意深く割れ目を観察すると
09:47
you'll see little things scurrying all over the place.
あちこちでちょこちょこ動く
小さな生物が見えるでしょう
09:49
There's a just-unbelievable diversity.
信じられないほど多様性があります
09:53
It's not just fish, either.
魚だけにとどまりません
09:55
These are crinoids, sponges, black corals. There're some more fishes.
これらはウミユリ 海綿 クロサンゴです
魚はもっといます
09:57
And those fishes that you see right now are new species.
そして 今見た魚は新種です
10:00
They're still new species because I had a video camera on this dive instead of my net,
網の代わりにビデオカメラを持ち
潜水したため 今なお新種です
10:02
so they're still waiting down there for someone to go find them.
見つけに来るのを
今もそこで待っています
10:06
But this is what it looks like,
しかし このような生息環境は
何キロにもわたります
10:09
and this kind of habitat just goes on and on and on for miles.
しかし このような生息環境は
何キロにもわたります
10:11
This is Papua, New Guinea.
ここはパプア・ニューギニアです
10:14
Now little fishes and invertebrates aren't the only things we see down there.
小魚や無脊椎動物以外の
生物も見られます
10:16
We also see sharks,
例えばサメです
10:19
much more regularly than I would have expected to.
それも思っていたよりも
ずっと頻繁にです
10:21
And we're not quite sure why.
理由はよくわかりませんが
10:24
But what I want you to do right now is imagine yourself 400 feet underwater,
しかし 皆さん想像してください
10:26
with all this high-tech gear on your back,
水深約120メートルでハイテク装置を背負い
10:28
you're in a remote reef off Papua, New Guinea,
パプア・ニューギニアの遠く
離れた沖合にある岩礁
10:30
thousands of miles from the nearest recompression chamber,
それも最も近い(酸素治療を行う)減圧室から
数千キロ離れた場所で
10:32
and you're completely surrounded by sharks.
サメに完全に包囲されているのを
10:35
Video: Look at those ...
(映像)あれを見て…
10:38
Uh-oh ... uh-oh!
おっとっと!
10:40
I think we have their attention. (Laughter)
注目を集めているようだ(笑)
10:42
Richard Pyle: When you start talking like Donald Duck,
リチャード・パイル:
ドナルドダックみたいに話すと
10:46
there's no situation in the world that can seem tense.
緊張感は感じられません
10:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
10:51
So, we're down there, and this is at 400 feet --
水深は約120メートルですが --
10:54
that's looking straight up, by the way,
まっすぐ上を見てみると
10:57
so you can get a sense of how far away the surface is.
どの位深くもぐってきたか分ります
10:58
And if you're a biologist and you know about sharks,
皆さんが生物学者でサメに詳しい方なら
11:00
and you want to assess, you know, how much jeopardy am I really in here,
どの位私が危険なことか
考えてしまいますね
11:02
there's one question that sort of jumps to the forefront of your mind immediately
でもフロンティアを探検していたら
11:06
which is --
すぐにこんな疑問が湧くことでしょう
11:10
Diver 1 (Video): What kind of sharks?
(映像)ダイバー1:サメの種類は?
11:12
Diver 2: Uh, silvertip sharks.
ダイバー2:ツマジロだよ
11:15
Diver 1: Oh.
ダイバー1:おお
11:17
RP: Silvertip sharks -- they're actually three species of sharks here.
リチャード:
実は3種類のサメがいます
11:18
The silvertips are the one with the white edges on the fin,
ひれの先端が白いのがツマジロです
11:20
and there're also gray reef sharks and some hammerheads off in the distance.
他にもオグロメジロザメや
シュモクザメが遠方にいます
11:23
And yes, it's a little nerve-wracking.
そうです 緊張感が少しあります
11:26
Diver 2 (Video): Hoo!
(映像)ダイバー2:ふー!
11:30
That little guy is frisky! (Laughter)
あの小さいやつはよくじゃれます!(笑)
11:33
Now, you've seen video like this on TV a lot,
さて テレビでこうした映像を
たくさん見てきたと思いますが
11:38
and it's very intimidating, and I think it gives the wrong impression about sharks.
サメが怖い生物だと
誤解を招くものばかりです
11:42
Sharks are actually not very dangerous animals
サメは実際そんなに危険ではなく
11:45
and that's why we weren't worried much, why we were joking around down there.
だからあまり心配せず
悪ふざけをしていたのです
11:47
More people are killed by pigs, more people are killed by lightning strikes,
イングランドでは
ブタや落雷が原因で死ぬ人や
11:50
more people are killed at soccer games in England.
サッカーの試合で死ぬ人の方が
多いです
11:53
There's a lot of other ways you can die.
他にもたくさんの死因があります
11:56
And I'm not making that stuff up.
でっち上げではありません
11:58
Coconuts! You can get killed by a coconut more likely than killed by a shark.
ココナッツもです!
サメよりも可能性は高いです
12:00
So sharks aren't quite as dangerous as most people make them out to be.
そのため サメは世間が言うほど
危険ではありません
12:03
Now, I don't know if any of you get U.S. News and World Report --
さて 『USニューズ&ワールド・レポート』を
お持ちか知りませんが
12:07
I got the recent issue.
最近の号を手に入れました
12:10
There's a cover story all about the great explorers of our time.
探検家について掲載されています
12:12
The last article is an article entitled "No New Frontiers."
最後の記事のタイトルは『新天地はない』です
[科学における発見とは背びれに余分な棘がある
グッピーを見つけるようなことだ]
12:14
It questions whether or not there really are any new frontiers out there,
新天地は本当に無いのかどうか
[科学における発見とは背びれに余分な棘がある
グッピーを見つけるようなことだ]
12:18
whether there are any real, true, hardcore discoveries that can still be made.
まだ真の発見があるかは疑問です
[科学における発見とは背びれに余分な棘がある
グッピーを見つけるようなことだ]
12:22
And this is my favorite line from the article.
これが記事の中で好きな文です
[科学における発見とは背びれに余分な棘がある
グッピーを見つけるようなことだ]
12:25
As a fish nerd, I have to laugh, because you know they don't call us fish nerds for nothing --
魚バカとして笑ってしまいます
彼らはそう呼びませんから
12:27
we actually do get excited about finding a new dorsal spine in a guppy.
グッピーの新しい背棘を発見し
私たちは本当に興奮しています
12:30
But, it's much more than that.
しかしあれ以上のものがあります
12:35
And, I want to show you a few of the guppies we've found over the years.
それでは 数年間で発見したグッピーを
いくつかお見せします
12:37
This one's -- you know, you can see how ugly it is.
この魚ですが
醜さが分かりますよね
12:41
Even if you ignore the scientific value of this thing,
たとえこの魚の科学的価値を
無視しても
12:44
just look at the monetary value of this thing.
貨幣価値だけは考えてください
12:48
A couple of these ended up getting sold through the aquarium trade to Japan,
最終的に数匹が
日本の水族館に取引されました
12:50
where they sold for 15,000 dollars apiece.
1匹1万5千ドルでです
12:53
That's half-a-million dollars per pound.
つまり 約450グラムで
50万ドルになります
12:55
Here's another new angelfish we discovered.
これも新種のエンゼルフィッシュです
12:58
This one we actually first discovered back in the air days -- the bad old air days,
実はこの魚を最初に発見したのは
空気潜水の時代 つまり
13:00
as we used to say -- when we were doing these kind of dives with air.
空気を使用していたときでした
13:04
We were at 360 feet.
水深約110メートルにいました
13:06
And I remember coming up from one of these deep dives, and I had this fog,
覚えているのは 潜水から戻ると
霧がかかったような
13:08
and the narcosis takes a little while to, you know, fade away.
酔った状態が少し続き
次第に消えていったことです
13:11
It's sort of like sobering up.
酔いがさめるような感じです
13:14
And I had this vague recollection of seeing these yellow fish with a black spot,
黒い斑点のある黄色い魚を見て
13:16
and I thought, "Aw, damn. I should have caught one.
こう思いました
「ああ 畜生 捕まえるべきだった
13:18
I think that's a new species."
新種だったんだろうな」
13:21
And then, eventually, I got around to looking in my bucket.
最後に バケツを覗いたのですが
13:23
Sure enough, I had caught one -- I just completely forgot that I had caught one. (Laughter)
1匹捕まえたのを
すっかり忘れてました(笑)
13:25
And so this one we decided to give the name Centropyge narcosis to.
そして ナーク(昏睡)・エンゼルフィッシュと
命名しました (笑)
13:27
So that's it's official scientific name,
深海に住む習性に関連した
正式な学名です
13:31
in reference to its deep-dwelling habits.
深海に住む習性に関連した
正式な学名です
13:33
And this is another neat one.
そしてこれは均整のとれた魚です
13:35
When we first found it, we weren't even sure what family this thing belonged to,
当初何科に属すかも不明でした
13:37
so we just called it the Dr. Seuss fish,
そこで ドクター・スース・フィッシュと呼びました
13:39
because it looked like something out of one of those books.
スースの本から出てきたように見えたからです
13:41
Now, this one's pretty cool.
さて これはとても素敵な魚です
13:43
If you go to Papua, New Guinea, and go down 300 feet,
パプアニューギニアで90メートルほど潜ると
13:46
you're going to see these big mounds.
こういった ちょっとした小山があります
13:48
And this may be kind of hard to see, but they're about --
見づらいかもしれませんが
13:50
oh, a couple meters in diameter.
直径数メートルです
13:52
If you look closely, you'll see there's
よく見ると そこに出入りする
小さな白や灰色の魚がいます
13:54
a little white fish and gray fish that hangs out near them.
よく見ると そこに出入りする
小さな白や灰色の魚がいます
13:56
Well, it turns out this little white fish builds these giant mounds,
この白い魚が山を築いているのです
13:58
one pebble at a time.
小石を1つずつ使ってです
14:00
It's really extraordinary to find something like this.
こんなすごい発見はあまりありません
14:02
It's not just new species: it's new behavior, it's new ecology it's all kind of new things.
新種だけではなく新しい行動や生態系など
様々な発見があります
14:04
So, what I'm going to show you right now, very quickly,
そして さっとお見せしたいのは
14:07
is just a sampling of a few of the new species we've discovered.
私たちが発見した
いくつかの新種の見本です
14:09
What's extraordinary about this is not just the sheer number of species we're finding --
驚くべきは
単に発見した数ではありません
14:13
although as you can see that's pretty amazing, this is only half of what we've found --
その数にも驚かれるでしょうが それでも
実際の数のたった半分です
14:16
what's extraordinary is how quickly we find them.
並外れているのはその発見のペースです
14:19
We're up to seven new species per hour of time we spend at that depth.
1時間当たり7種類のペースです
14:23
Now, if you go to an Amazon jungle and fog a tree, you may get a lot of bugs,
アマゾンのジャングルで木を調べれば
たくさん昆虫が見つかると思いますが
14:26
but for fishes, there's nowhere in the world
魚となると どこを探しても
14:31
you can get seven new species per hour of time.
1時間で7種類もの新種を発見できる
場所はありません
14:33
Now, we've done some back of the envelope calculations,
ちょっと概算してみると
14:36
and we're predicting that there are probably on the order of 2,000 to 2,500 new species
インド太平洋だけでおそらく2千から2千5百種類の
14:38
in the Indo-Pacific alone.
新種がいると予想されます
14:42
There are only five to six thousand known species.
既知の種はたった5千から6千です
14:44
So a very large percentage of what is out there isn't really known.
ですからかなりの割合の種がまだ知られていないのです
14:46
We thought we had a handle on all the reef fish diversity -- evidently not.
サンゴや魚の多様性を
理解したつもりでいただけでした
14:50
And I'm going to just close on a very somber note.
では 湿っぽく話を締めます
14:53
At the beginning I told you that I was going to show you two extraordinary photographs.
冒頭で特別な写真を2枚
お見せすると申し上げました
14:55
This is the second extraordinary photograph I'm going to show you.
これが2枚目の写真です
15:00
This one was taken at the exact moment I was down there filming those sharks.
これは あそこまで潜って
サメを撮影していた時のものです
15:02
This was taken exactly 300 feet above my head.
私の頭上90メートルで撮られました
15:07
And the reason this photograph is extraordinary
そしてこの写真が特別なのは
15:09
is because it captures a moment in the very last minute of a person's life.
人の命の最後の瞬間をとらえた
ものだからです
15:12
Less than 60 seconds after this picture was taken, this guy was dead.
写真が撮られて1分もしないうちに
この男は死にました
15:16
When we recovered his body, we figured out what had gone wrong.
遺体を発見したとき
何が起きたかを理解しました
15:20
He had made a very simple mistake.
彼は単純なミスをしたのです
15:24
He turned the wrong valve when he filled his cylinder --
誤ったバルブを回したため
15:26
he had 80 percent oxygen in his tank when he should have had 40.
タンク内の酸素濃度が倍の80%になっていました
15:28
He had an oxygen toxicity seizure and he drowned.
彼は酸素中毒による発作で
溺れました
15:30
The reason I show this -- not to put a downer on everything --
これをお見せしたのは
がっかりさせるためではなく
15:33
but I just want to use it to key off my philosophy of life in general,
私の人生哲学を
明らかにしたいからです
15:36
which is that we all have two goals.
それは 私たち全員が2つの目的を
持っているということです
15:41
The first goal we share with every other living thing on this planet,
全生物共通の1つ目の目的は地球上の他の生物と共に
15:43
which is to survive. I call it perpetuation:
生きのびること これを永続化と呼びます
15:45
the survival of the species and survival of ourselves,
種および自身の生存は
15:47
because they're both about perpetuating the genome.
それら両方ともが
ゲノムを永続させるからです
15:51
And the second goal, for those of us who have mastered that first goal,
そして1つ目の目的を十分理解したら
次の目的は
15:54
is to -- you know, you call it spiritual fulfillment, you can call it financial success,
精神的な達成や経済的成功など
15:56
you can call it any number of different things.
いくらでも他の呼び方ができます
16:01
I call it seeking joy --
私はこの幸福の追求を
喜びの探求と呼んでいます
16:03
this pursuit of happiness.
私はこの幸福の追求を
喜びの探求と呼んでいます
16:05
So, I guess my theme on this is this guy lived his life to the fullest,
だからこのテーマから推測すると
この男は精一杯生きました
16:07
he absolutely did.
だからこのテーマから推測すると
この男は精一杯生きました
16:10
You have to balance those two goals.
これら2つの目的のバランスが
必要です
16:12
If you live your whole life in fear --
ビクビクして一生を過ごしても
16:14
I mean, life is a sexually transmitted disease with 100 percent mortality.
生命は死亡率100%の性感染症のようなものです
16:16
So, you can't live your life in fear.
ですので ビクビクして生きてはいけません
16:19
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:22
I thought that was an old one.
周知のことだと思います
16:24
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:26
But, at the same time you don't want to get so focused on rule number two,
しかし同時に
1つ目のゴールを無視してまで
16:27
or goal number two, that you neglect goal number one.
2つ目の目的に集中したくないですよね
16:31
Because once you're dead, you really can't enjoy anything after that.
死んでしまったら
その後は何も楽しめませんから
16:34
I wish you all the best of luck in maintaining that balance in your future endeavors.
バランスを維持した輝かしい未来を
お祈りしています
16:37
Thanks.
ありがとう
16:41
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:43
Translated by Yuji Tomiyama
Reviewed by Tomoyuki Suzuki

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

Richard Pyle - Ichthyologist
Ichthyologist Richard Pyle is a fish nerd. In his quest to discover and document new species of fish, he has also become a trailblazing exploratory diver and a pioneer of database technology.

Why you should listen

A pioneer of the dive world, Richard Pyle discovers new biodiversity on the cliffs of coral reefs. He was among the first to use rebreather technology to explore depths between 200 and 500 feet, an area often called the "Twilight Zone." During his dives, he has identified and documented hundreds of new species. Author of scientific, technical and popular articles, his expeditions have also been featured in the IMAX film Coral Reef Adventure, the BBC series Pacific Abyss and many more. In 2005, he received the NOGI Award, the most prestigious distinction of the diving world.

Currently, he is continuing his research at the Bernice P. Bishop Museum, outside Honolulu, Hawai'i, and is affiliated with the museum's comprehensive Hawaii Biological Survey. He also serves on the Board of Directors for the Association for Marine Exploration, of which he is a founding member. He continues to explore the sea and spearhead rebreather technology, and is a major contributor to the Encyclopedia of Life.

More profile about the speaker
Richard Pyle | Speaker | TED.com