sponsored links
TED2012

Andrew Stanton: The clues to a great story

アンドリュー・スタントン「すばらしい物語を創る方法」

February 28, 2012

「トイ・ストーリー」「ウォーリー」を作った映画制作者 アンドリュー・スタントンが物語の伝え方について、結末から始まりへと遡りながら教えてくれます。 (一部不適切な表現が含まれます)

Andrew Stanton - Filmmaker
Andrew Stanton has made you laugh and cry. The writer behind the three "Toy Story" movies and the writer/director of "WALL-E," he releases his new film, "John Carter," in March. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
A tourist is backpacking
バックパッカーが
スコットランド高地を
00:15
through the highlands of Scotland,
旅行中に 何か飲もうと
00:17
and he stops at a pub to get a drink.
パブに立ち寄ったところ ビール一杯で粘っている
老人と バーテンがいるだけでした
00:19
And the only people in there is a bartender
パブに立ち寄ったところ ビール一杯で粘っている
老人と バーテンがいるだけでした
00:21
and an old man nursing a beer.
旅行者はビールを1杯注文し
00:23
And he orders a pint, and they sit in silence for a while.
みんなしばらく黙って座っていましたが
00:25
And suddenly the old man turns to him and goes,
突然老人が 彼に話しかけました
00:27
"You see this bar?
「このバーどうだい?ワシが—
00:29
I built this bar with my bare hands
国中の良木を使って
00:31
from the finest wood in the county.
素手で作った
00:33
Gave it more love and care than my own child.
自分の子よりも手をかけ
愛を込めたんだ
00:35
But do they call me MacGregor the bar builder? No."
世間のやつらはバーを作った
マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ」
00:38
Points out the window.
次に 一方の窓を指さして
00:41
"You see that stone wall out there?
「あの石壁が見えるか?
00:43
I built that stone wall with my bare hands.
ワシが素手で作った
石を持ってきては
00:45
Found every stone, placed them just so through the rain and the cold.
雨の日も凍える日も
壁に積んでいった なのに
00:48
But do they call me MacGregor the stone wall builder? No."
世間のやつらは石壁を作った
マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ」
00:51
Points out the window.
また もう一方の窓を指さして
00:54
"You see that pier on the lake out there?
「あの湖の桟橋が見えるか?
00:56
I built that pier with my bare hands.
ワシが素手で作った
杭を持ってきては
00:58
Drove the pilings against the tide of the sand, plank by plank.
砂浜に打ちこんで 板を
1枚1枚はめてった
01:00
But do they call me MacGregor the pier builder? No.
世間のやつらは桟橋を作った
マグレガーと呼んだか?よばねぇ
01:04
But you fuck one goat ... "
それが いっぺんヤギをヤっただけでよ...」
01:08
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:11
Storytelling --
物語を語ること—
01:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:24
is joke telling.
それは冗談を言うのと一緒です
01:26
It's knowing your punchline,
オチや 結末を
01:29
your ending,
念頭に置きつつ
01:31
knowing that everything you're saying, from the first sentence to the last,
最初から最後のひと言まで
伝え方を全て操って
01:33
is leading to a singular goal,
1つの結末に導くということです
01:36
and ideally confirming some truth
理想としては 人間とは何か
01:38
that deepens our understandings
その理解を深めるような
01:41
of who we are as human beings.
ちょっとした真実を
確かめられるものです
01:43
We all love stories.
みんな物語が大好きです
01:46
We're born for them.
本能的に求めます
01:48
Stories affirm who we are.
自分が何者なのかを確認するのです
01:50
We all want affirmations that our lives have meaning.
人生に意味があることを
確認したいのです
01:52
And nothing does a greater affirmation
物語で人と人がつながる時ほど
01:54
than when we connect through stories.
これを確かめられるものはありません
01:56
It can cross the barriers of time,
過去 現在 未来の
01:58
past, present and future,
時間の壁を超えるものです
02:00
and allow us to experience
創作であろうと事実であろうと
02:02
the similarities between ourselves
人々の類似性を体験し
02:04
and through others, real and imagined.
登場人物の立場になって
追体験することを可能にします
02:06
The children's television host Mr. Rogers
子供番組のホスト
ミスターロジャースは
02:09
always carried in his wallet
ソーシャルワーカーの
02:12
a quote from a social worker
こんな言葉をいつも
財布に入れていました
02:14
that said, "Frankly, there isn't anyone you couldn't learn to love
「はっきり言って その人の物語を聞くと
愛せない人なんて誰もいないのです」
02:17
once you've heard their story."
「はっきり言って その人の物語を聞くと
愛せない人なんて誰もいないのです」
02:20
And the way I like to interpret that
私はこう解釈したいのです
02:22
is probably the greatest story commandment,
素晴らしい物語というものは
こんな鉄則を守っているものです
02:24
which is "Make me care" --
「関心を持たせよ」
02:29
please, emotionally,
感情的な面であれ
知的な面であれ
02:32
intellectually, aesthetically,
美しさの面であれ
02:34
just make me care.
ただただ関心を引きつけるということ
02:36
We all know what it's like to not care.
もちろんなかなか気を惹けません
02:38
You've gone through hundreds of TV channels,
何百ものTVのチャンネルを
次から次へ切り替え
02:40
just switching channel after channel,
そしてその中で突然
02:43
and then suddenly you actually stop on one.
どこかのチャンネルを見始めます
02:45
It's already halfway over,
興味を引ければ 半分は
終わったようなものです
02:47
but something's caught you and you're drawn in and you care.
何かが心を捉え チャンネルに
引き込まれ 気になって見ます
02:49
That's not by chance,
そのチャンネルにしたのは偶然じゃなく
02:52
that's by design.
意図的に気を引くように作られてます
02:54
So it got me thinking, what if I told you my history was story,
それで私自身の来歴を物語として
語ったらどうかと思いつきました
02:56
how I was born for it,
私がいかに創作すべく生まれ
03:00
how I learned along the way this subject matter?
どのように物語の創り方を 身に付けて
きたかというストーリーです
03:02
And to make it more interesting,
今日はもっと楽しんでもらう為に
03:05
we'll start from the ending
結末から始めて
03:07
and we'll go to the beginning.
始まりへと話を進めることにしましょう
03:09
And so if I were going to give you the ending of this story,
そうですね 結末を
教えてしまうとしたら
03:11
it would go something like this:
それはこんな感じです
03:14
And that's what ultimately led me
「そんなわけで
03:16
to speaking to you here at TED
こうして TED で 皆さんに
03:18
about story.
物語について語るまでになったのです」
03:20
And the most current story lesson that I've had
物語の教訓で 最新のものは
03:23
was completing the film I've just done
今年 2012年に完成したばかりの
03:26
this year in 2012.
映画を作る過程にありました
03:28
The film is "John Carter." It's based on a book called "The Princess of Mars,"
映画「ジョン・カーター」は
「火星のプリンセス」が原作です
03:30
which was written by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
エドガー・ライス・バローズの著作です
03:33
And Edgar Rice Burroughs actually put himself
バローズは映画の中で
物語の語り部として
03:35
as a character inside this movie, and as the narrator.
登場しています
03:38
And he's summoned by his rich uncle, John Carter, to his mansion
彼は大金持ちのおじ ジョン・カーターからの
「すぐきてくれ」という電報で豪邸に呼び寄せられます
03:41
with a telegram saying, "See me at once."
彼は大金持ちのおじ ジョン・カーターからの
「すぐきてくれ」という電報で豪邸に呼び寄せられます
03:44
But once he gets there,
訪ねて行ってみると
03:46
he's found out that his uncle has mysteriously passed away
おじが 既に謎に満ちた死をとげていて
03:48
and been entombed in a mausoleum on the property.
敷地内の霊廟に葬られたことを知ります
03:52
(Video) Butler: You won't find a keyhole.
(ビデオ) 執事: 鍵穴はございません
03:56
Thing only opens from the inside.
中からしか開けられない
ようになっております
03:58
He insisted,
旦那様は 死化粧も
04:01
no embalming, no open coffin,
弔問も 葬列も
04:03
no funeral.
絶対するなとおっしゃいました
04:05
You don't acquire the kind of wealth your uncle commanded
まぁ 普通の人のようにしていたら おじさまのような
富を我がモノにすることはできないのでしょうね
04:07
by being like the rest of us, huh?
まぁ 普通の人のようにしていたら おじさまのような
富を我がモノにすることはできないのでしょうね
04:09
Come, let's go inside.
さぁ 家に入りましょう
04:12
AS: What this scene is doing, and it did in the book,
スタントン: この場面は本でも同じですが
04:33
is it's fundamentally making a promise.
何かが起こりそうと期待させます
04:35
It's making a promise to you
この場面は 物語が見るに値する—
04:37
that this story will lead somewhere that's worth your time.
ものとなっていくのを期待させます
04:39
And that's what all good stories should do at the beginning, is they should give you a promise.
よくできた物語は全て 最初に期待を
持たせるようにしないとだめです
04:41
You could do it an infinite amount of ways.
期待を持たす方法は無数にあります
04:44
Sometimes it's as simple as "Once upon a time ... "
「昔むかし あるところに」のような
単純な出だしもあります
04:46
These Carter books always had Edgar Rice Burroughs as a narrator in it.
カーターシリーズには バローズが
常に語り部として登場します
04:50
And I always thought it was such a fantastic device.
このしかけは凄いと思っていました
04:53
It's like a guy inviting you around the campfire,
まるで たき火を囲んでの
談話に誘っているかのよう
04:55
or somebody in a bar saying, "Here, let me tell you a story.
あるいは バーで「面白い話があるんだ
いや オレじゃなくて 他のやつに起こった事だけど
04:58
It didn't happen to me, it happened to somebody else,
あるいは バーで「面白い話があるんだ
いや オレじゃなくて 他のやつに起こった事だけど
05:01
but it's going to be worth your time."
聞く価値はあるぞ」と
話しかけてくる人のようです
05:03
A well told promise
うまく引き起こされた期待というのは
05:05
is like a pebble being pulled back in a slingshot
引き絞ったパチンコから放たれた石のように
話の結末までグングンと
05:07
and propels you forward through the story
引き絞ったパチンコから放たれた石のように
話の結末までグングンと
05:11
to the end.
引っ張っていくのです
05:13
In 2008,
さて 2008年には
05:15
I pushed all the theories that I had on story at the time
それまでに学んでいた
物語に関する全ての理論を
05:17
to the limits of my understanding on this project.
極限まで押し進めて
この作品を作りました
05:20
(Video) (Mechanical Sounds)
(ビデオ) (機械音)
05:23
♫ And that is all ♫
♫ 愛とは ♫
05:53
♫ that love's about ♫
♫ そういうもの ♫
05:58
♫ And we'll recall ♫
♫ 最後の時に ♫
06:04
♫ when time runs out ♫
♫ 思い起こすでしょう ♫
06:09
♫ That it only ♫
♫ 一生の愛は・・・ ♫
06:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:24
AS: Storytelling without dialogue.
スタントン: 会話によらない伝え方
06:26
It's the purest form of cinematic storytelling.
もっとも純粋に映画的な伝え方で
06:28
It's the most inclusive approach you can take.
これ以上に全体的な
アプローチはありません
06:30
It confirmed something I really had a hunch on,
これを通して 観客は主題を
06:33
is that the audience
自分で見つけたがっているという
06:35
actually wants to work for their meal.
直感が確信になりました
06:37
They just don't want to know that they're doing that.
意識せず そうしたがっているのです
06:39
That's your job as a storyteller,
物語を作る側の仕事は
06:42
is to hide the fact
観客に主題を見つけさせていることを
06:44
that you're making them work for their meal.
うまく隠すということです
06:46
We're born problem solvers.
人は問題を解こうとします
06:48
We're compelled to deduce
人は推論や推理をしたがります
06:50
and to deduct,
これは人が現実世界でも
06:52
because that's what we do in real life.
そうしているからです
06:54
It's this well-organized absence of information
緻密に計算された情報の欠落が
06:56
that draws us in.
人を引き込みます
06:59
There's a reason that we're all attracted to an infant or a puppy.
人が幼児や子犬に惹かれるのには
理由があります
07:01
It's not just that they're damn cute;
すごくかわいいだけじゃなく
07:04
it's because they can't completely express
幼児や子犬は 考えていること
したいことを全て
07:06
what they're thinking and what their intentions are.
表現できるわけではないからです
07:09
And it's like a magnet.
まるで磁石のようです
07:11
We can't stop ourselves
人は 途中までになっている文を
07:13
from wanting to complete the sentence and fill it in.
完成せずにはいられません
07:15
I first started
このしかけが分かり始めたのは
07:17
really understanding this storytelling device
ボブ・ピーターソンと
「ファインディング・ニモ」の
07:19
when I was writing with Bob Peterson on "Finding Nemo."
脚本を書いていたときです
07:21
And we would call this the unifying theory of two plus two.
この結びつけざるを得ないしかけを
「2 + 2 の法則」と呼びました
07:23
Make the audience put things together.
観客に手掛かりから推理させます
07:26
Don't give them four,
答えの4を見せず
07:28
give them two plus two.
2 + 2 を見せるのです
07:30
The elements you provide and the order you place them in
どんな手掛かりを
どういう順序で見せるかが
07:32
is crucial to whether you succeed or fail at engaging the audience.
観客を引き込めるかの
成否を握っています
07:35
Editors and screenwriters have known this all along.
編集者や脚本家には このことが
ずっと分かっていました
07:38
It's the invisible application
気付かない内に観客を物語に
07:41
that holds our attention to story.
惹きつける方法なのです
07:43
I don't mean to make it sound
これは正に科学で立証されてると
07:45
like this is an actual exact science, it's not.
言うつもりはありません
そういったものではありません
07:47
That's what's so special about stories,
これは物語の素晴らしいところです
07:50
they're not a widget, they aren't exact.
機械のようなきっちりした
ものではないのです
07:52
Stories are inevitable, if they're good,
いい物語は必然性を持ちながら
07:55
but they're not predictable.
先を読むことができません
07:57
I took a seminar in this year
今年 演技指導者であるジュディス・
ウェストンのセミナーを受けて
07:59
with an acting teacher named Judith Weston.
今年 演技指導者であるジュディス・
ウェストンのセミナーを受けて
08:02
And I learned a key insight to character.
人物像に関する重要な洞察を学びました
08:05
She believed that all well-drawn characters
彼女によれば よく描かれた
キャラクターには全て
08:07
have a spine.
一本背骨が通っているのです
08:10
And the idea is that the character has an inner motor,
キャラクターを内面から突き動かす
08:12
a dominant, unconscious goal that they're striving for,
無意識ながら支配的な
願望があるのです
08:14
an itch that they can't scratch.
掻き切れない 痒みのようなものです
08:17
She gave a wonderful example of Michael Corleone,
「ゴットファーザー」でアル・パチーノが演じた
マイケル・コルレオーネが良い例として挙げられていました
08:19
Al Pacino's character in "The Godfather,"
「ゴットファーザー」でアル・パチーノが演じた
マイケル・コルレオーネが良い例として挙げられていました
08:21
and that probably his spine
この役の背骨は恐らく
08:23
was to please his father.
父親を喜ばせるところにあります
08:25
And it's something that always drove all his choices.
それが常に彼の行動を決めています
08:27
Even after his father died,
父親が亡くなってからでさえも
08:29
he was still trying to scratch that itch.
その痒みを掻き続けているのです
08:31
I took to this like a duck to water.
私はこの背骨の話には
最初から納得できました
08:35
Wall-E's was to find the beauty.
ウォーリーの場合は
美を追い求め
08:38
Marlin's, the father in "Finding Nemo,"
「ファインディング・ニモ」の
父親マーリンは
08:41
was to prevent harm.
子を守ろうとし
08:44
And Woody's was to do what was best for his child.
ウッディは 持ち主である子供
の為に全力を尽くします
08:47
And these spines don't always drive you to make the best choices.
この背骨によって 必ずしも最善の
選択ができるわけではありません
08:50
Sometimes you can make some horrible choices with them.
ときには 背骨がとんでもない
決断をさせることもあります
08:53
I'm really blessed to be a parent,
私は祝福され親になりました
08:56
and watching my children grow, I really firmly believe
子供たちが成長するのを見ていると 人はなんらかの
気質や才能を持って生まれてくると 思えてなりません
08:58
that you're born with a temperament and you're wired a certain way,
子供たちが成長するのを見ていると 人はなんらかの
気質や才能を持って生まれてくると 思えてなりません
09:01
and you don't have any say about it,
持って生まれてくるものは
選ぶこともできないし
09:04
and there's no changing it.
変えることもできません
09:07
All you can do is learn to recognize it
できるのは 気質や才能を認識することと
09:09
and own it.
自分の本分として活かしていくことだけです
09:12
And some of us are born with temperaments that are positive,
良い気質を持って生まれもすれば
09:15
some are negative.
悪い気質を持って生まれることもあります
09:17
But a major threshold is passed
悪い面も 突き動かす背骨を受け入れて
09:19
when you mature enough
自ら制御できるように成長すれば
09:22
to acknowledge what drives you
大きな分岐点を
09:24
and to take the wheel and steer it.
超えることができます
09:26
As parents, you're always learning who your children are.
親としては常に 自分の子が
どんな子かを学び
09:28
They're learning who they are.
子供たちも日々
自分について知っていき
09:31
And you're still learning who you are.
大人自身もまた 自分について
学び続けています
09:33
So we're all learning all the time.
全ての人が常に探り続けているのです
09:35
And that's why change is fundamental in story.
そのため変化は物語の
基礎的な要素となります
09:38
If things go static, stories die,
変化がないと物語は
死んでしまいます
09:41
because life is never static.
変化のない人生なんてないからです
09:43
In 1998,
1998年に「トイストーリー」と
「バグズ・ライフ」の
09:46
I had finished writing "Toy Story" and "A Bug's Life"
脚本を書き終えて 映画の—
09:48
and I was completely hooked on screenwriting.
脚本作りに病みつきになりました
09:50
So I wanted to become much better at it and learn anything I could.
もっと上手く書きたくなって
その為にどんなことでも学びました
09:52
So I researched everything I possibly could.
調べられるすべてのことを調べました
09:55
And I finally came across this fantastic quote
そしてついに イギリスの劇作家
09:58
by a British playwright, William Archer:
ウィリアム・アーチャーの
素晴らしい名言に出会いました
10:00
"Drama is anticipation
「劇とは不確実なものに
10:03
mingled with uncertainty."
取り巻かれた期待だ」という言葉です
10:05
It's an incredibly insightful definition.
信じられないほど
示唆に富んだ定義です
10:07
When you're telling a story,
物語を伝えるときに
10:10
have you constructed anticipation?
期待感をうまく構築しているか?
10:12
In the short-term, have you made me want to know
瞬間瞬間に 次に何が起こるのか
10:14
what will happen next?
知りたいと思わせているか?
10:16
But more importantly,
さらに重要なのは 全体として
10:18
have you made me want to know
最終的にどんな風に終わるのかを
10:20
how it will all conclude in the long-term?
知りたいと思わせているか?
10:22
Have you constructed honest conflicts
結果が思った通りにならないかも
10:24
with truth that creates doubt
と思わせるような事実を入れて
10:26
in what the outcome might be?
正当な緊張感を組み込んだか?
10:28
An example would be in "Finding Nemo,"
「ファインディング・ニモ」を例に出すなら
10:30
in the short tension, you were always worried,
瞬間瞬間には マーリンに言われたことを
10:32
would Dory's short-term memory
ドーリーがすぐに忘れてしまうことに
10:34
make her forget whatever she was being told by Marlin.
常にやきもきさせられます
10:36
But under that was this global tension
同時に 物語中ずっと 果たして—
10:38
of will we ever find Nemo
大海原の中で ニモを見つけられるのかが
10:40
in this huge, vast ocean?
気になっています
10:42
In our earliest days at Pixar,
ピクサー創業当時は
10:44
before we truly understood the invisible workings of story,
物語に隠されたしかけを
掴んでいなかったので
10:46
we were simply a group of guys just going on our gut, going on our instincts.
本能や感じるままに何でも
試している ただの集団でした
10:49
And it's interesting to see
こうした挑戦が
10:52
how that led us places
結構いい線までたどりつくまでの
10:54
that were actually pretty good.
道のりを辿るのは面白いです
10:56
You've got to remember that in this time of year,
1993年当時のことを
思い起こしてください
10:58
1993,
成功したアニメ映画といえば
11:01
what was considered a successful animated picture
「リトルマーメイド」や
「美女と野獣」だったり
11:03
was "The Little Mermaid," "Beauty and the Beast,"
「アラジン」や「ライオンキング」
と考えられていた
11:06
"Aladdin," "Lion King."
あの時代です
11:09
So when we pitched "Toy Story" to Tom Hanks for the first time,
「トイストーリー」への出演依頼を
トム・ハンクスに最初にした時
11:11
he walked in and he said,
やってきた彼が開口一番
11:14
"You don't want me to sing, do you?"
「歌えって言うんじゃないよね?」
11:16
And I thought that epitomized perfectly
これは その当時 みんなが
11:18
what everybody thought animation had to be at the time.
アニメをどう思っていたか
正に象徴するひと言だと思いました
11:20
But we really wanted to prove
しかし アニメでこれまでとは
11:23
that you could tell stories completely different in animation.
全く違う方法で物語が伝えられることを
証明したかったのです
11:25
We didn't have any influence then,
この頃の我々には影響力がなかったので
11:28
so we had a little secret list of rules
密かに持っていた
11:30
that we kept to ourselves.
私たちだけのルールがありました
11:32
And they were: No songs,
そのルールとは 歌を入れない
11:34
no "I want" moment,
願い事のシーンを入れない
11:37
no happy village,
幸せな村を入れない
11:39
no love story.
ラブ・ストーリーを入れない でした
11:41
And the irony is that, in the first year,
皮肉なことに 最初の年の
11:43
our story was not working at all
物語は上手くいっていませんでした
11:45
and Disney was panicking.
ディズニー社はパニック状態でした
11:47
So they privately got advice
そして 誰かは言いませんが
ディズニーは有名な作詞家から
11:49
from a famous lyricist, who I won't name,
内々に助言を受け
11:52
and he faxed them some suggestions.
改善案がファックスされました
11:54
And we got a hold of that fax.
そのファックスを私たちも入手して
11:56
And the fax said,
見てみると そこに書かれていたのは
11:58
there should be songs,
歌を入れないと駄目
12:00
there should be an "I want" song,
願い事の歌を入れないと駄目
12:02
there should be a happy village song,
幸せな村の歌を入れないと駄目
12:04
there should be a love story
ラブストーリーを入れて
12:06
and there should be a villain.
悪役もいないと駄目ですよ
12:08
And thank goodness
幸いに 私たちは 当時
12:10
we were just too young, rebellious and contrarian at the time.
まだ青く 反抗的で
人と反対のことをしたいと—
12:12
That just gave us more determination
思っていたので もっと良い作品が
作れると証明しようと
12:15
to prove that you could build a better story.
よけいに団結と決心を固めたのでした
12:18
And a year after that, we did conquer it.
1年後に 勝利が訪れました
12:20
And it just went to prove
この成功によって
物語の伝え方には
12:22
that storytelling has guidelines,
決められたルールはなく
12:24
not hard, fast rules.
方向性があるだけだと証明しました
12:26
Another fundamental thing we learned
他に分かってきた基礎的なことは
12:28
was about liking your main character.
キャラクターを感じよく
させることでした
12:30
And we had naively thought,
我々は「トイストーリー」の
ウッディを最終的には
12:32
well Woody in "Toy Story" has to become selfless at the end,
献身的に変貌させたいと考えましたが
12:34
so you've got to start from someplace.
元の性格を持たせないといけません
12:36
So let's make him selfish. And this is what you get.
それで自己中なやつにすることにして
こんな風になりました
12:38
(Voice Over) Woody: What do you think you're doing?
(声) ウッディ: なにやってんだ?
12:41
Off the bed.
ベットからおりろよ おいってば
12:43
Hey, off the bed!
ベットからおりろって!
12:45
Mr. Potato Head: You going to make us, Woody?
ポテトヘッド: やれるもんならやってみろ!
12:47
Woody: No, he is.
ウッディ: こいつがやるさ
12:49
Slinky? Slink ... Slinky!
スリンキー?ス スリンキー!
12:51
Get up here and do your job.
さぁ ここにきて やっつけるんだ
12:55
Are you deaf?
聞こえないのか?
12:57
I said, take care of them.
やれって言ってるんだ
12:59
Slinky: I'm sorry, Woody,
スリンキー: ウッディ わるいけど
13:01
but I have to agree with them.
彼らと同意見だよ
13:03
I don't think what you did was right.
君がやってるのは正しくないよ
13:05
Woody: What? Am I hearing correctly?
ウッディ: なに!?わかんなかったな
もう一度言ってみろよ!?
13:07
You don't think I was right?
僕が正しくないって?
13:10
Who said your job was to think, Spring Wiener?
何も考えずに 僕が言ったようにすればいいんだ
バネ・ウィンナー野郎!
13:12
AS: So how do you make a selfish character likable?
スタントン: どうやって自己中心的な
役を 感じ良くするか?
13:17
We realized, you can make him kind,
一番のおもちゃであり続けるという
13:19
generous, funny, considerate,
条件さえ満たしていれば ウッディを
13:21
as long as one condition is met for him,
優しく 寛容で 面白く 思慮深い
13:23
is that he stays the top toy.
キャラクターに出来る
ということに気が付きました
13:25
And that's what it really is,
そして究極的には
13:27
is that we all live life conditionally.
人は人生を条件付きで
生きているということです
13:29
We're all willing to play by the rules and follow things along,
みんな特定の条件さえ満たされれば
13:31
as long as certain conditions are met.
ルールや既定のものと
折り合っていこうとします
13:33
After that, all bets are off.
それがなくなると
次の行動は予測不可能です
13:36
And before I'd even decided to make storytelling my career,
物語の創作を仕事にしようと
決める以前のことですが
13:38
I can now see key things that happened in my youth
いま振り返ると 若い時に
起きた出来事が
13:41
that really sort of opened my eyes
実は物語のしかけに 気付かされる
13:43
to certain things about story.
重要な出来事であったことに気付きました
13:45
In 1986, I truly understood the notion
1986年に 物語がテーマを
持っているということが
13:47
of story having a theme.
どういうことなのか 本当に
理解できた瞬間がありました
13:50
And that was the year that they restored and re-released
この年は「アラビアのロレンス」が復元されて
13:53
"Lawrence of Arabia."
再度 映画公開された年でした
13:56
And I saw that thing seven times in one month.
月に7回も見に行きました
13:58
I couldn't get enough of it.
いくら見ても 見たりなかったのです
14:01
I could just tell there was a grand design under it --
全てのカット 場面 セリフの背後に
何か大きなものが
14:03
in every shot, every scene, every line.
あるのがわかっていただけでした
14:06
Yet, on the surface it just seemed
しかし 表面的には ただ単に
14:08
to be depicting his historical lineage
彼の歴史的な足跡が描かれている
14:10
of what went on.
だけに見えるのです
14:13
Yet, there was something more being said. What exactly was it?
しかし 見えないものがあり
それが何なのか?
14:15
And it wasn't until, on one of my later viewings,
何度も見た後にはじめて
14:17
that the veil was lifted
ベールがめくれるように
掴めたのでした
14:19
and it was in a scene where he's walked across the Sinai Desert
シナイ半島の砂漠を歩いて
渡るときのあのシーン
14:21
and he's reached the Suez Canal,
スエズ運河に到着する場面で
14:24
and I suddenly got it.
ふと分かったのです
14:26
(Video) Boy: Hey! Hey! Hey! Hey!
(ビデオ) 少年: おーい!おーい!おーい!おーい!
14:33
Cyclist: Who are you?
オートバイの男: だれだー?
14:46
Who are you?
だれだー?
14:50
AS: That was the theme: Who are you?
スタントン: それがテーマだったのです
「自分は一体だれなのか?」
14:53
Here were all these seemingly disparate
一見繋がりがないような
14:56
events and dialogues
ただ時系列で彼の歴史をたどっている
14:58
that just were chronologically telling the history of him,
出来事や会話なのですが
15:00
but underneath it was a constant,
その根底には一貫して
15:03
a guideline, a road map.
道しるべがあったのです
15:05
Everything Lawrence did in that movie
映画でロレンスが行った全ては
15:07
was an attempt for him to figure out where his place was in the world.
彼が自分の居場所を見つけよう
とする試みだったのです
15:09
A strong theme is always running through
うまく語られた物語には
15:12
a well-told story.
常に強いテーマが流れています
15:15
When I was five,
私が5才の時
15:18
I was introduced to possibly the most major ingredient
もっとも物語に備わっているべきと
感じるものながら
15:20
that I feel a story should have,
なかなか遭遇することのない
15:23
but is rarely invoked.
しかけに始めて出会いました
15:26
And this is what my mother took me to when I was five.
これが5才の時に 母が私を
連れて行ってくれた映画です
15:28
(Video) Thumper: Come on. It's all right.
(ビデオ) タンパー: おいでよ 大丈夫だって
15:34
Look.
ほらみて
15:37
The water's stiff.
水が固まってるよ
15:39
Bambi: Yippee!
バンビ: ヤッホー
15:45
Thumper: Some fun,
タンパー: おもしろいだろう
15:57
huh, Bambi?
バンビ どう?
15:59
Come on. Get up.
さぁ 立って
16:02
Like this.
こうだよ
16:04
Ha ha. No, no, no.
ハハハ ちがう ちがう ちがうよ
16:24
AS: I walked out of there
スタントン: 映画館から出て
16:27
wide-eyed with wonder.
ただ 驚きに目を見開いてました
16:29
And that's what I think the magic ingredient is,
これこそ私の考える魔法の隠し味
16:31
the secret sauce,
秘伝のソースです
16:33
is can you invoke wonder.
驚きと好奇心を引き起こすということです
16:35
Wonder is honest, it's completely innocent.
驚きは正直な反応で
まったく純粋なものです
16:37
It can't be artificially evoked.
驚きの感情は自分では作れません
16:39
For me, there's no greater ability
私からすると この感覚を他の人に
16:41
than the gift of another human being giving you that feeling --
与えられる能力ほど
素晴らしいものはありません
16:43
to hold them still just for a brief moment in their day
日常の中のほんの一瞬であれ
心を掴んで 驚きに
16:46
and have them surrender to wonder.
身をゆだねさせるということ
16:49
When it's tapped, the affirmation of being alive,
この驚きに触れると
生きていることが実感でき
16:51
it reaches you almost to a cellular level.
細胞の1つひとつまでにも
響きわたります
16:54
And when an artist does that to another artist,
芸術家が他の芸術家から
驚きを与えられると
16:57
it's like you're compelled to pass it on.
どんどん驚きを 受け渡して
行きたくなるのです
16:59
It's like a dormant command
「他の人がしてくれたように
他の人にもなさい」
17:01
that suddenly is activated in you, like a call to Devil's Tower.
と悪魔の塔の呼びかけで
眠っていた指令が
17:03
Do unto others what's been done to you.
突然活性化されるかのようです
17:06
The best stories infuse wonder.
最高の物語というものは
驚きを与えます
17:09
When I was four years old,
私が4才の時こんなことがありました
17:12
I have a vivid memory
はっきりと覚えています
17:14
of finding two pinpoint scars on my ankle
私には 2つの点のような
傷が足首にあって
17:16
and asking my dad what they were.
父にこれがなにか尋ねました
17:19
And he said I had a matching pair like that on my head,
実は私には同じような傷が頭にも
17:21
but I couldn't see them because of my hair.
髪に隠れたところにあると
父は言いました
17:23
And he explained that when I was born,
キミが産まれたとき
17:25
I was born premature,
予定よりかなり早く出て来てしまい
17:27
that I came out much too early,
まだ体が出来上がっていなかったんだというのが
17:29
and I wasn't fully baked;
父のしてくれた説明でした
17:32
I was very, very sick.
非常に状態が悪く
17:34
And when the doctor took a look at this yellow kid with black teeth,
歯が黒く 血色の悪い
赤ん坊を見た医者は
17:36
he looked straight at my mom and said,
母をじっと見て 「この子は
17:39
"He's not going to live."
生きられないでしょう」
と言ったそうです
17:41
And I was in the hospital for months.
私は何カ月も入院していました
17:44
And many blood transfusions later,
それからも何回も輸血をうけ
17:47
I lived,
生きのびました
17:49
and that made me special.
生き延びることで
私は特別になったのです
17:51
I don't know if I really believe that.
本気でそう信じているかと
言われれば半信半疑で
17:54
I don't know if my parents really believe that,
両親も本気で信じているか
わかりませんが
17:57
but I didn't want to prove them wrong.
両親が間違っていたという結論にだけは
したくありませんでした
18:00
Whatever I ended up being good at,
うまくできるようになったことが何であれ
18:03
I would strive to be worthy of the second chance I was given.
もう1度生きるチャンスを与えられた
価値を示す努力をしたかったのです
18:06
(Video) (Crying)
(ビデオ) (泣き声)
18:10
Marlin: There, there, there.
マーリン: ああ いた いたよ
18:23
It's okay, daddy's here.
もう大丈夫だよ とうさんはここにいるよ
18:26
Daddy's got you.
ここにおいで もう大丈夫だ
18:29
I promise,
約束するよ
18:34
I will never let anything happen to you, Nemo.
ニモ もうこんなことは二度と
起こらないようにするよ
18:36
AS: And that's the first story lesson I ever learned.
スタントン: これは私が
最初に学んだ物語の教訓です
18:40
Use what you know. Draw from it.
知ってることを使って
そこから引き出すこと
18:44
It doesn't always mean plot or fact.
筋や出来事に限りません
18:46
It means capturing a truth from your experiencing it,
自分の体験から真実をとらえ
18:48
expressing values you personally feel
心の奥底で個人的に感じる価値を
18:51
deep down in your core.
表現するということです
18:54
And that's what ultimately led me to speaking to you
そんなわけで こうして TED で
18:56
here at TEDTalk today.
物語について語るまでになったのです
18:58
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:00
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:02
Translator:Akinori Oyama
Reviewer:Amelia Juhl

sponsored links

Andrew Stanton - Filmmaker
Andrew Stanton has made you laugh and cry. The writer behind the three "Toy Story" movies and the writer/director of "WALL-E," he releases his new film, "John Carter," in March.

Why you should listen

Andrew Stanton wrote the first film produced entirely on a computer, Toy Story. But what made that film a classic wasn't the history-making graphic technology -- it's the story, the heart, the characters that children around the world instantly accepted into their own lives. Stanton wrote all three Toy Story movies at Pixar Animation Studios, where he was hired in 1990 as the second animator on staff. He has two Oscars, as the writer-director of Finding Nemo and WALL-E. And as Edgar Rice Burroughs nerds, we're breathlessly awaiting the March opening of his fantasy-adventure movie John Carter.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.