19:31
TEDGlobal 2012

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life

ジェーン・マゴニガル 「ゲームで10年長生きしましょう」

Filmed:

重度の脳震盪の後長い間病床に付き自殺まで考えたゲームデザイナーのジェーン・マゴニガルは、回復のための素晴らしいアイデアを思い付きました。科学的研究の成果を織り込んだ回復のためのゲーム「スーパー・ベター」を作ったのです。この感動的な講演で、彼女はゲームがいかに人の回復力を高め、人生におまけの7分半を付け加えてくれるか語っています。

- Game Designer
Reality is broken, says Jane McGonigal, and we need to make it work more like a game. Her work shows us how. Full bio

I'm a gamer, so I like to have goals.
私はゲーマーなので ゴールを
設定するのが好きです
00:16
I like special missions and secret objectives.
特別な使命とか
秘密の目的みたいな
00:20
So here's my special mission for this talk:
それで今日の講演にも
使命を用意しました
00:25
I'm going to try to increase the life span
この場にいる人
00:28
of every single person in this room
みんなの寿命を
00:31
by seven and a half minutes.
7分半伸ばします
00:33
Literally, you will live seven and half minutes longer
文字通り 皆さんは
00:35
than you would have otherwise,
この講演を聴けば
00:39
just because you watched this talk.
7分半長生きするんです
00:40
Okay, some of you are looking a little bit skeptical.
なんか疑っている人も
いるみたいですね
00:41
That's okay, because check it out --
いいですよ
それが可能だと
00:45
I have math to prove that it is possible.
証明する数式が
ちゃんとあるんです
00:47
And it won't make a lot of sense now.
今はまだ分からない
でしょうけど
00:49
I'll explain it all later,
後で説明しますので
最後の数字にだけ
00:51
just pay attention to the number at the bottom:
注目してください
00:52
plus-7.68245837 minutes
この7.68245837分というのが
00:54
that will be my gift to you if I'm successful in my mission.
使命達成の暁に 私が皆さんに
プレゼントするものです
00:58
Now, you have a secret mission too.
皆さんにも秘密の
使命があります
01:02
Your mission is to figure out how you want to spend your
それは このおまけの
7分半の使い道を
01:04
extra seven and a half minutes.
見つけるということです
01:08
And I think you should do something unusual with them,
何かいつもとは違うことに
使うべきだと思います
01:10
because these are bonus minutes. You weren't going to have them anyway.
これはボーナスで 元々
なかったものなんですから
01:13
Now, because I'm a game designer, you might be thinking to yourself,
私はゲームデザイナーなので
「どうせ その時間で何を—
01:16
I know what she wants us to do with those minutes,
させたがっているか分かるぞ
01:20
she wants us to spend them playing games.
ゲームをしろって言うんだ」
と思っているかもしれませんね
01:22
Now this is a totally reasonable assumption,
もっともな推測です
01:25
given that I have made quite a habit of encouraging people
私はずっとみんなに
もっとゲームしましょうと
01:28
to spend more time playing games.
言い続けてきたわけですから
01:30
For example, in my first TEDTalk,
たとえば最初のTEDTalkの時は
01:32
I did propose that we should spend 21 billion hours a week
地球全体で週210億時間を
ゲームに費やすべきだと
01:34
as a planet playing video games.
提案したのでした
01:38
Now, 21 billion hours, it's a lot of time.
210億時間といったら
相当な時間です
01:41
It's so much time, in fact, that the number one unsolicited comment
それだからこそ
あのTEDTalkの後
01:44
that I have heard from people all over the world
世界の人たちから寄せられた
コメントで一番多かったのが
01:48
since I gave that talk, is this:
これだったんです
01:51
Jane, games are great and all, but on your deathbed,
「ジェーン ゲームも結構だけど
死の間際になっても
01:53
are you really going to wish you spent more time playing Angry Birds?
アングリーバードで
もっと遊びたいと思うの?」
01:57
This idea is so pervasive -- that games are a waste of time
そういう考えはすごく一般的です
ゲームは時間の無駄で
02:00
that we will come to regret -- that I hear it literally everywhere I go.
後で後悔することになる・・・
どこへ行っても耳にします
02:05
For example, true story: Just a few weeks ago,
これは実話なんですが
ほんの数週間前
02:09
this cab driver, upon finding out that a friend and I were in town
このタクシーの運転手は 私と友人が
ゲームカンファレンスのために
02:11
for a game developer's conference,
町に来たと知ると
02:15
turned around and said -- and I quote --
振り向いて言ったんです
02:17
"I hate games. Waste of life. Imagine getting to the end of your life
「ゲームは大嫌いだね
人生の無駄遣いだ
02:19
and regretting all that time."
人生の最後に後悔するところを
考えてみなよ」
02:25
Now, I want to take this problem seriously.
この問題を真剣に考えたいのです
02:28
I mean, I want games to be a force for good in the world.
ゲームは世界を良くする力
であって欲しいし
02:31
I don't want gamers to regret the time they spent playing,
ゲームに費やした時間を
ゲーマーたちに
02:33
time that I encouraged them to spend.
後悔して欲しくはありません
02:36
So I have been thinking about this question a lot lately.
だから最近この問題を
よく考えています
02:38
When we're on our deathbeds, will we regret
人生最後の時に
私たちはゲームしていた時間を
02:41
the time we spent playing games?
後悔するのでしょうか?
02:45
Now, this may surprise you, but it turns out
驚くかも知れませんが
実はこの疑問に対する
02:47
there is actually some scientific research on this question.
科学的な調査結果があったんです
02:50
It's true. Hospice workers,
人生の最後を迎える人たちを
02:53
the people who take care of us at the end of our lives,
世話するホスピスの看護師が
02:55
recently issued a report on the most frequently expressed regrets
死の間際に人が
よく後悔することを
02:58
that people say when they are literally on their deathbeds.
最近記事に書きました
03:03
And that's what I want to share with you today --
今日は皆さんに
それをお教えします
03:07
the top five regrets of the dying.
人が死の間際によく後悔する
5つのことです
03:09
Number one: I wish I hadn't worked so hard.
1番 あんなに仕事ばかり
するんじゃなかった
03:14
Number two: I wish I had stayed in touch with my friends.
2番 友達と連絡を絶やさず
にいればよかった
03:21
Number three: I wish I had let myself be happier.
3番 もっと自分を幸せに
してあげればよかった
03:27
Number four: I wish I'd had the courage to express my true self.
4番 本当の自分を表す
勇気を持てばよかった
03:33
And number five: I wish I'd lived a life true to my dreams,
5番 他の人の期待に
合わせるのでなく
03:39
instead of what others expected of me.
自分の夢に忠実に
生きればよかった
03:43
Now, as far as I know, no one ever told one of the hospice workers,
私の知る限り もっと
ゲームをやればよかったと
03:48
I wish I'd spent more time playing video games,
言っていた患者さんは
いなかったわけですが
03:51
but when I hear these top five regrets of the dying,
でもこの5つの
後悔の話を聞いて
03:54
I can't help but hear five deep human cravings
そこにある人間の深い欲求は
ゲームで満たすことができる—
03:57
that games actually help us fulfill.
そう気付きました
04:00
For example, I wish I hadn't worked so hard.
「あんなに仕事ばかり
するんじゃなかった」
04:02
For many people, this means, I wish I'd spent more time
というのは 多くの場合
もっと家族や 成長しつつある
04:04
with my family, with my kids when they were growing up.
子どもたちと 過ごすべきだった
ということでしょう
04:07
Well, we know that playing games together has tremendous
いっしょにゲームをするのは
家族にとって良い点が
04:09
family benefits.
たくさんあります
04:12
A recent study from Brigham Young University
ブリガムヤング大学
家政学部の
04:14
School of Family life reported that parents who
最近の研究によると
子どもたちとビデオゲームをして
04:16
spend more time playing video games with their kids
多くの時間を過ごした両親は
04:19
have much stronger real-life relationships with them.
実生活でも子どもたちとより強い絆を
持っていることが分かりました
04:21
I wish I'd stayed in touch with my friends.
「友達と連絡を絶やさず
にいればよかった」
04:26
Well, hundreds of millions of people
何億という人たちが
04:28
use social games like FarmVille or Words With Friends
ファームビルやワーズ・ウィズ・フレンズ
のようなソーシャルゲームを通して
04:30
to stay in daily contact with real-life friends and family.
友達や家族と日常的な
連絡を保っています
04:33
A recent study from [University of Michigan] showed
ミシガン大学の最近の
研究で明らかになったのは
04:37
that these games are incredibly powerful
こういったゲームが
人間関係を保つ上で
04:41
relationship-management tools.
非常に強力なツールになる
ということです
04:44
They help us stay connected with people in our social network
いっしょにゲームを
することで
04:46
that we would otherwise grow distant from,
疎遠になりがちな
人たちとも
04:50
if we weren't playing games together.
関係を維持することが
できるのです
04:53
I wish I'd let myself be happier.
「もっと自分を幸せに
してあげればよかった」
04:55
Well, here I can't help but think of the groundbreaking clinical trials
最近 東カロライナ大学
で行われた
04:57
recently conducted at East Carolina University
画期的な臨床試験の話を
思わずにいられません
05:00
that showed that online games can outperform
患者の不安や抑鬱を
解消する上で
05:03
pharmaceuticals for treating clinical anxiety and depression.
オンラインゲームが薬よりも
高い効果を示したのです
05:06
Just 30 minutes of online game play a day
毎日30分オンライン
ゲームをするだけで
05:10
was enough to create dramatic boosts in mood
気分や長期的な幸福度が
05:13
and long-term increases in happiness.
劇的に改善されたのです
05:16
I wish I'd had the courage to express my true self.
「本当の自分を表す勇気を
持てばよかった」
05:19
Well, avatars are a way to express our true selves,
アバターというのは
本当の自分を
05:23
our most heroic, idealized version of who we might become.
英雄的な理想化された姿で
表現する方法です
05:27
You can see that in this alter ego portrait by Robbie Cooper
ロビー・クーパーが撮影した
このゲーマーと その分身の写真が
05:30
of a gamer with his avatar.
それをよく表しています
05:34
And Stanford University has been doing research for five years now
スタンフォード大学では
5年にわたる調査から
05:36
to document how playing a game with an idealized avatar
理想化されたアバターで
ゲームをすることで
05:40
changes how we think and act in real life,
実生活での考え方や
行動も変化し
05:44
making us more courageous, more ambitious,
より勇敢で野心的になり
05:47
more committed to our goals.
目標に集中するようになると
報告しています
05:50
I wish I'd led a life true to my dreams,
「他の人の期待に
合わせるのでなく
05:54
and not what others expected of me.
自分の夢に忠実に
生きればよかった」
05:56
Are games doing this yet? I'm not sure,
ゲームがこれを実現して
いるのか分かりません
05:58
so I've left a question mark, a Super Mario question mark.
スーパーマリオのクエスチョン
マークを付けておきました
06:00
And we're going to come back to this one.
後でまた取り上げます
06:02
But in the mean time, perhaps you're wondering,
何でゲームデザイナーが
06:04
who is this game designer to be talking to us
死の間際の後悔の話なんか
しているのかと
06:08
about deathbed regrets?
思っているかもしれませんね
06:11
And it's true, I've never worked in a hospice,
確かに私はホスピスで
働いたこともなければ
06:13
I've never been on my deathbed.
自分自身 死に直面した
こともありません
06:16
But recently I did spend three months in bed, wanting to die.
でも最近死にたいと思いながら
3ヶ月ベッドで過ごしました
06:19
Really wanting to die.
本当に死にたいと
思っていたんです
06:25
Now let me tell you that story.
お話ししましょう
06:27
It started two years ago, when I hit my head and got a concussion.
2年前のことですが 頭を強く
打って脳震盪を起こしました
06:29
Now the concussion didn't heal properly,
脳震盪が治らず
06:33
and after 30 days I was left with symptoms like nonstop headaches,
30日過ぎても 絶えざる
頭痛 吐き気 めまい
06:35
nausea, vertigo, memory loss, mental fog.
物忘れ 頭に霞がかかった
ような状態が続きました
06:39
My doctor told me that in order to heal my brain,
医者は頭を癒すには
06:41
I had to rest it.
休息が必要だと言って
06:44
So I had to avoid everything that triggered my symptoms.
症状の引き金と
なることを禁じました
06:46
For me that meant no reading, no writing, no video games,
だから 読書も駄目
書くのも駄目 ゲームも駄目
06:48
no work or email, no running, no alcohol, no caffeine.
仕事もメールも駄目 走っても駄目
お酒もコーヒーも駄目
06:51
In other words -- and I think you see where this is going --
言い換えると
06:54
no reason to live.
生きている意味がない
ような状態です
06:56
Of course it's meant to be funny,
面白おかしく
話していますが
06:59
but in all seriousness, suicidal ideation is quite common
真面目な話 脳の外傷が
自殺願望に繋がることは
07:01
with traumatic brain injuries.
よくあるんです
07:05
It happens to one in three, and it happened to me.
3人に1人に起き
私にも起きました
07:07
My brain started telling me, Jane, you want to die.
私の脳が言い始めたのです
ジェーン 死にたいでしょ?
07:10
It said, you're never going to get better.
きっと治らないわ
07:15
It said, the pain will never end.
もう痛みが消える
ことはないのよ
07:18
And these voices became so persistent and so persuasive
その声があまりに強く
絶えることがないので
07:22
that I started to legitimately fear for my life,
自分の命を本当に
心配し始めました
07:26
which is the time that I said to myself after 34 days --
はっきり覚えていますが
34日目に
07:32
and I will never forget this moment --
こう思ったんです
07:36
I said, I am either going to kill myself
もう自殺するか
07:38
or I'm going to turn this into a game.
これをゲームにするしかない
07:42
Now, why a game?
どうしてゲームなのか?
07:44
I knew from researching the psychology of games for more than a decade
10年以上ゲームの心理学を研究してきて
分かったことがあります
07:46
that when we play a game -- and this is in the scientific literature --
ちゃんと学術研究があるんですが
ゲームをするときには
07:50
we tackle tough challenges with more creativity,
私たちはよりクリエイティブになり
07:53
more determination, more optimism,
意志が強くなり
楽観的になり
07:56
and we're more likely to reach out to others for help.
他の人に助けを求め
やすくなるんです
07:58
And I wanted to bring these gamer traits to my real-life challenge,
現実の問題の解決に
このゲーマーの
08:01
so I created a role-playing recovery game
特性を生かしたくて作ったのが
回復ロールプレイングゲーム
08:03
called Jane the Concussion Slayer.
「脳震盪ハンター・ジェーン」です
08:06
Now this became my new secret identity,
これが私の新しい
秘密の自分となり
08:08
and the first thing I did as a slayer
ハンターとして
最初にしたのは
08:10
was call my twin sister -- I have an identical twin sister named Kelly --
一卵性双生児の妹のケリーに
こう言うことでした
08:12
and tell her, I'm playing a game to heal my brain,
「頭を治すためにゲームを
やってるんだけど
08:16
and I want you to play with me.
あんたにも一緒に
やってほしいの」
08:20
This was an easier way to ask for help.
そう言う方が助けを
求めやすかったんです
08:22
She became my first ally in the game,
妹がこのゲームの
最初の仲間になり
08:26
my husband Kiyash joined next,
続いて夫のキアシュが
加わりました
08:28
and together we identified and battled the bad guys.
みんなで悪者を見つけて
やっつけました
08:30
Now this was anything that could trigger my symptoms
悪者というのは
私の症状を引き起こし
08:34
and therefore slow down the healing process,
治癒を遅らせるもの
08:37
things like bright lights and crowded spaces.
明るい光や
人混みなんかです
08:39
We also collected and activated power-ups.
そしてパワーアップを集めて
発動させました
08:41
This was anything I could do on even my worst day
これは最悪の日だろうと
08:44
to feel just a little bit good,
多少とも気分を改善し
生産的にしてくれるものです
08:47
just a little bit productive.
多少とも気分を改善し
生産的にしてくれるものです
08:50
Things like cuddling my dog for 10 minutes,
飼っている犬を
10分間抱きしめるとか
08:51
or getting out of bed and walking around the block just once.
ベッドから出て近所を
一回りするとか
08:54
Now the game was that simple:
ゲームは単純です
08:58
Adopt a secret identity, recruit your allies,
秘密の自分になり
仲間を集め
08:59
battle the bad guys, activate the power-ups.
悪者と戦い パワーアップを
発動させる
09:02
But even with a game so simple,
ゲームは単純でも
09:05
within just a couple days of starting to play,
やり始めてほんの数日で
09:07
that fog of depression and anxiety
鬱や不安の霧が晴れたのです
09:10
went away. It just vanished. It felt like a miracle.
消えたんです
奇跡のようでした
09:12
Now it wasn't a miracle cure for the headaches
頭痛や認知的な症状が
魔法のように治った
09:16
or the cognitive symptoms.
わけではありません
09:19
That lasted for more than a year,
それは1年以上続き
09:20
and it was the hardest year of my life by far.
私の人生でも一番
辛い時期でした
09:22
But even when I still had the symptoms,
でも症状があり
痛みがあっても
09:25
even while I was still in pain, I stopped suffering.
気に病まなくなったんです
09:27
Now what happened next with the game surprised me.
それからこのゲームで
驚くようなことが起きました
09:31
I put up some blog posts and videos online,
私はブログを書き ビデオを
アップロードして
09:34
explaining how to play.
遊び方を説明しました
09:37
But not everybody has a concussion, obviously,
でもみんな脳震盪を起こして
いるわけじゃないし
09:38
not everyone wants to be "the slayer,"
「ハンター」になりたい
わけでもありません
09:41
so I renamed the game SuperBetter.
だからゲームの名前を
「スーパー・ベター」に変えました
09:43
And soon I started hearing from people all over the world
すぐに世界中のいろんな人から
反響がありました
09:45
who were adopting their own secret identity,
みんな秘密の自分に変身して
09:48
recruiting their own allies, and they were getting "super better"
仲間を集め
「スーパ・ベター」になって
09:51
facing challenges like cancer and chronic pain,
癌や慢性痛や
鬱やクローン病に
09:54
depression and Crohn's disease.
立ち向かったんです
09:58
Even people were playing it for terminal diagnoses like ALS.
ALSのような不治の病の人まで
このゲームをやっていたんです
10:00
And I could tell from their messages and their videos
彼らが寄せてくれたメッセージや
ビデオで このゲームが
10:05
that the game was helping them in the same ways
私同様に彼らにも
力になっていることが
10:08
that it helped me.
分かりました
10:11
They talked about feeling stronger and braver.
「力と勇気を感じるようになった」
10:12
They talked about feeling better understood by their friends and family.
「友達や家族と理解が深まった」
10:15
And they even talked about feeling happier,
「痛みや人生最大の困難に
10:19
even though they were in pain, even though they were tackling
直面しながらも
10:22
the toughest challenge of their lives.
幸福を感じられるようになった」
10:25
Now at the time, I'm thinking to myself, what is going on here?
これはどういうことなのでしょう?
10:28
I mean, how could a game so trivial intervene so powerfully
こんなに単純なゲームが これほど深刻な
時には生死にかかわる状況で
10:32
in such serious, and in some cases life-and-death, circumstances?
力強い効果を
発揮するのはなぜなのか
10:37
I mean, if it hadn't worked for me,
自分で体験していなければ
10:41
there's no way I would have believed it was possible.
きっと信じられなかったと思います
10:42
Well, it turns out there's some science here too.
ここでも科学的な裏付けが
あるのが分かりました
10:44
Some people get stronger and happier after a traumatic event.
人によっては 深刻な出来事の後
より強く より幸せになるんです
10:47
And that's what was happening to us.
それが私たちに起きた
ことだったんです
10:53
The game was helping us experience
このゲームは科学者が
10:55
what scientists call post-traumatic growth,
「心的外傷後の成長」と呼ぶ
体験を促していたのです
10:57
which is not something we usually hear about.
あまり聞き慣れない言葉ですね
11:00
We usually hear about post-traumatic stress disorder.
よく聞くのは 「心的外傷後
ストレス症候群」です
11:02
But scientists now know that a traumatic event
でも科学者たちは
心的外傷を起こす出来事が
11:05
doesn't doom us to suffer indefinitely.
いつまでも私たちを苛む
わけではないのを明らかにしました
11:08
Instead, we can use it as a springboard
逆にそれをバネにして
11:11
to unleash our best qualities and lead happier lives.
自分の長所を引き出し 幸せな人生を
歩むこともできるのです
11:13
Here are the top five things that people with
心的外傷後の成長を
体験した人が
11:17
post-traumatic growth say:
よく口にする 5つの
ことがあります
11:19
My priorities have changed. I'm not afraid to do what makes me happy.
「優先順位が変わり 幸せを
追求するのを怖れなくなった」
11:21
I feel closer to my friends and family.
「友達や家族と
より親密になった」
11:25
I understand myself better. I know who I really am now.
「自分自身がよくわかるようになり
本当の自分を知った」
11:29
I have a new sense of meaning and purpose in my life.
「人生に意味や目的を
感じられるようになった」
11:33
I'm better able to focus on my goals and dreams.
「自分の目標や夢に専念
できるようになった」
11:36
Now, does this sound familiar?
聞き覚えが
ありませんか?
11:40
It should, because the top five traits of post-traumatic growth
心的外傷後の成長の5つの特徴は
11:42
are essentially the direct opposite of the top five regrets of the dying.
死の間際に後悔する5つのことの
ちょうど反対なんです
11:46
Now this is interesting, right?
面白いですよね?
11:51
It seems that somehow, a traumatic event can unlock our ability
心的外傷を起こす出来事が
後悔せずに人生を送る能力を
11:53
to lead a life with fewer regrets.
開放したかのようです
11:58
But how does it work?
でもどういう仕組みなんでしょう?
12:00
How do you get from trauma to growth?
どうしたら心的外傷を成長に
繋げられるのか?
12:02
Or better yet, is there a way to get all the benefits
心的外傷なしで 心的外傷後の成長の
利点だけ得られたら
12:04
of post-traumatic growth without the trauma,
もっといいですよね?
12:07
without having to hit your head in the first place?
頭を強く打ったりすることなしに・・・
12:09
That would be good, right?
そのほうがいいと思いません?
12:12
I wanted to understand the phenomenon better,
この現象をもっと
理解したくて
12:13
so I devoured the scientific literature, and here's what I learned.
科学文献を読み漁って
分かったことがあります
12:16
There are four kinds of strength, or resilience,
心的外傷後の成長に
寄与する
12:19
that contribute to post-traumatic growth,
4種類の回復力があって
12:22
and there are scientifically validated activities
それを高めるために
毎日できる
12:25
that you can do every day to build up these four kinds of resilience,
科学的に裏付けられた
方法があるんです
12:28
and you don't need a trauma to do it.
しかも心的外傷は
不要です
12:32
Now, I could tell you what these four types of strength are,
その4種類の力を説明
してもいいんですが
12:34
but I'd rather you experience them firsthand.
それより自分で体験
して欲しいんです
12:36
I'd rather we all start building them up together right now.
今から全員で この力を
つけていきましょう
12:39
So here's what we're going to do.
これからやるのは
12:42
We're going to play a quick game together.
簡単なゲームです
12:43
This is where you earn those seven and a half minutes
お約束した
7分半のボーナスを
12:45
of bonus life that I promised you earlier.
このゲームで
手に入れるんです
12:47
All you have to do is successfully complete
「スーパー・ベター」の
最初の4つのクエストを
12:49
the first four SuperBetter quests.
皆さんに やり遂げて
いただきます
12:52
And I feel like you can do it. I have confidence in you.
きっとできます
そう信じています
12:54
So, everybody ready? This is your first quest. Here we go.
じゃあ始めますよ
最初のクエストです
12:57
Pick one: Stand up and take three steps,
どちらか1つ選んでください
立ち上がって3歩進むか
13:00
or make your hands into fists, raise them over your head
両の拳を握って
高く頭の上に
13:03
as high as you can for five seconds. Go!
5秒間 突き上げてください
始め!
13:06
All right, I like the people doing both. You are overachievers.
両方やっている人もいますね
頑張り屋さんですね
13:08
Very good. (Laughter)
いいですよ
(笑)
13:13
Well done, everyone. Now that is worth plus-one
良くできました
これは肉体的回復力+1です
13:15
physical resilience, which means that your body can
皆さんの体が
ストレスに強くなって
13:17
withstand more stress and heal itself faster.
早く回復できるように
なるということです
13:19
Now we know from the research that the number one thing
肉体的回復力を高める
一番良い方法は
13:22
you can do to boost your physical resilience is to not sit still.
じっとしていない
ということです
13:24
That's all it takes.
それだけでいいんです
13:28
Every single second that you are not sitting still,
じっと座っていない
時間の1秒1秒が
13:30
you are actively improving the health of your heart,
心臓や肺や脳を
積極的に健康にするんです
13:32
and your lungs and brains.
心臓や肺や脳を
積極的に健康にするんです
13:36
Everybody ready for your next quest?
次のクエストにいきますよ
13:37
I want you to snap your fingers exactly 50 times,
指をちょうど
50回鳴らすか
13:39
or count backwards from 100 by seven, like this: 100, 93 ...
100から7ずつ減らして
数えてください
13:42
Go!
始め!
13:45
(Snapping)
(指を鳴らす音)
13:47
Don't give up.
諦めないで
13:49
(Snapping)
(指を鳴らす音)
13:51
Don't let the people counting down from 100
お互いの声で
カウントを
13:53
interfere with your counting to 50.
間違わないで
13:55
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:57
Nice. Wow. That's the first time I've ever seen that.
いいですね
こんなの初めて見ました
14:02
Bonus physical resilience. Well done, everyone.
肉体回復力のボーナスポイントです
良くできました
14:06
Now that's worth plus-one mental resilience,
今のは精神的回復力+1です
14:08
which means you have more mental focus, more discipline,
集中力 自制 決意
14:11
determination and willpower.
意志力を高められます
14:13
We know from the scientific research that willpower
意志力は筋肉のようなものであることが
科学的研究から
14:15
actually works like a muscle.
分かっています
14:18
It gets stronger the more you exercise it.
鍛えるほど強くなるんです
14:19
So tackling a tiny challenge without giving up,
小さな挑戦だろうと
諦めずにやれば
14:22
even one as absurd as snapping your fingers exactly 50 times
指を50回鳴らすとか
100から7ずつ減らしていくといった
14:25
or counting backwards from 100 by seven
つまらないことでも
14:29
is actually a scientifically validated way to boost your willpower.
意志力を高められることが
科学的に示されています
14:31
So good job. Quest number three.
良くできました
3つ目のクエストです
14:34
Pick one: Now because of the room we're in,
この場所では
14:36
fate's really determined this for you, but here are the two options.
やれるのが決まってしまうんですが
2つから選びます
14:38
If you're inside, find a window and look out of it.
屋内にいるなら窓から外を
14:41
If you're outside, find a window and look in.
屋外にいるなら窓の中を覗きます
14:43
Or do a quick YouTube or Google image search for
もしくはYouTubeかGoogleで
好きな動物の赤ちゃんの画像を
14:46
"baby [your favorite animal.]"
見つけてください
14:49
Now, you could do this on your phones,
携帯で探してもいいし
14:50
or you could just shout out some baby animals,
動物の名前を—
14:52
I'm going to find some and put them on the screen for us.
言ってくれたら
探して画面に出します
14:53
So, what do we want to see?
何が見たいですか?
14:55
Sloth, giraffe, elephant, snake. Okay, let's see what we got.
ナマケモノ キリン ゾウ ヘビ
では見てみましょう
14:56
Baby dolphin and baby llamas. Everybody look.
赤ちゃんイルカに 赤ちゃんラマ
ご覧ください
15:01
Got that?
いかがですか?
15:06
Okay, one more. Baby elephant.
もう1つ出しましょう
赤ちゃんゾウです
15:08
We're clapping for that?
拍手してる人がいますね
15:12
That's amazing.
素晴らしい
皆さんが今
15:14
All right, now what we're just feeling there
感じているのは
15:16
is plus-one emotional resilience,
感情的回復力+1です
15:17
which means you have the ability to provoke powerful,
好奇心や愛のような力強い
15:19
positive emotions like curiosity or love,
ポジティブな感情を
引き起こす力です
15:21
which we feel when we look at baby animals,
動物の赤ちゃんを見たときとか それが
まさに必要なときに起きる感情です
15:24
when you need them most.
動物の赤ちゃんを見たときとか それが
まさに必要なときに起きる感情です
15:26
And here's a secret from the scientific literature for you.
科学文献で見つけた秘訣を
お教えしましょう
15:27
If you can manage to experience three positive emotions
ネガティブな感情1つに対して
15:30
for every one negative emotion over the course of an hour,
ポジティブな感情3つを
15:34
a day, a week, you dramatically improve
1時間か1日か1週間の
うちに体験するなら
15:37
your health and your ability to successfully tackle
健康や 問題解決能力が
15:41
any problem you're facing.
劇的に向上します
15:43
And this is called the three-to-one positive emotion ratio.
これは3対1のポジティブな
感情の比率と呼ばれています
15:45
It's my favorite SuperBetter trick, so keep it up.
「スーパー・ベター」の中でも
お気に入りの秘訣です
15:48
All right, pick one, last quest:
最後のクエストです
15:50
Shake someone's hand for six seconds,
誰かと6秒間握手するか
15:53
or send someone a quick thank you
誰かに感謝の気持ちを
15:55
by text, email, Facebook or Twitter. Go!
メールかFacebookかTwitterで
送りましょう 始め!
15:56
(Chatting)
(おしゃべりの声)
15:58
Looking good, looking good.
いい感じ いい感じ
16:03
Nice, nice.
続けて
16:05
Keep it up. I love it!
いいですね
16:08
All right, everybody, that is plus-one social resilience,
皆さん これは
社会的回復力+1です
16:12
which means you actually get more strength from your friends,
友達やご近所や家族や
コミュニティから
16:15
your neighbors, your family, your community.
力を与えられます
16:18
Now, a great way to boost social resilience is gratitude.
社会的回復力を高める
良い方法は感謝の気持ちです
16:20
Touch is even better.
触れあうのは もっと良いです
16:24
Here's one more secret for you:
もう1つ秘訣を
お教えしましょう
16:25
Shaking someone's hand for six seconds
誰かと6秒間握手すると
16:27
dramatically raises the level of oxytocin in your bloodstream,
信頼のホルモンである
オキシトシンの血中濃度が
16:29
now that's the trust hormone.
劇的に上がります
16:32
That means that all of you who just shook hands
握手した人たちは
生物化学的に
16:34
are biochemically primed to like and want to help each other.
互いに好きになり
助け合いやすくなります
16:36
This will linger during the break,
効果はすぐには消えないので
16:40
so take advantage of the networking opportunities.
休み時間の交流の機会に
活用してください
16:42
(Laughter)
(笑)
16:45
Okay, well you have successfully completed your four quests,
皆さんは4つのクエストを
クリアしました
16:46
so let's see if I've successfully completed my mission
では私の方も7分半の
ボーナス寿命を与える
16:49
to give you seven and a half minutes of bonus life.
ミッションを完了できたか
見てみましょう
16:51
And here's where I get to share one more little bit of science with you.
もう1つ科学豆知識を
ご紹介します
16:53
It turns out that people who regularly
この 肉体的 精神的 感情的 社会的の
4つの回復力を
16:56
boost these four types of resilience --
この 肉体的 精神的 感情的 社会的の
4つの回復力を
16:58
physical, mental, emotional and social --
日常的に高めている人は
そうでない人より
17:00
live 10 years longer than everyone else.
10年長く生きることが
分かっています
17:03
So this is true.
本当です
17:05
If you are regularly achieving the three-to-one
3対1の ポジティブな感情の
17:06
positive emotion ratio,
比率を守り
17:09
if you are never sitting still for more than an hour at a time,
1時間以上続けて座らず
17:10
if you are reaching out to one person you care about every single day,
気にかけている誰かと
毎日連絡を取り
17:13
if you are tackling tiny goals to boost your willpower,
意志力を高める小さな
目標に挑戦するなら
17:17
you will live 10 years longer than everyone else,
そうしない人より
10年長く生きて
17:21
and here's where that math I showed you earlier comes in.
最初にお見せした
計算式が導かれます
17:24
So, the average life expectancy in the U.S. and the U.K. is 78.1 years,
アメリカやイギリスで
平均寿命は78.1歳ですが
17:26
but we know from more than 1,000 peer-reviewed scientific studies
1,000以上の査読付き科学論文から
4つの回復力を
17:30
that you can add 10 years of life to that by boosting
高めることで これを10年伸ばせる
ことが分かっています
17:34
your four types of resilience.
高めることで これを10年伸ばせる
ことが分かっています
17:36
So every single year that you are
だから1年当たりでは
17:37
boosting your four types of resilience,
4つの回復力によって
17:39
you're actually earning .128 more years of life
寿命を0.128年 —
17:40
or 46 more days of life, or 67,298 more minutes of life,
つまり46日 あるいは
67,298分伸ばせます
17:43
which means every single day, you are earning 184 minutes of life,
言い換えると 4つの回復力で
1日当たり 184分
17:48
or every single hour that you are boosting your four types of resilience,
1時間当たり
7.68245837分
17:52
like we just did together, you are earning 7.68245837
寿命を伸ばせるということです
17:55
more minutes of life.
寿命を伸ばせるということです
17:59
Congratulations, those seven and a half minutes
やりましたね
7分半は皆さんのものです
18:00
are all yours. You totally earned them.
皆さん自分で勝ち取ったんです
18:02
(Applause)
(拍手)
18:03
Yeah! Awesome.
すごいでしょう
18:05
Wait, wait, wait.
ねぇ 待って
18:09
You still have your special mission,
まだ秘密のミッションが
18:11
your secret mission.
残っています
18:13
How are you going to spend these seven and a half
この7分半の寿命のボーナスを
18:14
minutes of bonus life?
どう使うつもりですか?
18:16
Well, here's my suggestion.
こんなのはどうでしょう
18:17
These seven and a half bonus minutes are kind of like genie's wishes.
この時間は魔法のランプに
お願いするのに似ています
18:19
You can use your first wish to wish for a million more wishes.
最初にプラス100万個の願い事を
頼むことだってできるんです
18:22
Pretty clever, right?
いいアイデアでしょう?
18:26
So, if you spend these seven and a half minutes today
だから今日
この7分半を使って
18:27
doing something that makes you happy,
楽しい気分になり
18:31
or that gets you physically active,
体を動かし
18:33
or puts you in touch with someone you care about,
好きな人と連絡を取り
18:35
or even just tackling a tiny challenge,
小さなパズルに挑戦するなら
18:38
you are going to boost your resilience,
自分の回復力を高め
18:41
so you're going to earn more minutes.
さらに時間を手に
入れられます
18:43
And the good news is, you can keep going like that.
しかも それをずっと
続けていけるんです
18:44
Every hour of the day, every day of your life,
毎日の1時間1時間
人生の1日1日を
18:47
all the way to your deathbed,
最後の時までずっと
18:50
which will now be 10 years later than it would have otherwise.
しかもその時は 元々よりも
10年先に伸びています
18:51
And when you get there, more than likely,
そして最後の時を迎えても
18:54
you will not have any of those top five regrets,
もはや あの5つの後悔を
することはないでしょう
18:57
because you will have built up the strength and resilience
力と回復力をつけて
自分の夢に忠実な
19:01
to lead a life truer to your dreams.
人生を送っているからです
19:04
And with 10 extra years, you might even have enough time
それに余分の10年があれば
もっとゲームをする時間だって
19:07
to play a few more games.
とれるでしょう
19:11
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
19:12
(Applause)
(拍手)
19:14
Translated by Yasushi Aoki
Reviewed by Kazunori Akashi

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Jane McGonigal - Game Designer
Reality is broken, says Jane McGonigal, and we need to make it work more like a game. Her work shows us how.

Why you should listen

Jane McGonigal asks: Why doesn't the real world work more like an online game? In the best-designed games, our human experience is optimized: We have important work to do, we're surrounded by potential collaborators, and we learn quickly and in a low-risk environment. In her work as a game designer, she creates games that use mobile and digital technologies to turn everyday spaces into playing fields, and everyday people into teammates. Her game-world insights can explain--and improve--the way we learn, work, solve problems, and lead our real lives. She served as the director of game R&D at the Institute for the Future, and she is the founder of Gameful, which she describes as "a secret headquarters for worldchanging game developers."

Several years ago she suffered a serious concussion, and she created a multiplayer game to get through it, opening it up to anyone to play. In “Superbetter,” players set a goal (health or wellness) and invite others to play with them--and to keep them on track. While most games, and most videogames, have traditionally been about winning, we are now seeing increasing collaboration and games played together to solve problems.

More profile about the speaker
Jane McGonigal | Speaker | TED.com