sponsored links
TEDxBinghamtonUniversity

Hannah Fry: The mathematics of love

ハンナ・フライ: 愛を語る数学

April 4, 2014

ふさわしいパートナーを見つけるのは簡単なことではありません―でも、数学的にはどうでしょうか? 数学者のハンナ・フライは、この魅力的な講演で、愛を求める私たちの姿に見られるパターンを解説し、運命の人に出会うための3つの秘訣(数学的裏付けあり!)を紹介します。

Hannah Fry - Complexity theorist
Hannah Fry researches the trends in our civilization and ways we can forecast its future. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Today I want to talk to you
about the mathematics of love.
今日のテーマは
「愛を語る数学」です
00:12
Now, I think that we can all agree
皆さんご承知のとおり
数学者というのは
00:16
that mathematicians
are famously excellent at finding love.
非常に素晴らしい
愛の探究者です
00:18
But it's not just
because of our dashing personalities,
でも それは
私たちが肉食系で
00:23
superior conversational skills
and excellent pencil cases.
卓越した話術を誇り
最高の筆箱を携えているだけでなく
00:26
It's also because we've actually done
an awful lot of work into the maths
実際に 非常に多くの研究を行い
完ぺきなパートナーを
00:31
of how to find the perfect partner.
見つける方法を
計算してきたからです
00:35
Now, in my favorite paper
on the subject, which is entitled,
この研究の中で
私のお気に入りの論文は
00:38
"Why I Don't Have a Girlfriend" --
(Laughter) --
「なぜ僕には彼女がいないか」です(笑)
00:41
Peter Backus tries to rate
his chances of finding love.
ピーター・バッカスは
理想の恋人と出会える確率を計算します
00:45
Now, Peter's not a very greedy man.
ピーターは
さほど高望みはしていません
00:48
Of all of the available women in the U.K.,
イギリスにいる
フリーな女性のうち
00:51
all Peter's looking for
is somebody who lives near him,
ピーターが探しているのは
近くに住んでいて
00:53
somebody in the right age range,
彼に見合う年齢で
00:56
somebody with a university degree,
大卒で
00:58
somebody he's likely to get on well with,
ピーターと馬が合い
01:01
somebody who's likely to be attractive,
魅力的で
01:03
somebody who's likely
to find him attractive.
ピーターを魅力的と
思ってくれる人です
01:05
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:08
And comes up with an estimate
of 26 women in the whole of the UK.
はじき出された数字は
イギリス全体で26人というものです
01:11
It's not looking very good,
is it Peter?
はじき出された数字は
イギリス全体で26人というものです
01:17
Now, just to put that into perspective,
あんまりですよね ピーター
01:19
that's about 400 times fewer
than the best estimates
これが どれくらいの
数字かというと
01:21
of how many intelligent
extraterrestrial life forms there are.
最も確かな予測で
存在するとされる―
01:24
And it also gives Peter
a 1 in 285,000 chance
地球外生命体の数の
400分の1です
01:28
of bumping into any one
of these special ladies
さらに ピーターが
一晩 遊びに繰り出して
01:33
on a given night out.
この特別な女性に
出会うチャンスは
01:35
I'd like to think
that's why mathematicians
28万5千分の1です
01:37
don't really bother
going on nights out anymore.
これが理由で
数学者はわざわざ
01:39
The thing is that I personally
夜遊びなんて
しないんでしょうね
01:42
don't subscribe
to such a pessimistic view.
でも 私はそんな悲観的には
考えていないんです
01:44
Because I know,
just as well as all of you do,
というのも
皆さんもそうだと思いますが
01:47
that love doesn't really work like that.
愛は そんな計算どおりには
行かないからです
01:49
Human emotion isn't neatly ordered
and rational and easily predictable.
人間の感情は 無秩序で
非合理的で予測が難しいものです
01:52
But I also know that that doesn't mean
でも だからといって
01:57
that mathematics hasn't got something
that it can offer us
数学は何の役にも立たない
ということではありません
01:59
because, love, as with most of life,
is full of patterns
愛は 人生の多くがそうであるように
パターンにあふれており
02:02
and mathematics is, ultimately,
all about the study of patterns.
数学は つまるところ
パターンの研究だからです
02:06
Patterns from predicting the weather
to the fluctuations in the stock market,
パターンも様々です
天気から 株式市場の変動
02:10
to the movement of the planets
or the growth of cities.
惑星の動き 都市の成長の
予測まであります
02:15
And if we're being honest,
none of those things
はっきり言って
02:18
are exactly neatly ordered
and easily predictable, either.
これらはすべて
まさに無秩序で予測困難でしょう
02:21
Because I believe that mathematics
is so powerful that it has the potential
数学はとてもパワフルで
ほぼすべての事象に対して
02:24
to offer us a new way of looking
at almost anything.
新たな見地を授けてくれるものだ
と信じています
02:29
Even something as mysterious as love.
たとえ それが愛のように
ミステリアスなものであっても
02:33
And so, to try to persuade you
さて 皆さんに
数学がどれほど
02:37
of how totally amazing, excellent
and relevant mathematics is,
素晴らしく 身近なものか
ご納得いただくため
02:38
I want to give you my top three
mathematically verifiable tips for love.
数学的に検証可能な
愛の秘訣 トップ3をご紹介します
02:43
Okay, so Top Tip #1:
それでは 1つ目の秘訣です
02:51
How to win at online dating.
「オンラインデート必勝法」
02:53
So my favorite online dating
website is OkCupid,
オンラインデート・サイトで
私のお気に入りはOkCupidです
02:58
not least because it was started
by a group of mathematicians.
何と言っても 数学者チームが
立ち上げたサイトだからです
03:01
Now, because they're mathematicians,
数学者らしく 彼らは
03:05
they have been collecting data
ほぼ10年にわたって
03:07
on everybody who uses their site
for almost a decade.
全ユーザーの情報を
収集してきており
03:08
And they've been trying
to search for patterns
そこに パターンを
見い出そうとしています
03:11
in the way that we talk about ourselves
サイト上で
どんな風に自分のことを話し
03:14
and the way that we
interact with each other
どんな風に交流するか
03:15
on an online dating website.
といったパターンです
03:18
And they've come up with some
seriously interesting findings.
そして 冗談抜きに
興味深い発見がありました
03:19
But my particular favorite
その中でも
大のお気に入りは
03:22
is that it turns out
that on an online dating website,
「オンラインデート・サイトでは
03:24
how attractive you are
does not dictate how popular you are,
魅力的な容姿の人がモテるとは限らない」
というものです
03:27
and actually, having people
think that you're ugly
むしろ 残念な容姿と
思われた方が
03:33
can work to your advantage.
有利に働くこともあるのです
03:37
Let me show you how this works.
詳しく説明させてください
03:40
In a thankfully voluntary
section of OkCupid,
ありがたいことに
OkCupidでは任意で
03:41
you are allowed to rate
how attractive you think people are
異性のルックスを
1~5の尺度で
03:46
on a scale between 1 and 5.
評価できるように
なっています
03:49
Now, if we compare this score,
the average score,
この平均スコアを
03:51
to how many messages a
selection of people receive,
受け取るメッセージの数と
比較することで
03:55
you can begin to get a sense
オンラインデート・サイトにおける
魅力と人気の相関関係がわかります
03:58
of how attractiveness links to popularity
on an online dating website.
オンラインデート・サイトにおける
魅力と人気の相関関係がわかります
03:59
This is the graph that the OkCupid guys
have come up with.
こちらは OkCupidの人たちが
作ったグラフです
04:03
And the important thing to notice
is that it's not totally true
注目すべきは
必ずしも 魅力が高いほど
04:06
that the more attractive you are,
the more messages you get.
多くのメッセージを受け取るわけではない
ということです
04:10
But the question arises then
of what is it about people up here
しかし 不思議なことに
この青枠の人たちは
04:12
who are so much more popular
than people down here,
魅力は同じくらいなのに
この赤枠の人たちより
04:16
even though they have the
same score of attractiveness?
かなりモテています
なぜでしょう?
04:21
And the reason why is that it's not just
straightforward looks that are important.
ルックスが良ければ良い
というものではないからです
04:23
So let me try to illustrate their
findings with an example.
具体例を挙げて ご説明しましょう
04:28
So if you take someone like
Portia de Rossi, for example,
例えば 女優のポーシャ・デ・ロッシのような人が
いたとしましょう
04:31
everybody agrees that Portia de Rossi
is a very beautiful woman.
誰もが ポーシャ・デ・ロッシは
とても美しい女性だと言います
04:35
Nobody thinks that she's ugly,
but she's not a supermodel, either.
誰も彼女が醜いとは思いませんが
彼女はスーパーモデルでもありません
04:40
If you compare Portia de Rossi
to someone like Sarah Jessica Parker,
サラ・ジェシカ・パーカーのような人と
比べたらどうでしょう
04:43
now, a lot of people,
myself included, I should say,
私も含め
多くの方はきっと
04:48
think that Sarah Jessica Parker
is seriously fabulous
サラ・ジェシカ・パーカーは
とても素晴らしく
04:51
and possibly one of the
most beautiful creatures
この地球で
一番美しい生き物だと
04:56
to have ever have walked
on the face of the Earth.
認めるに違いありません
04:58
But some other people,
i.e., most of the Internet,
でも 中には―
たいていはネット上の書き込みで
05:01
seem to think that she looks
a bit like a horse. (Laughter)
彼女はちょっと馬に似ている
と言う人もいるようです(笑)
05:07
Now, I think that if you ask people
how attractive they thought
サラ・ジェシカ・パーカーと
ポーシャ・デ・ロッシがどれだけ魅力的か
05:13
Sarah Jessica Parker
or Portia de Rossi were,
サラ・ジェシカ・パーカーと
ポーシャ・デ・ロッシがどれだけ魅力的か
05:16
and you ask them to give
them a score between 1 and 5,
1~5の尺度で
評価をしてもらったら
05:19
I reckon that they'd average out
to have roughly the same score.
二人の平均値は
ほぼ同じになるでしょう
05:22
But the way that people would vote
would be very different.
でも 評価の分布は
まったく違うものになると思います
05:25
So Portia's scores would
all be clustered around the 4
ポーシャの評価は
4のあたりに集中します
05:27
because everybody agrees
that she's very beautiful,
誰もがとても美しいと
考えるからです
05:30
whereas Sarah Jessica Parker
completely divides opinion.
一方で サラ・ジェシカ・パーカーは
意見が分かれます
05:32
There'd be a huge spread in her scores.
評価にも広がりがあります
05:35
And actually it's this spread that counts.
実は この広がりが
重要なんです
05:37
It's this spread
that makes you more popular
評価に幅があるからこそ
こうしたサイトでは
05:40
on an online Internet dating website.
より人気を獲得できるのです
05:42
So what that means then
つまり
05:44
is that if some people
think that you're attractive,
自分の魅力を
認めてくれる人がいる限り
05:46
you're actually better off
他の人には 魅力なしと思われた方が
うまく行くのです
05:48
having some other people
think that you're a massive minger.
他の人には 魅力なしと思われた方が
うまく行くのです
05:50
That's much better
than everybody just thinking
皆に「近所の可愛い子」と思われるより
だいぶ良いのです
05:55
that you're the cute girl next door.
皆に「近所の可愛い子」と思われるより
だいぶ良いのです
05:57
Now, I think this begins
makes a bit more sense
メッセージを送る側の立場に
立って考えれば
05:59
when you think in terms of the people
who are sending these messages.
理にかなっていることが
分かるでしょう
06:01
So let's say that you think
somebody's attractive,
例えば あなたが
魅力的と思う人がいたとします
06:05
but you suspect that other people
won't necessarily be that interested.
他の人は必ずしも その人に
さほど関心を抱かないとすれば
06:07
That means there's
less competition for you
あなたには
競争相手が少ないことになり
06:11
and it's an extra incentive
for you to get in touch.
コンタクトするインセンティブも
高まります
06:14
Whereas compare that
to if you think somebody is attractive
もし あなたが魅力的だと思う人が
06:16
but you suspect that everybody
is going to think they're attractive.
誰もが魅力的と考えそうだったら
どうでしょう
06:19
Well, why would you bother
humiliating yourself, let's be honest?
正直なところ
わざわざ恥をかきたいですか?
06:22
Here's where the really
interesting part comes.
面白いのはここからです
06:26
Because when people choose the pictures
that they use on an online dating website,
オンラインデート・サイトに
載せる写真を選ぶとき
06:28
they often try to minimize the things
人は 魅力がないと思われそうなことを
06:33
that they think some people
will find unattractive.
できるだけ隠そうとします
06:35
The classic example is people
who are, perhaps, a little bit overweight
典型的な例は
肥満気味の人が
06:38
deliberately choosing
a very cropped photo,
意図的に体型を隠すよう
写真に修正を加えたり
06:43
or bald men, for example,
ハゲている人が
06:46
deliberately choosing pictures
where they're wearing hats.
帽子をかぶっている写真を
選んだりするようなものです
06:48
But actually this is the opposite
of what you should do
でも もし成功したければ
06:51
if you want to be successful.
これと逆のことをすべきです
06:53
You should really, instead, play up to
whatever it is that makes you different,
つまり たとえ
魅力的でないと考える人がいたとしても
06:55
even if you think that some people
will find it unattractive.
他の人と違うところを
アピールすべきです
07:00
Because the people who fancy you
are just going to fancy you anyway,
あなたを好きになる人は
どうやっても好きになります
07:04
and the unimportant losers who don't,
well, they only play up to your advantage.
そうでない人は あなたの良いところしか
見ていないので 重要ではないのです
07:07
Okay, Top Tip #2:
How to pick the perfect partner.
2つ目の秘訣は
「完ぺきなパートナーの見つけ方」です
07:12
So let's imagine then
that you're a roaring success
恋愛が 絶好調で
進んでいるとしましょう
07:14
on the dating scene.
恋愛が 絶好調で
進んでいるとしましょう
07:17
But the question arises
of how do you then convert that success
でも ここで問題なのは
恋愛での成功を
07:18
into longer-term happiness
and in particular,
いかに永遠の幸せに結びつけるか
07:23
how do you decide
when is the right time to settle down?
特に いつの時点で
「その人」と決めるかです
07:27
Now generally,
it's not advisable to just cash in
一般的に
あなたに好意を示した―
07:31
and marry the first person
who comes along
最初の人に
慌てて決めて
07:34
and shows you any interest at all.
結婚すべきでないと
言われます
07:36
But, equally, you don't really
want to leave it too long
でも それと同時に
永遠の幸せをつかみたいなら
07:38
if you want to maximize your
chance of long-term happiness.
あまり長くは
待ちたくもないでしょう
07:41
As my favorite author,
Jane Austen, puts it,
私の大好きな作家
ジェーン・オースティンは言います
07:44
"An unmarried woman of seven and twenty
「27歳の未婚女性は
二度と―
07:47
can never hope to feel or
inspire affection again."
愛情を感じ 愛情を呼び起こすことを
望めはしない」
07:49
(Laughter)
(笑)
07:53
Thanks a lot, Jane.
What do you know about love?
ジェーン ありがとう
さすが 愛を熟知していますね
07:55
So the question is then,
つまり 問題は
07:59
how do you know when
is the right time to settle down
人生でデートできる人が
限られている中で
08:01
given all the people
that you can date in your lifetime?
落ち着くべき時を
どうやって知るかです
08:03
Thankfully, there's a rather delicious bit
of mathematics that we can use
幸いにも ここで使える
かなり美味しい数学があります
08:06
to help us out here, called
optimal stopping theory.
「最適停止理論」というものです
08:10
So let's imagine then,
想像してみましょう
08:12
that you start dating when you're 15
15歳でお付き合いを始めて
08:14
and ideally, you'd like to be married
by the time that you're 35.
35歳までに結婚するのを
理想とします
08:16
And there's a number of people
その間に お付き合いできそうな人に
たくさん出会います
08:20
that you could potentially
date across your lifetime,
その間に お付き合いできそうな人に
たくさん出会います
08:22
and they'll be at varying
levels of goodness.
長所のレベルも様々です
08:24
Now the rules are that once
you cash in and get married,
誰か一人に決めて結婚すると
08:27
you can't look ahead to see
what you could have had,
その後 どんな人に出会えたか
知ることはできず
08:30
and equally, you can't go back
and change your mind.
同様に 時間を戻して
決断を変えることはできません
08:32
In my experience at least,
少なくとも
私の経験では
08:35
I find that typically people don't
much like being recalled
他の人がいるという理由で
お断りされて 何年もしてから
08:36
years after being passed up
for somebody else, or that's just me.
また誘われるのは嫌なものです
私だけではないでしょう
08:39
So the math says then
that what you should do
ですから 数学的には
このようにすべきなんです
08:45
in the first 37 percent
of your dating window,
デート相手の候補リストにいる
最初の37%は
08:48
you should just reject everybody
as serious marriage potential.
真剣な結婚相手としては
全員お断りするのです
08:51
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:55
And then, you should pick the
next person that comes along
そのあと
それまでに会った誰よりも
08:57
that is better than everybody
that you've seen before.
「良い」と最初に感じた人を
選ぶのです
09:01
So here's the example.
例えば こうです
09:03
Now if you do this, it can be
mathematically proven, in fact,
これに従えば
数学的裏付けをもって
09:05
that this is the best possible way
完ぺきなパートナーを
見つける確率を
09:08
of maximizing your chances
of finding the perfect partner.
最大化する最良の方法を
実践できるのです
09:10
Now unfortunately, I have to tell you that
this method does come with some risks.
ただ残念ながら これには
リスクを伴うこともご承知おきください
09:15
For instance, imagine if
your perfect partner appeared
例えば 完ぺきなパートナーが
09:20
during your first 37 percent.
最初の37%に現れた場合です
09:24
Now, unfortunately,
you'd have to reject them.
不幸にも あなたは
お断りすることになるでしょう
09:28
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:30
Now, if you're following the maths,
そして この数学的方法に従う限り
09:33
I'm afraid no one else comes along
前に会った人より 良い人に
09:35
that's better than anyone
you've seen before,
会うことはありませんから
09:37
so you have to go on
rejecting everyone and die alone.
あなたは ただ断り続けて
死ぬまで一人というわけです
09:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
09:43
Probably surrounded by cats
nibbling at your remains.
おそらく最期は 猫に囲まれて
看取られることになるでしょう
09:46
Okay, another risk is,
let's imagine, instead,
さて もう一つのリスクです
今度はこう考えてください
09:51
that the first people that you dated
in your first 37 percent
最初の37%に
会った人たちが
09:55
are just incredibly dull,
boring, terrible people.
異常につまらなくて
退屈で最悪の人だった場合です
09:58
Now, that's okay, because
you're in your rejection phase,
まあ このときは
お断りの段階にいますから
10:02
so thats fine,
you can reject them.
大丈夫
お断りすることができます
10:05
But then imagine, the next
person to come along
でも 次に会う人が
辛うじて
10:06
is just marginally less boring,
dull and terrible
退屈でなく 面白くて
マシだったとしたら
10:10
than everybody that you've seen before.
どうでしょうか
10:14
Now, if you are following the maths,
I'm afraid you have to marry them
この方法に従っている限りは
その人と結婚しますから
10:16
and end up in a relationship
which is, frankly, suboptimal.
ずばり 次善の関係に
落ち着いてしまうわけです
10:20
Sorry about that.
残念なことです
10:24
But I do think that there's
an opportunity here
でも ここを好機と
市場に応えて
10:25
for Hallmark to cash in on
and really cater for this market.
ホールマーク社が
決めにかかる余地があります
10:27
A Valentine's Day card like this.
(Laughter)
こんなバレンタイン・カードとかね(笑)
10:30
"My darling husband, you
are marginally less terrible
「親愛なる夫へ
あなたは私がデートした
10:32
than the first 37 percent
of people I dated."
最初の37%の人たちより
辛うじてマシだったわ」
10:36
It's actually more romantic
than I normally manage.
私にしては かなりロマンチックです
10:39
Okay, so this method doesn't give
you a 100 percent success rate,
ですから この方法に
100%の成功率は期待できません
10:45
but there's no other possible
strategy that can do any better.
でも これより
良い戦略などないのです
10:49
And actually, in the wild,
there are certain types
実際 野生界では
ある魚は
10:53
of fish which follow and
employ this exact strategy.
これと全く同じ戦略を
実践しています
10:55
So they reject every possible
suitor that turns up
その魚は
交配期に現れた求愛者の
10:59
in the first 37 percent
of the mating season,
最初の37%を拒否し
11:02
and then they pick the next fish
that comes along after that window
次に出会う
これまでのどの魚よりも
11:05
that's, I don't know, bigger and burlier
より大きく たくましい魚を
11:08
than all of the fish
that they've seen before.
選ぶのです
11:10
I also think that subconsciously,
humans, we do sort of do this anyway.
人間も無意識のうちに
これをしていると思います
11:13
We give ourselves a little bit of time
to play the field,
私たちは少しの間
いろんな異性と出会って
11:18
get a feel for the marketplace
or whatever when we're young.
若いうちに
いわば市場感覚を磨きます
11:21
And then we only start looking seriously
at potential marriage candidates
そして 20代半ばか
それ以降になってから
11:24
once we hit our mid-to-late 20s.
まじめに結婚相手を
探し始めます
11:29
I think this is conclusive proof,
if ever it were needed,
これこそが決定的な証拠で
11:31
that everybody's brains are prewired
to be just a little bit mathematical.
脳には元々 ちょっとした数学的回路が
埋め込まれているのです
11:34
Okay, so that was Top Tip #2.
秘訣の2つ目を
お話ししました
11:39
Now, Top Tip #3: How to avoid divorce.
さて 3つ目の秘訣は
「離婚の回避法」です
11:41
Okay, so let's imagine then
that you picked your perfect partner
皆さんは
完ぺきなパートナーを選び
11:44
and you're settling into
a lifelong relationship with them.
その人と 一生を
共にしようとしています
11:47
Now, I like to think that everybody
would ideally like to avoid divorce,
誰もが できることなら
離婚は避けたいものだと思います
11:52
apart from, I don't know,
Piers Morgan's wife, maybe?
まあ ピアーズ・モーガンの奥さんは
違うでしょうか
11:56
But it's a sad fact of modern life
でも 現代の
悲しい事実として
12:02
that 1 in 2 marriages in the
States ends in divorce,
アメリカでは 結婚したカップルの
2組に1組は離婚します
12:04
with the rest of the world
not being far behind.
それ以外の地域でも
数字は大して変わりません
12:08
Now, you can be forgiven, perhaps
結婚生活が破たんする前に
12:11
for thinking that the arguments
that precede a marital breakup
起こる口論は
数学の研究対象としては
12:13
are not an ideal candidate
for mathematical investigation.
理想的ではない
とも言えるでしょう
12:17
For one thing, it's very hard to know
何しろ 計測する対象や
12:20
what you should be measuring
or what you should be quantifying.
数値化の対象を設定するのが
とても難しいですから
12:22
But this didn't stop a psychologist,
John Gottman, who did exactly that.
それでも この研究をやってのけたのが
心理学者のジョン・ゴットマンです
12:25
Gottman observed hundreds of couples
having a conversation
ゴットマンは 数百のカップルを対象に
会話を観察し
12:32
and recorded, well,
everything you can think of.
考え得る あらゆることを
記録しました
12:37
So he recorded what was said
in the conversation,
どんな会話が
交わされているかを記録し
12:39
he recorded their skin conductivity,
皮膚コンダクタンス反応も記録し
12:42
he recorded their facial expressions,
顔の表情も
12:44
their heart rates, their blood pressure,
心拍数 血圧も記録しました
12:46
basically everything apart from whether
or not the wife was actually always right,
つまり 妻が常に正しかったかを除き
すべてを記録したわけです
12:48
which incidentally she totally is.
まあ 妻がいつも正しいんですけど
12:55
But what Gottman and his team found
ゴットマンのチームが
導いた結論によれば
12:58
was that one of the
most important predictors
あるカップルが離婚するか
予測をする上で
13:01
for whether or not a couple
is going to get divorced
最も重要な因子の一つは
13:03
was how positive or negative each
partner was being in the conversation.
会話中の二人が どれだけ
ポジティブか ネガティブかです
13:05
Now, couples that were very low-risk
リスクがとても低いとされたカップルは
13:10
scored a lot more positive points
on Gottman's scale than negative.
ゴットマンの基準では ネガティブより
ポジティブの要素が多かったのです
13:13
Whereas bad relationships,
関係がこじれている場合
13:17
by which I mean, probably
going to get divorced,
つまり 離婚に向かうであろう人たちは
13:19
they found themselves getting
into a spiral of negativity.
負のスパイラルに
陥ってしまっているのです
13:22
Now just by using these very simple ideas,
このような非常に
シンプルな考え方だけで
13:27
Gottman and his group were able to predict
ゴットマンのチームは
あるカップルが
13:29
whether a given couple
was going to get divorced
離婚をするかどうか
90%の確度で
13:32
with a 90 percent accuracy.
予測することができました
13:34
But it wasn't until he teamed up
with a mathematician, James Murray,
でも 数学者のジェームズ・マレーと
共同研究をして初めて
13:37
that they really started to understand
このような負のスパイラルが起きる―
13:40
what causes these negativity spirals
and how they occur.
理由とメカニズムが
解明されるようになりました
13:43
And the results that they found
彼らがたどり着いた結論は
13:47
I think are just incredibly
impressively simple and interesting.
感銘を受けるほど
シンプルで面白いものです
13:49
So these equations, they predict how
the wife or husband is going to respond
これらの等式は
会話をしている夫妻が
13:53
in their next turn of the conversation,
自分が話すときに
どう反応するか
13:57
how positive or negative
they're going to be.
ポジティブ・ネガティブの度合いを
予想します
13:59
And these equations, they depend on
これらの式は
14:01
the mood of the person
when they're on their own,
その人が一人でいるときの機嫌と
14:03
the mood of the person when
they're with their partner,
パートナーと一緒にいるときの機嫌で
変わりますが
14:06
but most importantly, they depend on
最も重要なのは
14:08
how much the husband and wife
influence one another.
夫妻がどれだけ
お互いに影響し合うかです
14:10
Now, I think it's important
to point out at this stage,
ここで ぜひ申し上げたいのは
14:13
that these exact equations
have also been shown
これらの方程式が
14:16
to be perfectly able at describing
もう一つ 完ぺきに描写し得るのは
14:19
what happens between two
countries in an arms race.
軍拡競争にある2国間の関係
ということです
14:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:26
So that -- an arguing couple
spiraling into negativity
ですから
口論をして負のスパイラルに陥り
14:30
and teetering on the brink of divorce --
離婚の瀬戸際に
追いつめられたカップルは
14:33
is actually mathematically equivalent to
the beginning of a nuclear war.
実は 数学的には
核戦争の始まりと同等なわけです
14:35
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:39
But the really important term
in this equation
でも この等式で重要なことは
14:42
is the influence that people
have on one another,
人々が互いに与え合う影響
14:44
and in particular, something called
the negativity threshold.
特に「ネガティブの しきい値」
と呼ばれるものです
14:47
Now, the negativity threshold,
ネガティブの しきい値
14:50
you can think of as
how annoying the husband can be
これは 夫がどこまで悪さをしたら
妻がキレてしまうか
14:52
before the wife starts to get
really pissed off, and vice versa.
臨界点のようなものです
逆も然りですが
14:56
Now, I always thought that good marriages
were about compromise and understanding
私はこれまで
良い結婚とは 歩み寄りと相互理解
15:01
and allowing the person to
have the space to be themselves.
互いの空間を許容することが
すべてだと思っていました
15:06
So I would have thought that perhaps
the most successful relationships
つまり 最も成功している関係というのは
15:09
were ones where there was
a really high negativity threshold.
ネガティブの しきい値が非常に高いのだ
と思っていたのです
15:12
Where couples let things go
些細なことには目をつぶって
15:15
and only brought things up if
they really were a big deal.
大事なことだけを話し合う
カップルのようなものです
15:17
But actually, the mathematics
and subsequent findings by the team
でも実際 数学と
チームが導き出した答えは
15:20
have shown the exact opposite is true.
その正反対こそが真である
ということでした
15:23
The best couples,
or the most successful couples,
ベスト・カップル―
最も成功しているカップルは
15:27
are the ones with a really low
negativity threshold.
ネガティブのしきい値が
非常に低いのです
15:29
These are the couples that don't
let anything go unnoticed
これらのカップルは
何事も 気づかないふりはせず
15:33
and allow each other
some room to complain.
お互いに不平不満を
言えるようにしています
15:37
These are the couples that are continually
trying to repair their own relationship,
さらに 常に
関係を修復しようとしていて
15:40
that have a much more positive
outlook on their marriage.
結婚生活の先行きを
かなりポジティブに捉えています
15:45
Couples that don't let things go
何でも とことん話し合うか
15:48
and couples that don't let trivial things
end up being a really big deal.
些細なことには 目をつぶるかで
大きな違いが生まれるのです
15:50
Now of course, it takes bit more than
just a low negativity threshold
もちろん ただネガティブの
しきい値を低くし
15:56
and not compromising to
have a successful relationship.
妥協せず 良い関係を
築こうとするだけでは不十分です
16:01
But I think that it's quite interesting
でも 怒りをため込んではいけないことの
16:05
to know that there is really
mathematical evidence
数学的な証拠が
本当に存在するということは
16:08
to say that you should never
let the sun go down on your anger.
非常に興味深いことです
16:10
So those are my top three tips
ここまで
愛と恋愛関係において
16:14
of how maths can help you
with love and relationships.
どのように数学が役立ちうるか
3つの秘訣をお伝えしました
16:16
But I hope
that aside from their use as tips,
こうした数学の使い方に加えて
16:19
they also give you a little bit of insight
into the power of mathematics.
数学が持つ力について
ちょっとした私見をご紹介します
16:21
Because for me, equations
and symbols aren't just a thing.
私にとって 等式や記号は
無味乾燥なものではありません
16:25
They're a voice that speaks out
about the incredible richness of nature
それらは 声を持っています
息をのむような自然の豊かさや
16:30
and the startling simplicity
私たちの身の周りで
16:34
in the patterns that twist and turn
and warp and evolve all around us,
ねじれ 展開するパターンの
驚くべきシンプルさを 声高に語りかけています
16:36
from how the world works to how we behave.
世界の躍動から
私たちの立ち居振る舞いに至るまで
16:41
So I hope that perhaps,
for just a couple of you,
カップルの皆さんには
16:44
a little bit of insight into
the mathematics of love
愛を語る数学に
少し耳を傾けていただき
16:46
can persuade you to have
a little bit more love for mathematics.
数学を少しでも
愛していただければと思います
16:48
Thank you.
ありがとうございました
16:51
(Applause)
(拍手)
16:53
Translator:Yuko Yoshida
Reviewer:Mari Arimitsu

sponsored links

Hannah Fry - Complexity theorist
Hannah Fry researches the trends in our civilization and ways we can forecast its future.

Why you should listen

Hannah Fry completed her PhD in fluid dynamics in early 2011 with an emphasis on how liquid droplets move. Then, after working as an aerodynamicist in the motorsport industry, she began work on an interdisciplinary project in complexity sciences at University College London. Hannah’s current research focusses on discovering new connections between mathematically described systems and human interaction at the largest scale.


The original video is available on TED.com
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.