16:48
TED2003

Vik Muniz: Art with wire, sugar, chocolate and string

ヴィック・ムニーズ: 針金、砂糖、チョコ、糸で作るアート

Filmed:

ヴィック・ムニーズはぼろぼろの紙、針金、雲やダイヤモンドなど、ほとんど何でもアートにしてしまいます。このトークでは作品の背景にある考えが説明され、私たちを素晴らしい作品の世界へと誘います。

- Artist
Vik Muniz delights in subverting a viewer's expectations. He uses unexpected materials to create portraits, landscapes and still lifes, which he then photographs. Full bio

I was asked to come here and speak about creation.
今日は創作について話しに来ました
00:25
And I only have 15 minutes, and I see they're counting already.
15分しかないんですが
もう時間を計り始めていますね
00:28
And I can -- in 15 minutes, I think I can touch only a very rather janitorial branch of creation,
15分では創作の方向性の紹介を
少しできるくらいだと思います
00:32
which I call "creativity."
クリエイティビティと呼ばれるものです
00:39
Creativity is how we cope with creation.
クリエイティビティとは
どのように創作を行うのかということです
00:42
While creation sometimes seems a bit un-graspable, or even pointless,
創作は時に意味が掴みにくかったり
よく分からなかったりしますが
00:46
creativity is always meaningful.
クリエイティビティは常に意味のあるものです
00:52
See, for instance, in this picture.
例えばこの写真を見て下さい
00:55
You know, creation is what put that dog in that picture,
創作とは犬をこの写真に入れる
意図は何かということですが
00:56
and creativity is what makes us see a chicken on his hindquarters.
クリエイティビティは 犬の後ろ足に
ニワトリを見せるものは何かということです
01:00
When you think about -- you know, creativity has a lot to do with causality too.
クリエイティビティとは
因果関係とも大きく関係しています
01:05
You know, when I was a teenager, I was a creator.
私は十代のころクリエイターでした
01:11
I just did things.
いろいろやっていただけなんです
01:14
Then I became an adult and started knowing who I was,
大人になって自分が何者なのかを知り始めて
01:17
and tried to maintain that persona -- I became creative.
その人格を保とうとして
クリエイティブになりました
01:19
It wasn't until I actually did a book and a retrospective exhibition, that I could track exactly --
実際に本を出版したり回顧展を開いて
初めて今まで自分がやってきた
01:23
looks like all the craziest things that I had done, all my drinking, all my parties --
飲み会とかパーティーとか
最もバカらしいことの跡をたどる事ができました
01:31
they followed a straight line that brings me to the point
そしてそれら全てが
この場所まで一直線につながっています
01:35
that actually I'm talking to you at this moment.
実際に今ここで話していますしね
01:37
Though it's actually true, you know,
これは事実なんですよ
01:39
the reason I'm talking to you right now is because I was born in Brazil.
この話をしている理由は
私がブラジル生まれだからなんです
01:43
If I was born in Monterey, probably would be in Brazil.
もしモントレーに生まれていても
ブラジルにいたでしょう
01:46
You know, I was born in Brazil and grew up in the '70s
私はブラジルで生まれて
01:52
under a climate of political distress,
政治的苦難の風潮の下で
1970年代に育ち
01:54
and I was forced to learn to communicate in a very specific way --
特殊なコミュニケーションの
方法を学ばされました
01:58
in a sort of a semiotic black market.
まるで記号論的な闇市の中でした
02:01
You couldn't really say what you wanted to say;
実際に言いたいことを言えないんです
02:03
you had to invent ways of doing it.
伝え方を見つけなければなりません
02:06
You didn't trust information very much.
情報をあまり信用できませんでした
02:08
That led me to another step of why I'm here today,
私がここに来た もうひとつの理由は
02:10
is because I really liked media of all kinds.
全ての種類のメディアが好きだからです
02:13
I was a media junkie, and eventually got involved with advertising.
私はメディア中毒で
広告業界に足を突っ込みました
02:16
My first job in Brazil
ブラジルでの はじめての仕事は
02:20
was actually to develop a way to improve the readability of billboards,
電光掲示板の読みやすさを
速度や近づく時の角度や
02:22
and based on speed, angle of approach and actually blocks of text.
文字のまとまりをもとに
向上させる方法の開発でした
02:27
It was very -- actually, it was a very good study,
その仕事はとてもよい勉強になりました
02:31
and got me a job in an ad agency.
それから広告代理店で仕事を得ました
02:34
And they also decided that I had to --
その広告の仕事先から
02:36
to give me a very ugly Plexiglas trophy for it.
とても醜いアクリルのトロフィーも貰いました
02:39
And another point -- why I'm here --
私がここに来た もうひとつの理由は
02:44
is that the day I went to pick up the Plexiglas trophy,
アクリルのトロフィーを受け取りに行った日
02:46
I rented a tuxedo for the first time in my life,
私は人生で初めてタキシードを借りて
02:50
picked the thing -- didn't have any friends.
トロフィーを貰いました
02:53
On my way out, I had to break a fight apart.
そして出口に向かう途中で
喧嘩の仲裁をしました
02:55
Somebody was hitting somebody else with brass knuckles.
メリケンサックで人を殴っていたのです
02:58
They were in tuxedos, and fighting. It was very ugly.
タキシードで喧嘩なんて最悪です
03:01
And also -- advertising people do that all the time -- (Laughter) --
広告業界の人たちは
いつもそうです(笑)
03:03
and I -- well, what happened is when I went back, it was on the way back to my car,
私が自分の車へ向かう途中で
起こったことなんですが
03:09
the guy who got hit decided to grab a gun --
殴られていた相手が銃を持って ―
03:14
I don't know why he had a gun --
なぜ銃を持っていたかは分かりませんが
03:16
and shoot the first person he decided to be his aggressor.
自分を攻撃したと思われる人物を撃ちました
03:18
The first person was wearing a black tie, a tuxedo. It was me.
その相手とは黒いネクタイと
タキシードを身に着けた私でした
03:20
Luckily, it wasn't fatal, as you can all see.
幸運にも 見て分かるとおり
命に別条ははありませんでした
03:26
And, even more luckily, the guy said that he was sorry
それからもっと幸運なことに
撃った人が私に謝罪をしたので
03:29
and I bribed him for compensation money, otherwise I press charges.
賠償金を払えば告発しないと
彼に持ちかけたのです
03:34
And that's how -- with this money I paid for a ticket to come to the United States in 1983,
そのお金で1983年に
アメリカへのチケットを買いました
03:38
and that's very -- the basic reason I'm talking to you here today:
これが私がなぜ今日
ここでお話をしてるのかという根本的な理由です
03:44
because I got shot. (Laughter) (Applause)
撃たれたからです
(笑)(拍手)
03:48
Well, when I started working with my own work, I decided that I shouldn't do images.
自分の制作をはじめた時
もう映像はやめようと決めて
03:51
You know, I became -- I took this very iconoclastic approach.
もっと因習を打破する方法を選びました
03:59
Because when I decided to go into advertising, I wanted to do --
なぜなら広告業界に進むと決めたとき
04:03
I wanted to airbrush naked people on ice, for whiskey commercials,
ウィスキーのCM用に エアーブラシで
氷に裸の人々を描きたかったんです
04:06
that's what I really wanted to do. (Laughter)
それが私が本当にやりたいことでした
04:12
But I -- they didn't let me do it, so I just -- you know,
けれどやらせてもらえませんでした
04:13
they would only let me do other things.
他のことしかやらせてもらえませんでした
04:16
But I wasn't into selling whiskey; I was into selling ice.
私はウィスキーではなく
氷を売ろうとしていたのです
04:18
The first works were actually objects.
最初の作品はオブジェでした
04:22
It was kind of a mixture of found object, product design and advertising.
ファウンドオブジェクトと製品デザインと
広告を混ぜたようなものでした
04:24
And I called them relics.
それを「遺物」と名付けました
04:29
They were displayed first at Stux Gallery in 1983.
1983年にスタックスギャラリーで展示されました
04:31
This is the clown skull.
これはピエロの頭蓋骨です
04:35
Is a remnant of a race of -- a very evolved race of entertainers.
進化したエンターテイナーという
人種の遺物です
04:37
They lived in Brazil, long time ago. (Laughter)
彼らは昔ブラジルに住んでいました
(笑)
04:40
This is the Ashanti joystick.
これはアシャンティのジョイスティックです
04:44
Unfortunately, it has become obsolete because it was designed for Atari platform.
残念ながらこれはアタリのゲーム機用だったので
時代遅れになりました
04:46
A Playstation II is in the works, maybe for the next TED I'll bring it.
今はプレイステーション2用を作っています
今度お話しするときに持ってきましょう
04:51
The rocking podium. (Laughter)
これは揺れる表彰台(笑)
04:56
This is the pre-Columbian coffeemaker. (Laughter)
コロンブス以前のコーヒーメーカー(笑)
05:01
Actually, the idea came out of an argument that I had at Starbucks,
実はこのアイデアは
スターバックスでの議論から生まれました
05:06
that I insisted that I wasn't having Colombian coffee;
私が飲んでいるのはコロンビアじゃない ―
05:10
the coffee was actually pre-Columbian.
コロンブス以前からあったと主張したのです
05:12
The Bonsai table.
盆栽テーブルです
05:14
The entire Encyclopedia Britannica bound in a single volume, for travel purposes.
旅行用ブリタニカ百科事典が
1巻に収まっています
05:20
And the half tombstone, for people who are not dead yet.
まだ死んでいない人のための半分の墓石です
05:30
I wanted to take that into the realm of images,
私はイメージの領域を
考慮に入れたかったので
05:36
and I decided to make things that had the same identity conflicts.
同じようなアイデンティティの衝突を
伴うものを作ることにしました
05:39
So I decided to do work with clouds.
そして雲を使うことを決めました
05:44
Because clouds can mean anything you want.
どんな意味でも持たせられるからです
05:46
But now I wanted to work in a very low-tech way,
ただしローテクで行こうと思いました
05:49
so something that would mean at the same time
同時にいくつかの意味を
持たせたかったのです
05:52
a lump of cotton, a cloud and Durer's praying hands --
綿のかたまりと 雲と
デューラーの『祈りの手』です
05:55
although this looks a lot more like Mickey Mouse's praying hands.
どちらかというと
ミッキーの祈りの手のようですが
05:59
But I was still, you know -- this is a kitty cloud.
これは子猫の雲です
06:03
They're called "Equivalents," after Alfred Stieglitz's work.
アルフレッド・スティーグリッツの作品を真似て
これらは「等価」と呼ばれるようになりました
06:07
"The Snail."
『かたつむり』です
06:12
But I was still working with sculpture,
しかし私は彫刻もまだ行っています
06:13
and I was really trying to go flatter and flatter.
そしてより平坦にすることに挑戦しています
06:15
"The Teapot."
『ティーポット』です
06:18
I had a chance to go to Florence, in -- I think it was '94,
たしか1994年に
フィレンツェに行く機会があって
06:20
and I saw Ghiberti's "Door of Paradise."
そこでギベルティの『天国の扉』を見ました
06:23
And he did something that was very tricky.
彼はとても巧妙なことをしていました
06:27
He put together two different media from different periods of time.
異なる時代からの
2つのメディアを一緒にしたんです
06:30
First, he got an age-old way of making it, which was relief,
まず浮き彫りという古い手法を使って
06:33
and he worked this with three-point perspective, which was brand-new technology at the time.
それから当時では新しい手法だった
3点透視図法を使いました
06:38
And it's totally overkill.
完全にやり過ぎでした
06:43
And your eye doesn't know which level to read.
鑑賞者は どう見たらいいか
分からなくなります
06:46
And you become trapped into this kind of representation.
そしてこのような表現方法の
罠にかかってしまいます
06:48
So I decided to make these very simple renderings,
だから私はシンプルな表現で作ると決めました
06:51
that at first they are taken as a line drawing --
まずは線描写を取り入れて
06:55
you know, something that's very -- and then I did it with wire.
それから針金を使いました
06:58
The idea was to -- because everybody overlooks white -- like pencil drawings, you know?
誰でも白は見落とすので
鉛筆デッサンのように見えるのです
07:02
And they would look at it -- "Ah, it's a pencil drawing."
みんな「鉛筆デッサンだ」と言います
07:08
Then you have this double take and see that it's actually something that existed in time.
これには実体があるので 見直すと
07:10
It had a physicality,
実際に何かが存在するものが見えるのです
07:14
and you start going deeper and deeper into sort of narrative
そしてイメージに対してもっと
物語の世界に深入りします
07:16
that goes this way, towards the image. So this is "Monkey with Leica."
これは『猿とライカ』です
07:20
"Relaxation."
『リラクセーション』
07:28
"Fiat Lux."
『光あれ』
07:30
And the same way the history of representation
同じように表現の歴史は
07:34
evolved from line drawings to shaded drawings.
線描写から陰影描写に進みました
07:37
And I wanted to deal with other subjects.
私は他の主題に取り組みたかったので
07:40
I started taking that into the realm of landscape,
風景の領域に入りました
07:42
which is something that's almost a picture of nothing.
風景画は ほとんど何も
描かれていないようなものです
07:45
I made these pictures called "Pictures of Thread,"
私は「糸の絵」シリーズを制作して
07:49
and I named them after the amount of yards that I used to represent each picture.
絵を描くために糸を
何ヤード使ったかで題名を付けました
07:51
These always end up being a photograph at the end,
最終的には写真になります
07:55
or more like an etching in this case.
この作品の場合はまるで銅版画です
07:57
So this is a lighthouse.
灯台です
07:59
This is "6,500 Yards," after Corot. "9,000 Yards," after Gerhard Richter.
コローの絵から『6500ヤード』
ゲルハルト・リヒターの絵から『9000ヤード』
08:06
And I don't know how many yards, after John Constable.
何ヤードかわかりませんが
ジョン・コンスタブルの絵をもとにしました
08:13
Departing from the lines, I decided to tackle the idea of points,
次に線から離れて
点に取り組むことにしました
08:19
like which is more similar to the type of representation that we find in photographs themselves.
写真の表現方法とより似ているものです
08:22
I had met a group of children in the Caribbean island of Saint Kitts,
カリブ海のセントキッツ島に住む
子供たちに会い
08:27
and I did work and play with them.
作品を作り一緒に遊びました
08:31
I got some photographs from them.
そして子供たちの写真を手に入れました
08:35
Upon my arrival in New York, I decided --
ニューヨークに着くとすぐに
08:37
they were children of sugar plantation workers.
砂糖プランテーションの
労働者の子供たちを
08:39
And by manipulating sugar over a black paper, I made portraits of them.
黒い紙に砂糖をのせて描きました
08:43
These are -- (Applause) --
これらは
08:48
Thank you. This is "Valentina, the Fastest."
ありがとう これは
『駿足のヴァレンチナ』です
08:52
It was just the name of the child,
子供の名前と
08:56
with the little thing you get to know of somebody that you meet very briefly.
少し会っただけで知ることのできる情報です
08:58
"Valicia."
『ヴァリシア』
09:02
"Jacynthe."
『ジャシンタ』
09:06
But another layer of representation was still introduced.
もうひとつの表現方法も紹介します
09:10
Because I was doing this while I was making these pictures,
これらの作品と同時進行で
もうひとつ作成していました
09:12
I realized that I could add still another thing
他のものも出来ると気が付いたからです
09:15
I was trying to make a subject --
何かテーマを阻むようなものを
09:18
something that would interfere with the themes,
造ろうと思いました
09:20
so chocolate is very good, because it has --
だからチョコレートはとても良かった
09:25
it brings to mind ideas that go from scatology to romance.
スカトロからロマンスまで
いろいろと思い浮かべられます
09:29
And so I decided to make these pictures,
だからこれらの作品の作成を決めました
09:34
and they were very large, so you had to walk away from it to be able to see them.
とても大きな作品なので
遠くから見なければなりません
09:37
So they're called "Pictures of Chocolate."
「チョコレートの絵」です
09:40
Freud probably could explain chocolate better than I. He was the first subject.
フロイドは私より上手くチョコについて
説明できるでしょう 彼が最初の対象です
09:41
And Jackson Pollock also.
ジャクソン・ポロックもですね
09:46
Pictures of crowds are particularly interesting,
群衆の絵は特に面白いです
09:52
because, you know, you go to that --
群衆を取り上げると
09:54
you try to figure out the threshold with something you can define very easily,
顔のように判別しやすいものが
09:56
like a face, goes into becoming just a texture.
ただのテクスチャーに変わる
その境界がわかりやすいからです
09:59
"Paparazzi."
『パパラッチ』です
10:03
I used the dust at the Whitney Museum to render some pieces of their collection.
ホイットニー美術館では 埃を使って
コレクションの一部を表現しました
10:07
And I picked minimalist pieces because they're about specificity.
選んだのはミニマリズムの作品です
特異性を扱っているからです
10:11
And you render this with the most non-specific material,
それを最も特異でない素材 ―
10:15
which is dust itself.
埃で表現しています
10:18
Like, you know, you have the skin particles of every single museum visitor.
これで美術館を訪れた人 全員の
皮膚の一部が手に入るので
10:20
They do a DNA scan of this, they will come up with a great mailing list.
それでDNAをスキャンすれば
すごいメーリングリストができますね
10:24
This is Richard Serra.
これはリチャード・セラです
10:30
I bought a computer, and [they] told me it had millions of colors in it.
私がコンピューターを買ったとき
何百万もの色が入っていると言われました
10:38
You know an artist's first response to this is, who counted it? You know?
アーティストとして最初の疑問は
「誰が数えたんだ?」
10:42
And I realized that I never worked with color,
そして今まで自分の作品で
色を使っていないことに気付きました
10:46
because I had a hard time controlling the idea of single colors.
一つの色でも取り扱うのが
難しかったからです
10:49
But once they're applied to numeric structure,
しかし数的構造を当てはめてみると
10:53
then you can feel more comfortable.
色の扱いはより容易になりました
10:56
So the first time I worked with colors was by making these mosaics of Pantone swatches.
初めて色を使ったのが
パントンの色見本によるモザイクです
10:58
They end up being very large pictures,
最終的にはとても大きな作品になったので
11:03
and I photographed with a very large camera --
8x10のとても大きなカメラで
11:05
an 8x10 camera.
作品を撮影しました
11:07
So you can see the surface of every single swatch --
このように色見本が全部見えます
11:09
like in this picture of Chuck Close.
チャック・クロースの自画像です
11:11
And you have to walk very far to be able to see it.
これは遠くから見なければなりません
11:13
Also, the reference to Gerhard Richter's use of color charts --
ゲルハルト・リヒターの
「カラーチャート」も参考にしています
11:18
and the idea also entering another realm of representation that's very common to us today,
さらに私たちに馴染み深い
別の表現方法にもつながっています
11:25
which is the bit map.
ビットマップです
11:29
I ended up narrowing the subject to Monet's "Haystacks."
テーマはモネの『積みわら』に
絞ることにしました
11:31
This is something I used to do as a joke --
次はジョークでやったことなんですが
11:37
you know, make -- the same like -- Robert Smithson's "Spiral Jetty" --
ロバート・スミッソンの
『スパイラル・ジェティ』と同じものを作り
11:38
and then leaving traces, as if it was done on a tabletop.
机の上で制作したかのような
形跡を残しました
11:43
I tried to prove that he didn't do that thing in the Salt Lake.
彼がグレートソルト湖で制作したのではないと
証明しようとしたのです
11:47
But then, just doing the models, I was trying to explore the relationship
しかしこのようなモデルの制作過程で
モデルとオリジナルの
11:51
between the model and the original.
関係性を探求したくなりました
11:55
And I felt that I would have to actually go there and make some earthworks myself.
そして実際にその場所で
ランド・アートを作りたいと思いました
11:57
I opt for very simple line drawings -- kind of stupid looking.
ちょっとバカらしい位に
とても単純な線描を選びました
12:03
And at the same time, I was doing these very large constructions,
そして こんなふうに
超巨大に描きました
12:08
being 150 meters away.
150メートル離れています
12:11
Now I would do very small ones, which would be like --
今はとても小さなものを作り
12:14
but under the same light, and I would show them together,
同じ考え方で同時に展示したいと考えています
12:18
so the viewer would have to really figure it out what one he was looking.
そうすれば鑑賞者が実際に何を見ているのか
理解しなければなりませんから
12:21
I wasn't interested in the very large things, or in the small things.
とても大きなものとか 小さなものよりも
12:24
I was more interested in the things in between,
その中間に興味がありました
12:27
you know, because you can leave an enormous range for ambiguity there.
大きな曖昧さをそこに残せるからです
12:30
This is like you see -- the size of a person over there.
写真の中の人のサイズが分かりますね
12:36
This is a pipe.
これはパイプです
12:41
A hanger.
ハンガー
12:46
And this is another thing that I did -- you know working
私の別の作品は ―
12:48
-- everybody loves to watch somebody draw,
みんな描くのを見るのは好きですが
12:53
but not many people have a chance to watch somebody draw in --
1つの絵が描かれていくところを
12:55
a lot of people at the same time, to evidence a single drawing.
大勢の人が同時に見る
チャンスというのは そう多くないでしょう
12:58
And I love this work,
だからこの作品が好きなんです
13:02
because I did these cartoonish clouds over Manhattan for a period of two months.
2か月間 マンハッタンの空に
漫画風の雲を描きました
13:05
And it was quite wonderful, because I had an interest -- an early interest -- in theater,
以前から演劇に興味があって
13:10
that's justified on this thing.
この作品で理由付けができました
13:14
In theater, you have the character and the actor in the same place,
劇場では同じ場所で
登場人物と役者が共存して
13:16
trying to negotiate each other in front of an audience.
観客の前で折り合いをつけようとします
13:20
And in this, you'd have like a --
この作品では
13:22
something that looks like a cloud, and it is a cloud at the same time.
雲のように見えて 実際に雲なんです
13:24
So they're like perfect actors.
まるで完璧な役者のようです
13:28
My interest in acting, especially bad acting, goes a long way.
私の演技に対する関心
特に下手な演技への関心は筋金入りです
13:31
Actually, I once paid like 60 dollars
私は素晴らしい役者が演じる
13:37
to see a very great actor to do a version of "King Lear,"
『リア王』を見るために
60ドル払ったことがあります
13:39
and I felt really robbed, because by the time the actor started being King Lear,
でも彼がリア王になり始めると
私はお金を盗られた気分になりました
13:43
he stopped being the great actor that I had paid money to see.
私はリヤ王ではなく
役者を見るためにお金を払ったのに
13:48
On the other hand, you know, I paid like three dollars, I think --
反対にアマチュア劇団の『オセロ』を
13:51
and I went to a warehouse in Queens
クィーンズの倉庫で見るために
13:59
to see a version of "Othello" by an amateur group.
3ドルほど払いました
14:01
And it was quite fascinating, because you know the guy --
演技は素晴らしかった
14:06
his name was Joey Grimaldi --
ジョーイ・グリマルディという役者が
14:09
he impersonated the Moorish general
ムーア人の将軍に扮していました
14:11
-- you know, for the first three minutes he was really that general,
彼は最初の3分間は将軍でしたが
14:14
and then he went back into plumber, he worked as a plumber, so --
その後 配管工に戻ってしまい
14:16
plumber, general, plumber, general --
将軍から配管工
配管工から将軍へと・・・
14:20
so for three dollars, I saw two tragedies for the price of one.
たった3ドル 1つ分の料金で
2つの悲劇を目にしたのです
14:23
See, I think it's not really about impression,
でも それは印象の問題でも
完璧なイリュージョンを
14:29
making people fall for a really perfect illusion,
信じさせることでもありません
14:34
as much as it is to make -- I usually work at the lowest threshold of visual illusion.
私は普段 わずかの視覚的イリュージョンで制作します
14:36
Because it's not about fooling somebody,
視覚的イリュージョンは
誰かを騙すことではなく
14:42
it's actually giving somebody a measure of their own belief:
人に考える尺度 つまり
どの位 騙されたいのかという
14:45
how much you want to be fooled.
尺度を与えるのですから
14:48
That's why we pay to go to magic shows and things like that.
だから私たちはマジックを
お金を払って見に行くのです
14:50
Well, I think that's it.
これで今日の
14:54
My time is nearly up.
私の話は終わりです
14:56
Thank you very much.
どうもありがとう
14:57
Translated by Ayuno Kawakami
Reviewed by Masaki Yanagishita

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Vik Muniz - Artist
Vik Muniz delights in subverting a viewer's expectations. He uses unexpected materials to create portraits, landscapes and still lifes, which he then photographs.

Why you should listen

Slf-effacing, frankly open and thought-provoking, all at the same time, Vik Muniz explores the power of representation. He's known for his masterful use of unexpected materials such as chocolate syrup, toy soldiers and paper confetti, but his resulting images transcend mere gimmickry. Most recently, he's been working with a team at MIT to inscribe a castle on a grain of sand ... 

Muniz is often hailed as a master illusionist, but he says he's not interested in fooling people. Rather, he wants his images to show people a measure of their own belief. Muniz has exhibited his playfully provocative work in galleries all over the world and was featured in the documentary Waste Land, which follows Muniz around the largest garbage dump in Rio de Janeiro, as he photographs the collectors of recycled materials in which he finds inspiration and beauty. Describing the history of photography as "the history of blindness," his images simply but powerfully remind a viewer of what it means to see, and how our preconceptions can color every experience.

More profile about the speaker
Vik Muniz | Speaker | TED.com