sponsored links
TED2008

David Griffin: How photography connects us

デビッド・グリフィン:写真はいかに我々を結びつけるか

February 2, 2008

ナショナルジオグラフィックの写真部長、デビッド・グリフィンは、写真が私たちを世界と結びつける威力を知っています。素晴らしい写真で彩られたこのトークで、我々が写真でいかに物語るかを話します。

David Griffin - Director of photography, National Geographic
As director of photography for National Geographic, David Griffin works with some of the most powerful photographs the world has ever seen. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Let's just start by looking at some great photographs.
さっそく素晴らしい写真を見ていくことにしましょう
00:18
This is an icon of National Geographic,
これはナショナルジオグラフィック誌の象徴とも言うべき写真です
00:23
an Afghan refugee taken by Steve McCurry.
スティーブ・マッカリーが撮ったアフガン難民の女性です
00:26
But the Harvard Lampoon is about to come out
ハーバードランプーン誌がちかぢか
00:29
with a parody of National Geographic,
ナショナルジオグラフィックのパロディを出版する予定で
00:32
and I shudder to think what they're going to do to this photograph.
彼らがこの写真をどうするかと思うとぞっとします
00:34
Oh, the wrath of Photoshop.
おお、Photoshopの災いよ
00:38
This is a jet landing at San Francisco, by Bruce Dale.
ブルース・デイルによるサンフランシスコでの着陸の光景
00:42
He mounted a camera on the tail.
彼は尾翼にカメラを装着しました
00:45
A poetic image for a story on Tolstoy, by Sam Abell.
サム・アベルによるトルストイの小説の詩的な表現
00:52
Pygmies in the DRC, by Randy Olson.
ランディ・オルソン コンゴのピグミー族
00:58
I love this photograph because it reminds me
この写真が好きです なぜならこれを見ると
01:00
of Degas' bronze sculptures of the little dancer.
ドガの小さな踊り子のブロンズ像を思わせるからです
01:02
A polar bear swimming in the Arctic, by Paul Nicklen.
ポール・ニクリンによる北極海を泳ぐシロクマです
01:08
Polar bears need ice to be able to move back and forth --
シロクマは動き回れるために氷が必要で
01:13
they're not very good swimmers --
泳ぎはあまり上手くありません
01:16
and we know what's happening to the ice.
北極の氷がどうなっているかはご存知ですね
01:18
These are camels moving across the Rift Valley in Africa,
アフリカのリフトバレーを横断しているラクダです
01:22
photographed by Chris Johns.
クリス・ジョンズの写真です
01:26
Shot straight down, so these are the shadows of the camels.
真上から撮影していて、見えているのはラクダの影です
01:29
This is a rancher in Texas, by William Albert Allard,
ウィリアム・アルバート・アラードによる
01:37
a great portraitist.
テキサスの牧童 素晴らしいポートレイトです
01:39
And Jane Goodall, making her own special connection,
そしてジェーン・グドールの特別な絆
01:43
photographed by Nick Nichols.
ニック・ニコルズの写真です
01:45
This is a soap disco in Spain, photographed by David Alan Harvey.
デビッド・アラン・ハーベイによる、スペインの石鹸ディスコの写真です
01:50
And David said that there was lot of weird stuff
「フロアではあちこちで
01:54
happening on the dance floor.
奇妙なことが起きていた
01:56
But, hey, at least it's hygienic.
まどっちにしろ、衛生的だね」と言っていました
01:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:01
These are sea lions in Australia doing their own dance,
こっちはオーストラリアのアシカのダンスです
02:05
by David Doubilet.
デビッド・デュビレの写真です
02:09
And this is a comet, captured by Dr. Euan Mason.
こちらはユアン・メイソン博士の撮影した彗星です
02:12
And finally, the bow of the Titanic, without movie stars,
そして、映画スターのいないタイタニックの船首
02:18
photographed by Emory Kristof.
エモリー・クリストフの写真です
02:22
Photography carries a power that holds up
今日の飽和し切ったメディア世界の
02:29
under the relentless swirl of today's saturated, media world,
容赦ない渦の中で、写真は厳然と力を保ち続けています
02:31
because photographs emulate the way
なぜなら、写真は私たちの心が、大切な一瞬を
02:35
that our mind freezes a significant moment.
固定するのを真似ているからです
02:37
Here's an example.
例を挙げましょう
02:39
Four years ago, I was at the beach with my son,
4年前、私は息子とビーチにいました
02:41
and he was learning how to swim
彼は泳ぎの練習中で
02:43
in this relatively soft surf of the Delaware beaches.
デラウェアビーチの波はまあまあ穏やかでした
02:46
But I turned away for a moment, and he got caught into a riptide
しかしちょっと眼を離した隙に、彼は引き潮に捉えられ
02:50
and started to be pulled out towards the jetty.
防波堤に向かって流され始めたのです
02:53
I can stand here right now and see,
今ここに立っていても目に浮かびます
02:56
as I go tearing into the water after him,
私が息子を追って波をかき分けていると
02:59
the moments slowing down and freezing into this arrangement.
場面がスローモーションになり、ある配置で凍り付く
03:02
I can see the rocks are over here.
岩がこちらにあり、
03:05
There's a wave about to crash onto him.
波が息子の上に砕けようとしている
03:09
I can see his hands reaching out,
息子は手を伸ばし
03:11
and I can see his face in terror,
顔には恐怖の色を浮かべ
03:14
looking at me, saying, "Help me, Dad."
私の方を見てこう言う:「パパ、助けて」
03:16
I got him. The wave broke over us.
私は彼を捕まえ、波が私たちに砕け
03:20
We got back on shore; he was fine.
彼を浜に引き揚げ、無事でした
03:22
We were a little bit rattled.
少しばかりガタガタしていました
03:24
But this flashbulb memory, as it's called,
しかしこの「フラッシュ写真の記憶」には
03:26
is when all the elements came together to define
そこにあった全ての要素が
03:30
not just the event, but my emotional connection to it.
出来事だけでなく、それと私の感情的な繋がりも焼き付いているのです
03:32
And this is what a photograph taps into
これこそ、写真が、見る人と
03:37
when it makes its own powerful connection to a viewer.
強い繋がりを生み出す力の元なのです
03:39
Now I have to tell you,
ついでに打ち明けますが
03:42
I was talking to Kyle last week about this,
先週このことについて息子と話をして
03:44
that I was going to tell this story.
あの話をするんだ、と言いました
03:46
And he said, "Oh, yeah, I remember that too!
すると彼が「ああ、あれね 覚えてるよ!
03:48
I remember my image of you
あの時の父さんは
03:50
was that you were up on the shore yelling at me."
砂浜から僕に叫んでたよね」
03:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:54
I thought I was a hero.
自分はヒーローだと思っていたのに
03:56
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:58
So,
それで…
03:59
this represents -- this is a cross-sample of
世界有数のフォトジャーナリストによる
04:02
some remarkable images taken by some of the world's greatest photojournalists,
素晴らしい写真のサンプルです
04:04
working at the very top of their craft --
業界でもトップの人たちです
04:08
except one.
一つを除いては
04:11
This photograph was taken by Dr. Euan Mason
この写真はユアン・メイスン博士が撮影しました
04:13
in New Zealand last year,
昨年ニュージーランドでです
04:16
and it was submitted and published in National Geographic.
そして投稿され、ナショナルジオグラフィック誌に掲載されました
04:18
Last year, we added a section to our website called "Your Shot,"
昨年私たちは「あなたの一枚」というセクションを
04:21
where anyone can submit photographs for possible publication.
ウェブサイトに追加し、みんなの投稿した写真が雑誌に載るチャンスを作ったのです
04:23
And it has become a wild success,
これは大成功となり
04:27
tapping into the enthusiast photography community.
熱心な写真コミュニティを動かすことになりました
04:30
The quality of these amateur photographs
こういうアマチュア写真の質の高さには
04:33
can, at times, be amazing.
時に驚くべきものがあります
04:35
And seeing this reinforces, for me,
こういう写真を見ると、私は
04:37
that every one of us has at least one or two
誰でも一枚や二枚は凄い写真を撮っているという
04:39
great photographs in them.
思いを強くします
04:42
But to be a great photojournalist,
しかし偉大なフォトジャーナリストになるためには
04:44
you have to have more than just one or two
一枚や二枚の凄い写真では
04:47
great photographs in you.
足りません
04:49
You've got to be able to make them all the time.
ずっと生み出し続けている必要があるのです
04:51
But even more importantly,
しかしそれよりさらに重要なのは
04:53
you need to know how to create a visual narrative.
視覚的に語るすべを知っている必要があるということです
04:56
You need to know how to tell a story.
物語を語れなくてはならない
04:59
So I'm going to share with you some coverages
そこで、写真がいかに物語るかを
05:02
that I feel demonstrate the storytelling power of photography.
示している作品を一緒に見ていきたいと思います
05:04
Photographer Nick Nichols went to document
写真家ニック・ニコルズは、チャドにある
05:09
a very small and relatively unknown wildlife sanctuary
ザコーマという、比較的小さくあまり知られていない
05:12
in Chad, called Zakouma.
野生動物保護区に撮影しに行きました
05:15
The original intent was to travel there
最初の計画は
05:18
and bring back a classic story of diverse species,
異郷の地の、多様な生物の
05:20
of an exotic locale.
よくあるような物語でした
05:22
And that is what Nick did, up to a point.
ここまではニックはそうしていたのです
05:24
This is a serval cat.
これはサーバルキャットです
05:26
He's actually taking his own picture,
この猫は自分で写真を撮りました
05:28
shot with what's called a camera trap.
カメラトラップという方法でです
05:30
There's an infrared beam that's going across,
赤外線ビームが仕掛けられていて
05:32
and he has stepped into the beam and taken his photograph.
遮断するとシャッターが切れます
05:34
These are baboons at a watering hole.
水場にいるヒヒです
05:36
Nick -- the camera, again, an automatic camera
ニックはここでも自動式のカメラを使って
05:41
took thousands of pictures of this.
ヒヒの写真を何千枚も撮りました
05:43
And Nick ended up with a lot of pictures
結局どうなったかというと、たくさんの
05:45
of the rear ends of baboons.
ヒヒのお尻が撮れたわけです
05:47
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:49
A lion having a late night snack --
夜食中のライオンです
05:50
notice he's got a broken tooth.
牙が折れていますね
05:53
And a crocodile walks up a riverbank toward its den.
クロコダイルが川から上がって巣に向かうところです
05:58
I love this little bit of water
この写真は、尻尾から水が
06:01
that comes off the back of his tail.
したたり落ちているところがいいですね
06:03
But the centerpiece species of Zakouma are the elephants.
しかし、ザコーマの中心的な動物は象です
06:07
It's one of the largest intact herds in this part of Africa.
アフリカのこの地域では最大の、野生の群れの一つです
06:10
Here's a photograph shot in moonlight,
これは月明かりで撮った写真で
06:14
something that digital photography has made a big difference for.
デジタル写真技術によって大きく変わった領域です
06:16
It was with the elephants that this story pivoted.
象によって物語ががらりと変わりました
06:19
Nick, along with researcher Dr. Michael Fay,
ニックは研究者のマイケル・フェイ博士と同行して
06:21
collared the matriarch of the herd.
群れのリーダーに発信器を取りつけ
06:25
They named her Annie,
アニーと名前を付け
06:27
and they began tracking her movements.
追跡を開始しました
06:29
The herd was safe within the confines of the park,
群れは保護区の中にいる間は
06:31
because of this dedicated group of park rangers.
監視員のグループがいるので安全です
06:33
But once the annual rains began,
しかし毎年雨期になると
06:35
the herd would begin migrating to feeding grounds outside the park.
群れは保護区の外のエサ場に移動します
06:39
And that's when they ran into trouble.
そこでトラブルが起きたのです
06:42
For outside the safety of the park were poachers,
安全な保護区の外には密猟者がいて
06:45
who would hunt them down only for the value of their ivory tusks.
高価な象牙を求めて群れを襲うのです
06:47
The matriarch that they were radio tracking,
無線で追跡していたリーダー象は
06:52
after weeks of moving back and forth, in and out of the park,
何週間も保護区の中と外を行ったり来たりしていましたが
06:54
came to a halt outside the park.
保護区の外で動かなくなりました
06:57
Annie had been killed, along with 20 members of her herd.
アニーは、他の20頭の仲間とともに殺されていました
06:59
And they only came for the ivory.
象牙だけのために襲撃されたのです
07:07
This is actually one of the rangers.
これは監視員の一人です
07:13
They were able to chase off one of the poachers and recover this ivory,
彼らは密猟者の一人を追い払い、象牙を回収したのです
07:15
because they couldn't leave it there,
それには価値があるので
07:18
because it's still valuable.
置いて行くわけにはいきません
07:20
But what Nick did was he brought back
ニックは、
07:22
a story that went beyond the old-school method
昔ながらの手法の「ねえ、これ面白いじゃない?」
07:24
of just straight, "Isn't this an amazing world?"
を遥かに越えたものを持ち帰り
07:28
And instead, created a story that touched our audiences deeply.
我々の読者の心に深く響く物語を創り上げたのです
07:30
Instead of just knowledge of this park,
保護区に関する単なる知識ではなく
07:34
he created an understanding and an empathy
象や、監視員や、その他の
07:36
for the elephants, the rangers and the many issues
人間と野生の紛争に関する
07:38
surrounding human-wildlife conflicts.
理解と共感を生み出したのです
07:40
Now let's go over to India.
さて、インドに行ってみましょう
07:44
Sometimes you can tell a broad story in a focused way.
一つのことを深く追うことで、より普遍的な物語を語れることがあります
07:46
We were looking at the same issue that Richard Wurman
「New World Population Project」で
07:49
touches upon in his new world population project.
リチャード・ワーマンが触れたのと同じものを見ています
07:52
For the first time in history,
人類史上初めて
07:55
more people live in urban, rather than rural, environments.
農村部より都市部に、より多くの人が住んでいます
07:57
And most of that growth is not in the cities,
そして人口増加は都市の中ではなく
08:01
but in the slums that surround them.
その周辺のスラムで起きています
08:03
Jonas Bendiksen, a very energetic photographer,
ジョナス・ベンディクセンは非常にエネルギッシュな写真家ですが
08:06
came to me and said,
私の所に来て言いました:
08:09
"We need to document this, and here's my proposal.
「これを是非撮らなきゃ こういうのはどうです?
08:11
Let's go all over the world and photograph every single slum around the world."
『世界中のスラムというスラムを写真に収める』」
08:14
And I said, "Well, you know, that might be a bit ambitious for our budget."
私は言いました:「予算に対してちょっと野心的すぎやしないか?」
08:17
So instead, what we did was
そこで私たちがやったのは
08:20
we decided to, instead of going out and doing what would result
出かけていって、いろんなものをちょっとずつ見てきましたという
08:22
in what we'd consider sort of a survey story --
いわゆる概観的な物語で
08:25
where you just go in and see just a little bit of everything --
終わらせてしまうのではなく、
08:27
we put Jonas into Dharavi,
ジョナスをインドのムンバイの
08:30
which is part of Mumbai, India,
ダラヴィに送って
08:33
and let him stay there, and really get into
そこに滞在してもらい、この街の
08:35
the heart and soul of this really major part of the city.
一番奥の奥にまで入り込んでもらうことでした
08:37
What Jonas did was not just go and do a surface look
そういう場所のひどい状態を
08:44
at the awful conditions that exist in such places.
ちょっと出かけていって表層的に見てくるのではありません
08:46
He saw that this was a living and breathing and vital part
生活と、息吹と、その都市域全体がどう機能しているかの
08:49
of how the entire urban area functioned.
核となる部分を見てきたのです
08:52
By staying tightly focused in one place,
一つの場所を見据えることで
08:55
Jonas tapped into the soul and the enduring human spirit
その生活圏の裏にある魂と不屈の人間精神に
08:57
that underlies this community.
触れることができたのです
09:00
And he did it in a beautiful way.
彼はそれを美しく表現しました
09:04
Sometimes, though, the only way to tell a story is with a sweeping picture.
物語を語る方法が、広範囲の写真しかない場合もあります
09:09
We teamed up underwater photographer Brian Skerry
我々は水中写真家ブライアン・スケリーと
09:12
and photojournalist Randy Olson
フォトジャーナリストのランディ・オルソンに
09:15
to document the depletion of the world's fisheries.
世界の漁業における枯渇問題を取材してもらいました
09:17
We weren't the only ones to tackle this subject,
このテーマに挑んだのは私たちだけではありませんが
09:20
but the photographs that Brian and Randy created
ブライアンとランディの写真は、中でも
09:23
are among the best to capture both the human
乱獲による自然と人間の荒廃を
09:26
and natural devastation of overfishing.
誰よりもよく捉えていました
09:28
Here, in a photo by Brian,
これはブライアンの写真で
09:30
a seemingly crucified shark is caught up
鮫が十字架に架けられたような姿で
09:32
in a gill net off of Baja.
バハの刺し網にかかっています
09:35
I've seen sort of OK pictures of bycatch,
ある魚の漁で別の魚がかかってしまうという
09:37
the animals accidentally scooped up
「混獲」を扱った
09:40
while fishing for a specific species.
写真を見てきましたが、
09:42
But here, Brian captured a unique view
ブライアンはここで
09:44
by positioning himself underneath the boat
自分でボートの下に位置して、いらない魚が
09:46
when they threw the waste overboard.
投げ捨てられるところをユニークに捉えています
09:49
And Brian then went on to even greater risk
ブライアンはさらに危険を冒し
09:55
to get this never-before-made photograph
かつて一度も撮られたことのない
09:57
of a trawl net scraping the ocean bottom.
海底をこそぎ取る底引き網を撮しました
09:59
Back on land, Randy Olson photographed
陸上では、ランディ・オルソンが
10:04
a makeshift fish market in Africa,
アフリカの仮設の魚市場を撮影し
10:06
where the remains of filleted fish were sold to the locals,
身の部分がヨーロッパに送られた後の
10:08
the main parts having already been sent to Europe.
残り物が売られているのを記録に収めました
10:11
And here in China, Randy shot a jellyfish market.
ここ中国では、ランディはクラゲの市場を撮っています
10:14
As prime food sources are depleted,
主要な食料資源は捕り尽くされ
10:18
the harvest goes deeper into the oceans
捕獲はさらに海の深いところで行われ
10:20
and brings in more such sources of protein.
このようなタンパク源まで運んで来ているのです
10:22
This is called fishing down the food chain.
食物連鎖の底辺まで捕り尽くしているのです
10:24
But there are also glimmers of hope,
しかし希望の光も見えています
10:27
and I think anytime we're doing a big, big story on this,
このように非常に大きな問題を取り扱う時は
10:29
we don't really want to go
我々は単に問題ばかりに
10:32
and just look at all the problems.
眼を向けたくはないのです
10:34
We also want to look for solutions.
解決策も見たい
10:36
Brian photographed a marine sanctuary in New Zealand,
ブライアンはニュージーランドの海洋保護地域を撮影し
10:37
where commercial fishing had been banned --
商業漁業が禁止されたことで
10:41
the result being that the overfished species have been restored,
乱獲された種が回復してきており
10:43
and with them a possible solution for sustainable fisheries.
そこから持続的な漁業の可能性が生まれてきています
10:47
Photography can also compel us to confront
写真はまた、我々を無理矢理にでも
10:50
issues that are potentially distressing and controversial.
憂鬱で議論の多い問題へと直面させます
10:53
James Nachtwey, who was honored at last year's TED,
昨年TEDで表彰されたジェームズ・ナクトウェイは
10:56
took a look at the sweep of the medical system
イラクで負傷したアメリカ兵を扱う
11:00
that is utilized to handle the American wounded coming out of Iraq.
医療システムの全体を記録しました
11:02
It is like a tube where a wounded soldier enters on one end
それはまるで魔法のチューブで、一方から負傷兵が入り
11:05
and exits back home, on the other.
帰還すると反対側から出てくるようなものでした
11:08
Jim started in the battlefield.
ジムは戦場から始めました
11:11
Here, a medical technician tends to a wounded soldier
ここでは医療スタッフが負傷兵を野戦病院へと運ぶ
11:13
on the helicopter ride back to the field hospital.
ヘリコプターの中で手当しています
11:17
Here is in the field hospital.
こちらは野戦病院です
11:20
The soldier on the right has the name of his daughter
右の兵士は胸に娘の名前があり
11:22
tattooed across his chest, as a reminder of home.
故郷へのよすがとして胸に入れ墨してあります
11:25
From here, the more severely wounded are transported
ここから、より重傷者は移送され
11:28
back to Germany, where they meet up with their families
ドイツへ戻り、彼らは初めて
11:32
for the first time.
家族と対面するのです
11:34
And then back to the States to recuperate at veterans' hospitals,
それから故郷に戻り退役軍人病院で回復期を過ごします
11:39
such as here in Walter Reed.
ここウォルター・リード病院の様に
11:43
And finally, often fitted with high-tech prosthesis,
そして最後に、多くはハイテク義肢をつけ
11:45
they exit the medical system and attempt
医療システムを抜けて、彼らの
11:47
to regain their pre-war lives.
戦場以前の生活を取り戻すのです
11:49
Jim took what could have been a straight-up medical science story
ジムは、普通なら医療技術の話にしかならないような写真を撮りながら
11:51
and gave it a human dimension that touched our readers deeply.
それに人間的側面を付け加え、読者に深い感銘を与えたのです
11:54
Now, these stories are great examples
さて、これらは
12:00
of how photography can be used
我々にとって重要な話題を扱う上で
12:02
to address some of our most important topics.
写真がいかに使えるかを示すよい例でした
12:04
But there are also times when photographers
しかし写真家は、時に撮影で
12:07
simply encounter things that are, when it comes down to it,
何かと出会い、その結果として
12:09
just plain fun.
とても楽しめる場合もあります
12:11
Photographer Paul Nicklin traveled to Antarctica
写真家ポール・ニクリンは南極大陸を旅し
12:13
to shoot a story on leopard seals.
ヒョウアザラシを撮影しました
12:15
They have been rarely photographed, partly because they are considered
これはめったに撮影されることがありません 理由の一部は、彼らが
12:17
one of the most dangerous predators in the ocean.
最も危険な海の捕食動物と考えられているからです
12:20
In fact, a year earlier, a researcher had been
実際、一年前に研究者が
12:23
grabbed by one and pulled down to depth and killed.
海に引きずりこまれて亡くなっています
12:25
So you can imagine Paul was maybe a little bit hesitant
だから、ポールも水に入るのをちょっと
12:27
about getting into the water.
躊躇したと思うかも知れません
12:29
Now, what leopard seals do mostly is, they eat penguins.
ヒョウアザラシは、大体はペンギンを食べています
12:32
You know of "The March of the Penguins."
「ペンギン・マーチ」をご存知でしょう;
12:35
This is sort of the munch of the penguins.
これは「ペンギン・ランチ」です
12:37
(Laughter)
(笑)
12:39
Here a penguin goes up to the edge and looks out
ペンギンが水際に来て、浜が安全か
12:42
to see if the coast is clear.
調べています
12:45
And then everybody kind of runs out and goes out.
そしてみんな押し出したり飛び込んだりしていくのです
12:47
But then Paul got in the water.
ポールは水に入りました
12:53
And he said he was never really afraid of this.
別に怖くはなかったと言っていました
12:55
Well, this one female came up to him.
そして、この一匹のメスが近寄ってきました
12:58
She's probably -- it's a shame you can't see it in the photograph,
写真では分からないのが残念なのですが
13:00
but she's 12 feet long.
3メートル半くらいあったそうです
13:03
So, she is pretty significant in size.
非常に大きいのですが
13:05
And Paul said he was never really afraid,
ポールは別に怖くなかったと言うんです
13:08
because she was more curious about him than threatened.
彼女が、威嚇するというよりは好奇心を持っていたからです
13:09
This mouthing behavior, on the right,
右側の大きく口を開けているのは、彼女が
13:12
was really her way of saying to him, "Hey, look how big I am!"
こう言ってるんです:「ねえ、私って大きいでしょ!」
13:14
Or you know, "My, what big teeth you have."
それか:「ねえ、私の歯は大きいでしょ」
13:17
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:20
Then Paul thinks that she simply took pity on him.
それからポールは、彼女が単に彼を哀れんでいるんだと思いました
13:21
To her, here was this big, goofy creature in the water
彼女からみれば、水の中に何か変な生きものがいて
13:23
that for some reason didn't seem to be interested
なぜだかわからないが、
13:27
in chasing penguins.
全然ペンギンを追う気がないらしいんですから
13:29
So what she did was she started to bring penguins to him,
それで彼女は、彼にペンギンを持って来はじめました
13:31
alive, and put them in front of him.
生きたまま、彼の目の前に
13:35
She dropped them off, and then they would swim away.
彼女が放すと、ペンギンは逃げ出そうとする
13:38
She'd kind of look at him, like "What are you doing?"
それを見て彼女は「あんたなにやってんのよ?」と
13:41
Go back and get them, and then bring them back
追いかけて、また捕まえて戻ってきて
13:43
and drop them in front of him.
彼の前に落とす
13:46
And she did this over the course of a couple of days,
彼女はこれを二日ばかりやって
13:48
until the point where she got so frustrated with him
いいかげん頭に来て
13:51
that she started putting them directly on top of his head.
ついにペンギンを彼の頭の上に直接置くようになったんです
13:53
(Laughter)
(笑)
13:56
Which just resulted in a fantastic photograph.
それでこの素晴らしい写真が撮れた
13:58
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:01
Eventually, though, Paul thinks that she just figured
結局、彼女はポールが
14:04
that he was never going to survive.
生き残れないな、と思ったらしく
14:07
This is her just puffing out, you know,
愛想を尽かして
14:09
snorting out in disgust.
タメ息をついて
14:12
(Laughter)
(笑)
14:14
And lost interest with him, and went back to what she does best.
そして彼に興味をなくして、去っていったのです
14:16
Paul set out to photograph a relatively
ポールはこの不思議な生き物の
14:19
mysterious and unknown creature,
写真を撮りに行って
14:21
and came back with not just a collection of photographs,
ただ写真のコレクションを得ただけでなく
14:23
but an amazing experience and a great story.
驚くべき体験と素晴らしい物語を持ち帰ったのです
14:25
It is these kinds of stories,
この様な物語こそが
14:29
ones that go beyond the immediate or just the superficial
単に直裁的で表面的なものを越えた
14:31
that demonstrate the power of photojournalism.
フォトジャーナリズムの力を示すのです
14:34
I believe that photography can make a real connection to people,
私は、写真が、人々とリアルに結びつくことができ
14:37
and can be employed as a positive agent
今日世界が直面している課題と可能性を
14:42
for understanding the challenges and opportunities
理解するために役立てられると
14:45
facing our world today.
信じています
14:47
Thank you.
ありがとう
14:49
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:50
Translator:Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

David Griffin - Director of photography, National Geographic
As director of photography for National Geographic, David Griffin works with some of the most powerful photographs the world has ever seen.

Why you should listen

David Griffin has one of the world's true dream jobs: He's the director of photography for National Geographic magazine. He works with photo editors and photographers to set the visual direction of the magazine -- which in turn raises the bar for photographers around the world.

Griffin offers an intriguing look into the magazine's creative process on his blog, Editor's Pick, where he talks about how the magazine uses its extraordinary photos to tell compelling stories.

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.