sponsored links
TED2009

Jill Tarter: Join the SETI search

ジル・ターターのSETI(地球外知的生命体探査)への参加の呼びかけ(TED prize 受賞!)

February 5, 2009

ジル ターター(SETI)のTED Prize の願い: 宇宙の知的生命体探索を促進し広めること! 多数の電波望遠鏡を結び、地球外知的存在のエビデンスとなり得るパターンに彼女とそのチームは耳を傾けています。

Jill Tarter - Astronomer
SETI's Jill Tarter has devoted her career to hunting for signs of sentient beings elsewhere, and almost all aspects of this field have been affected by her work. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
So, my question:
質問です
00:20
are we alone?
私たちは唯一の存在なのでしょうか?
00:22
The story of humans is the story of ideas --
人類の物語は 思想の物語でもあります
00:24
scientific ideas that shine light into dark corners,
未知なものへ光りを当てる科学の思想
00:28
ideas that we embrace rationally and irrationally,
私たちが理性的に あるいは 分別なく受け入れている思想
00:33
ideas for which we've lived and died and killed and been killed,
人類がそのために生き、死に、殺し、殺されてきた思想
00:38
ideas that have vanished in history,
歴史の中で消えていった思想
00:43
and ideas that have been set in dogma.
ドグマになってしまった思想もあります
00:45
It's a story of nations,
国家の物語があり
00:49
of ideologies,
イデオロギーの物語があり
00:53
of territories,
領土の物語があり
00:57
and of conflicts among them.
それらの間の衝突の物語があります
01:00
But, every moment of human history,
しかし 人類の歴史においてあらゆる瞬間は
01:05
from the Stone Age to the Information Age,
石器時代から情報化時代に至るまで
01:09
from Sumer and Babylon to the iPod and celebrity gossip,
シュメール文明や古代都市バビロンもi Podや有名人のゴシップも
01:13
they've all been carried out --
それらすべて
01:18
every book that you've read,
みなさんがお読みになった本も
01:23
every poem, every laugh, every tear --
あらゆる詩 笑い声 泣き声もすべて
01:25
they've all happened here.
ここで起きてきたのです
01:30
Here.
ここ
01:34
Here.
ここ
01:37
Here.
ここ
01:41
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:44
Perspective is a very powerful thing.
物事の見方というのは とても強力なものです
01:47
Perspectives can change.
物事の見方は自然に変わることもありますし
01:50
Perspectives can be altered.
外的な力により変えられもします
01:53
From my perspective, we live on a fragile island of life,
私の見方では 私たちが住んでいるのは 可能性に満ちた宇宙の中にある
01:56
in a universe of possibilities.
危うげな生命の孤島です
02:02
For many millennia, humans have been on a journey to find answers,
何千年と人類は答えを探す旅をしてきました
02:06
answers to questions about naturalism and transcendence,
自然に対する疑問や超絶的存在に対する疑問への答えです
02:13
about who we are and why we are,
我々は何者で なぜ存在しているのか
02:18
and of course, who else might be out there.
そして他に何が存在するのかという疑問
02:22
Is it really just us?
本当に我々しかいないのでしょうか
02:28
Are we alone in this vast universe
このエネルギーや 物質や 化学と物理の現象に満ちた
02:32
of energy and matter and chemistry and physics?
この広大な宇宙で唯一の存在なのでしょうか
02:35
Well, if we are, it's an awful waste of space.
もし私たちだけなのだとしたら すごい空間の無駄遣いですね
02:39
(Laughter)
(笑)
02:43
But, what if we're not?
しかし もし私たちだけではなかったら?
02:45
What if, out there, others are asking and answering similar questions?
もし宇宙に同じ疑問への答えを求める「何者か」が居たら?
02:47
What if they look up at the night sky, at the same stars,
夜空を見上げ 私たちと同じ星々を 反対側から
02:53
but from the opposite side?
見ている誰かがいたとしたら?
02:57
Would the discovery of an older cultural civilization out there
人類のものより古い「あちら側」にある文明の発見は
03:00
inspire us to find ways to survive
日々進化する技術をコントロールして上手くやっていく為の
03:08
our increasingly uncertain technological adolescence?
ヒントを何か与えてくれるのでしょうか
03:13
Might it be the discovery of a distant civilization
遠く離れた文明の存在と
03:18
and our common cosmic origins
宇宙における共通の起源の発見は
03:22
that finally drives home the message of the bond among all humans?
全人類を繋ぐメッセージとして地球に届くのでしょうか?
03:25
Whether we're born in San Francisco, or Sudan,
生まれたのがサンフランシスコでもスーダンでも
03:31
or close to the heart of the Milky Way galaxy,
天の川銀河の中心近くでも同じ
03:34
we are the products of a billion-year lineage of wandering stardust.
私たちは皆 宇宙を漂う星屑が何十億年もかけて紡ぎだした産物なのです
03:37
We, all of us,
私たち そう私たちすべては―
03:44
are what happens when a primordial mixture of hydrogen and helium
水素とヘリウムの原始混合物が
03:47
evolves for so long that it begins to ask where it came from.
長い時間をかけて進化し 自らの出自に疑問を抱くまでになったのです
03:51
Fifty years ago,
50年前
03:57
the journey to find answers took a different path
答え探しの旅が 違った道を辿り始め
03:59
and SETI, the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence,
SETI(地球外知的生命体探査)が
04:04
began.
生まれたのです
04:07
So, what exactly is SETI?
SETIとは いったい何なのでしょう
04:09
Well, SETI uses the tools of astronomy
SETIは天文学の道具を利用し
04:11
to try and find evidence of someone else's technology out there.
「あちら側」にある技術の存在を示す証拠を掴もうとする試みです
04:14
Our own technologies are visible over interstellar distances,
私たちの技術は星間距離を隔てても認識できます
04:19
and theirs might be as well.
彼らの技術も同様だと考えます
04:22
It might be that some massive network of communications,
彼らの技術は何らかの壮大な通信網かもしれないし
04:25
or some shield against asteroidal impact,
小惑星の衝突を避けるためのシールドみたいなものかもしれません
04:29
or some huge astro-engineering project that we can't even begin to conceive of,
私たちの理解を超えた巨大な宇宙工学プロジェクトかもしれません
04:32
could generate signals at radio or optical frequencies
それが発する電波や光の周波数帯の信号を
04:37
that a determined program of searching might detect.
徹底した探索プログラムによって検知できるかもしれません
04:41
For millennia, we've actually turned to the priests and the philosophers
数千年もの間 私たちは神官や哲学者に助言と指示を仰いできました
04:45
for guidance and instruction on this question of whether there's intelligent life out there.
「あちら側」に知的生命は存在するのかと
04:49
Now, we can use the tools of the 21st century to try and observe what is,
現代では21世紀の道具を使うことができます その道具を使えば
04:55
rather than ask what should be, believed.
何を信じるべきかではなく 何があるのかを観測することができます
05:01
SETI doesn't presume the existence of extra terrestrial intelligence;
SETIは地球外知的生命体の存在を前提にしているわけではありません
05:05
it merely notes the possibility, if not the probability
ごく均一に見える広大な宇宙に存在しうる可能性を
05:10
in this vast universe, which seems fairly uniform.
指摘しているのです 確率までは示せないにしても
05:14
The numbers suggest a universe of possibilities.
数字に目を向けて宇宙の可能性を探ってみましょう
05:18
Our sun is one of 400 billion stars in our galaxy,
太陽は私たちの銀河系にある 4000億もの恒星の中の1つです
05:21
and we know that many other stars have planetary systems.
他の多くの恒星が惑星を持つという事実はご存知でしょう
05:27
We've discovered over 350 in the last 14 years,
過去14年間に350を超える惑星が発見されました
05:32
including the small planet, announced earlier this week,
今週のはじめにも 小さな惑星が見つかっています
05:36
which has a radius just twice the size of the Earth.
地球のちょうど2倍の大きさの惑星です
05:42
And, if even all of the planetary systems in our galaxy were devoid of life,
私たちの銀河系にある惑星のどれにも生命がいなかったとしても
05:46
there are still 100 billion other galaxies out there,
まだ他に1000億もの銀河系があるのです
05:55
altogether 10^22 stars.
全部で恒星が10の22乗個も存在することになります
05:57
Now, I'm going to try a trick, and recreate an experiment from this morning.
ここでゲームをしてみましょう 今朝の実験の続きです
06:00
Remember, one billion?
覚えてますか 10億でしたね
06:05
But, this time not one billion dollars, one billion stars.
今回は10億ドルではなく 10億個の恒星です
06:07
Alright, one billion stars.
この厚さが10億個の恒星だとすると
06:11
Now, up there, 20 feet above the stage,
ステージに6mの高さまで積み上げて
06:13
that's 10 trillion.
恒星がやっと10兆個あることになります
06:16
Well, what about 10^22?
10の22乗個の恒星の場合は?
06:18
Where's the line that marks that?
いったいどれくらいの高さになるんでしょう?
06:21
That line would have to be 3.8 million miles above this stage.
このステージ上600万キロの高さです!
06:24
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:30
16 times farther away than the moon,
月と比べて16倍も離れています
06:31
or four percent of the distance to the sun.
太陽との距離と比較すると4%ですね
06:34
So, there are many possibilities.
だから結構可能性はあるということです
06:36
(Laughter)
(笑)
06:39
And much of this vast universe,
この広大な宇宙に
06:41
much more may be habitable than we once thought,
かつて私たちが予想した以上の居住可能な環境が存在し得ます
06:44
as we study extremophiles on Earth --
人類が生きられない状況で生存可能な
06:47
organisms that can live in conditions totally inhospitable for us,
極限微生物について研究を進めていくと分かります
06:49
in the hot, high pressure thermal vents at the bottom of the ocean,
それらは海底にある高温高圧の熱水噴出口や
06:53
frozen in ice, in boiling battery acid,
氷や 沸騰する強酸性のバッテリー液の中
07:00
in the cooling waters of nuclear reactors.
そして原子炉の冷却水の中でも生存可能で
07:04
These extremophiles tell us that life may exist in many other environments.
生命が様々な環境に存在しうることを示しています
07:08
But those environments are going to be widely spaced in this universe.
しかしそういった環境は宇宙の中で遠く隔たっています
07:15
Even our nearest star, the Sun --
地球に最も近い恒星である太陽でさえも
07:19
its emissions suffer the tyranny of light speed.
放射光を光の速度で地球に届けるのに苦労しています
07:21
It takes a full eight minutes for its radiation to reach us.
太陽光が地球に到達するまで8分を要します
07:26
And the nearest star is 4.2 light years away,
地球に最も近い恒星でさえ4.2光年離れています
07:29
which means its light takes 4.2 years to get here.
つまりその恒星の光が地球に到達するまで4.2年かかってしまいます
07:32
And the edge of our galaxy is 75,000 light years away,
地球から天の川銀河の端までは7万5千光年離れていて
07:36
and the nearest galaxy to us, 2.5 million light years.
地球から最も近い銀河系は250万光年も離れています
07:40
That means any signal we detect would have started its journey a long time ago.
つまり私たちが検知する信号はずっと前に発信されたものなのです
07:45
And a signal would give us a glimpse of their past,
その信号は彼らの過去を見せてくれます
07:51
not their present.
彼らの現在ではありません
07:56
Which is why Phil Morrison calls SETI, "the archaeology of the future."
フィリップ モリソンがSETIを「未来の考古学」と呼んだ所以です
07:58
It tells us about their past,
信号そのものは彼らの過去を教えてくれますが
08:03
but detection of a signal tells us it's possible for us to have a long future.
信号の検知は 私たちの文明も長く存続できる可能性を示します
08:06
I think this is what David Deutsch meant in 2005,
2005年のオックスフォードでのTEDTalkの終わりに
08:14
when he ended his Oxford TEDTalk
デイヴィッド ドイッチュ氏が
08:17
by saying he had two principles he'd like to share for living,
生きるために共有し 石版に刻んでおきたい2つの原理があると言ったのは
08:19
and he would like to carve them on stone tablets.
そういうことだったのだと思います
08:24
The first is that problems are inevitable.
1つ目は「問題は回避不可能である」
08:27
The second is that problems are soluble.
2つ目は「問題は解決可能である」
08:31
So, ultimately what's going to determine the success or failure of SETI
さて SETIプロジェクトの正否は何によって決まるのでしょうか
08:38
is the longevity of technologies,
プロジェクトの成功は 技術の存続可能性と
08:43
and the mean distance between technologies in the cosmos --
宇宙に存在する技術文明の間の平均距離にかかっています
08:47
distance over space and distance over time.
時間的な距離と 空間的な距離です
08:53
If technologies don't last and persist,
技術が長く存続しなければ
08:57
we will not succeed.
私たちは成功しません
09:00
And we're a very young technology
私たちの技術はこの古い銀河にあって
09:02
in an old galaxy,
まだまだ若く
09:04
and we don't yet know whether it's possible for technologies to persist.
技術が存続し得るのかということさえ分かっていません
09:07
So, up until now I've been talking to you about really large numbers.
これまで大きな数字を使って話をしてきました
09:12
Let me talk about a relatively small number.
今度は少し小さな数字の話をしましょう
09:17
And that's the length of time that the Earth was lifeless.
地球に生命のなかった期間の長さです
09:20
Zircons that are mined in the Jack Hills of western Australia,
西オーストラリアのジャックヒルズで
09:25
zircons taken from the Jack Hills of western Australia
採掘されたジルコンを調査すると
09:32
tell us that within a few hundred million years of the origin of the planet
地球誕生から数億年後には 豊富な水と
09:36
there was abundant water and perhaps even life.
おそらくは生命も存在していたことを示しています
09:41
So, our planet has spent the vast majority of its 4.56 billion year history
この地球は45億6千万年の歴史の中のかなりの時間を使って
09:44
developing life,
生命体を育んできたのです
09:53
not anticipating its emergence.
その出現を予期することもなく
09:55
Life happened very quickly,
生命体は早い段階で出現しました
09:57
and that bodes well for the potential of life elsewhere in the cosmos.
この事実は地球外生命体の可能性を示唆しています
09:59
And the other thing that one should take away from this chart
もうひとつ この図で見逃してならないのは
10:05
is the very narrow range of time
人類が生命体のピラミッドの頂点に居る期間は
10:09
over which humans can claim to be the dominant intelligence on the planet.
地球のタイムスケールから見ると 大変短いということです
10:13
It's only the last few hundred thousand years
現生人類が技術と文明を追い求めるようになって
10:17
modern humans have been pursuing technology and civilization.
まだほんの何十万年かにしかなりません
10:21
So, one needs a very deep appreciation
宇宙の他の場所にいる生命とコンタクトするための
10:25
of the diversity and incredible scale of life on this planet
最初のステップとして私たちがすべきことは
10:29
as the first step in preparing to make contact with life elsewhere in the cosmos.
地球の生命の驚くべきスケールと多様性を良く理解することです
10:34
We are not the pinnacle of evolution.
私たち人類は進化の頂点ではありません
10:43
We are not the determined product
人類は何十億年の進化の最終形態として
10:49
of billions of years of evolutionary plotting and planning.
予期され計画されていたわけではありません
10:53
We are one outcome of a continuing adaptational process.
私たちは継続的な適応プロセスの結果の1つに過ぎないのです
10:58
We are residents of one small planet
私たちは天の川銀河の端に位置する
11:06
in a corner of the Milky Way galaxy.
1つの小さな惑星の住人です
11:10
And Homo sapiens are one small leaf
何百万年に渡る生存競争を勝ち抜いた生物達で満たされた
11:13
on a very extensive Tree of Life,
大きく広がる命の木の中にあって
11:18
which is densely populated by organisms that have been honed for survival
ホモ サピエンスは ほんの小さな 一枚の葉っぱに
11:22
over millions of years.
過ぎません
11:29
We misuse language,
私たちは言葉を誤用し
11:31
and talk about the "ascent" of man.
「人類の上昇」と言っています
11:34
We understand the scientific basis for the interrelatedness of life
生物同士の相互関連を 科学的には理解していますが
11:37
but our ego hasn't caught up yet.
私たちのエゴは それに追いついていないのです
11:43
So this "ascent" of man, pinnacle of evolution,
「人類の上昇」そして「進化の頂点」という考えは
11:47
has got to go.
捨てなければなりません
11:51
It's a sense of privilege that the natural universe doesn't share.
そのような特権意識は 自然界と相容れません
11:53
Loren Eiseley has said,
ローレン アイズリーはこう言います
11:58
"One does not meet oneself
「我々は人間以外の目に映った己を見て初めて
12:01
until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human."
真の自分と出会うことができる」と
12:04
One day that eye may be that of an intelligent alien,
いつの日にかその「目」は地球外生命体のものになるかもしれません
12:08
and the sooner we eschew our narrow view of evolution
進化に対する偏狭な考えから離れることが出来てはじめて
12:13
the sooner we can truly explore our ultimate origins and destinations.
私たちが究極的には どこから来てどこへ行くのか 探求できるようになるでしょう
12:19
We are a small part of the story of cosmic evolution,
私たちは宇宙の進化物語の小さな一部分です
12:28
and we are going to be responsible for our continued participation in that story,
今後もその物語に参加し続ける責任があるのです
12:34
and perhaps SETI will help as well.
SETIもその一助となるかもしれません
12:43
Occasionally, throughout history, this concept
この宇宙的な視点に立った物の見方は
12:46
of this very large cosmic perspective comes to the surface,
歴史の中で折に触れて現れては 世界に影響を与えてきました
12:50
and as a result we see transformative and profound discoveries.
時代の常識を根本から揺るがし 核心を突く発見に繋がってきたのです
12:54
So in 1543, Nicholas Copernicus published "The Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres,"
1543年にニコラウス コペルニクスが発表した「天球回転論」は
13:00
and by taking the Earth out of the center,
地球を中心だとする それまでの考えを払拭し
13:07
and putting the sun in the center of the solar system,
太陽を太陽系の中心と捉えることで
13:13
he opened our eyes to a much larger universe,
広い宇宙に向けて私たちの目を開いてくれました
13:16
of which we are just a small part.
地球は小さな一部分だということを教えてくれたのです
13:20
And that Copernican revolution continues today
このコペルニクス的転回は現在も
13:23
to influence science and philosophy and technology and theology.
科学、哲学、テクノロジー、神学、様々な分野で引き継がれています
13:26
So, in 1959, Giuseppe Coccone and Philip Morrison
フィリップ モリソン氏とジュセッペ コッコーニ氏は1959年に
13:31
published the first SETI article in a refereed journal,
査読付き論文誌でSETIに関する最初の論文を発表し
13:36
and brought SETI into the scientific mainstream.
SETIを科学の世界で認知させることに成功しました
13:40
And in 1960, Frank Drake conducted the first SETI observation
1960年には フランク ドレイク氏がSETIの第1回目の実験として
13:43
looking at two stars, Tau Ceti and Epsilon Eridani,
「くじら座のタウ星」 と 「エリダヌス座のイプシロン星」 という2つの星をー
13:49
for about 150 hours.
150時間 観察しました
13:52
Now Drake did not discover extraterrestrial intelligence,
地球外知的生命体の発見こそ出来ませんでしたが
13:54
but he learned a very valuable lesson from a passing aircraft,
空を横切る飛行機や地上波放送が
13:57
and that's that terrestrial technology can interfere
地球外の技術を探索する上で障害になるという
14:02
with the search for extraterrestrial technology.
貴重な教訓を得ました
14:05
We've been searching ever since,
それ以来ずっとSETIは探索を続けています
14:08
but it's impossible to overstate the magnitude of the search that remains.
まだ残されている探索がいかに広大かは 過大に言うことが出来ません
14:10
All of the concerted SETI efforts, over the last 40-some years,
40年に渡るSETIの努力も
14:15
are equivalent to scooping a single glass of water from the oceans.
大海から汲み上げたコップ一杯の海水のようなものです
14:19
And no one would decide that the ocean was without fish
その一杯のコップの水から 海に魚がいないとは
14:24
on the basis of one glass of water.
誰にも言えません
14:28
The 21st century now allows us to build bigger glasses --
21世紀になって私たちはより大きなコップを手に入れました
14:30
much bigger glasses.
ずっと大きなコップです
14:35
In Northern California, we're beginning to take observations
北カリフォルニアにある「アレン テレスコープ アレイ」(ATA)の
14:37
with the first 42 telescopes of the Allen Telescope Array --
最初の42基の電波望遠鏡で観測を始めました
14:42
and I've got to take a moment right now to publicly thank
ここでお礼を言わせて下さい
14:46
Paul Allen and Nathan Myhrvold
ポール アレン氏、ネイサン ミアボルド氏と
14:50
and all the TeamSETI members in the TED community
TEDコミュニティーの全TeamSETIメンバーに
14:52
who have so generously supported this research.
SETIへの多大なるご協力を感謝します
14:55
(Applause)
(拍手)
14:59
The ATA is the first telescope built from a large number of small dishes,
ATAはコンピューターでまとめた多数の小型アンテナで構成された
15:08
and hooked together with computers.
最初の電波望遠鏡です
15:12
It's making silicon as important as aluminum,
アルミに加え シリコンの力を使うわけです
15:14
and we'll grow it in the future by adding more antennas to reach 350
アンテナは今後も増え続け 最終的には350台を連結することで
15:16
for more sensitivity and leveraging Moore's law for more processing capability.
受信感度を高め ムーアの法則を生かして処理能力も高めます
15:22
Today, our signal detection algorithms
現在の信号検出アルゴリズムでは
15:27
can find very simple artifacts and noise.
ごく単純な人工物とノイズを見分けることができます
15:31
If you look very hard here you can see the signal from the Voyager 1 spacecraft,
よく注意すると ボイジャー1号の信号が感知されているのも分かります
15:34
the most distant human object in the universe,
地球から最も離れている宇宙の人工物です
15:39
106 times as far away from us as the sun is.
太陽よりも106倍も地球から離れています
15:43
And over those long distances, its signal is very faint when it reaches us.
長距離なので信号が地球に届くまでにはかなり微弱になっています
15:48
It may be hard for your eye to see it,
それを目で見るのはとても大変なことですが
15:53
but it's easily found with our efficient algorithms.
SETIの効率的なアルゴリズムなら容易に見つけ出せるのです
15:55
But this is a simple signal,
しかし これらは単純な信号です
15:58
and tomorrow we want to be able to find more complex signals.
今後はより複雑な信号も見つけたいと思っています
16:00
This is a very good year.
今年は良い年です
16:04
2009 is the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first use of the telescope,
2009年はガリレオが初めて望遠鏡を用いた時から400年目にあたり
16:07
Darwin's 200th birthday,
ダーウィン生誕200周年
16:14
the 150th anniversary of the publication of "On the Origin of Species,"
ダーウィンの「種の起源」出版から150周年
16:17
the 50th anniversary of SETI as a science,
SETIが科学として認知されてから50周年
16:22
the 25th anniversary of the incorporation of the SETI Institute as a non-profit,
SETIが非営利法人となって25周年
16:25
and of course, the 25th anniversary of TED.
そして TED設立25周年の年です
16:31
And next month, the Kepler Spacecraft will launch
来月にはケプラー宇宙望遠鏡の打上げがあります
16:34
and will begin to tell us just how frequent Earth-like planets are,
SETI探索の対象である地球のような惑星がどれほど多く
16:37
the targets for SETI's searches.
宇宙に存在するかを教えてくれるでしょう
16:42
In 2009, the U.N. has declared it to be the International Year of Astronomy,
国連は2009年を世界天文年と定めました
16:44
a global festival to help us residents of Earth
宇宙の中の地球や人間の存在に思いを馳せ
16:51
rediscover our cosmic origins and our place in the universe.
その起源と存在を再認識するための世界的なお祭りです
16:55
And in 2009, change has come to Washington,
2009年 ワシントンにも「変化」の波が来て
16:59
with a promise to put science in its rightful position.
科学技術が然るべき扱いを受けられることが約束されました
17:03
(Applause)
(拍手)
17:08
So, what would change everything?
すべてを変えるものは何だと思いますか?
17:09
Well, this is the question the Edge foundation asked this year,
これはエッジ財団の今年の質問です
17:11
and four of the respondents said, "SETI."
回答者でSETIと答えた人が4人いました
17:14
Why?
選んだその理由は?
17:18
Well, to quote:
回答から引用すると
17:20
"The discovery of intelligent life beyond Earth
「地球外知的生命体の発見はー
17:22
would eradicate the loneliness and solipsism
人類がその誕生以来 ずっと患ってきた
17:24
that has plagued our species since its inception.
孤独感と自己中心主義を取り除くことが出来るかもしれない
17:26
And it wouldn't simply change everything,
その発見は 単に全てを変えるのではなく
17:29
it would change everything all at once."
全てを一度に変えることになるだろう」
17:31
So, if that's right, why did we only capture four out of those 151 minds?
この人の言葉が正しいなら なぜSETIは151人のうち4人の心しか掴めなかったのでしょうか
17:34
I think it's a problem of completion and delivery,
「完遂可能性」と「伝え方」の問題だと思います
17:41
because the fine print said,
質問の下に小さな活字でこう書かれていました
17:47
"What game-changing ideas and scientific developments
「どのような革新的なアイディアや科学的発展を
17:49
would you expect to live to see?"
生きているうちに見たいですか?」
17:52
So, we have a fulfillment problem.
生きているうちに実現するかどうかに捕らわれているんですね
17:54
We need bigger glasses and more hands in the water,
私たちには より大きなコップと より多くの手が必要です
17:57
and then working together, maybe we can all live to see
そうして協力していけば私たちが生きている間に
18:00
the detection of the first extraterrestrial signal.
宇宙からの最初の信号の目撃者となれるかもしれません
18:03
That brings me to my wish.
その願いと共に私はここに立っています
18:07
I wish that you would empower Earthlings everywhere
私の願いは 皆さん1人1人がこの地球上の人々に対して
18:11
to become active participants
宇宙の仲間探しに積極的に関わるよう
18:16
in the ultimate search for cosmic company.
促して欲しいということです
18:20
The first step would be to tap into the global brain trust,
その第一歩は 世界の専門家の力を借りて
18:23
to build an environment where raw data could be stored,
未加工データの保存環境を構築し
18:28
and where it could be accessed and manipulated,
そこでデータの評価と操作ができるようにし
18:32
where new algorithms could be developed and old algorithms made more efficient.
新しいアルゴリズムを開発し 古いアルゴリズムを改良できるようにすることです
18:35
And this is a technically creative challenge,
これは技術的でクリエイティブな挑戦であり
18:40
and it would change the perspective of people who worked on it.
それに携わる人の物事の見方を変えるでしょう
18:43
And then, we'd like to augment the automated search with human insight.
それから私たちは探索プログラムに人間の洞察力を組み込みたいと思っています
18:46
We'd like to use the pattern recognition capability of the human eye
人間の目が持つパターン認識能力を利用し
18:55
to find faint, complex signals that our current algorithms miss.
現在のSETIのアルゴリズムでは探知できない微弱で複雑な信号を見つけたいのです
19:01
And, of course, we'd like to inspire and engage the next generation.
もちろん次世代の人々にも 刺激を与え参加を促したい
19:07
We'd like to take the materials that we have built for education,
SETIが開発した教材を
19:12
and get them out to students everywhere,
世界中の子供たちに届けたいのです
19:19
students that can't come and visit us at the ATA.
ATAに来られない子供たちに
19:22
We'd like to tell our story better,
私たちのことをもっとうまく伝え
19:25
and engage young people, and thereby change their perspective.
参加することによって 若者達に世界の見方を変えて欲しい
19:27
I'm sorry Seth Godin, but over the millennia, we've seen where tribalism leads.
セス ゴーディン氏には悪いのですが 部族主義が何をもたらすかを 私たちは何百年も目にしてきました
19:31
We've seen what happens when we divide an already small planet
小さな惑星をさらに小さな島に分裂させることで
19:36
into smaller islands.
何が起こってきたのか知っています
19:40
And, ultimately, we actually all belong to only one tribe,
つまるところ 私たちが属する部族は1つであり
19:42
to Earthlings.
それは「地球人」という部族です
19:48
And SETI is a mirror --
SETIは鏡です
19:50
a mirror that can show us ourselves
私たち自身を 外からの見方で
19:52
from an extraordinary perspective,
映し出す鏡なのです
19:55
and can help to trivialize the differences among us.
その見方は 人類の中の違いなど 些細なものにするでしょう
19:57
If SETI does nothing but change the perspective of humans on this planet,
SETIが何も見つけられなかったとしても この惑星の住人の物の見方を変えることが出来れば
20:02
then it will be one of the most profound endeavors in history.
歴史上もっとも大きな意味のある運動と言えるでしょう
20:09
So, in the opening days of 2009,
2009年の年明けに
20:14
a visionary president stood on the steps of the U.S. Capitol
洞察力に優れた大統領は国会議事堂の階段に立ち
20:18
and said, "We cannot help but believe
こう言いました 「私たちは信じています
20:22
that the old hatreds shall someday pass,
過去の憎しみは消え去り
20:25
that the lines of tribe shall soon dissolve,
民族間の境界線はいずれなくなり
20:28
that, as the world grows smaller, our common humanity shall reveal itself."
世界が小さくなる中で 私たちみんなが持っている人類愛が現れるだろうと」
20:32
So, I look forward to working with the TED community
TEDコミュニティーと共に考えていきたいです
20:38
to hear about your ideas about how to fulfill this wish,
皆さんの考えを聞かせてください どうしたらこの願いを叶えられるのか
20:40
and in collaborating with you,
大統領の言葉が実現する日を早めるため
20:44
hasten the day that that visionary statement can become a reality.
共に手を取り合い ムーブメントを広げていきましょう
20:48
Thank you.
ご静聴いただき有難うございました
20:53
(Applause)
(拍手)
20:55
Translator:kie ikeda
Reviewer:Yasushi Aoki

sponsored links

Jill Tarter - Astronomer
SETI's Jill Tarter has devoted her career to hunting for signs of sentient beings elsewhere, and almost all aspects of this field have been affected by her work.

Why you should listen

Astronomer Jill Tarter is director of the SETI (Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) Institute's Center for SETI Research, and also holder of the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI. She led Project Phoenix, a decade-long SETI scrutiny of about 750 nearby star systems, using telescopes in Australia, West Virginia and Puerto Rico. While no clearly extraterrestrial signal was found, this project was the most comprehensive targeted search for artificially generated cosmic signals ever undertaken.

Tarter serves on the management board for the Allen Telescope Array, a massive new instrument that will eventually include 350 antennas, each 6 meters in diameter. This telescope will increase the speed and the spectral range of the hunt for signals from other distant technologies by orders of magnitude.

Tarter is committed to the education of future citizens and scientists. Beyond her scientific leadership at NASA and the SETI Institute, Tarter has been actively involved in developing curriculum for children. She was Principal Investigator for two curriculum development projects funded by NSF, NASA, and others. One project, the Life in the Universe series, created 6 science teaching guides for grades 3-9. The other project, Voyages Through Time, is an integrated high school science curriculum on the fundamental theme of evolution in six modules: Cosmic Evolution, Planetary Evolution, Origin of Life, Evolution of Life, Hominid Evolution and Evolution of Technology.

Watch Jill Tarter's TED-Ed lesson: "Calculating the Odds of Intelligent Alien Life" >>

sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.