07:08
TED2009

Philip Zimbardo: The psychology of time

フィリップ・ジンバルド:「時間と健全に向き合う処方箋」

Filmed:

心理学者フィリップ・ジンバルドは幸福と成功は我々が一番無視しがちな特質にある、といいます:それは我々が過去・現在・未来に向き合う方法です。彼は、時間に関する観点を修正することが、人生をより良くする最初のステップだと言います。

- Psychologist
Philip Zimbardo was the leader of the notorious 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment -- and an expert witness at Abu Ghraib. His book The Lucifer Effect explores the nature of evil; now, in his new work, he studies the nature of heroism. Full bio

I want to share with you
これから皆さんと
00:18
some ideas about the secret power of time,
とても短い時間で、時間の秘密を
00:20
in a very short time.
分かち合いたいと思います
00:22
Video: All right, start the clock please. 30 seconds studio.
ビデオ:オーケー、時計スタート 本番30秒前
00:25
Keep it quiet please. Settle down.
お静かに じっとして
00:28
It's about time. End sequence. Take one.
「そろそろだ」 最終シーン テイク1
00:33
15 seconds studio.
15秒前
00:39
10, nine, eight, seven,
10, 9, 8, 7
00:42
six, five, four, three, two ...
6,5,4,3,2...
00:45
Philip Zimbardo: Let's tune into the conversation
フィリップ・ジンバルド:アダムの誘惑の原理に関する
00:52
of the principals in Adam's temptation.
会話を聴いてみましょう
00:54
"Come on Adam, don't be so wishy-washy. Take a bite." "I did."
イヴ:なにやってんの、アダム ぐだぐだしないの 一口よ 私は食べたわ
00:58
"One bite, Adam. Don't abandon Eve."
蛇:食べちまいなよ、アダム イヴを見捨てるのか?
01:02
"I don't know, guys.
アダム:わからないよ
01:05
I don't want to get in trouble."
トラブルはいやだ
01:08
"Okay. One bite. What the hell?"
イヴ:ねえ 一口なのよ どうしたっていうの?
01:10
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:15
Life is temptation. It's all about yielding, resisting,
人生は誘惑です 誘惑に負けるか、抵抗するか
01:17
yes, no, now, later, impulsive, reflective,
イエス、ノー、今すぐ、後で、衝動的、思索的、
01:20
present focus and future focus.
現在志向か、未来志向か
01:23
Promised virtues fall prey to the passions of the moment.
約束の美徳が、束の間の情熱に打ち負かされる
01:26
Of teenage girls who pledged sexual abstinence and virginity until marriage --
結婚までは純潔を守ると誓ったティーンエイジャーたちが
01:28
thank you George Bush --
ありがとう、ジョージ・ブッシュ
01:31
the majority, 60 percent, yielded to sexual temptations within one year.
その大半、60%が一年以内に性の誘惑に身を任せる
01:33
And most of them did so without using birth control.
ほとんどは産児制限の手段をとらずに
01:37
So much for promises.
約束よさようなら
01:40
Now lets tempt four-year-olds, giving them a treat.
さて、4歳児を誘惑してみます ごちそうで
01:42
They can have one marshmallow now. But if they wait
彼らは、今マシュマロを一つもらえる でも
01:46
until the experimenter comes back, they can have two.
もし実験者が戻ってくるまで待てば、二つもらえる
01:48
Of course it pays, if you like marshmallows, to wait.
もちろんマシュマロが好きなら、待つ甲斐がある
01:50
What happens is two-thirds of the kids give in to temptation.
実際は、子どものうち3分の2は誘惑に負けるのです
01:53
They cannot wait. The others, of course, wait.
彼らは待てないのです その他の子は、もちろん待てます
01:56
They resist the temptation. They delay the now for later.
誘惑に勝てる子がいる 彼らは「後々」のために「今」を遅らせます
01:59
Walter Mischel, my colleague at Stanford,
私のスタンフォードの同僚、ウォルター・ミシェルは
02:03
went back 14 years later,
14年後に戻って来て
02:05
to try to discover what was different about those kids.
この子供たちがどう違うかを見つけようとしました
02:07
There were enormous differences between kids who resisted
誘惑に勝った子どもと負けた子どもの間には、多くの点で
02:10
and kids who yielded, in many ways.
ものすごく大きな差がありました
02:12
The kids who resisted scored 250 points higher on the SAT.
打ち勝った子供たちは大学進学適性試験で250点も得点が高く
02:14
That's enormous. That's like a whole set of different IQ points.
これは莫大です IQの段階が違うくらいです
02:18
They didn't get in as much trouble. They were better students.
余りトラブルにかかわり合わない より良い学生です
02:22
They were self-confident and determined. And the key for me today,
彼らには自信と決意があります 今日の私のポイント、
02:25
the key for you,
あなたへのポイントは
02:27
is, they were future-focused rather than present-focused.
彼らは「現在志向」でなく「未来志向」だという事です
02:29
So what is time perspective? That's what I'm going to talk about today.
「時間的展望」とはなにか? 今日お話しすることはそれです
02:32
Time perspective is the study of how individuals,
「時間的展望」とは、我々個人が、
02:35
all of us, divide the flow of your human experience
経験の流れをどうやって切り分けて、どの
02:38
into time zones or time categories.
時間の枠に入れるかを研究することです
02:41
And you do it automatically and non-consciously.
それは自動的、無意識的に行われます
02:43
They vary between cultures, between nations,
それは文化や、国民性や、
02:45
between individuals, between social classes,
個人差や、社会階層の差や、
02:47
between education levels.
教育レベルの差によって違いがあります
02:49
And the problem is that they can become biased,
問題は、それが偏向性をもたらすということです
02:51
because you learn to over-use some of them and under-use the others.
あるものは使い過ぎたり、他のものは使わな過ぎたりするからです
02:53
What determines any decision you make?
あなたの決断を決定するのは何か?
02:57
You make a decision on which you're going to base an action.
あなたは決断し、それを元に行動します
02:59
For some people it's only about what is in the immediate situation,
ある人たちには、今この瞬間、他人が何をしているか、
03:02
what other people are doing and what you're feeling.
あなたがどう感じているかが重要です
03:05
And those people, when they make their decisions in that format --
このような方式で決断する人たちを
03:08
we're going to call them "present-oriented,"
「現在志向」と呼びましょう
03:11
because their focus is what is now.
彼らは「今」に集中しているのです
03:13
For others, the present is irrelevant.
他の人たちにとっては、現在は関係ありません
03:15
It's always about "What is this situation like that I've experienced in the past?"
常に「昔こういうことを経験した時は、どんな状態だったか?」が重要です
03:17
So that their decisions are based on past memories.
彼らの決定は過去の記憶に基づいています
03:20
And we're going to call those people "past-oriented," because they focus on what was.
この人たちは過去に集中しているので「過去志向」と呼びましょう
03:23
For others it's not the past, it's not the present,
また別の人たちには、現在でも、過去でもなく
03:27
it's only about the future.
未来が重要です
03:29
Their focus is always about anticipated consequences.
彼らは「予想される結果」に集中しています
03:31
Cost-benefit analysis.
費用対効果分析です
03:33
We're going to call them "future-oriented." Their focus is on what will be.
彼らを「未来志向」と呼びましょう 彼らは将来に集中しています
03:36
So, time paradox, I want to argue,
それで「タイムパラドックス」についてですが
03:39
the paradox of time perspective,
時間的展望のパラドックスは
03:41
is something that influences every decision you make,
我々全ての決断に影響します
03:43
you're totally unaware of.
それも全く無意識にです
03:46
Namely, the extent to which you have one of these
つまりあなたがこれらの時間的展望のどれに
03:48
biased time perspectives.
偏向しているかによるのです
03:50
Well there is actually six of them. There are two ways to be present-oriented.
実際は6つになります 現在志向に二つ
03:52
There is two ways to be past-oriented, two ways to be future.
過去志向にも二つ、未来志向にも二つです
03:55
You can focus on past-positive, or past-negative.
過去のポジティブ、あるいはネガティブに集中できます
03:57
You can be present-hedonistic,
現在―快楽型にもなれます
04:01
namely you focus on the joys of life, or present-fatalist --
人生の喜びに集中するのです あるいは現在―運命論にも
04:03
it doesn't matter, your life is controlled.
どちらの場合も 人生はコントロールできています
04:06
You can be future-oriented, setting goals.
未来志向にもなれます 目標を設定したり、
04:08
Or you can be transcendental future:
あるいは常識を超えた未来:つまり
04:10
namely, life begins after death.
死後に始まる世界を考えたり
04:12
Developing the mental flexibility to shift time perspectives fluidly
状況に応じて 時間的展望を自由にずらしていく
04:15
depending on the demands of the situation,
精神の柔軟さを習得すること
04:17
that's what you've got to learn to do.
それを学習しなくてはなりません
04:20
So, very quickly, what is the optimal time profile?
それで、ちょうどいい時間的展望の全体像はどんなものか?
04:22
High on past-positive. Moderately high on future.
過去-ポジティブが高く、未来にはやや高め
04:25
And moderate on present-hedonism.
現在-快楽には中程度
04:27
And always low on past-negative
そして過去-ネガティブと
04:29
and present-fatalism.
現在-運命論はは常に低いのがよい
04:32
So the optimal temporal mix is what you get from the past --
したがって、至適な時制のミックスでは、過去からは
04:34
past-positive gives you roots. You connect your family, identity and your self.
過去-ポジティブでルーツを得る 家族、アイデンティティ、自分自身とつながる
04:37
What you get from the future is wings
未来から得るのは「翼」
04:41
to soar to new destinations, new challenges.
新しい目的地、新しいチャレンジへ飛び立つための
04:43
What you get from the present hedonism
現在-快楽から得られるのは
04:45
is the energy, the energy to explore yourself,
自分自身や、場所や、人々や、官能を
04:47
places, people, sensuality.
探索するエネルギー
04:50
Any time perspective in excess has more negatives than positives.
時間的展望のいかなる行き過ぎも、悪い方向に働きます
04:54
What do futures sacrifice for success?
未来が、成功のために何を犠牲にするか?
04:58
They sacrifice family time. They sacrifice friend time.
犠牲になるのは家族との時間、友人との時間、
05:01
They sacrifice fun time. They sacrifice personal indulgence.
楽しみのための時間、自分の道楽、
05:03
They sacrifice hobbies. And they sacrifice sleep. So it affects their health.
趣味が犠牲に、睡眠が犠牲になり、健康に影響する
05:07
And they live for work, achievement and control.
そして仕事と、達成と、支配のために生きる
05:12
I'm sure that resonates with some of the TEDsters.
そういわれて心に響くTEDsterもいるでしょう
05:15
(Laughter)
(笑)
05:18
And it resonated for me. I grew up as a poor kid in the South Bronx ghetto,
私の心にも響きます 私はサウスブロンクスのスラム街の
05:20
a Sicilian family -- everyone lived in the past and present.
シチリア人家族で育ちました 誰もが過去と現在に生きている
05:23
I'm here as a future-oriented person
私は今や未来志向の人間ですが
05:26
who went over the top, who did all these sacrifices
トップに上り詰めるのに全てを犠牲にしました
05:28
because teachers intervened, and made me future oriented.
先生が介入して、私を未来志向にしたのです
05:30
Told me don't eat that marshmallow,
「そのマシュマロを食べるな
05:34
because if you wait you're going to get two of them,
今我慢すれば、あとで二つもらえるから」と
05:36
until I learned to balance out.
私がバランスを身につけられるまで
05:38
I've added present-hedonism, I've added a focus on the past-positive,
私は現在-快楽を加え、過去-ポジティブを加えました
05:41
so, at 76 years old, I am more energetic than ever, more productive,
そして76歳の今、私は未だかつてなくエネルギッシュで、生産的です
05:46
and I'm happier than I have ever been.
今までより以上に幸せです
05:49
I just want to say that we are applying this to many world problems:
私は、このことを世界のいろいろな問題に当てはめたいと言いたいのです
05:52
changing the drop-out rates of school kids,
学校をドロップアウトする生徒の率を減らし、
05:54
combating addictions, enhancing teen health,
薬物依存と闘い、十代の健康を増進し、
05:56
curing vets' PTSD with time metaphors -- getting miracle cures --
時間の暗喩で退役軍人のPTSDを治療し、―奇跡的に回復します―
05:59
promoting sustainability and conservation,
持続可能性と自然保護を促進し、
06:02
reducing physical rehabilitation where there is a 50-percent drop out rate,
身体リハビリテーションの50%の脱落率を減らし、
06:04
altering appeals to suicidal terrorists,
自殺テロ集団に対しもっと現在に目を向けさせたり
06:08
and modifying family conflicts as time-zone clashes.
時間的展望の衝突で起きる家族の争いを変えたいのです
06:10
So I want to end by saying:
そこで終りにこう言いたい
06:14
many of life's puzzles can be solved
人生の多くのパズルは、自分や他人の時間的展望を
06:16
by understanding your time perspective and that of others.
理解することで解決できます
06:19
And the idea is so simple, so obvious,
この考えはとてもシンプルで、明らかですが
06:22
but I think the consequences are really profound.
その結果はものすごく深いのです
06:24
Thank you so much.
どうもありがとう
06:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
06:28
Translated by Masahiro Kyushima
Reviewed by Masaaki Ueno

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Philip Zimbardo - Psychologist
Philip Zimbardo was the leader of the notorious 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment -- and an expert witness at Abu Ghraib. His book The Lucifer Effect explores the nature of evil; now, in his new work, he studies the nature of heroism.

Why you should listen

Philip Zimbardo knows what evil looks like. After serving as an expert witness during the Abu Ghraib trials, he wrote The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil. From Nazi comic books to the tactics of used-car salesmen, he explores a wealth of sources in trying to explain the psychology of evil.

A past president of the American Psychological Association and a professor emeritus at Stanford, Zimbardo retired in 2008 from lecturing, after 50 years of teaching his legendary introductory course in psychology. In addition to his work on evil and heroism, Zimbardo recently published The Time Paradox, exploring different cultural and personal perspectives on time.

Still well-known for his controversial Stanford Prison Experiment, Zimbardo in his new research looks at the psychology of heroism. He asks, "What pushes some people to become perpetrators of evil, while others act heroically on behalf of those in need?"

More profile about the speaker
Philip Zimbardo | Speaker | TED.com