English-Video.net comment policy

The comment field is common to all languages

Let's write in your language and use "Google Translate" together

Please refer to informative community guidelines on TED.com

TEDGlobal 2009

James Geary: Metaphorically speaking

ジェームス・ゲーリー 「比喩的話法」

Filmed
Views 827,597

格言狂であり作家であるジェームス・ゲーリーが自然言語の魅力的な特徴比喩に一磨きかけます。文士アリストテレスからエルビス、比喩が意志決定に与える微妙な影響までゲーリーが考察します。

- Aphorist
Lost jobs, wayward lovers, wars and famine -- come to think of it, just about any of life's curveballs -- there's an aphorism for it, and James Geary's got it. Full bio

Metaphor lives a secret life all around us.
比喩は我々の日常にひっそりと暮らしています
00:15
We utter about six metaphors a minute.
我々は1分間に6個程比喩表現を用いています
00:19
Metaphorical thinking is essential
我々が自分自身や他人を理解したり
00:23
to how we understand ourselves and others,
意思疎通 や学習 発見 発明をする上で
00:25
how we communicate, learn, discover
比喩的思考はとても
00:28
and invent.
重要なのです
00:31
But metaphor is a way of thought before it is a way with words.
しかし比喩は言葉を先行する物事の考え方なのです
00:33
Now, to assist me in explaining this,
さて私の意見を説明する手掛かりとして
00:38
I've enlisted the help of one of our greatest philosophers,
比喩研究会において貢献度があまりに高く
00:41
the reigning king of the metaphorians,
彼自身比喩となっている比喩界に君臨する王
00:44
a man whose contributions to the field
我々の間では最高の哲学者でもある人物から
00:48
are so great that he himself
ご助力をリストにまとめてきました
00:50
has become a metaphor.
もちろん
00:53
I am, of course, referring to none other
私がお話しているのは紛れもなく
00:55
than Elvis Presley.
エルビスプレスリーのことです
00:59
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:01
Now, "All Shook Up" is a great love song.
さて"恋にしびれて"は素晴しいラブソングです
01:02
It's also a great example of how
それから私たちが何か抽象的な考え 情緒
01:05
whenever we deal with anything abstract --
感情や概念、思考を扱う時には
01:07
ideas, emotions, feelings, concepts, thoughts --
どのようにして必然的に比喩に行き着いてしまうかという
01:09
we inevitably resort to metaphor.
よい例でもあります
01:13
In "All Shook Up," a touch is not a touch, but a chill.
"恋にしびれて"の中では触れることはしびれでもあり
01:15
Lips are not lips, but volcanoes.
唇は火山であり
01:20
She is not she, but a buttercup.
彼女はキンポウゲであり
01:23
And love is not love, but being all shook up.
愛は愛ではなく全身の震えだと描写されています
01:26
In this, Elvis is following Aristotle's classic definition of metaphor
この曲でエルビスは他の物に属している対象に
01:31
as the process of giving the thing
名前を付与するというアリストテレスの比喩の
01:35
a name that belongs to something else.
古典的定義に従っています
01:38
This is the mathematics of metaphor.
これが比喩の数学です
01:41
And fortunately it's very simple.
そして幸いこれはとても単純です
01:44
X equals Y.
XはYです
01:46
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:48
This formula works wherever metaphor is present.
この公式は比喩の登場する場面どこにでも用いることができます
01:51
Elvis uses it, but so does Shakespeare
エルビス同様、シェイクスピアも
01:54
in this famous line from "Romeo and Juliet:"
"ロミオとジュリエット"の有名な台詞の中で
01:57
Juliet is the sun.
ジュリエットは太陽であるという表現をしています
01:59
Now, here, Shakespeare gives the thing, Juliet,
ここでシェイクスピアはジュリエットに
02:02
a name that belongs to something else, the sun.
太陽という別の物の名前を与えています
02:06
But whenever we give a thing a name that belongs to something else,
しかし我々が物に対し、別の物の名前を与えるとき
02:11
we give it a whole network of analogies too.
類似的な網も張り巡らせています
02:14
We mix and match what we know about the metaphor's source,
我々はこの場合で言えば太陽という比喩のもととなるものと
02:17
in this case the sun,
そのターゲットであるジュリエットを
02:20
with what we know about its target, Juliet.
掛けあわせて一致させているのです
02:22
And metaphor gives us a much more vivid understanding of Juliet
そして比喩はシェイクスピアが文字だけでジュリエットの容姿を描くよりも
02:25
than if Shakespeare had literally described what she looks like.
ずっと生き生きとした我々の理解を作り出しているのです
02:28
So, how do we make and understand metaphors?
そこで我々はどのようにして比喩を作り理解しているのでしょうか?
02:33
This might look familiar.
みなさん馴染みがあるかもしれません
02:35
The first step is pattern recognition.
第一段階はパターン認識です
02:37
Look at this image. What do you see?
この画像を見てください何が見えますか
02:39
Three wayward Pac-Men,
攻撃態勢の三匹のパックマンと
02:42
and three pointy brackets are actually present.
それと三つのカギカッコがありますね
02:44
What we see, however,
しかし我々に見えるのは
02:47
are two overlapping triangles.
重なり合う二つの三角形です
02:49
Metaphor is not just the detection of patterns;
比喩とはパターンの発見だけではなく
02:51
it is the creation of patterns.
パターンを作り出すことでもあるのです
02:54
Second step, conceptual synesthesia.
第二段階は概念共感覚です
02:56
Now, synesthesia is the experience of a stimulus in once sense organ
ここで、共感覚とは色聴のように
02:59
in another sense organ as well,
ある感覚器への刺激が同時に他の感覚器の刺激になるという
03:04
such as colored hearing.
経験のことです
03:06
People with colored hearing
色聴の人々は実際
03:08
actually see colors when they hear the sounds
単語や文字を聞くことで
03:10
of words or letters.
色がわかるのです
03:13
We all have synesthetic abilities.
我々はみな共感覚の能力を持っているんです
03:15
This is the Bouba/Kiki test.
ブーバーキーキーテストをしてみましょう
03:17
What you have to do is identify which of these shapes
皆さんにはこれらのどちらがブーバーで
03:20
is called Bouba, and which is called Kiki.
どちらがキーキーか当てていただきます
03:22
(Laughter)
(笑)
03:26
If you are like 98 percent of other people,
もしあなたが他の98%の人と同じ感覚を持っていれば
03:27
you will identify the round, amoeboid shape as Bouba,
丸いアメーバみたいな方をブーバーとし
03:29
and the sharp, spiky one as Kiki.
とげとげした方をキーキーだとするはずです
03:33
Can we do a quick show of hands?
挙手してもらえますか?
03:36
Does that correspond?
一致しましたか?
03:38
Okay, I think 99.9 would about cover it.
よし99.9%はあがっているみたいですね
03:40
Why do we do that?
なぜこんなことするのかって?
03:44
Because we instinctively find, or create,
なぜなら我々は直感的に
03:46
a pattern between the round shape
丸い図形にはブーバーという柔らかい音
03:50
and the round sound of Bouba,
とげとげしい図形にはキーキーという鋭い音という
03:52
and the spiky shape and the spiky sound of Kiki.
パターンを見つけるかあるいは作り出しているからです
03:55
And many of the metaphors we use everyday are synesthetic.
我々が日ごろ用いる比喩の多くは共感覚に訴えるものなんです
04:00
Silence is sweet.
沈黙は甘く
04:04
Neckties are loud.
ネクタイは派手
04:06
Sexually attractive people are hot.
性的魅力のある人は熱く
04:08
Sexually unattractive people leave us cold.
性的魅力に欠ける人には熱くはなりません
04:11
Metaphor creates a kind of conceptual synesthesia,
比喩は概念的な共感覚を作り出し
04:14
in which we understand one concept
我々はあるコンセプトを何か他のコンセプトで
04:17
in the context of another.
理解しているのです
04:19
Third step is cognitive dissonance.
第三段階は認知的不協和です
04:22
This is the Stroop test.
ここにストループテストがあります
04:24
What you need to do here is identify
ここではできるだけ速く
04:26
as quickly as possible
単語が表示されているインクの色を
04:28
the color of the ink in which these words are printed.
識別するというテストです
04:30
You can take the test now.
よろしければやってみてください
04:33
If you're like most people, you will experience
一般的な人ならば
04:37
a moment of cognitive dissonance
色の名前がそれとは違う色のインクで
04:39
when the name of the color
印刷されていることに
04:41
is printed in a differently colored ink.
一瞬のとまどいを覚えるでしょう
04:44
The test shows that we cannot ignore the literal meaning of words
このテストは色が文字が示す意味と異なっていても
04:46
even when the literal meaning gives the wrong answer.
我々はその意味を無視することができないことを示すのです
04:49
Stroop tests have been done with metaphor as well.
ストループテストは比喩としても行われていたのです
04:52
The participants had to identify, as quickly as possible,
参加者はできる限り速く文字の表す意味と
04:54
the literally false sentences.
異なっているものを識別しなければいけませんでした
04:58
They took longer to reject metaphors as false
誤ったものを除外するよりも比喩が誤っているものを
05:00
than they did to reject literally false sentences.
除外するのにもっと時間がかかったのです
05:03
Why? Because we cannot ignore
なぜでしょうか? それは我々が
05:06
the metaphorical meaning of words either.
単語が暗示する部分を無視できないからです
05:09
One of the sentences was, "Some jobs are jails."
例のひとつに"ある仕事は牢屋と同じだ"がありました
05:12
Now, unless you're a prison guard,
あなたが牢獄の番人でない限り
05:15
the sentence "Some jobs are jails" is literally false.
"ある仕事は牢屋と同じだ"という文は実際には誤りです
05:18
Sadly, it's metaphorically true.
悲しいことに比喩的には事実です
05:21
And the metaphorical truth interferes with our ability
そして比喩的な事実は、文字通り誤っていると識別する
05:24
to identify it as literally false.
我々の能力を阻害するのです
05:27
Metaphor matters because
比喩は重要です
05:29
it's around us every day, all the time.
なぜならいつでも我々の周りにあふれてますから
05:31
Metaphor matters because it creates expectations.
比喩は重要です 期待をうみ出すからです
05:34
Pay careful attention the next time you read the financial news.
今度金融のニュースを読むときには注意をしてください
05:37
Agent metaphors describe price movements
人のような比喩は価格変動で
05:41
as the deliberate action of a living thing,
"ナスダックは高く登った"というように
05:43
as in, "The NASDAQ climbed higher."
生き物の意思的行動のようにして表します
05:45
Object metaphors describe price movements
モノに喩えるなら価格変動は
05:49
as non-living things,
"ダウはレンガのごとく落下した"のように
05:52
as in, "The Dow fell like a brick."
非生命体のように表現されます
05:54
Researchers asked a group of people
研究者たちはあるグループに
05:57
to read a clutch of market commentaries,
手堅い市場評論を読み、翌日の価格動向を
05:59
and then predict the next day's price trend.
予想してもらうという調査を行いました
06:01
Those exposed to agent metaphors
人的な比喩を表した評論には
06:04
had higher expectations that price trends would continue.
価格上昇の持続に高い期待を示しました
06:06
And they had those expectations because
彼らがそのような期待を抱いたのは
06:09
agent metaphors imply the deliberate action
人間的な比喩が目標をめざす生き物の
06:11
of a living thing pursuing a goal.
意図的行動を暗示していたからです
06:14
If, for example, house prices
例えばもし住宅の価格が
06:17
are routinely described as climbing and climbing,
日常的にどんどん高くに上って行っていると描写されると
06:19
higher and higher, people might naturally assume
人々は価格上昇は止まることを知らないのだと
06:22
that that rise is unstoppable.
自然と思ってしまうのかもしれません
06:24
They may feel confident, say,
すると払えるはずもない額のローンを
06:26
in taking out mortgages they really can't afford.
借り入れることに対する迷いも消えるかもしれません
06:28
That's a hypothetical example of course.
もちろんこれは仮説的な例です
06:31
But this is how metaphor misleads.
しかし比喩がいかにして誤解を招くのかということです
06:34
Metaphor also matters because it influences decisions
比喩が重要であるもう1つの理由は類似性の活性によって
06:38
by activating analogies.
意志決定に影響するからです
06:41
A group of students was told that a small democratic country
学生グループにある小さな民主国家が侵略され
06:44
had been invaded and had asked the U.S. for help.
アメリカに助けを求めたという課題を出し
06:46
And they had to make a decision.
彼らは何をすべきなのか
06:49
What should they do?
答えを出してもらいました
06:51
Intervene, appeal to the U.N., or do nothing?
仲裁するか 国連に提訴するか 何もしないのか
06:53
They were each then given one of three
それぞれがこの仮想した危機に対応する
06:56
descriptions of this hypothetical crisis.
三つのシナリオからひとつを与えられました
06:58
Each of which was designed to trigger
それぞれ異なる歴史的な類推を
07:00
a different historical analogy:
喚起するよう仕組まれていました
07:03
World War II, Vietnam,
第二次世界大戦 ベトナム戦争
07:05
and the third was historically neutral.
三番目は世界的中立でした
07:07
Those exposed to the World War II scenario
第二次世界大戦のシナリオを受け取った学生は
07:10
made more interventionist recommendations
他に比べより仲裁思考型の
07:12
than the others.
提案を見せました
07:14
Just as we cannot ignore the literal meaning of words,
我々が言葉の意味を無視できないのと同様に
07:16
we cannot ignore the analogies
比喩により喚起される類推的思考も
07:19
that are triggered by metaphor.
無視することはできないのです
07:21
Metaphor matters because it opens the door to discovery.
比喩は重要です 新たな発見へのドアを開いてくれるからです
07:25
Whenever we solve a problem, or make a discovery,
我々は問題解決や新たな発見の局面では
07:28
we compare what we know with what we don't know.
いつでも既知のことと未知なことを比較しています
07:31
And the only way to find out about the latter
そこで後者について理解する唯一の方法は
07:34
is to investigate the ways it might be like the former.
前者になりそうな方法を調べてみることです
07:36
Einstein described his scientific method as combinatory play.
アインシュタインは彼の科学理論を組み合わせ遊びと表現しました
07:40
He famously used thought experiments,
彼は純粋に精巧な類推である
07:44
which are essentially elaborate analogies,
思考的実験を用いていました
07:46
to come up with some of his greatest discoveries.
いくつもの偉大な発見をしてきたのは知るところです
07:49
By bringing together what we know
既知と未知を類推を通して
07:52
and what we don't know through analogy,
組み合わせることによって
07:54
metaphorical thinking strikes the spark
比喩的思考が発見を燃え上がらせる
07:56
that ignites discovery.
ひらめきを呼び起こすのです
07:58
Now metaphor is ubiquitous, yet it's hidden.
比喩はどこにでもあふれています見えないだけです
08:02
But you just have to look at the words around you
ただあなたをとりまく言葉に耳を傾けてみてください
08:06
and you'll find it.
そうすれば見えてくるはずです
08:09
Ralph Waldo Emerson described language
ラルフワルドエマーソンは
08:11
as "fossil poetry."
言語を"詩の化石"だと表現しました
08:13
But before it was fossil poetry
しかし詩の化石である以前に
08:15
language was fossil metaphor.
言語は比喩の化石だったのです
08:17
And these fossils still breathe.
そして化石は今もなお呼吸を続けています
08:20
Take the three most famous words in all of Western philosophy:
西洋哲学の中で最も有名な三単語を例にとってみましょう
08:23
"Cogito ergo sum."
"コギト アーゴ サム"
08:28
That's routinely translated as, "I think, therefore I am."
繰り返し"我思う故に我あり"と訳されています
08:30
But there is a better translation.
しかしもっと良い訳があるんです
08:34
The Latin word "cogito"
ラテン語の"コギト"は
08:36
is derived from the prefix "co," meaning "together,"
"共に"を意味する接頭辞"co"から来ています
08:38
and the verb "agitare," meaning "to shake."
それから動詞"agitare"は"振動する"という意味です
08:41
So, the original meaning of "cogito"
つまり"コギト"の本来の意味は
08:44
is to shake together.
共に震えるとなります
08:47
And the proper translation of "cogito ergo sum"
そしてコギトアーゴサムの本来の訳は
08:49
is "I shake things up, therefore I am."
"我揺さぶらん故に我あり"となります
08:52
(Laughter)
(笑)
08:56
Metaphor shakes things up,
比喩は物事を揺さぶるのです
08:58
giving us everything from Shakespeare to scientific discovery in the process.
我々にシェイクスピアから科学的発見まであらゆるものを与えてくれるのです
09:00
The mind is a plastic snow dome,
心と言うのはプラスチック製のスノードームであり
09:05
the most beautiful, most interesting,
最高に美しく最高に興味をそそります
09:08
and most itself, when, as Elvis put it,
エルビスがつづったように
09:10
it's all shook up.
まさしく揺さぶりそのものです
09:13
And metaphor keeps the mind shaking,
それから比喩はエルビスが建物を去った後もずっと
09:15
rattling and rolling, long after Elvis has left the building.
心震わせ揺さぶり回すことをやめません
09:17
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
09:20
(Applause)
(拍手)
09:22
Translated by Takahiro Shimpo
Reviewed by Noriyuki KOIKE

▲Back to top

About the speaker:

James Geary - Aphorist
Lost jobs, wayward lovers, wars and famine -- come to think of it, just about any of life's curveballs -- there's an aphorism for it, and James Geary's got it.

Why you should listen

One of a handful of the world's professional aphorists, James Geary has successfully fused early creative endeavors in performance art, poetry and juggling with his childhood fascination with the "Quotable Quotes" column in Reader's Digest. His books Geary's Guide to the World's Great Aphorists and the bestselling The World in a Phrase are invaluable journeys through the often-ignored art of the witty (and memorably brief) summation.

His next book is about the secret life of metaphors, and how metaphorical thinking drives invention and creativity. Geary is a former writer for Time Europe and is now an editor for Ode magazine, a print and online publication devoted to optimism and positive news.

More profile about the speaker
James Geary | Speaker | TED.com