09:14
TED2014

Zak Ebrahim: I am the son of a terrorist. Here's how I chose peace.

ザック・エブラヒム: テロリストの息子に生まれて――平和への道を選んだ軌跡

Filmed:

教義をすりこまれ、憎むことを教えられて育てられたら、もうそれとは異なる道を選ぶことはできないのでしょうか?ザック・エブラヒムの父親が1993年の世界貿易センタービル爆破事件に手を染めた時、エブラヒムはまだ7歳でした。エブラヒムが語る衝撃的でパワフルな話は、最後に感動をもたらします。

- Peace activist
Groomed for terror, Zak Ebrahim chose a different life. The author of The Terrorist's Son, he hopes his story will inspire others to reject a path of violence. Full bio

On November 5th, 1990,
1990年11月5日
00:14
a man named El-Sayyid Nosair walked
エル・サイード・ノサイルという男が
00:16
into a hotel in Manhattan
マンハッタンのホテルを訪れ
00:19
and assassinated Rabbi Meir Kahane,
ユダヤ防衛同盟の指導者
ラビ・メイル・カハネを殺害しました
00:21
the leader of the Jewish Defense League.
ユダヤ防衛同盟の指導者
ラビ・メイル・カハネを殺害しました
00:24
Nosair was initially found not guilty of the murder,
当初 ノサイルは
殺人容疑では無罪とされ
00:28
but while serving time on lesser charges,
ほかの軽い罪状で
服役しましたが
00:31
he and other men began planning attacks
その間 仲間と
爆破計画を立て始めます
00:34
on a dozen New York City landmarks,
ニューヨークの象徴的建造物を
00:37
including tunnels, synagogues
狙ったもので
トンネルやユダヤ教の教堂
00:39
and the United Nations headquarters.
国連本部も標的にされました
00:41
Thankfully, those plans were foiled
幸いにも これらの計画は
00:44
by an FBI informant.
FBI捜査官の手で
未遂に終わりましたが
00:46
Sadly, the 1993 bombing
残念なことに 1993年の
00:49
of the World Trade Center was not.
世界貿易センタービル爆破は
止められませんでした
00:51
Nosair would eventually be convicted
ノサイルは のちに
00:54
for his involvement in the plot.
この爆破計画に関与したとして
有罪判決を受けます
00:56
El-Sayyid Nosair is my father.
エル・サイード・ノサイルは
私の父です
00:59
I was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
私は ペンシルバニア州ピッツバーグで
01:04
in 1983 to him, an Egyptian engineer,
1983年 エジプト人技術者である父と
01:06
and a loving American mother
and grade school teacher,
小学校教諭で 愛情深い
アメリカ人の母のもとに生まれました
01:09
who together tried their best
両親は 私の幸せを願い
懸命に育ててくれました
01:13
to create a happy childhood for me.
両親は 私の幸せを願い
懸命に育ててくれました
01:14
It wasn't until I was seven years old
しかし 私が7歳のとき
01:17
that our family dynamic started to change.
家族のあり方が変わり始めます
01:18
My father exposed me to a side of Islam
父は 私をイスラム教の ある一派に
引き入れました
01:22
that few people, including the majority of Muslims,
一握りの人しか―
大多数のイスラム教徒ですら
01:25
get to see.
会うこともないような一派です
01:28
It's been my experience that when people
私の経験では
01:31
take the time to interact with one another,
時間をかけて
人と よく話をすれば
01:32
it doesn't take long to realize that for the most part,
たいていの場合 すぐに
01:35
we all want the same things out of life.
人生に求めることは
皆 同じだとわかります
01:38
However, in every religion, in every population,
しかし どの宗教や民族でも
01:40
you'll find a small percentage of people
熱心な信奉者の数パーセントは
01:43
who hold so fervently to their beliefs
熱心な信奉者の数パーセントは
01:46
that they feel they must use any means necessary
どんな手段を使ってでも
ほかの人たちにも
01:49
to make others live as they do.
同じ生き方をさせねばと
思っているものなのです
01:52
A few months prior to his arrest,
父が逮捕される数ヶ月前
01:55
he sat me down and explained that
父は私を座らせて こう言いました
01:57
for the past few weekends, he and some friends
「ここ最近
週末は仲間とともに
01:59
had been going to a shooting range on Long Island
ロング・アイランドの射撃場に通って
02:02
for target practice.
射撃訓練をしていた
02:04
He told me I'd be going with him the next morning.
明日の朝は お前も行くんだ」
02:07
We arrived at Calverton Shooting Range,
そして カルバートン射撃場に行きました
02:10
which unbeknownst to our group was being watched
私たちは知りませんでしたが
02:12
by the FBI.
そこは FBIの監視対象でした
02:15
When it was my turn to shoot,
私が撃つ番になると
父は ライフルを肩にかけさせてくれ
02:18
my father helped me hold the rifle to my shoulder
私が撃つ番になると
父は ライフルを肩にかけさせてくれ
02:19
and explained how to aim at the target
30メートル先の標的の狙い方を
教えてくれました
02:21
about 30 yards off.
30メートル先の標的の狙い方を
教えてくれました
02:23
That day, the last bullet I shot
その日 私が最後に撃った弾は
02:26
hit the small orange light that sat on top of the target
標的の上にある
小さなオレンジ色のランプに命中し
02:28
and to everyone's surprise, especially mine,
誰もが―特に私自身が―
驚いたことに
02:31
the entire target burst into flames.
標的は見事に
燃え上がりました
02:35
My uncle turned to the other men,
おじは ほかの仲間に向かって
02:39
and in Arabic said, "Ibn abuh."
アラビア語で
“Ibn Abuh” と言いました
02:40
Like father, like son.
「この父にして この子あり」
02:44
They all seemed to get a really
big laugh out of that comment,
皆は これを聞いて
大笑いしていましたが
02:47
but it wasn't until a few years later
私は数年たってようやく
02:50
that I fully understood what
they thought was so funny.
その真の意味を
理解することとなりました
02:52
They thought they saw in me the same destruction
皆は 私の中に
02:56
my father was capable of.
破壊的な父の姿を見たのです
02:58
Those men would eventually be convicted
この人たちは
のちに有罪判決を受けますが
03:01
of placing a van filled with
1,500 pounds of explosives
爆発物 約700キロを積んだバンを
03:04
into the sub-level parking lot of the
World Trade Center's North Tower,
世界貿易センタービルの
ノース・タワーの地下駐車場に停車し
03:08
causing an explosion that killed six people
爆破させ 6名の命を奪い
03:12
and injured over 1,000 others.
千人以上の負傷者を出しました
03:15
These were the men I looked up to.
これが 私が尊敬し
03:18
These were the men I called
ammu, which means uncle.
おじさん―“ammu”と呼び
慕っていた人たちです
03:20
By the time I turned 19,
19歳になる頃には
03:25
I had already moved 20 times in my life,
私はすでに20回もの
引っ越しを経験していました
03:26
and that instability during my childhood
子どもの頃
住む場所を転々としたお蔭で
03:30
didn't really provide an opportunity
私は たくさんの友人を作る
機会に恵まれませんでした
03:32
to make many friends.
私は たくさんの友人を作る
機会に恵まれませんでした
03:33
Each time I would begin to feel
comfortable around someone,
ようやく仲良くなったかと思えば
03:35
it was time to pack up and move to the next town.
もう次の町に
移らなければならなかったのです
03:38
Being the perpetual new face in class,
クラスでは
常に新入りだったこともあり
03:41
I was frequently the target of bullies.
よく いじめの対象になりました
03:44
I kept my identity a secret from my classmates
同級生たちから
いじめられないよう
03:46
to avoid being targeted,
素性は隠していましたが
03:48
but as it turns out, being the
quiet, chubby new kid in class
物静かで ぽっちゃりした
新顔というだけで
03:50
was more than enough ammunition.
十分な攻撃材料だったのです
03:53
So for the most part, I spent my time at home
ですから
私は たいてい家で
03:56
reading books and watching TV
本を読んだり
テレビを見たり
03:58
or playing video games.
ビデオゲームをしたりして
過ごしました
04:00
For those reasons, my social skills were lacking,
こういったわけで
控えめに言っても
04:01
to say the least,
私は 社交性に乏しい人間となり
04:04
and growing up in a bigoted household,
偏った思想の家庭に育ち
04:06
I wasn't prepared for the real world.
現実社会に旅立つ準備も
できないままでした
04:08
I'd been raised to judge people
私は 恣意的な価値基準で
04:10
based on arbitrary measurements,
人を判断するよう
育てられてきました
04:12
like a person's race or religion.
人種や宗教などで
人を見ていたのです
04:14
So what opened my eyes?
では 何が私を
変えたのでしょう?
04:18
One of my first experiences
この考え方を初めて
見直すことになる出来事は
04:21
that challenged this way of thinking
この考え方を初めて
見直すことになる出来事は
04:23
was during the 2000 presidential elections.
2000年の大統領選のときに
起こりました
04:25
Through a college prep program,
大学準備プログラムで
04:28
I was able to take part
私は フィラデルフィアで
全国学生議会に参加しました
04:30
in the National Youth Convention in Philadelphia.
私は フィラデルフィアで
全国学生議会に参加しました
04:31
My particular group's focus was on youth violence,
私のグループは
若者の暴力対策を柱に据えており
04:34
and having been the victim
of bullying for most of my life,
人生のほとんどを
いじめられて過ごした私は
04:37
this was a subject in which
I felt particularly passionate.
特に熱心に取り組みました
04:40
The members of our group came
from many different walks of life.
グループには 様々な背景の人たちが
集まっていました
04:44
One day toward the end of the convention,
会議も終盤に差しかかった ある日
04:48
I found out that one of the kids I had befriended
仲良くなった人たちの中に
ユダヤ人の子がいると知りました
04:50
was Jewish.
仲良くなった人たちの中に
ユダヤ人の子がいると知りました
04:53
Now, it had taken several days
私たちは数日間
何も知らず
04:55
for this detail to come to light,
共に過ごしていたのです
04:57
and I realized that there was no natural animosity
イスラム教徒とユダヤ教徒は
最初から憎み合う運命にはないのです
04:58
between the two of us.
イスラム教徒とユダヤ教徒は
最初から憎み合う運命にはないのです
05:02
I had never had a Jewish friend before,
それまでユダヤ人の
友だちがいなかった私は
05:04
and frankly I felt a sense of pride
この障害を
乗り越えられたことを
05:07
in having been able to overcome a barrier
素直に誇りに思いました
05:10
that for most of my life I had been led to believe
これまでずっと 無理だと
05:12
was insurmountable.
思い込んでいた障害でしたから
05:14
Another major turning point came when
つぎに私を大きく変えたのは
05:17
I found a summer job at Busch Gardens,
「ブッシュガーデン」という遊園地で
05:19
an amusement park.
ひと夏 働いたときです
05:21
There, I was exposed to people
from all sorts of faiths and cultures,
そこでは 様々な信条や文化の
人たちに触れました
05:24
and that experience proved to be fundamental
その経験は
私の人格形成に
05:27
to the development of my character.
大きな影響を与えました
05:29
Most of my life, I'd been taught
それまでの人生では
05:33
that homosexuality was a sin, and by extension,
同性愛は罪であり
ひいては―
05:34
that all gay people were a negative influence.
ゲイは 悪い影響を与えると
教えられてきました
05:38
As chance would have it, I had the opportunity
幸運にも
そこで行われたショーで
05:41
to work with some of the gay performers
ゲイのパフォーマーと
仕事をする機会に恵まれました
05:44
at a show there,
ゲイのパフォーマーと
仕事をする機会に恵まれました
05:45
and soon found that many were the kindest,
すぐに 彼らの多くが
誰よりも優しく―
05:47
least judgmental people I had ever met.
相手を色眼鏡で見ない人たちだと
わかりました
05:49
Being bullied as a kid
いじめられっ子だった私は
05:53
created a sense of empathy in me
他人の痛みに対して
ある種の共感を―
05:55
toward the suffering of others,
覚えたものですが
05:58
and it comes very unnaturally to me
私が望む以上に
とにかく優しい―
05:59
to treat people who are kind
そんな人たちと
向き合うのは
06:01
in any other way than how
I would want to be treated.
とても不思議な感覚でした
06:03
Because of that feeling, I was able
そうした感覚が
あったからこそ
06:07
to contrast the stereotypes I'd been taught as a child
私は子ども時代に
植え込まれた固定観念を
06:09
with real life experience and interaction.
実生活での経験や交流と
突き合わせることができたのです
06:14
I don't know what it's like to be gay,
ゲイであることの辛さは
想像もつきませんが
06:17
but I'm well acquainted with being judged
自分にはどうしようもないことで
06:19
for something that's beyond my control.
判断される辛さは
身をもって知っています
06:21
Then there was "The Daily Show."
そして 『ザ・デイリー・ショー』では
06:25
On a nightly basis, Jon Stewart forced me
毎晩 ジョン・スチュワートを見て
06:29
to be intellectually honest with
myself about my own bigotry
私は 自らの偏見と
向き合わさせられました
06:31
and helped me to realize that a person's race,
お蔭で 人種や
06:35
religion or sexual orientation
宗教 性的嗜好は
06:37
had nothing to do with the quality of one's character.
人の善し悪しを決めるものではないと
悟りました
06:40
He was in many ways a father figure to me
父親をすごく欲していた私にとって
06:45
when I was in desperate need of one.
ジョンは いろんな意味で
父親のような存在でした
06:48
Inspiration can often come
from an unexpected place,
啓示とは 時に
思いがけないところから来るものです
06:51
and the fact that a Jewish comedian had done more
私の世界観は
極端な考えを持つ父親よりも
06:55
to positively influence my worldview
一人のコメディアンに大きな影響を受け
06:58
than my own extremist father
良い方向に導かれていったことは
07:00
is not lost on me.
私の目にも明らかでした
07:02
One day, I had a conversation with my mother
ある日 母とこんな話をしました
07:05
about how my worldview was starting to change,
私の価値観が どう変わりつつあるのか
07:07
and she said something to me
そのときの母の言葉は
07:10
that I will hold dear to my heart
私が 後生大事にするものとなりました
07:12
for as long as I live.
私が 後生大事にするものとなりました
07:14
She looked at me with the weary eyes
母は 生涯を教条主義に染めた人に
特有の疲れ果てた目で
07:17
of someone who had experienced
母は 生涯を教条主義に染めた人に
特有の疲れ果てた目で
07:19
enough dogmatism to last a lifetime, and said,
私を見やると こう言ったのです
07:20
"I'm tired of hating people."
「他人を忌み嫌うことに疲れたわ」
07:24
In that instant, I realized how much negative energy
その瞬間
私は憎しみを持ち続けることが
07:28
it takes to hold that hatred inside of you.
どれだけエネルギーを
無駄に消耗するのか悟りました
07:31
Zak Ebrahim is not my real name.
ザック・エブラヒムは
私の本名ではありません
07:36
I changed it when my family decided
家族が父との関係を断ち
07:39
to end our connection with my father
新しい人生を歩むと
決めたときに
07:41
and start a new life.
付けた名前です
07:42
So why would I out myself
では なぜ私は
こんな告白をして
07:45
and potentially put myself in danger?
自らを危険にさらすのでしょう?
07:47
Well, that's simple.
それは簡単なことです
07:50
I do it in the hopes that perhaps someone someday
暴力を強制されている人が
私の話を聞いて
07:52
who is compelled to use violence
暴力を強制されている人が
私の話を聞いて
07:56
may hear my story and realize
他にも良い方法があると
気付いてほしいと願っているからです
07:58
that there is a better way,
他にも良い方法があると
気付いてほしいと願っているからです
08:00
that although I had been subjected
私はこの暴力的で
08:03
to this violent, intolerant ideology,
偏狭なイデオロギーに
さらされてきましたが
08:04
that I did not become fanaticized.
それに染まることは
ありませんでした
08:07
Instead, I choose to use my experience
その代わり
私はこの経験を生かして
08:10
to fight back against terrorism,
テロに抗い
08:12
against the bigotry.
この偏見に抗うことを
選んだのです
08:15
I do it for the victims of terrorism
それは テロの犠牲者と
08:19
and their loved ones,
その愛する人々のためであり
08:22
for the terrible pain and loss
彼らがテロによって強いられた―
08:24
that terrorism has forced upon their lives.
激しい苦痛や喪失感のため
でもありました
08:26
For the victims of terrorism, I will speak out
テロの犠牲者の方々のために
私は立ち上がり
08:29
against these senseless acts
こうした非情な行為に断固反対し
08:31
and condemn my father's actions.
私の父の行いを非難します
08:34
And with that simple fact, I stand here as proof
この単純明快な事実とともに
私は身をもって
08:38
that violence isn't inherent in one's religion or race,
暴力は 宗教や人種に
最初からあるものではないと証明します
08:41
and the son does not have to follow
息子だからといって
父親のやり方に
08:45
the ways of his father.
従う必要はありません
08:48
I am not my father.
私は 父ではないのですから
08:51
Thank you. (Applause)
ありがとうございました(拍手)
08:54
Thank you, everybody. (Applause)
皆さん ありがとう(拍手)
08:57
Thank you all. (Applause)
ありがとうございます(拍手)
09:01
Thanks a lot. (Applause)
本当にありがとう(拍手)
09:03
Translated by Yuko Yoshida
Reviewed by Mari Arimitsu

▲Back to top

About the Speaker:

Zak Ebrahim - Peace activist
Groomed for terror, Zak Ebrahim chose a different life. The author of The Terrorist's Son, he hopes his story will inspire others to reject a path of violence.

Why you should listen

When Zak Ebrahim was seven, his family went on the run. His father, El Sayyid Nosair, had hoped Zak would follow in his footsteps -- and become a jihadist. Instead, Zak was at the beginning of a long journey to comprehend his past.

Zak Ebrahim kept his family history a secret as they moved through a long succession of towns. In 2010, he realized his experience as a terrorist’s son not only gave him a unique perspective, but also a unique chance to show that if he could escape a violent heritage, anyone could. As he told Truthdig.com, “We must embrace tolerance and nonviolence. Who knows this better than the son of a terrorist?”

In 2014 Ebrahim published the TED Book The Terrorist's Son, a memoir written with Jeff Giles about the path he took to turn away from hate. In early 2015 the book won an American Library Association Alex award.

More profile about the speaker
Zak Ebrahim | Speaker | TED.com