sponsored links
TEDNYC

Eric Liu: Let's make voting fun again

エリック・リュー: 投票しないという選択肢はない

September 7, 2016

いかに投票が大事で、大人としての義務と責任であるか、よく語られます。エリック・リューはそれに賛成する一方で、今こそ投票所に喜びを取り戻す必要があると考えています。元政治スピーチライターのリューは、彼のチームが2016年の米国選挙を取り巻く文化をどう醸成させつつあるか紹介し、そして、投票権のある人がなぜ投票すべきか強力な分析で締めくくります。

Eric Liu - Civics educator
Eric Liu is a civics educator and founder of Citizen University, which brings together leaders, activists and practitioners to teach the art of effective and creative citizenship. Full bio

sponsored links
Double-click the English subtitles below to play the video.
Why bother?
なんで わざわざ?
00:12
The game is rigged.
結果はもう分かってるのに
00:16
My vote won't count.
私の一票なんて関係ない
00:18
The choices are terrible.
選びたい候補がいない
00:20
Voting is for suckers.
投票なんて物好きのもの
00:22
Perhaps you've thought
some of these things.
こういう考えが浮かんだことも
あると思います
00:25
Perhaps you've even said them.
そう口にしたことも
あるかもしれません
00:27
And if so, you wouldn't be alone,
and you wouldn't be entirely wrong.
そうだとしても あなただけではないし
そう間違ってる訳でもない
00:29
The game of public policy today
is rigged in many ways.
現在 政治という名のゲームは
様々な形で操作されています
00:33
How else would more than half
of federal tax breaks
でないと なぜ連邦税控除の半分以上が
00:37
flow up to the wealthiest
five percent of Americans?
アメリカ人の上位5%の富裕層へ
渡るのでしょうか
00:41
And our choices indeed are often terrible.
確かに選択肢が
本当にひどい時もあります
00:45
For many people
across the political spectrum,
どんな政治的な立場であれ
多くの人にとって
00:48
Exhibit A is the 2016
presidential election.
その最たる例が
2016年大統領選でしょう
00:50
But in any year, you can look
up and down the ballot
しかし どの年の投票用紙を
上から下まで見ても
00:54
and find plenty to be uninspired about.
不満を抱くものが
たくさん見つかるでしょう
00:57
But in spite of all this,
I still believe voting matters.
しかし それでもなお
投票はとても大事だと思います
01:01
And crazy as it may sound,
どうかしているように聞こえようが
01:04
I believe we can revive the joy of voting.
投票する楽しさは
復活できると信じています
01:06
Today, I want to talk
about how we can do that, and why.
今日お話ししたいのは
そのやり方と意義についてです
01:09
There used to be a time
in American history when voting was fun,
アメリカ史においても
投票が楽しみだった時がありました
01:14
when it was much more than just
a grim duty to show up at the polls.
義務で いやいや投票所に行く以上の
大きなものがあった時です
01:18
That time is called
"most of American history."
この時期は「アメリカの歴史ほとんど」
と言えるでしょう
01:21
(Laughter)
(笑)
01:24
From the Revolution
to the Civil Rights Era,
アメリカ独立革命から
公民権時代まで
01:25
the United States had a vibrant,
アメリカには とても活発で
01:28
robustly participatory
and raucous culture of voting.
超参加型でお祭り騒ぎのような
投票の文化がありました
01:30
It was street theater, open-air debates,
fasting and feasting and toasting,
街頭演劇 公開討論会
断食して食べて飲んで
01:35
parades and bonfires.
パレードや焚き火などと大騒ぎ
01:39
During the 19th century,
immigrants and urban political machines
19世紀に 移民や都会の集票組織が
01:41
helped fuel this culture of voting.
このような投票の文化を活性化しました
01:45
That culture grew with each
successive wave of new voters.
新しい有権者が増える度
この文化は発展していきました
01:47
During Reconstruction,
when new African-American voters,
南北戦争後のレコンストラクションの間
アフリカ系アメリカ人が
01:52
new African-American citizens,
新たな有権者、新たな市民として
01:55
began to exercise their power,
手に入れた権利を使い始めたとき
01:58
they celebrated in jubilee parades
彼らは 祝祭パレードで祝い
02:00
that connected emancipation
with their newfound right to vote.
そのことで「解放」が「新たな投票権」と
結び付けられました
02:02
A few decades later, the suffragettes
そのまた数十年後
婦人参政権論者たちは
02:06
brought a spirit
of theatricality to their fight,
演出の精神を自らの闘いに持ち込み
02:09
marching together in white dresses
as they claimed the franchise.
お揃いの白いドレスで行進しながら
選挙権を要求しました
02:12
And the Civil Rights Movement,
そして公民権運動は
02:16
which sought to redeem
the promise of equal citizenship
ジム・クロウ法で反故にされた―
02:18
that had been betrayed by Jim Crow,
平等な市民権を取り戻すものでしたが
02:20
put voting right at the center.
選挙権にスポットライトを当てました
02:23
From Freedom Summer to the march in Selma,
フリーダム・サマーからセルマの行進まで
02:25
that generation of activists
knew that voting matters,
その時期に生きた活動家たちは
いかに投票が大事か
02:28
and they knew that spectacle
and the performance of power
実際に力を手に入れるためには
派手に力を見せつけることが
02:31
is key to actually claiming power.
いかに大事か理解していました
02:34
But it's been over a half century
since Selma and the Voting Rights Act,
しかしセルマや投票権法から
半世紀がたち
02:38
and in the decades since,
この数十年の間に
02:42
this face-to-face culture of voting
面と向き合う投票の文化は
02:44
has just about disappeared.
もうほとんど消えています
02:47
It's been killed by television
最初はテレビに殺され
02:49
and then the internet.
次はインターネットでした
02:50
The couch has replaced the commons.
広場がソファーに取って代わられ
02:52
Screens have made
citizens into spectators.
画面が 市民を
ただの見物人に変えたのです
02:54
And while it's nice to share
political memes on social media,
SNSに政治的な投稿をするのはいいですが
02:57
that's a rather quiet kind of citizenship.
かなり静かな市民権ではないでしょうか
03:01
It's what the sociologist Sherry Turkle
calls "being alone together."
社会学者シェリー・タークルが言う
「一緒にいても孤独」と言う状況です
03:04
What we need today
今必要なのは
03:09
is an electoral culture
that is about being together together,
まさに「一緒にいたら一緒」と言う
投票文化です
03:10
in person,
投票が 直に
03:14
in loud and passionate ways,
うるさく情熱的な形で
03:15
so that instead of being
"eat your vegetables" or "do you duty,"
「野菜を食べなさい」や
「義務を果たせ」と言うことではなく
03:18
voting can feel more like "join the club"
「一緒にサークルに入ろう」
さらには「一緒にパーティーしよう」
03:22
or, better yet, "join the party."
と感じるくらいの文化です
03:25
Imagine if we had,
across the country right now,
想像してみてください
今 全国で
03:27
in local places but nationwide,
地区ごと しかし全国規模で
03:31
a concerted effort
to revive a face-to-face set of ways
面と向き合った形で
参加し選挙運動するのを復活させる
03:34
to engage and electioneer:
そんな努力が共にされることを
03:38
outdoor shows in which candidates
and their causes are mocked
候補者と彼らの主張を広く風刺して
03:40
and praised in broad satirical style;
嘲笑し褒めるような野外公演
03:44
soapbox speeches by citizens;
市民による街頭演説
03:47
public debates held inside pubs;
居酒屋での公開ディベート
03:49
streets filled with political art
and handmade posters and murals;
ポリティカル・アートや
手作りのポスターや壁画で溢れた街路
03:53
battle of the band concerts in which
competing performers rep their candidates.
各候補者を代表するパフォーマーが
競い合うバンドコンサート
03:58
Now, all of this may sound
a little bit 18th century to you,
こうしたことは
少し18世紀っぽいかもしれませんが
04:04
but in fact, it doesn't have to be
any more 18th century
ブロードウェイ・ミュージカルの
『ハミルトン』のような
04:08
than, say, Broadway's "Hamilton,"
刺激的で現代的な
04:11
which is to say vibrantly contemporary.
18世紀でさえあれば いいんです
04:14
And the fact is that all around the world,
今実際に世界中では
04:17
today, millions of people
are voting like this.
何百万人もの人々が
このように投票しています
04:19
In India, elections are colorful,
communal affairs.
インドでは選挙は
鮮やかな地域社会のイベントです
04:23
In Brazil, election day
is a festive, carnival-type atmosphere.
ブラジルでは まるで
カーニバルのようなお祭りムード
04:27
In Taiwan and Hong Kong,
there is a spectacle,
台湾と香港では
ある種の見世物
04:32
eye-popping, eye-grabbing spectacle
選挙という街頭劇場で繰り広げられる
04:35
to the street theater of elections.
度肝を抜き 目の離せない見世物です
04:37
You might ask, well,
here in America, who has time for this?
アメリカで こんなことする暇がある人なんて
いるのかと言うかもしれません
04:40
And I would tell you
しかし アメリカ人は
04:44
that the average American
watches five hours of television a day.
1日平均5時間テレビを見ています
04:45
You might ask, who has the motivation?
では 誰がやりたがるのか
と言うかもしれません
04:50
And I'll tell you,
もちろん います
04:52
any citizen who wants to be seen and heard
自らの存在を認識し
自らの声を聞いてほしいと願う市民です
04:53
not as a prop, not as a talking point,
ただの支持者や話題としてでなく
04:57
but as a participant, as a creator.
参加者 創造者としてです
05:00
Well, how do we make this happen?
では どう実現するのでしょうか
05:03
Simply by making it happen.
ただ 実現させればいいのです
05:06
That's why a group of colleagues and I
そのため 私は仲間と共に
05:08
launched a new project
called "The Joy of Voting."
「投票の喜び(The Joy of Voting)」
プロジェクトを発足させました
05:10
In four cities across the United States --
アメリカの4都市
05:14
Philadelphia, Miami,
フィラデルフェア、マイアミ
05:17
Akron, Ohio, and Wichita, Kansas --
オハイオ州アクロン
カンザス州ウィチタで
05:18
we've gathered together
artists and activists,
芸術家、活動家、教育者
05:21
educators, political folks,
neighbors, everyday citizens
政治家、近隣住民、一般市民たちを集め
05:24
to come together and create projects
一緒になって その地域なりの
05:28
that can foster this culture
of voting in a local way.
投票文化を築くプロジェクトを
作っています
05:29
In Miami, that means
all-night parties with hot DJs
マイアミでは
選挙人登録がないと入場できない
05:34
where the only way to get in
is to show that you're registered to vote.
ホットなDJたちによる
夜通しパーティーをやりました
05:37
In Akron, it means political plays
アクロンでは 政治劇を
05:40
being performed
in the bed of a flatbed truck
平床トラックの荷台で上演し
05:44
that moves from neighborhood
to neighborhood.
近隣をまわりました
05:46
In Philadelphia,
フィラデルフィアでは
05:49
it's a voting-themed scavenger hunt
all throughout colonial old town.
選挙がテーマの
古い町を駆け巡る借り物競争をしました
05:51
And in Wichita, it's making
mixtapes and live graffiti art
そしてウィチタでは
投票所に行くのを促すべく
05:54
in the North End to get out the vote.
ノースエンド地区でミックステープ作りや
生でストリートアートをしました
06:00
There are 20 of these projects,
20ほどのプロジェクトがあり
06:02
and they are remarkable
in their beauty and their diversity,
どれも 美しく多様性が溢れたものです
06:04
and they are changing people.
また 人々をも変えています
06:06
Let me tell you about a couple of them.
そのうち いくつか紹介したいと思います
06:08
In Miami, we've commissioned and artist,
マイアミでは アトミコという名前の
06:10
a young artist named Atomico,
若い芸術家を雇い
06:12
to create some vivid and vibrant images
for a new series of "I voted" stickers.
「投票した」というシールのための
鮮やかで美しい画像を作ってもらいました
06:14
But the thing is, Atomico had never voted.
しかし アトミコは投票したことが
ありませんでした
06:19
He wasn't even registered.
登録さえしてなかったのです
06:22
So as he got to work on creating
this artwork for these stickers,
彼はシールのための画像を
作っていく中で
06:24
he also began to get over
his sense of intimidation about politics.
政治に対して感じていた威圧感に
打ち勝つ様になりました
06:29
He got himself registered,
彼は投票登録をし
06:33
and then he got educated
about the upcoming primary election,
次の選挙のことについて
色々学び
06:34
and on election day he was out there
not just passing out stickers,
投票日当日はシールを
配るだけではなく
06:38
but chatting up voters
and encouraging people to vote,
有権者に声をかけ
人々に投票を呼びかけ
06:41
and talking about
the election with passersby.
選挙について
誰とでも話す様になったのです
06:44
In Akron, a theater company
called the Wandering Aesthetics
アクロンでは
Wandering Aestheticsという劇団が
06:47
has been putting on
these pickup truck plays.
平床トラックの荷台で
様々な劇を上演していました
06:51
And to do so, they put out
an open call to the public
次の劇の内容を決めるために
06:54
asking for speeches,
monologues, dialogues, poems,
彼らはスピーチ モノローグ
対話作品 詩など
06:56
snippets of anything
that could be read aloud
読み上げられて上演できるものを
07:00
and woven into a performance.
一般の人々から集めていました
07:02
They got dozens of submissions.
何十件かの応募がありました
07:05
One of them was a poem
そのうちの一つが 詩でした
07:07
written by nine students in an ESL class,
近くのオハイオ州ハートビル地区で
07:09
all of them Hispanic migrant workers
ESL(第二言語としての英語)の
クラスで学ぶ
07:12
from nearby Hartville, Ohio.
ヒスパニックの移民労働者9人のものです
07:14
I want to read to you from this poem.
その詩の一部を朗読したいと思います
07:17
It's called "The Joy of Voting."
「投票の喜び(The Joy of Voting)」
と言います
07:21
"I would like to vote for the first time
「私は初めて投票してみたい
07:24
because things are changing for Hispanics.
ヒスパニックにとって
物事が変わりつつあるから
07:26
I used to be afraid of ghosts.
私はお化けが怖かった
07:29
Now I am afraid of people.
今は人間が怖い
07:31
There's more violence and racism.
暴力と人種差別が増えている
07:34
Voting can change this.
投票はこれを変えられる
07:36
The border wall is nothing.
国境の壁なんて なんとも無い
07:39
It's just a wall.
ただの壁だ
07:41
The wall of shame is something.
恥の壁は意味があるけど
07:43
It's very important to vote
この恥の壁を壊すには
07:47
so we can break down this wall of shame.
投票することが大事
07:49
I have passion in my heart.
私は心に情熱を持っている
07:53
Voting gives me a voice and power.
投票は私に声と力を与えた
07:55
I can stand up and do something."
立ち上がって何かできる」
07:58
"The Joy of Voting" project
isn't just about joy.
「投票の喜び」プロジェクトは
喜びのことだけでは ないのです
08:02
It's about this passion.
この情熱のこともです
08:05
It's about feeling and belief,
ただの団体の仕事ではなく
08:07
and it isn't just our organization's work.
生まれる感情 信念などが大事なのです
08:09
All across this country right now,
この国のあらゆるところで
08:12
immigrants, young people, veterans,
people of all different backgrounds
移民 若者 退役軍人
様々な背景を持った人々が集まり
08:14
are coming together to create
this kind of passionate, joyful activity
選挙について
このような情熱的で喜びあふれる活動を
08:17
around elections,
共に行っています
08:21
in red and blue states,
in urban and rural communities,
共和党・民主党どちらが強い州でも
都会でも田舎でも
08:22
people of every political background.
いろんな政治的背景の人たちがです
08:25
What they have in common is simply this:
彼らに共通するのは純粋に
08:27
their work is rooted in place.
活動が場所と結びついていることです
08:30
Because remember,
all citizenship is local.
市民権は全て土地に根付いていることを
思い出してください
08:34
When politics becomes
just a presidential election,
政治がただの大統領選挙
になってしまうと
08:37
we yell and we scream at our screens,
and then we collapse, exhausted.
我々は画面に向かって叫んで喚いて
疲労で倒れます
08:41
But when politics is about us
しかし政治が
08:45
and our neighbors
and other people in our community
我々、隣人達、地域の人々が一緒になって
08:49
coming together to create experiences
of collective voice and imagination,
声と想像力を集めて
経験が創られるものになると
08:51
then we begin to remember
that this stuff matters.
本当にこれは大事なのだと
思い出せるのです
08:57
We begin to remember
that this is the stuff of self-government.
自治に関することなのだと
思い出せるのです
09:00
Which brings me back to where I began.
ということで最初の問いに戻ります
09:05
Why bother?
なんで わざわざ?
09:07
There's one way to answer this question.
一つの答え方はこれです
09:09
Voting matters because it is
a self-fulfilling act of belief.
投票は自分で自分の意思を表す行為
だから大事なのです
09:12
It feeds the spirit of mutual interest
that makes any society thrive.
互いに関心を持つ精神を高め
社会を活性化するのです
09:17
When we vote, even if it is in anger,
投票する時 怒りが動機となっていても
09:22
we are part of a collective,
creative leap of faith.
我々は共に創造的に
信じることを選択しているのです
09:25
Voting helps us generate
the very power that we wish we had.
投票すれば 我々が欲していた力を
自ら作り出せます
09:29
It's no accident
that democracy and theater
古代アテネで民主主義と演劇が
09:34
emerged around the same time
in ancient Athens.
同時期に発展したことは
偶然ではありません
09:36
Both of them yank the individual
out of the enclosure of her private self.
両方とも 人々を
心の殻から引っ張り出します
09:40
Both of them create great
public experiences of shared ritual.
両方とも 公共で皆が楽しめる
儀式を作り出します
09:45
Both of them bring the imagination to life
そして 両方とも
その想像に息を吹き込んでくれます
09:50
in ways that remind us
that all of our bonds in the end
人と人との繋がりは
想像で創られ 何度も創り上げられることを
09:52
are imagined, and can be reimagined.
思い出させてくれるのです
09:55
This moment right now,
この瞬間
10:02
when we think about
the meaning of imagination,
私たちが想像力の意味を考えるときは
10:04
is so fundamentally important,
根本的に大事で
10:08
and our ability to take that spirit
その精神を取り入れ
10:12
and to take that sense
我々を超える何かが
10:15
that there is something greater out there,
世の中にあると考えられる我々の能力は
10:17
is not just a matter
of technical expertise.
ただの技術の問題ではないのです
10:19
It's not just a matter of making the time
or having the know-how.
ただ時間を作って
ノウハウを知ればいいわけではないのです
10:22
It is a matter of spirit.
これは魂のことなのです
10:26
But let me give you an answer
to this question, "Why bother?"
まず 「なんで わざわざ?」
という問いに
10:28
that is maybe a little less spiritual
and a bit more pointed.
精神論から少し離れ
ちょっと直接的な答えをあげましょう
10:31
Why bother voting?
なぜ投票しないといけないのか?
10:36
Because there is
no such thing as not voting.
なぜなら 「投票しない」 ということは
ありえないからです
10:38
Not voting is voting,
投票しないことは
10:40
for everything that you
may detest and oppose.
自ら嫌いで反対する全てに
投票することと同じなのです
10:42
Not voting can be dressed up
投票しないことは
10:45
as an act of principled,
passive resistance,
考えに基づいた消極的抵抗なのだと
言うこともできますが
10:47
but in fact not voting
投票しないということは
10:50
is actively handing power over
自分の利益に相反する人々や
10:52
to those whose interests
are counter to your own,
自分がいないことに
付け入って喜ぶ人々に
10:54
and those who would be very glad
to take advantage of your absence.
積極的に力を渡すことと同じなのです
10:57
Not voting is for suckers.
投票しないのはダメな人達がすることです
11:00
Imagine where this country would be
この国はどうなっていたでしょう
11:04
if all the folks who in 2010
created the Tea Party
2010年にティーパーティー運動を
起こした人々が
11:06
had decided that,
you know, politics is too messy,
政治はゴチャゴチャし
11:09
voting is too complicated.
投票はややこしいと決めつけていたら
11:12
There is no possibility
of our votes adding up to anything.
我々の票で何かを
成し遂げる可能性がないとしたら
11:13
They didn't preemptively
silence themselves.
彼らは始まる前から諦めませんでした
11:17
They showed up,
彼らは動き
11:19
and in the course of showing up,
they changed American politics.
動くことによりアメリカの政治を変えたのです
11:21
Imagine if all of the followers
of Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders
もしドナルド・トランプや
バーニー・サンダースの支持者が
11:25
had decided not to upend
the political status quo
政治の現状維持をひっくり返そうとせず
11:30
and blow apart the frame
of the previously possible
昔のアメリカの政治では
想像さえできなかったほどの運動を
11:33
in American politics.
起こしていなかったら どうでしょう
11:36
They did that by voting.
彼らは投票を通して
これらを可能にしたのです
11:38
We live in a time right now,
我々が今 生きている時代は
11:42
divided, often very dark,
分断され 時に暗黒の様相を見せ
11:45
where across the left and the right,
there's a lot of talk of revolution
左派と右派両方とも
革命を起こそう
11:47
and the need for revolution
to disrupt everyday democracy.
日常の民主主義を壊す革命が
必要だ としきりに語っています
11:51
Well, here's the thing:
しかし
11:54
everyday democracy already
gives us a playbook for revolution.
日常の民主主義はもう我々に
革命を起こす方法をくれています
11:56
In the 2012 presidential election,
2012年の大統領選挙で
12:00
young voters, Latino voters,
若い投票者 ラテン系投票者
12:02
Asian-American voters, low-income voters,
アジア系投票者 低所得者層の投票者で
12:04
all showed up at less than 50 percent.
実際に投票したのは
それぞれ50%以下でした
12:06
In the 2014 midterm elections,
turnout was 36 percent,
2014年の中間選挙での投票率は36%
12:11
which was a 70-year low.
70年間で最低でした
12:15
And in your average local election,
そして 地区選挙での
12:17
turnout hovers
somewhere around 20 percent.
投票率は 20%くらいなのです
12:19
I invite you to imagine 100 percent.
あなた方には100%を想像してもらいたい
12:23
Picture 100 percent.
100%を頭に描いてください
12:27
Mobilize 100 percent,
100%の人が動けば
12:29
and overnight, we get revolution.
一夜で革命が起きるのです
12:32
Overnight, the policy priorities
of this country change dramatically,
一夜でこの国の政策は劇的に変化し
12:34
and every level of government
becomes radically more responsive
どのレベルの政府も市民の声に対して
12:38
to all the people.
すぐ反応するようになれるのです
12:42
What would it take
to mobilize 100 percent?
100%の人を動かすために
何をすればいいのでしょうか
12:45
Well, we do have to push back
against efforts afoot
まず 全国で起こっている
12:48
all across the country right now
投票することを難しくする運動を
12:50
to make voting harder.
阻止しないといけません
12:52
But at the same time,
それと同時に
12:54
we have to actively create
a positive culture of voting
人々が参加し 一緒になり
共に経験したいと思うような
12:55
that people want to belong to,
投票の文化を作るために
12:58
be part of, and experience together.
我々は動かないといけないのです
13:00
We have to make purpose.
目的を作らないといけません
13:03
We have to make joy.
喜びを作らないといけません
13:04
So yes, let's have that revolution,
そうです
その革命を作ろうではありませんか
13:06
a revolution of spirit, of ideas,
精神 思想
13:09
of policy and participation,
政策と参加の革命
13:12
a revolution against cynicism,
政治不信に対抗する革命
13:14
a revolution against the self-fulfilling
sense of powerlessness.
自分で作り上げている無力感に
対しての革命を
13:16
Let's vote this revolution into existence,
この革命を実現するために投票し
13:20
and while we're at it,
それをしながらも
13:23
let's have some fun.
楽しもうじゃないですか
13:25
Thank you very much.
ありがとうございました
13:26
(Applause)
(拍手)
13:27
Translator:Makiko Fujimoto
Reviewer:Yuko Yoshida

sponsored links

Eric Liu - Civics educator
Eric Liu is a civics educator and founder of Citizen University, which brings together leaders, activists and practitioners to teach the art of effective and creative citizenship.

Why you should listen
Civics is about the teaching of power. So why don't more Americans understand how power works? In this talk, educator Eric Liu talks about ways to make civics sexy again -- and why cities must be a democratic laboratory for experimentation and innovation.
sponsored links

If you need translations, you can install "Google Translate" extension into your Chrome Browser.
Furthermore, you can change playback rate by installing "Video Speed Controller" extension.

Data provided by TED.

This website is owned and operated by Tokyo English Network.
The developer's blog is here.